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Yoshimura Sert Wins FIM Endurance World Championship Title on Bridgestone Tires

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Yoshimura Sert Motul Wins the FIM Endurance World Championship Title, the World’s Foremost Series of Endurance Motorcycle Races, on Bridgestone Tires

  • Bridgestone is proud to celebrate YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL’s FIM Endurance World Championship title.
  • After a dominant season, YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL became the second team to win the title on Bridgestone tires since 2018.
  • Since 2017, Bridgestone has supplied tires for teams competing in the FIM Endurance World Championship.

Tokyo (October 10, 2021) ― Bridgestone Corporation (Bridgestone) today announced that YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL won the FIM*1 Endurance World Championship (EWC) title, the world’s foremost series of endurance motorcycle races, on Bridgestone tires. YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL is the second team to win EWC title on Bridgestone tires since 2018.

Since 2017, Bridgestone has supplied tires for teams competing in the EWC. As one of three teams on Bridgestone tires, YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL earned first place in two 24-hour races this season. Going into the year’s final race, 6 Hours of Most in the Czech Republic (October 9), the team held the overall points lead and maintained the lead with third-place finish – earning the 2021 EWC title outright.

“I am very pleased and honored to win the championship in the first year of participation as YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL by using Bridgestone tires,” said Yohei Kato, Team Director of YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL. “We vowed to fight in this Endurance World Championship on behalf of the Suzuki Factory Team, and this season has proved to be a dream come true by winning two of the world’s most famous 24-hour races, namely, the 24 Heures of Le Mans and the Bol d’Or.The whole team has been respecting each other in the spirit of “One for all, all for one”, and we will keep working together to improve the Suzuki GSX-R1000R into an even better package. Thank you to all the sponsors, partners and fans who warmly supported the YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL this year. We pledge to attract everyone to an even better championship next year and YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL will go all out to defend its title.”

“I would like to congratulate all of the members of YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL on their EWC title,” said Masato Banno, Senior Vice President and Executive Officer, Global CTO (Global Chief Technology Officer), Bridgestone Corporation. “YOSHIMURA SERT MOTUL won both the Le Mans and Bol d’Or 24-hour endurance races, two of the toughest races in the series and showed why they deserved to be champion. Bridgestone is very proud to have contributed to their series championship in our first year as a team partner by supplying highly durable tires. I would also like to express my sincere gratitude to the many motorsports fans who supported us and to all the teams who worked so hard and cooperated in tire development. We will continue to refine our technology and support motorsports from the ground up through the development and supply of high-performance tires.”

The Bridgestone Group is implementing its Mid Term Business Plan (2021 – 2023)*2, which aims to realize its vision to provide social value and customer value as a sustainable solutions company toward 2050. To further enhance, the development of Dan-Totsu (the clear and absolute leader) products in the tire business, which is its core business, the group will continue to improve its technologies through motorsports, requiring maximum performances of tires. As an active member supporting the advancement of mobility society, the Bridgestone Group will continue to contribute to the automotive industry and motorsports culture by engaging in a wide range of motorsports with sustainability.

FIM stands for Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme

About Bridgestone Corporation: Bridgestone is a global leader in tires and rubber building on its expertise to provide solutions for safe and sustainable mobility. Headquartered in Tokyo, the company employs approximately 140,000 people globally and conducts business in more than 150 countries and territories worldwide. Bridgestone offers a diverse product portfolio of premium tires and advanced solutions backed by innovative technologies, improving the way people around the world move, live, work and play.

Bonhams announces its first motorcycle auction in Italy

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Bonhams Motorcycles Says Buongiorno Italia with Debut Sale at Moto Dei Miti

FIRST MOTORCYCLE SALE IN ITALY 1-3 APRIL 2022 AT WORLD-RENOWNED MUSEUM OF GENESIO BEVILACQUA

2011 ALTHEA WORLD SUPERBIKE AND SUPERSTOCK CHAMPIONSHIP WINNING MOTORCYCLES ARE EARLY HIGHLIGHTS

Bonhams is proud to announce its first motorcycle sale in Italy – in the world-renowned Moto dei Miti museum, created by paddock great Genesio Bevilacqua, founder of the Althea Racing team, which will be staged on 1-3 April 2022.

The weekend sale is the result of a new partnership with Genesio, which will see his museum, located in Civita Castellana (on the outskirts of Rome) provide a fitting venue for the 100-plus collectors’ motorcycles to be offered.

Telling the story of the evolution of motorcycle racing over the past 50 years, the museum represents Genesio’s own racing experience – as amateur rider and professional team manager – and his passion for two-wheeled sport and culture, featuring some of the most important sports and competition motorcycles of the modern era.

Genesio became General Manager in 2007 of the start-up Althea Racing Team, which picked up trophies in the World Superbike and Supersport series, winning both world championship titles in 2011, with Carlos Checa and Davide Giugliano respectively riding to victory. In 2016, with BMW as partner, Althea again won the World Superstock Championship, with Raffaele Da Rosa in the saddle.

The ex-Carlos Checa, 2011 World Superbike Championship-winning Ducati 1198 F11 estimate for sale is €110,000 – 130,000

Genesio will offer 27 machines from his collection for sale in the debut auction, including the two 2011 World Champion motorcycles: Carlos Checa’s Ducati 1198 RS and Davide Giugliano’s Ducati 1198 F12 and one of Raffaele De Rosa’s victorious BMW S 1000 RRs from 2016.

All motorcycles in the collection are ‘on the button’ and ready to race, having been maintained in the museum’s dedicated workshop, by technicians with years of experience in the paddock, and have recently ridden by Genesio and other riders.

