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Piaggio, KTM, Honda and Yamaha set up swappable batteries consortium

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by Reuters from https://www.investing.com

MILAN (Reuters) – Italian scooter maker Piaggio said on Monday it had set up a consortium with Honda Motor Co., KTM AG and Yamaha Motor Co. to encourage the use of swappable batteries for electric motorcycles and light electric vehicles.

The Swappable Batteries Motorcycle Consortium (SBMC) aims to broaden the use of light electric vehicles, such as scooters, mopeds and motorcycles, and support a more sustainable management of their batteries, a joint statement said.

It will focus on issues such as battery life, recharging times, infrastructure and costs and will work on defining international standard technical specifications for swappable batteries.

The companies in the consortium said they welcomed others joining them to extend standards to as many companies as possible.

“Urban mobility is going through a delicate transition moment towards electrification. Thanks to this consortium, motorbikes will keep their key role,” Piaggio Chief of Strategy and Product Michele Colaninno said.

Honda’s Motorcycle Operations Chief Officer Yoshishige Nomura said the consortium’s objectives aimed to make electric motorbikes more convenient for clients, as their “use on large scale can substantially contribute to the creation of a more sustainable society”.

Piaggio Group owns iconic two-wheeler brands such as Vespa, Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, among others.

MOONEYES Heavy Weight MOON Tank

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Limited Quantity Available from 10 AM Aug. 28th 2021 (JST)
HEAVY WEIGHT MOON TANK

MOON Genuine Product MOON Tank is turned to a mini size and will be released!!
It is elaborately crafted and detailed and finished like the genuine MOON Tank.

It features the brackets like the real MOON Tank and MOON EQUIP. CO. logo is embossed on the spinner cap. There is also the special label that is used for MQQNEYES Genuine Product.

The metal feeling enhances the product to the masterpiece. Add it to your collection or showcase and enjoy the MOONEYES Quality.

Size: (H)6cm (W)7cm (D)4.5cm
(About (H)2.36in (W)2.76in (D)1.77in)
Weight: 185g (6.52 oz.)

Available from 10 AM Saturday, August 28th 2021 (JST)
Available at MOONEYES Area-1 Shop, MOONEYES Official Online Shop.

Limited quantity. Limited to one per customer.

This item is also sold at MOONEYES Area-1. Therefore, please note that depending on the time you ordered, it might get sold out.

HEAVY WEIGHT MOON TANK
【MG925】 12,000円 (excl. tax)

AT WEBSITE http://mooneyes.jp/

Hot Wheels Sells Full-size Working Electric Bike

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Hot Wheels Super73-RX offers a top speed of 45 kmph while it can travel at a continuous speed of 32 kmph

Hot Wheels is known for creating scaled size toy models of famous automobiles. But they are much more than just a toy manufacturer. The company has collaborated with American electric bicycle maker Super73 to build a real-life model based on the flagship Super73-RX.

Only 24 units of Hot Wheels X Super73-RX have been made and not surprisingly all 24 units have been sold out already. Each such unit has been priced at USD 5,000 (approx. INR 3.71 lakh). The electric motorcycle gets a cosmetic overhaul over the standard model and looks much prettier to the eyes. However, it gets the same specs as the regular Super73 RX.

SEE BIKE AT https://super73.com/collections/r-series/products/super73-hot-wheels

Funky Styling
The Hot Wheels edition of Super73 RX gets wrapped around in a slick new livery with Hot Wheels branding on the blue and orange tank along with similarly coloured stripes on the frame. The unique paint scheme is complemented by the panels dipped in black which lends it a sporty appeal.

Foam on the handlebar and custom embroidered seat sourced from Saddlemen also scream of the Hot Wheels brand. The headlight gets a tint of yellow while the special medals have been made by Crankbrothers.

To keep consistency with the all-black theme of the bike, the makers have blacked out the battery tank pads, chain and the large stainless steel panel situated in the middle of the frame. The electric bicycle rides on wire-spoked wheels with bronze rims shod by knobby tyres block patterns so that it could perform mild off-roading.

