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Ducati DesertX with twin fuel tanks revealed

By General Posts

from https://menafn.com/ by MENAFN

Ducati has officially revealed the DesertX adventure motorcycle in the global market.

It gets a new off-road-friendly chassis and a host of electronic riding aids.

The bike has a retro look, dual fuel tanks for fulfilling additional fuel needs, a 5.0-inch TFT screen, and a 937cc engine that comes paired with a 6-speed gearbox.

Here’s our roundup.

Takeaways
The Ducati DesertX concept was showcased at EICMA 2019 and two years later, we have the production model. It has a similar appearance as the concept version and looks like the Ducati motorbikes of Dankar racing from 1990s.

Distinct features such as dual fuel tanks and dual-pod headlight make it a unique offering.

Design
The bike has a generous ground clearance of 250mm.

The front and rear fuel tanks on Ducati DesertX have capacity of 21 liters and 8 liters, respectively.

Ducati DesertX features a muscular front fuel tank, a transparent windshield, a twin-pod LED headlamp, a split-style seat, an upswept exhaust, and an auxiliary fuel tank at the back.

It houses a 5.0-inch TFT display and rides on 21-inch front and 18-inch rear wheels.

The two-wheeler has a seat height of 875mm, a ground clearance of 250mm, and a kerb weight of 223kg.

Engine & Specs
The Ducati DesertX is powered by a 937cc, Testastretta twin-cylinder motor that churns out 108hp of power at 9,250rpm and 92Nm of peak torque at 6,500rpm. Transmission duties are handled by a 6-speed gearbox.

For the rider’s safety, Ducati DesertX is equipped with disc brakes on both the front and rear wheels, along with cornering ABS, wheelie control, traction control, and engine brake control. It offers six riding modes.

The suspension duties are taken care of by fully-adjustable Kayaba inverted forks on the front and a fully-adjustable mono-shock unit on the rear end.

Pricing and availability
Ducati DesertX will start at $16,795 in the US. It will likely be available in North America starting June 2022.

Discovery of huge fuel-can stash reveals 500 rare artifacts

By General Posts

from https://www.hagerty.com by Charlotte Vowden

A shedload of surprises: Discovery of huge fuel-can stash reveals 500 rare artifacts

Editor’s note: In the interests of preserving the authentic whiff of petrol that pervades this remarkable story from our U.K. colleagues, we have made only slight concessions to an American lexicon. All quotations remain untouched.

Alan Pooley’s pursuit of petroliana was purely sentimental, but the collection of more than 500 automotive artifacts that he amassed during three decades of buying for love not money is so remarkable that it could fetch up to £65,000 (roughly $88,600) at auction. Including over 250 oil cans, 60 two-gallon fuel canisters, and dozens of enamel signs, oilers, and pourers, it is set to go under the hammer later this year.

“The important thing about this collection is that it is completely fresh to the market, but the exciting bit about it is that no one really knew about it,” says Tom Godsmark, an associate and vintage specialist at Cheffins auction house, the agency managing the sale.

“It’s a big collection in terms of scale, but it’s the extensiveness that’s so interesting because it ranges from little items such as lapel badges, old match boxes, and advertising pencils for Rudge bicycles to a fully restored petrol pump.”

Among the pieces which the late Mr. Pooley carefully stored, restored, and displayed in sheds at his home in Norfolk is a two-gallon fuel can that, to the untrained eye, stands out because of the large lightning bolt and bold lettering embossed on its side. Those in the know will recognize it as one of the few surviving examples of a limited-edition run of Shell Racing cans that were produced in the 1930s. With an estimated value of £400 to £600 (approximately $545–$818), it’s one of the rarest pieces of memorabilia to have been discovered in its original condition.

An automotive body finisher by profession, Alan, who passed away in 2020, was equipped with the skills and patience to rejuvenate items in a state of distress and spent a great deal of his spare time doing so. “It could be quite a long process, but he was a master of the art and was able to bring them back up to a really good standard, it gave him a huge buzz,” explains Alan’s partner, Karin Burleigh.

His penchant for rescuing fuel canisters from ruin (originally known as “motor spirit” cans) extended to vessels produced by the Scottish Oil Agency, Mobiloil, Alexander Duckham & Co Ltd, and Anglos Taxibus Spirit. “If it wasn’t for him, some of those cans wouldn’t be in existence anymore, they would have just rusted into a little heap on the floor,” says Burleigh, who considers the “best” of the three sheds Mr. Pooley used to house his automotive memorabilia is the one in which he arranged his favorite pieces—on every available surface.