Ben Walker, Global Head of Bonhams Motorcycles, said: “We are really excited to be hosting our debut sale in Italy – arguably THE land of motorcycles – and to have the ‘man who defeated giants’ as our new partner.

“”Genesio’s spectacular private museum will provide a stunning backdrop for the sale, and we are delighted that it will be open to the public for the preview and the auction itself.”

Genesio Bevilacqua, General Manager Althea Racing Team, said: “I am happy and proud to partner with Bonhams to bring to Italy their first auction dedicated to motorcycles and to the history of motorcycles, in which Italy has always played a vital role.

“Moto dei Miti is, without a doubt, the best location to hold this great event. Bonhams’ heritage and professionalism will attract the attention of international collectors and will play an important part in growing the collectors’ market for the motorcycles of the last 50 years”.

Further important collectors’ motorcycles and collections are currently being invited for consignment to this new sale.

Contact: ukmotorcycles@bonhams.com for further details.

Dave Currier, aged 68, on Winning Cannonball riding his 1911 Harley-Davidson

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by Kevin Wallevand from https://www.inforum.com

Fargo man wins Motorcycle Cannonball with 1911 Harley Davidson

  • Dave Currier turned 68 years of age on the road while racing in the Motorcycle Cannonball
  • Earlier, Dave Currier had been a runner-up in 2018 Motorcycle Cannonball riding a 1915 Harley-Davidson
  • His father sold Indian and Harley motorcycles in the 1940s and 50s in Fargo and also raced them
  • Dave Currier credits John Rouland of Northern Crankshaft in Thief River Falls for doing a lot of the technical and engine work on his 1911 H-D

“To start it, you have to pedal to start it, it is a belt drive. To move it forward, you have a lever which tensions the belt and the bike moves forward.” – Dave Currier

Fargo man wins Motorcycle Cannonball with 1911 Harley Davidson

A Fargo man has just won a cross country motorcycle run called The Motorcycle Cannonball.

Dave Currier is finally getting some feeling back in his rear-end. He is back in Fargo after competing in the most difficult, antique endurance race in the world: The Motorcycle Cannonball.

“I think this has been the toughest ride of my life,” Currier said. “It is a real grind, I had about eight hours in the saddle every day.”

Riding his 1911 belt-driven Harley Davidson, Currier and 88 competitors crossed 11 states over 16-days straight. From Michigan to South Padre Island, Texas, they racked up just over 3,700 miles.

“The bike is tall. I have short legs, so my feet don’t touch the ground,” Currier said. “To start it, you have to pedal to start it, it is a belt drive. To move it forward, you have a lever which tensions the belt and the bike moves forward.”

But Currier, who had a team planning and tweaking this bike, not only competed; he won.

“I had a police escort, it was an absolute incredible deal,” Currier said. “They closed the roads off.”

He crossed the finish line with this checkered flag, bringing home the trophy.

“Before the finish, they handed me the checkered flag, and I rode in with the checkered flag,” Currier said. “It was incredible. (It’s) still hard to talk about it.”

Currier credits John Rouland of Northern Crankshaft in Thief River Falls for doing a lot of the technical and engine work on the 1911 Harley.

He said his local sponsors; Milwaukee Tool, Acme Tools, Dakota Fence, and TechLine Coatings all played a role in the win.

Currier, who turned 68 during the race, thinks he had a little help from angels above. His dad, Dick Currier, sold Indian and Harley motorcycles in the 1940s and 50s in Fargo. He raced them as well, and Currier believes his dad would be pretty proud.

“He was a big part of my life,” Currier said. “That’s why I called it, ‘The Last Ride.'”

For more info on the Motorcycle Cannonball visit their website by clicking here.

Earlier Dave Currier had been a runner-up in 2018 Motorcycle Cannonball riding a 1915 Harley-Davidson

From September 2018.

“I’ve already been doing a lot of thinking,” Currier said, chuckling. “I have done the twin cylinder. The next challenge for me would be to take a single cylinder and make it across the U.S. But this was a trip of a lifetime. Going over the mountain in Kalispell, Montana, that’s when I turned 65.”

‘Trip of a lifetime’: Fargo resident named runner-up in world’s hardest antique motorcycle run

Currier says his bike, a 1915 Harley-Davidson twin-cylinder boasting an 11-horsepower engine, took him two years to restore.

by Emma Vatnsdal from https://bismarcktribune.com

PORTLAND, Ore. — Enjoying a sunny 48-degree morning in The Dalles, Ore., Dave Currier and his entourage were getting ready late last week to point themselves east and head back home to Fargo.

While many go west to escape the cold of winter or spend time with family and friends, Currier had a different motivation — and to end up in Portland, he had to start in Portland, Maine.

In 2010, one man set out to become the first person to take a group of 45 like-minded antique motorcycle riders across the U.S. from Kitty Hawk, N.C., to Santa Monica, Calif. Sixteen days later, 10 of the original 45 riders rolled their roughly century-old bikes onto the Santa Monica Pier, completing the inaugural Motorcycle Cannonball Endurance Run.

Now in its fifth running, the 2018 installment of the run saw more than 100 people ride from Maine to Oregon, giving participants a chance to see much of the U.S. in a whole new way.

Three classes of motorcycles — single cylinder, twin cylinders with two-speed rear ends and bikes with three-speed transmissions — set out, racing to navigate the roads to each day’s checkpoint before 5 p.m. Taking only the “back roads” across the whole country, Currier and the rest of the crew averaged around six hours of riding per day beginning at 7:30 a.m.

In true-to-history fashion, modern navigation systems like a GPS device were not allowed. Instead, riders were given maps each morning 30 minutes before they set out with directions consisting instructions like “drive north 3.2 miles, turn left at the blue house and head west.”

Currier said it was a voyage to remember.