Specifications
Coming to its powertrain specs, the E-bike is powered by a 960-watt-hour battery which sends energy to a motor mounted on the rear wheel. The 2 kW motor returns an output of 2.7 bhp on electric power alone, the bike can travel up to 65 kms at a speed of 32 kmph. The rider can, however, extend the range up to 120 kms by riding the pedal in the Eco pedal assist mode. Top speed on Super73 RX has been rated 45 kmph. It takes 3-4 hours to juice up the battery from zero to 100 percent with a five-amp charger. By using a 3-amp charger the same task can be accomplished in 6-7 hours. What also benefits the bike is that at 36 kilos (inclusive of the battery pack), it is extremely nimble and easy to handle.

Additional Goody
Each unit is built on a pre-order and it takes 12-16 weeks for a single unit to be built before getting dispatched at the owner’s doorstep. While USD 5,000 may seem too pricey for an e-bike, Hot Wheels aficionados wouldn’t mind shedding these bucks. Keeping in mind that each beneficiary is gifted a scaled-size Hot Wheels model of Ford Bronco as a compliment.

Aprilia Tuono V4 Review

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by Geoff Hill from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Big bikes don’t come with big scares any more

Back in the day, powerful bikes were thrilling and terrifying, but this naked Italian beauty has all the thrills and none of the terror thanks to a brain that works faster than the rider’s. Well, Geoff’s, although that’s not saying much.

I started doing bike tests in 1846, before bikes were even invented, so I just sat on a fence making bike noises, then hauled out a quill pen and a sheet of parchment and sent in my review to Velocipede Monthly on a passing donkey.

When bikes finally came along, I remember being simultaneously thrilled and terrified by some superbikes, such as the Kawasaki ZX-10R.

You got the feeling that at any moment it would fling you over the hedge, leaving you draped over a baffled cow called Gertrude, although it did get less frisky when Kawasaki fitted a steering damper to later models.

However, I realised at the launch a while back on the Suzuki Hayabusa that I wasn’t a bit scared.

There are several possible explanations for this. Either I’ve taken on board the advice I read from a psychiatrist recently that fear and excitement are just two sides of the same coin in your brain, so when you feel afraid, pretend it’s excitement.

I tried it on my first time back flying after lockdown, and it worked.

Another alternative is that I have become an astonishingly skilled rider, but since that’s highly unlikely, I suspect the answer is that bikes today such as this one are fitted with so many safety features that you’d need to be a complete idiot to end up draped over Gertrude.

I’m talking about cornering ABS, cornering traction control, anti-wheelie control, launch control, adaptive cruise control and so many other controls that before long we’ll be able to send bikes out on their own, and they can come back and tell us what a great day out they had.

And don’t laugh – BMW has already shown off an R 1200 GS which can tootle around without a rider, and that was back in 2018.

Anyway, where was I? Ah yes, just about to climb on board the Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory, the Factory bit meaning that it’s got electronically adjustable semi-active suspension, lower bars, better tyres and a more comfortable pillion position than the £15,500 base model.

In spite of the lower bars on the Factory, it’s surprisingly comfortable, even for the taller motorcycling chap, which is a welcome relief from the days when sportsbikes hunched you over like the love child of Quasimodo and Richard III and left you calling by the chiropractor on the way home.

Which left me free to admire the rather useful mirrors and a 5in TFT screen which is much clearer than on the previous Tuono, with bigger, brighter graphics which show you everything you need at a glance, including road riding modes, which can be either Tour, Sport and User, where you can geek out to your heart’s desire. There are also three track modes.

Acceleration, even in Tour mode, is gloriously lusty, accompanied by a visceral howl from the V4, handling is sublimely light and precise, and braking is as brutal but seamless as acceleration.

It’s a bike that’s impossible to unsettle no matter how ham-fisted you are in and out of corners, even on rough surfaces. Remarkable.

I spent a very happy hour getting lost on the rural A and B roads of Armagh, Northern Ireland’s apple country, feeling like I was on a bike I’d owned for years, rather than just picked up an hour ago.

Tweaked fuelling from the old model, and a firm but slick quickshifter to snick up and down the six-speed box just add to the feeling that this is a very well-sorted package indeed – fast but safe, agile but stable, and sporty but comfortable.