From to floor to ceiling—where oil pourers, Shell-branded hard hats, and Castrol Racing baseballs caps hung on hooks that he had fastened into the timber beams supporting the roof—Alan had curated his own at-home exhibition that showcased the containers, canisters, tins, tools, and signs that he treasured the most. “You name it, it was all there,” says Godsmark. “My first thought was Crikey! I imagine he liked going in there and just admiring it. I suspect it was a bit of a sanctuary for him.”

As a boy, Burleigh reveals, Alan cherished the time he spent with his grandfather, and as a man, the tools and Francis-Barnett water cycle that he inherited from him held huge nostalgic value. It’s this relationship and those heirlooms—which are not for sale—that she believes sparked Alan’s passion for automobilia and subsequent apprehensiveness to let any of it go. “He may have sold one or two things, but the majority stayed here,” she says. “Looking at the collection it looks like we spent our whole time at boot sales and auto jumbles, but honestly, we didn’t.”

With so many items in need of a new home, the collection will be divided into lots and auctioned gradually so as not to flood the market. “Collectibles such as gas pumps, fuel advertisements, enamel or tin signs are continually seeing a growth in value as the market continues to gather pace,” says Godsmark. “Values can be hugely varied, ranging from a few hundred pounds for a good example of an oil can right up into the tens of thousands for the best of class in petrol pumps.”

Of the six vintage motorcycles found in Mr. Pooley’s collection, Godsmark tips the 1937 499cc Norton Model 18 and 1966 649cc 650SS Norton as the ones likely to attract the highest bidders due to their condition, low mileage, and thorough documentation.

Making the decision to part with Mr. Pooley’s collection has been incredibly difficult for his three grandsons, who were entrusted with its care upon his passing, and the family’s biggest hope is that each of the items will find their way to “someone who will love it like Alan did.”

Airlite Lowers – form & function & durable

By General Posts

Soft Lower Leg Warmers? It’s not the ’80s anymore
Story & Photos by Koz Mraz
https://www.kozmoto.com/

Engine Guard Lowers, Engine Chaps, Rain Guards, Soft Farings…Leg Warmers? Whatever you want to call those things that go on engine guards to stop the rain, cold air, wind, and flapping pant legs from sanding the hair off your calves.

Sometimes you want the airflow, sometimes you don’t. There are a plethora of options and they all come in two parts, left side, right side, just like those 80’s leg warmers—except one. Airlite’s one-piece, full cover soft lowers can be installed and removed quickly.

There are many reasons riders need soft lowers. They cut down the cold wind and rain, keeping boots and legs dry. They can extend your riding season so you can cruise earlier – cruise later – cruise longer – cruise safer.

Because of its one-piece design, Airlite claims that air is captured, screened, and directed exactly where it belongs; into the radiator and/or cooling fins. They also claim that wind buffeting around your upper body is reduced. They’re efficient and form-fitting in the highway bar cover with no gaps, so there’s no cold and wet wind slapping onto the rider.

The soft lowers are constructed with vinyl used on car bras which means they can be in the sun and wind 24/7 and don’t harden and crack like upholstery vinyl. The soft woven fabric backing material makes it impossible to tear or rip.

The screen is made of a heavy-duty mesh for bug and rock chip protection. It’s the same material that dump trucks use to cover loads. Poly webbing that snugly surrounds the bars is also used in seat belts. Airlite uses the same nylon thread employed in aircraft upholstery and a computerized long arm sewing machine allows for topstitching.

With a background in aviation, owner Bob Morris has designed his soft lowers to be extremely durable and uses all U.S materials. These things seem indestructible and he claims to have never had a defective or damaged lower returned.

Optional storage pouches are available on one or both sides. As stated, fitment is a snap. There are in fact no snaps, clips, or zippers, just Velcro where you need it and it comes with a stowaway bag.

In the real world, Soft Lowers are leg warmers. The radiant engine heat reflecting off the back of the soft lowers creates warm air vortices noticeably increasing the ambient air temperature behind them.

The Airlite soft lowers look and function flawlessly. It’s easy to install, will stop the rain, bugs, and rocks and stows easily away when unused.