“It was incredible,” Currier said. “It was a fantastic trip kind of re-enacting what the old-time people did when they had the opportunity to go across the U.S. What was really kind of special was I had my birthday (during the trip). Going over the mountain in Kalispell, Montana, that’s when I turned 65. It was kind of a monumental trip in many ways for me.”

Lifelong passion
There are few requirements about which motorcycles qualify for this cross-country road trip, but there are standards that must be met. For the 2018 run, all motorcycles had to be manufactured in 1928 or earlier, and must still appear original in nature.

While period-correct modifications were accepted, no modern replica bikes could be entered.

Electrical charging systems, auxiliary fuel tanks and modern wheels were OK, though GPS systems were specifically banned.

Currier says his bike, a 1915 Harley-Davidson twin-cylinder boasting an 11-horsepower engine, took him two years to restore.

“I started with the basic frame and completely refurbished it from the ground up,” he said. “I’ve always enjoyed the motorcycles since I was 7 years old when I first rode one. Restoring this was pretty special.”

Safety is the No. 1 concern during this race, especially because the bikes are sometimes older than riders’ grandparents. Upon arriving in Portland, Maine, riders completed a half-day of safety classes consisting of rules of the road and safety features.

Each Cannonball rider is also allowed a support team to help them along the way. Currier chose his wife, Kay, two friends from Alaska and a co-worker to assist him with any repairs after each day was done.

“When you get done with the day and you check out, you can do any service work you want on your bike,” he said. “You can change motors, you can overhaul it, whatever you can between 5 at night and 7 in the morning. The support team can’t have anything to do with you during the day.”

Even with the small issues he faced — losing bolts, tough winds and unsoldered ground wires — Currier says he wouldn’t have placed runner-up in his class without the support of his wife and family.

“They’ve always been incredibly good,” he said. “I couldn’t have done this without them.”

The Motorcycle Cannonball Endurance Run happens every two years, and Currier said he’s started planning for 2020.

“I’ve already been doing a lot of thinking. Six to seven hours a day, you got plenty of time to think about a lot of stuff,” Currier said, chuckling. “I have done the twin cylinder. The next challenge for me would be to take a single cylinder and make it across the U.S. But this was a trip of a lifetime.”

World’s Fastest Female Motorcycle Racer

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Valerie on 5-Ball Racing Panhead built by Keith Ball

Valerie Thompson is the World’s Fastest Female Motorcycle Racer and a 10x land speed record holder with membership in the Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame as well as eight 200 MPH Clubs and one 300 MPH Club.

She is consistently ranked as one of the World’s Top 10 Fastest Motorcycle Racers.

“The first time I raced at Bonneville, there were only 3 other female competitors, so we really stood out. A lot of people didn’t take me seriously until I established myself as a serious competitor capable of breaking records.” – Valerie Thompson

“I collected my first two records with team owner Keith Ball, who had a lot of faith in me and provided my first two record rides at Bonneville. Now I have Denis Manning, designer of the BUB 7 streamliner and AMA Hall of Fame member, as a mentor and team director.” – Valerie Thompson

Racing the BUB 7 during the 2018 Dry Lake Racers Australia (DLRA) Speed Week competition at Lake Gairdner, she set a new speed record of 328.467 mph (528.616 km/h) to become Australia’s fastest female streamliner motorcycle racer.

2022 Will Be a Busy Year on the Salt for Valerie.

Click Here to Read a Feature Article on Valerie on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

Click To See the book on Building the Salt Shaker – a Panhead on which Valerie set her First Speed Record. “The Worlds Fastest Panhead ” by 5-Ball Racing Team.

Motorcycle Cannonball Run finishes at South Padre Island

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by Gaige Davila from https://www.sbnewspaper.com

The 10th annual Motorcycle Cannonball Run ended on South Padre Island this past weekend, with nearly a hundred riders cruising their 100-year-old machines through the Queen Isabella Causeway to victory.

Starting in Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan, on the Canadian border, 88 riders, some dressed in early 1900s garb, departed to Texas in a 17-day, 3,389-mile journey, all on motorcycles made in 1929 or earlier.

The group made two stops in the Rio Grande Valley before cruising to SPI: San Benito, at Mad Boar Harley-Davidson, and McAllen, at Desperado Harley-Davison, in their last 99-mile leg of the run.

When the riders got to South Padre Island, specifically to the South Padre Island Convention Centre, they were welcomed by their teams and motorcycle enthusiasts.

Dave Currier, #64, from Fargo, North Dakota, was the first to arrive, on his 1911 Harley-Davidson 7A. His first place finish is impressive: the Harley-Davidson 7A is a single-belt drive, four horsepower machine, closer to a bicycle than a motorcycle.

“I think this has been the toughest ride of my life,” Currier said on Motorcycle Cannonball’s live stream of the finish line. “We’ve been through torrential rains, all kinds of wind, difficulties, (but) the bike ran superb.”

Check Out the Details and Final Scores at https://motorcyclecannonball.com/

Peery Win Streak Continues at AHDRA

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AHDRA motorcycle drag racing race coverage report by Tim Hailey with photos by Mike Davis.

event: AHDRA Southern Nationals

when: September 17-18, 2021

where: South Carolina Motorplex, Orangeburg, South Carolina, USA

From the U.S. Nationals in Indy to AHDRA’s Southern Nationals in Orangeburg, Ryan Peery is enjoying a streak like few other racers ever. Heat and humidity, cool and dry, quarter mile or South Carolina Motorplex’s eighth—Peery has mastered them all in 2021 as he wins Top Fuel Harley races one after another in multiple sanctions, including AHDRA, NHRA, and just last weekend at AMRA.