Switch to Sport mode, and it’s as if the bike’s been given a large and probably illegal dose of steroids, and yet even with the suspension firmer and the acceleration even more ludicrously breathtaking, it still never feels unsafe or unsettled, with the bike’s brain working faster than yours can to keep the bike stable under all conditions.

Well, my brain, anyway. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ll put away my quill pen and roll up the parchment, since I see a donkey approaching, and the editor of Velocipede Monthly is an impatient sort of chap.

Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory
Engine: 1077cc liquid-cooled V4
Power: 173bhp @ 11,350rpm
Torque: 89 lb ft @ 9,000rpm
Colours: Black/red
Price: £18,100

BMW R NineT Pure Option 719 First Ride Review

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

To most motorcyclists, the term “pure” evokes images of kickstarters, chrome finishes, and cable throttles. It takes us back to simpler times; a time before electronic nannies and catalytic converters. Back then, motorcycles were easy on the eyes—and the technology.

Charming as it is, nostalgia certainly has its limitations. Most riders aren’t rushing back to hardtails, drum brakes, and carburetors. Luckily, modern-classic motorcycles can cherry-pick the best aspects of yesteryear and today. At least that’s what BMW attempts with its R nineT family. Now, circular headlamps can house LED lights. Wire-spoke wheels can bear retro styling as well as tubeless tires. Design can be both timeless and trendy.

The four R nineT models express this dual nature to various degrees, but the Pure variant embraces the back-to-basics philosophy most. The main ingredients remain intact, but the Pure favors stripped-down practicality over performance. A steel fuel tank replaces the lightweight aluminum unit, a conventional fork steps in for the responsive USD front end, and the cockpit hosts just one round gauge.

Those concessions result in a $10,995 price tag, cementing the Pure as the less-is-more option in BMW’s feature-rich lineup. Since introducing the R nineT in 2015, the Bavarian brand has positioned the neo-retro naked as a custom-friendly platform. The Pure just takes that approach to the next level. Sporting a Mineral Gray Metallic paint job, the base trim is both comely and capable. However, BMW proved that the stock guise is just the starting point when it put an R nineT Pure Option 719 in our charge for a few weeks.

The Ultimate Customizing Machine
In 2021, the R nineT’s air/oil-cooled, 1,170cc, boxer engine earns a Euro 5-compliant update. While noise emissions regulations muffle much of the platform’s signature bark, it holds onto its bite with 109 horsepower at 7,250 rpm and 85 lb-ft of torque at 6,000 rpm. The upgraded shock absorber now boasts a hand wheel adjuster and travel-dependent damping while ABS gains cornering functions. Rain and Road ride modes now come standard and full LED lighting illuminates the way.

Despite those generous revisions, BMW went even further with the R nineT’s paint and accessories catalog. Each model now features series colorways along with BMW’s custom in-house Option 719 paint schemes and accessory kits. For an additional $1,350, customers can trick out the R nineT Pure with the Option 719 Aluminum package seen here, which includes an aluminum front fender, fly screen, tail cowl, and gas tank.

The brand’s Billet Pack Classic tacks on milled cylinder head and engine front covers along with an extra $1,050. Additional cosmetic upgrades such as spoked wheels and the design option silencer add another $975 to the bill. Of course, the House of Munich offers a Comfort Package that unlocks the Dynamic ride mode, heated grips, and cruise control. On the other hand, the Select Package prioritizes safety with traction control, engine braking control, and an adaptive headlight.

After all the extra components, software patches, and destination charges, the R nineT Pure Option 719 retails for $15,865. That’s still $80 under the standard R nineT’s $15,945 MSRP, but it’s a far cry from the minimalist machine that the Pure sets out to be. For that reason, we’re going to primarily focus on the model’s standard equipment, and that all starts with the big-bore boxer.
The Ride

BMW may have updated the eight-valve, opposed-twin to meet modern emissions standards, but the aging powerplant retains all of its vintage charm in 2021. Twist the throttle while in neutral and the bulletproof boxer still jolts to the left. As always, vibrations course through the handlebars and foot pegs at higher revs. Unlike most modern motorcycles, BMW preserves these quarks, chalking them up to the R nineT’s “character”.