Airlite has a soft lower that’s specifically made for almost every bike and year.

Price Range: $94.95 to $126.95

https://www.airlite.ca/

Check out their website for choices and options.

Nash “PUSH” Starter Button

By General Posts

New From Nash Motorcycle Co

The newest addition to the original NMC Starter Button! The “PUSH” button starter comes in bronze or stainless steel button and is available now!

Just give it a push to start your bike! Fits most all 1.4 kw and 1.6 kw starters .

The “PUSH” button itself threads (1/2-13) onto the 4 ¼” starter button shaft. Aside from merely using it as a starter button, it can be applied to whatever creative application that you want to use it for!

The full NMC “Push” Starter Button plunger assembly comes with a black powder coated steel body, steel shaft and bushing.

Learn more about fitment and finishes on the Nash “PUSH” Button Starter product page:

https://nashmotorcycle.com/collections/starter-button

Nash Motorcycle Co.

Royal Enfield Introduces Refreshed 2022 Himalayan Motorcycle

By General Posts

ROYAL ENFIELD INTRODUCES 2022 HIMALAYAN

Tripper navigation, ergonomic upgrades and three new colorways highlight the refreshed 2022 Royal Enfield Himalayan

Milwaukee, WI (Wednesday, October 27, 2021) – Royal Enfield, the global leader in midsize motorcycles (250-750cc), is proud to announce the new 2022 Himalayan. The versatile adventure-touring motorcycle will now be available in three new distinctive, terrain-inspired colorways, and features a range of upgrades, most notably the Royal Enfield Tripper Navigation, a simple and intuitive turn-by-turn navigation pod that pairs with your smartphone via the Royal Enfield App.

Inspired by its global community of adventure touring enthusiasts, the Himalayan has evolved to offer the Royal Enfield Tripper, a functional upgrade dedicated to enhancing the overall ride experience both on and off the road. Designed with the Google Maps Platform, the built-in navigation display device offers turn-by-turn directions, and pairs with the rider’s smartphone by way of the Royal Enfield App.

The 2022 Royal Enfield Himalayan receives several ergonomic upgrades, focused on increasing comfort and capability for an improved adventure-touring experience. Revised seat cushioning allows riders to enjoy extended saddle time while a new windscreen keeps more wind off the rider for improved all-day comfort, amounting to even more enjoyable miles. The new slimmer and ergonomically adjusted front rack offers a more spacious cockpit with minimal interference in the leg area, further improving the overall comfort and experience.

The rear carrier on the 2022 Royal Enfield Himalayan is also revised, now with an additional plate to ensure secure fastening and placement of luggage. Additionally, the rear carrier is now reduced in height, making it easier for riders to swing a leg over the motorcycle.

The 2022 Royal Enfield Himalayan will now be available in new Granite Black (mix of matte and gloss), Mirage Silver and Pine Green, in addition to the existing colorways: Rock Red, Lake Blue and Gravel Grey. The 2022 Royal Enfield Himalayan will be available in North America as early as November, and will retail for $5,299 USD.

The Himalayan debuted in North America in 2018, and over the last three years, has definitively carved out a strong category of accessible adventure touring. Launched with the purpose of creating a distinct subcategory under the ever-popular adventure-touring segment, the Himalayan has been hugely successful in the U.S. market, and has a growing community of dedicated adventure riders around the globe.

A simple, capable, and go-anywhere motorcycle, the Himalayan was inspired by Royal Enfield’s experience of over 50 years of riding across the Himalayas of Northern India. Owing to its versatility, simplicity and competence, the Himalayan has received an incredible response from riders across the world. The Himalayan today is recognized as a capable and dependable adventure tourer by global motorcycle enthusiasts, and is among the leading Royal Enfield motorcycles sold across several geographies, including Europe, America, Latin America and Southeast Asia.

For more information on Royal Enfield North America, visit www.RoyalEnfield.com/us/en/

About Royal Enfield
The oldest motorcycle company in continuous production in the world, Royal Enfield made its first motorcycle in 1901.

Turning a Cuddly Honda Super Cub into a Beast

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Cuddly Honda Super Cub Turns Into Beast, Looks Meaner Than Some Harley-Davidsons

Like it or not, even the many fans of the Honda Super Cub have to admit this particular two-wheeler is not exactly custom material. The underbone machine is a huge customer favorite, but most of the time we don’t get to see the results of investments made in customization processes.