Peery could be headed to multiple Top Fuel Harley championships this year, including the AHDRA all-American motorcycle drag racing series. His final round win against Dr. Jimmy “Mack” McMillan at Orangeburg on September 17-18 might have sealed the deal.

Qualifying number one, Peery had the bye while running consistent 4.20’s all weekend, while McMillan had to face Bad Apple Racing’s Tracy Kile—the winner of AHDRA’s Cecil County event.

“Jimmy ran some personal bests and took out Tracy,” said Peery. “He and I paired up for the final, and it looked like he was lined up a little crooked and he crossed center. Jimmy is doing a great job though. He will turn into a tough competitor with a little more seat time.”

Local second generation star Armon Furr won Hawaya Racing Nitro Funnybike, beating points leader Michael Balch in the final. “I appreciate everyone that came out and participated in the event,” Furr said first off. “I hope we can try it again, maybe this time earlier in the year. If we are going to have a race in South Carolina, this is the best track even though it is eighth mile.

“Not really much to tell about my performance because I didn’t really do anything great. Just got lucky.”

Like Furr, South Carolina’s Sam White gave the home crowd what they wanted, taking the Hawaya Racing Pro Fuel final over Rocky Jackson.

Nate Carnahan scored an easy Pingel Modified win when Stoney Westbrook redlit in the final. “Was my first win in Mod, and it was pure luck but I’ll take it!” laughed Carnahan, who was struggling all weekend with tire spin off the line.

John Shotts won Vreeland’s Harley-Davidson Super Gas 6.35 index, beating Robert Willis in the final. Shotts took the tree .039 to .049 and came out on top of the double breakout race.

“We struggled all weekend with the bike,” said Shotts, echoing Carnahan’s path to victory. “Never did figure out the problem but we ran good enough to win! It was our first time at that track and we really had a good time.”

Willis also runner-upped in Top Eliminator, losing the final round to Ken Strauss, but won Mad Monkey Motorsports Eliminator over Jason Leeper.

Jason’s son Jordan Leeper had a Luke Skywalker moment, beating his dad in the Street Eliminator final. “Wasn’t the first time,” laughed Jordan. “He’s good, but my bike was dialed in more than his was. When it came down to it, I got the holeshot and he broke out trying to chase me down.

“I’d just like to thank Universal Fleet & Tire Racing for having me as a team rider, and everyone from the AHDRA for coming out and letting the sport prosper, and a special shout out to Bill Rowe for hosting these amazing races! I’m very pleased with my bike this year, minimal breakdowns while staying consistent. I’m happy with 11.50 wins this year, but we’re on the hunt for the championship.”

Leeper’s teammate “Crazy” won Trophy.

Larry Maynhart hadn’t been to the track in over five years, and came back with a bang—winning Universal Fleet & Tire Pro Eliminator 7.00 index and falling just short in Super Pro 6.60 as the runner-up.

“I did a permanent move to Georgia,” Maynhart says about his absence. “Don’t realize how fast the time goes, but I was determined to get back racing this year.”

Maynhart was sharp on the tree in both finals, putting .040 on Cody Hayward while winning a double breakout Pro Eliminator final. He had .033 on Bob Maier in the Super Pro final, but let Maier win with a sharp 6.609. “Get the light, lose the race. I’m rusty,” concluded Maynhart. “But I had a great weekend.”

John Price won the Zippers Performance Pro Modified final over Shane Pendergrass, and Ryland Mason tamed his wheelies long enough to win Law Tigers Pro Bagger over Justin Demery,

Greg Quinn is another winning wild wheelier, picking up the MTC Bagger trophy. “Been trying to tame my bike,” Quinn said of his Kendall Johnson ProCharged, former Tii Tharpe machine. “Finding the perfect combination is tough for a carbureted bike. Still doing wheelies and climbing the ladders of the field.

“My first time running at this track and the prep was good.

“I’m blessed to be part of a history making time frame. It really started in Nahunta, North Carolina—Wood Cycles put a race on. My racing life has been blessed, and out-of-pocket is hard. Hope to keep doing just as I did in South Carolina, and somebody will surprise me with sponsorship.

“I’m just grateful for my travels, and that AHDRA has Mike Davis and Tim Hailey around for capturing the moments I don’t get to see.”

Kevin Campbell won GMS Racing Pro Open

And now Bill Rowe, his family, and the AHDRA community turn their attention to making the World Finals at Gainesville Raceway the biggest, baddest, and best ever! Be there November 6-7 to cap off a great 2021 and set the stage for a historic 2022.

The AHDRA website is at http://raceahdra.com/

Daytona 200 with Triumph & Ducati plus King of the Baggers

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

At the 80th Daytona 200 Race – King of the Baggers Goes Oval Racing Next Year, Daytona 200 to Allow Triumph and Ducati.

When one hears the word Daytona, the first thing that comes to mind is the insane racing that goes on there, especially the Daytona 500 event dedicated to cars. But the same name can easily be associated with an equally grueling endurance race for motorcycles.

They call it Daytona 200, and it has been around in some form or another ever since 1937. Next year in March, when the upcoming event is scheduled, people attending will be celebrating the 80th edition of the race. On their end, organizers will do so with new rules and bagger racing as a side dish for the first time ever.

Bagger racing on sanctioned, iconic tracks has not been around for all that long. Or maybe it has, but it only got traction after back in 2020 Harley-Davidsons and Indians went at each other’s throats in a single high-adrenaline race, called King of the Baggers, at the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca.

Then, 2021 came with King of the Baggers as a three-race series (eventually won by Harley’s Kyle Wyman), and we also got the Bagger Racing League’s Drag Specialties Battle of the Baggers for the first time.