The Bavarians may hold on to those old ways, but the boxer now delivers an even stronger punch in the mid-range. Road mode harnesses those pulses with a linear power delivery while Rain mode dampens the effect in the name of safety. Unsurprisingly, the mid-range surge is most prevalent in the optional Dynamic mode. Those looking to maximize the Pure’s performance potential may spring for BMW’s Comfort Package as a result, but Road mode was notably capable in nearly all situations.

While the flat-twin went flat out in the mid-range, the Euro 5-compliant tune also produces lean fueling at the low-end. After a few unintended stalls off the line, I learned to babysit the clutch away from each stoplight. The low-end fueling paired with the engine’s high rpm vibes produced a narrow range of usable power, and that quality was most evident on twisty roads.

Without a slipper clutch, quickshifter, or auto-blipper, the R nineT was best ridden with smooth inputs and a patient demeanor. Aggressively banging through the gears only unsettled the big boxer, and in turn, the chassis. Consequently, R nineT riders are encouraged to let the corners come to them. That’s when the modern-classic comes into its own. On flowy canyon roads, the 43mm fork and steering damper hold a true line while the Metzeler RoadTec tires provide more than enough grip for the available lean angle.

Knocking on the door of 500 pounds, the Pure isn’t the nimblest Beemer of the bunch, but the centralized mass makes side-to-side transitions less strenuous than expected. The rear suspension adjustment knob will please two-up riders, but in the single-seat configuration, users will set it and forget it. After experimenting with the top and bottom settings, the mid-position produced the best feel without sacrificing too much comfort. However, it’s hard to characterize the ride as luxurious in any setting.

Conversely, the dual 320mm discs and Brembo four-piston calipers outperformed the spec sheet with a strong initial bite and surprisingly direct feel from the axial master cylinder. As anticipated, the two-pot Brembo binder and 265mm rotor in the rear delivered a less responsive experience, but they did a great job of steadying the 483-pound naked at slow speeds. The R nineT Pure may not win any performance shootouts, but the package sure fits the bill for everyday road use.

The Fit
Throwing a leg over the Pure for the first time, I was pleasantly surprised by the wide handlebars, broad seat pan, and narrow midsection. The low foot pegs position the knee at a 90-degree angle, though the hard parts drag much sooner as a result. Up top, the reach to the bars is a slight stretch, but the tank cutouts allow the rider’s knees to relieve pressure on their wrists. If it weren’t for the thinly padded saddle and nonexistent wind protection, the Pure could double as a suitable touring rig.

In stock form, however, the R nineT functions best in urban environments and twisty canyon roads. While the standard equipment includes a bench seat, the optional seat cowl increases both form and function. The tail unit not only locks the rider into the cockpit but also acts as a storage compartment. The removable backplate enables users to stash legal documents, disc locks, hats, and small tools in the rearward cubby. It may not replace a backpack or accommodate groceries, but it’s a convenient and reliable solution for most naked bike riders.

Similar to the ergonomics, the streamlined electronic suite is straightforward and user-friendly. The single gauge doesn’t include a tachometer, but the LCD display reports engine temperature, ambient temperature, time, mileage, and trip distance. The analog speedometer is a nice retro touch while a dedicated button allows riders to effortlessly cycle through the ride modes.

With the Comfort Package, cruise control settings are located at the top of the left switchgear and the right-hand side hosts the heated grips button. Select Package features like the adaptive headlight unit and traction control work in the background, freeing the rider to concentrate on the road ahead. The simple but effective accommodations should satisfy most riders, but BMW’s robust add-ons collection will also serve those that enjoy the bells and whistles.

Conclusion
Thanks to the lack of flashy TFT displays and radar-assisted farkles, the Pure lives up to its namesake. The tried-and-true boxer produces just enough rumble to enliven the ride and the tech never presents a distraction. What the platform gives up in performance it gains in ease of use and enjoyment.

Even without the Option 719 cosmetic kits and additional electronic upgrades, the R nineT Pure is an excellent companion for the weekday commute and the weekend cruise. The modern-classic Beemer may have electronic nannies and a subdued exhaust note, but the entry-level R nineT still captures the pure fun of riding a good, old-fashioned motorcycle.

Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Road Test & Review

By General Posts

So, you want a new, retro-styled street bike under five grand? There is Good News & Bad News.

The Meteor 350 is a bang-for-buck motorcycle. The Enfield name has more mystique than any of the major brands in this space, and those who appreciate Royal Enfield’s history will be proud to ride the modern-day version. Folks place more value on the bike’s style and personality. The Meteor 350 rides exactly the way it looks, as it advertises – “Cruise Easy”.

If you want a turn-key retro motorcycle with a warranty and a few modern luxuries, give the Meteor a try. It’s a nifty way to go motorcycling without getting in over your head.

Click Here to Read this comprehensive Review on Bikernet.com

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Four Motorcycles to catch at Monterey 2021

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Here are the four coolest bikes that will be up for grabs at Monterey 2021.

It’s called Monterey Car Week, but among all the tours, rallies, races, shows, auctions and even strolls through the parking lot, some of the coolest vehicles in Monterey each August ride on two wheels.

Read about four coolest bikes that will be attracting interest at this year’s Monterey event.

Click Here to Read this Photo Feature Article on Bikernet.com

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Harley-Davidson Rolls Out Serial 1 E-Bikes In Europe And North America

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Available at H-D dealerships soon.

2021 is a watershed year for Harley-Davidson. The Motor Company introduced its first adventure bike, the Pan America, and updated the decrepit Sportster range with its lively Revolution Max engine. On the coattails of those two successful launches, Harley will now turn its attention to the urban/electric mobility sector for the first time with its Serial 1 electric bike lineup.

Originally announced in October, 2020, Harley’s new e-bike spin-off introduced a concept based on the company’s first-ever motorcycle in 1903. However, the production models do away with the nostalgia in favor of a stripped-down, utilitarian aesthetic. All four Serial 1 variants feature a lithium-ion battery integrated into a hydroformed aluminum frame.

While all models utilize a Gates carbon drive belt mated to a mid-mounted Brose electric motor, some trims boast more power than others. Full LED lighting comes standard on all Serial 1s and riders will benefit from the four ride modes (Eco, Tour, Sport and Boost) and walk-assist function.

The MOSH/CTY represents Serial 1’s base offering. Without the Enviolo Automatiq auto-shifting hub found on the premium RUSH models, the single-speed reaches a top speed of 20 mph with a 250W motor. The MOSH/CTY’s 529Wh li-ion battery nets between 35-105 miles and requires four hours and 45 minutes to recharge. The MOSH/CTY retails for €3,499 and $3,799 in the U.S.

In contrast, the RUSH/CTY includes premium features such as an odometer display, storage compartment, and 4-piston brake calipers. The model also earns a 706Wh li-ion battery which achieves a maximum range of 115 miles but calls for 6.6 hours on the charger. Serial 1’s RUSH/CTY STEP-THRU model shares the same features as the standard RUSH/CTY but opts for a 529Wh battery unit good for 90 miles and 4.75 hours to recharge. The RUSH/CTY costs €4,699 in the E.U. and $4,999 in the States while the RUSH/CTY STEP-THRU drops by €100 in Europe but remains $4,999 in America.

Exclusive to the U.S., the RUSH/CTY SPEED adopts a Brose TF Mag motor for a 28-mph top speed. The 706Wh li-ion battery returns 25-115 miles and fully recharges in 6.6 hours. The high-performance model comes at a premium, however, with an MSRP of $5,599. Serial 1 will start delivering the RUSH/CTY, RUSH/CTY STEP_THRU, and MOSH/CTY European Harley-Davidson dealers and showcase the full lineup at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally on August 6-11, 2021.

“The dynamic, fast-growing e-bicycle market is at the forefront of a global mobility revolution,” proclaimed Serial 1 Brand Director Aaron Frank. “Offering the Serial 1 e-bicycles in dealerships across Europe allows Harley-Davidson to play a key role in this mobility revolution while allowing Serial 1 to deliver an unmatched riding experience rooted in fun, freedom, and adventure on two wheels.”