Next year in Daytona, most of the bikes that were raced this year, and hopefully, even more, will line up on the starting grid once more. It is there where the next season of King of the Baggers kicks off, marking the first time ever when such motorcycles have been raced “on the high banks of a Superspeedway with speeds expected to exceed 160 mph.”

So far, the organizers of the series, MotoAmerica, did not provide any info on how the race will shape up, so we have no idea how many tri-oval laps riders will have to do before being declared winners.

As said, this year’s three-race series winner is Kyle Wyman, who rode a Road Glide to victory, defeating last year’s single-race series winner, Indian Challenger rider Tyler O’Hara. It’s unclear at this point how the roster for the 2022 season will shape up, and the total number of races is kept under wraps as well.

The opening salvo of the King of the Baggers will, of course, not be part of the Daytona 200 main event, but there are things to discuss here as well, the most important of them all being the fact more motorcycles are now allowed in.

This is due to rule changes that “take into consideration several performance-related items that establish benchmarks for balancing a wide variety of middleweight performance machines.”

Based on the 2022 World Supersport Technical rules, the modifications should allow incredible two-wheelers like the Triumph 765, Ducati Panigale V2, and MV Agusta F3 to be fielded in the race, joining the existing Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R600, and Kawasaki ZX-6R.

Daytona 200 will continue to be an open tire event, meaning each of the teams will be able to choose whatever tire manufacturer they like for the competition.

Back in March this year, the winner of the Daytona 200 was Brandon Paasch, who rode his Suzuki motorcycle to the win in 57 laps, completed in a little over two hours. The fastest lap of the race was actually the last one, and it went to Paasch in 1:49.752. That was enough to put him ahead runner-up Sean Dylan Kelly and his Kawasaki by just 0.30 seconds.

The 2021 Daytona 200 takes place on the weekend of March 10-12. The event is not part of the MotoAmerica Supersport Championship, meaning riders from around the world can take part.

At the time of writing, there is no info on the price for tickets or available packages.

PRESS RELEASE:

16 SEPTEMBER 2021
MotoAmerica, home of AMA Superbike and North America’s premier motorcycle road racing series, is thrilled to announce that it will partner with Daytona International Speedway to host one of the world’s most prestigious races – the DAYTONA 200 – during the weekend of March 10-12, 2022, in Daytona Beach, Florida.

The 2022 DAYTONA 200, set for the green flag on Saturday, March 12, will be the 80th running of the event that began on the Daytona Beach shoreline in 1937 before moving to the World Center of Racing in 1961.

The DAYTONA 200 will feature new rules based off the proposed 2022 World Supersport Technical rules, which take into consideration several performance related items that establish benchmarks for balancing a wide variety of middleweight performance machines. These new rules open the door to motorcycles such as the Triumph 765, Ducati Panigale V2, MV Agusta F3 and others to compete alongside the current Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R600 and Kawasaki ZX-6R. The DAYTONA 200 will also continue to run as an “open tire” event, allowing multiple tire manufacturers to join the competition.

The DAYTONA 200 will not be included as part of the MotoAmerica Supersport Championship, leaving the opportunity open for the best riders from around the world to compete for the minimum $175,000 in purse and contingency that will be offered.

In addition to the DAYTONA 200, the MotoAmerica weekend at Daytona International Speedway will be the opening round of the 2022 MotoAmerica King Of The Baggers Championship, marking the first time Baggers will race on the high banks of a Superspeedway with speeds expected to exceed 160 mph, and also the first round of the Twins Cup Championship.

“The DAYTONA 200 is known worldwide to be one of the most exciting motorcycle races in the world,” said MotoAmerica President Wayne Rainey, who won the DAYTONA 200 in 1987. “We are proud to work with Daytona International Speedway, the AMA and FIM North America organizations to continue to enhance the prominence of the DAYTONA 200. With the new DAYTONA 200 rules in place, we are hopeful that this will open the door to more manufacturers and teams joining us in March. It’ll be a great way to start off the 2022 season. And, wow, Baggers on the high banks! What a spectacle that will be. Obviously, this is MotoAmerica’s first trip to Daytona, and it’s my first trip back to the Speedway since 2008. I’m looking forward to what is going to be a really cool weekend.”

“The tradition of the DAYTONA 200 is unprecedented, and we are thrilled to work with such a reputable group in MotoAmerica to continue the tradition,” said Daytona International Speedway President Frank Kelleher. “Racing two-wheel style has been a staple in Daytona for many years, first on the beach before moving to Bill France Sr.’s incredible creation of the 31-degree banking of Daytona International Speedway and Infield Road Course. There’s nothing like the excitement that the DAYTONA 200 provides, including close finishes that have become the norm.”

“The AMA is pleased that the DAYTONA 200 will now be run and managed by our AMA/FIM North America partner MotoAmerica for 2022,” said AMA President and CEO, and FIM North America President, Rob Dingman. “This has been one of our goals since 2015 when we established our partnership with MotoAmerica and facilitated the return of professional road racing sanctioning rights to the AMA.”

Earlier this year, Brandon Paasch, at only 19 years old, used an old, veteran move common to Daytona, to capture the 2021 DAYTONA 200 in breathtaking fashion. After running second for most of the last portion of the race, Paasch, utilizing the draft, reeled in leader Sean Dylan Kelly and calculated a perfect slingshot move at the entrance of the tri-oval as the duo came to the checkered flag, winning by just .031 of a second, and taking home the traditional Rolex Cosmograph Daytona watch.

Nine World Champions, including seven 500cc/MotoGP World Champions – six Americans (Kenny Roberts, Freddie Spencer, Eddie Lawson, Wayne Rainey, Kevin Schwantz and Nicky Hayden) and one Italian (Giacomo Agostini) – have won the Daytona 200.

The winningest riders in the Daytona 200 are former World and AMA Superbike Champion Scott Russell (1992, ’94, ’95, ’97 and ’98) and 1995 AMA Superbike Champion Miguel Duhamel (’91, ’96, ’99, 2003, 2005). The pair have each won five Daytona 200s.

More information on the 2022 DAYTONA 200 will be announced soon, including additional support classes, final rules, entry instructions, broadcast coverage and ticket opportunities.

The iconic Daytona International Speedway will be the site of a host of motorsports events in 2022, beginning with the Rolex 24 in January, the DAYTONA 500 and Speedweeks Presented by AdventHealth in February, along with the 81st Annual Bike Week At DAYTONA in March, featuring the Monster Energy AMA Supercross and DAYTONA 200.

Fans can stay connected with Daytona International Speedway on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for the latest speedway news. For information on all events, visit www.daytonainternationalspeedway.com or call 1-800-PITSHOP.

Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports Act of 2021

By General Posts

This week Senators Richard Burr (R-NC), Jon Tester (D-MT), Mark Kelly (D-AZ), Joni Ernst (R-IA), Thom Tillis (R-NC), and Joe Manchin (D-WV) reintroduced the Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports (RPM) Act of 2021. The bill, S. 2736, ensures that racing enthusiasts continue to have the ability to convert motor vehicles into vehicles used solely for competition. This bill also clarifies that it is legal under federal law to manufacture, sell, distribute, and install race parts that modify the emissions system of a motor vehicle that is used solely for racing.

The bill is in response to actions taken by the EPA in 2015. At that time, the EPA issued a proposed regulation that would prohibit the conversion of emissions-certified motor vehicles into vehicles used in motorsports competitions. The 2015 proposed regulation also prevented the sale or use of emissions-related race parts for those modified vehicles.

An important component of S. 2736 is that it helps protect the aftermarket parts industry. A robust and thriving aftermarket parts industry is vital to the motorcyclist community. The Motorcycle Riders Foundation is part of a broad collaboration of groups working together in D.C. on this topic.

As you may remember, earlier this year the House of Representatives introduced a similar bill, H.R. 3281, that now has 101 cosponsors. To see if your member of the House is a cosponsor of the RPM Act, click here.

If you’d like to read more about the Senate bill, click here.

Look for further updates and calls to actions on this issue before the end of the year!

See you in Atlanta!

Next week is shaping up to be another great Meeting of the Minds! If you make it down to Atlanta, be sure to introduce yourself to our D.C. lobbyist, Rocky Fox. Rocky is always looking to learn about what you are working on back home.

An important part of Meeting of the Minds is making connections between our members around the country and back in D.C. If you have relationships with your hometown Senators or Congressman, make sure Rocky knows!

Let’s have a great few days down South!

https://mrf.org/

About Motorcycle Riders Foundation
The Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) provides leadership at the federal level for states’ motorcyclists’ rights organizations as well as motorcycle clubs and individual riders.

Harley-Davidson XL Sportster 1957 & the OHV Engine

By General Posts

The XL commonly known as the Sportster.

The original XL Sportster used a lot of parts from the previous K Model, but the real revelation was its new OHV engine. Harley-Davidson was aware of the interest of buyers in customizing.

While the humble XL Sportster had made an impact of sorts upon its initial release in 1957, it was the continual evolution of this lighter-weight V-twin engine that cemented it as a staple in the Harley-Davidson range.

It has truly helped instill the Harley-Davidson name in motorcycle history.

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XDA Racers Reach First Time Success at Bike Brawl

By General Posts

For the third time this year, the XDA brought the best show in motorcycle drag racing to Virginia Motorsports Park for the Inaugural Bike Brawl.

The weekend featured cooler temperatures, and racers were able to show off some serious performance gains as they fought for points as the 2021 championship chase is quickly coming to an end.

Orient Express Racing Pro Street
Winner – Rodney Williford / Runner-up – Darion Payne

Jordan Haase is back! After missing the August Bike Bash event, Haase came out of the gate hot, running a career-best 6.549 / 228.50 mph to put him in the number four qualifying spot of Orient Express Racing Pro Street.

Many racers improved on their personal best in the cool September air at VMP. Improvements made were; Curtis Brown officially in the sixes with a 6.973, Ryan Bonitatis 6.676, Ricky Wood 6.700 at 226.24 mph, Darion Payne 6.488, Greg Wallace 6.500, and Rodney Williford 6.438.

The Bike Bash Pro finals from August were also contested on Saturday during qualifying and delivered a first-time winner. Justin Shakir has been making ET and MPH performance gains all season and Saturday; his hard work paid off with his first Pro Street win, including stopping Rodney Williford’s 5-race winning streak. Shakir went dangerously close to red lighting in the final with a .002 light, giving him the starting line advantage over Williford’s .036 light. With these two titans side-by-side down the quarter-mile, Shakir would get to the finish line first with a 6.463 at 227.08 mph to Williford’s quick but losing 6.496 at 229.51 mph.

With Shakir qualifying number one and Williford number two, there was potential for a repeat final on Sunday from these two racers. However, Shakir would fall to Darion Payne in the semi-final when he couldn’t produce enough power to outrun Payne’s stellar 6.491 pass.

Darion Payne ran his career-best in round two against Jordan Haase with 6.488, then after taking out Shakir, he would meet the champion Rodney Williford in the final.

Williford took out racers Curtis Brown, Ricky Wood, and Greg Wallace on his way to his sixth straight final this season. In the semi-final, Williford ran his career-best 6.438 against Wallace.

Both Williford and Payne were on track for a showdown in the final. Williford got out of the gate first with a marginally better reaction time of .071 over Payne’s .078. Payne was right on Williford, but he was not as stable as they both blasted down the quarter-mile. Williford’s Turbo Hayabusa was firmly planted on the track and ran perfectly straight to another win with 6.462 over Payne’s 6.506.

DME Racing Real Street
Winner – David Stewart / Runner-up – Ralphie Navarro

Points leader Mark Hylton took the number one qualifying position in DME Racing Real Street with a 7.515.

After David Stewart was dethroned from the points lead by Hylton, he also suffered a blow of a first-round loss at the August Bike Bash. So coming into the Bike Brawl, Stewart was looking for redemption. After qualifying number three with a 7.595 he made his way through eliminations taking out Trevor Schnitz, Chad Sosnowski, and finally Mark Hylton on his way to another final round appearance. Notably, Stewart also broke the class MPH record of 196.13 with a 196.82 pass. Unfortunately, he was unable to back it up for an official recording.

On the other side of the ladder, in only his seventh DME Racing Real Street race, Ralphie Navarro, who qualified with a 7.581, made his first final round appearance in the class. Navarro took wins over Bud Harrod, and Brittany Bohne earning himself a bye to the final against Stewart.

In the final, Stewart took a starting line advantage with a .072 to Navarro’s .112, yet Navarro caught up quickly. However, his slower reaction cost him the race as he went through the beams .04 seconds later than Stewart, with both racers putting up identical 7.627 ET’s on the board.

The August Bike Bash final also ran during qualifying but was uneventful. Trevor Schnitz, who was making his first Pro Final appearance in his short racing career, would be a no show for the final due to breakage, giving Mark Hylton an easy win and more points to pad his points lead for the championship.

HTP Performance Super Stock
Winner – David Fondon / Runner-up – Blake Johnson

The Kawasaki ZX-14’s dominated HTP Performance Super Stock at the September Bike Brawl. David Fondon was the number one qualifier with an 8.753, followed by Mike Davis with an 8.819.

During qualifying, the final two rounds from the August Bike Bash were completed. Curtis McDougald had a bye in the semi-final while Mike Davis would face class champion David Fondon. Fondon took the starting line advantage on his 2020 Kawasaki ZX-14, leaving Davis on his 2013 ZX-14 in chase mode to the finish line. Fondon took another win running 8.787 to Davis’ 8.819. Fondon would get another starting line advantage in the final, leaving McDougald trailing behind when his win light came on, running an 8.755 to an 8.867. This win made five undefeated wins in a row for Fondon.

Back to the Bike Brawl event, on Sunday during eliminations, Fondon took out all the heavy-hitters on his way to the final, including Mark Blake, Darion Payne, and Curtis McDougald. On the other side of the ladder, Blake Johnson worked through Dell Jones, his father Brian Jones, and Jyrec Givens on his way to his first Pro final.

Johnson qualified number three with an 8.856 and was well fit to give Fondon a run for the money. Johnson got the starting line advantage with a .118 reaction time to Fondon’s slower .147. Johnson gave it his best effort running an 8.893 at 157.52, but Fondon’s ZX-14 outran him with an 8.854 at 160.29 mph.

MaxxECU Pro Xtreme
Winner – Chris Garner-Jones / Runner-up – Rob Garcia

Chris Garner-Jones took the number one qualifying position in MaxxECU Pro Xtreme with a 3.901 followed by Rob Garcia with a 3.987.

In round one of eliminations, John Collins took a win over a broken Chris Cutsinger, Rob Garcia won with a 4.039 to Bobby Lovingood’s 5.450, and Garner-Jones had an earned bye.

In round two of eliminations, Rob Garcia advanced with an earned bye running a 4.032. And Garner-Jones won with a 3.924 over John Collins’ 4.048. The final would be uneventful as Garner-Jones took the win, breaking the beams when Garcia could not make the call for the final.

MaxxECU Pro Xtreme is presented by Ace Mechanical, Billy Vose Racing, Dallas Flat Glass, Dunigan Racing, DME Racing, Grothus Dragbikes, Harley Haul, Rob Bush Motorsports, Robinson Industries, Schnitz Racing, Timblin Chassis, and Worldwide Bearings.

Vance & Hines 4.60
Winner – Troy Hausmann / Runner-up – Kenny Cornell

For the first time this season, Kevin White held the number one qualifying position in the Vance & Hines 4.60 index class with a perfect 4.600. In round two, his weekend would end after a dreaded red-light against Kenny Cornell. Cornell would go on to win two more rounds to make it to his second final this season.

On the other side of the ladder, Troy Hausmann ran deadly consistent with an average ET of 4.62. Hausmann got the starting line advantage with a .016 reaction time to Cornell’s .022. But Cornell didn’t have the performance needed in the final against Hausmann’s winning 4.642 as he crossed the eighth-mile finish line with a 4.874. This win will give Hausmann a points injection as we head into the season finale.

The Vance & Hines 4.60 August Bike Bash final ran during qualifying between Michael Ostrowski and Cameron Shelton. Ostrowski cut a perfect .000 light to Shelton’s .041 light. The eight-mile finish line came up quickly as Ostrowski won with a 4.619 run to Shelton’s 4.629.

APE Nitrous Bulls
Russell Dennison Jr was the only rider in the APE Nitrous Bulls class and landed a winner’s circle finish. Richard Gadson is the only rider that can stop him from winning the championship with one race left in the season.

3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls
Winner – Mike Burkhart / Attila
Runner-up – Rendolf Torbed / Kastigala

Mike Burkhart on ‘Attila’ is on a winning streak in the Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls. After Burkhart’s Bike Bash win, he made a few performance upgrades and was back eager to keeping knocking out his competitors. On Burkhart’s way to the final he sent the points leader, David Page, and Michael Thyen back to their trailers to pack up for the weekend. 2019 class champion Rendolf Torbed from Curacao, who was on hiatus in 2020 was back ready to play. Torbed on ‘Kastigala’ made easy work of Junior Johnson on ‘Reparation’ and Howard Gerken on ‘Son of Sam’ on his way to meet Burkhart in the final. Even though the champ was back, it wasn’t enough as Burkhart boomed down the track for his second straight victory.

Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls
The action was heated Saturday night in Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls. The points leader Geoff Godfrey came in hot up with fresh upgrades to ‘Minion’, taking out Edward Thomas on ‘Da Setup’ in round one. In round two Travis Kidd on ‘Rebirth’ sent Godfrey back to the drawing board and putting his point lead in jeopardy.

At this first XDA event, Deshon Jones made a statement taking ‘Mae Jean’ to a final round after knocking out Augustine Herrera on ‘Bankrupt’ and Travis Kidd. Duane Jackson on ‘Miss Behavin’ took out heavy-hitters Brian Childress on ‘Joey Wales,’ Cody Lowe on ‘Codeine’ and Desmond Spaulding on ‘Sho Nuff’ on his way to the final.

Curfew hit Saturday night before Jones and Jackson could square off, and the two split the pot.

1 Stop Speed 5.60
Winner – Michael Rankin / Runner-up – Rico Brown

The 1 Stop Speed 5.60 eighth-mile index received two first-timers in the final. Michael Rankin, a staple in the sportsman classes, made his first XDA 1 Stop Speed 5.60 final along with Rico Brown, who is in his second season of motorcycle drag racing. Brown had the advantage going into the final because he was running deadly consistent with 5.607 ET average from the previous rounds compared to Rankin’s 5.65 average.

Brown left the starting line first with a .060 reaction time to Rankin’s .067. Brown got to the finish line first but broke out with a 5.570 ET, with the win going to Rankin on his 5.590 break-out pass.

Hard Times Parts & Service Gambler’s Race
Winner – Pablo Gonzalez / Runner-up – Normal Teal

The Friday night Hard Times Parts & Service Gambler’s race was again dominated by Pablo Gonzalez as he took back-to-back wins. In the final, he dialed a 9.34 to run against Norma Teal’s 8.24 dial. Gonzalez took the tree with a .027 to Teal’s .033. Both racers fought to get to the finish line first; Teal got there first but should have lifted quicker as he broke out running an 8.228 giving the win to Gonzalez’s 9.364

VooDoo Components Bracket Bash
Winner – Derrick Milbourne / Runner-up – Derek Burkhead Jr

On Saturday, a whopping one hundred and forty racers entered the VooDoo Components Bracket Bash. After seven rounds of competition, Derrick Milbourne and Derek Burkhead Jr. would be the last men standing. Milbourne’s reaction time average from the previous seven rounds was .042, while Burkhead Jr. had an advantage with a .030 average. Burkhead Jr. would react too quick and turn on the red light to hand the win over to Derrick Milbourne with a $4,500 class payout.

Mickey Thompson Tires Top Sportsman
Winner – Pablo Gonzalez / Runner-up – Robin Procopio

Pablo Gonzalez, who won the Mickey Thompson Tires Top Sportsman event at August’s Bike Bash, would qualify number one for the third straight race with a 7.499. This would also be his third consecutive final and second-time meeting Robin Procopio in the other lane. Procopio and Gonzalez both have wins over each other, and this weekend would be a tie-breaker. Procopio ended her weekend cutting a -.003 red light to send Gonzalez to his second-winner circle appearance of the weekend.

MPS Racing Pro ET
Winner – Dustin Lee / Runner-up – Pablo Gonzalez

Over a hundred racers entered Sunday’s MPS Racing Pro ET class. It would take seven wins before Dustin Lee and Pablo Gonzalez would meet in the final. Yes, Gonzalez was now in his third final of the weekend!

While Gonzalez was looking for a win, Lee needed a win to gain points for a shot at the championship. Lee dialed a 7.85 and Gonzalez a 7.50. With both 2008 Hayabusa’s staged, Lee got the starting line advantage with a .050 light to Gonzalez’s .071. As both riders headed to the finish looking over their shoulders, keeping an eye on their competitors position, it was Lee that made the better decision. Gonzalez backed off the throttle too soon, running a 7.57 while Lee ran closer to his dial with a 7.895 for the win.

Brock’s Performance Street ET
Winner – Derrick Milbourne / Runner-up – Jermiah Manuel

On Sunday, Brock’s Performance Street ET was dominated by Derrick Milbourne as his winning streak continued. Jermiah Manuel from Delaware won six straight rounds to meet Milbourne in the final. But his success would be undone in the final by his own hands. Manuel dialed a 9.07 to Milbourne’s 8.89. As both racers crossed the finish line, neither was willing to let out, and they both broke out, Milbourne with an 8.89 and Manuel with an injurious 9.034. This win gave Milbourne his second winner circle appearance of the weekend.

Visit www.xdaracing.com for event information, class rules, schedule, and more.

The XDA 2021 motorcycle drag racing season concludes at Maryland International Raceway for the 29th annual DME Racing Fall Nationals on October 8-10, 2021. The Fall air is bound to bring out record performances, so mark your calendars now and be there to watch the Championship chases unfold.

About XDA Racing
The Xtreme Dragbike Association (XDA) is an east coast motorcycle drag racing series with 700+ motorcycle racers competing at each event. Every XDA event hosts professional classes, sportsman classes, grudge racing and a vendor midway. Lifestyle activities such as bike shows, bikini contests, DJ and live bands are also held at select events. For more information on the XDA, please visit www.xdaracing.com or connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube @xdaracing