The Super Cub is one of the longest-running nameplates in the Japanese bike maker’s portfolio. It was introduced all the way back in the late 1950s, and since that time, it sold over 100 million units, becoming in effect the world’s most-produced motor vehicle (and that includes cars).

Given the huge number of them on the market, it was only natural for some owners to customize their rides even if, as said, we don’t get to see such projects all that often. Yet this week, thanks to a garage called K-Speed, we’re treated to exactly that, a too-good of a Super Cub not to discuss.

The Japanese say this is their first custom Super Cub C125, but even so, they seem to have nailed a look that might even put some Harleys to shame. The conversion rides closer to the ground than its stock siblings, the front end has been completely restyled, and much larger wheels than we’re used to were fitted front and back.

The rear end has been chopped as well, making the motorcycle look more like a vintage bike than an overgrown scooter. The black paint spread head to toe enhances that impression even more.

Click Here to See Details of this custom Honda Super Cub by K-Speed.

K-Speed says no changes were made to the thing’s engine and brakes, but even so, the price is about three times higher than that of a stock machine. Whereas, for instance, you could buy the 2021 Super Cub C125 for just under $4,000, this one has a retail price of over $13,000.

Visit K-Speed Website at: https://k-speed.com/

First Ride Review of 2022 BMW R 18 B

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

A Tour(ing) De Force – Conquering California’s coast with a Bavarian bagger.

BMW made no bones about moving in on the Harley-dominated cruiser market when it launched the R 18 in April, 2020. Drawing from the Motor Company’s Softail Slim, the Bavarians literally took a page out of Harley’s book to attract buyers. BMW then returned to the well in October, 2020, introducing the R 18 Classic. Equipped with leather bags and a large windshield, the variant shared more than a moniker with Harley’s Heritage Classic.

That first offensive wasn’t BMW’s endgame, however. To truly hit the Harley where it hurts, the company went after the Bar and Shield’s bread and butter: the grand touring segment. Released in July, 2021, the R 18 B added long-distance comfort and convenience to the platform’s repertoire. BMW did more than just slap on a full-size fairing and hard bags though. The House of Munich re-engineered the chassis to suit the cruiser’s new touring ambitions as well.

A 19-inch front wheel steps in for the R18’s 16-incher, the rake tightens to 27.3 degrees, and the wheelbase shrinks to 66.7 inches. That revised double-loop frame not only accommodates two-up touring but also lightened the standard model’s heavy steering. BMW addressed another common R 18 complaint when it increased the bagger’s rear suspension travel to 4.7 inches while adding position-dependent damping and hydraulically adjustable ride height.

The advanced technology doesn’t stop at the tail end though. The new front fairing houses the IMAX of all motorcycle displays, a 10.25-inch-wide, HD resolution (1920 x 720) TFT dash. On the left switchgear, BMW’s trademark WonderWheel makes its R 18 debut, allowing riders to scroll through the bike’s diagnostics, settings, and available navigation. The Marshall stereo system encourages users to jam out to local radio stations or Bluetooth-connected media while the optional radar-assisted adaptive cruise control outfits the R 18 B for the long haul.

Improved geometry and cutting-edge tech may lead BMW’s latest charge, but the Beemer still has to stand up to the class benchmark: the Harley-Davidson Street Glide. With that gold standard in mind, we set out for a 1,100-mile trip up the California coast to test whether the new BMW R 18 B is a checkmate in a brewing battle of the baggers.

On Tour
Despite all the changes that went into the R 18 B, the big-bore boxer remains unchanged. The air/liquid-cooled, 1,802cc opposed twin still produces 116 ft-lb of torque (at 3,000 rpm) and 91 horsepower (at 4,750 rpm). For that reason, the Beemer shines between 3,000 rpm and 4,000 rpm. Within that range, the bagger pulls like a freight train, but as the torque curve dives, the R 18 B’s direct throttle response trails off as well. Beyond the 4,000-rpm mark, the burly boxer still chugs up to its 5,500-rpm redline, but without all the gusto found in the mid-range.

Though the R 18 B idles at around 1,000 rpm, riders have to coax the 1.8-liter engine up to 2,000 rpm, or else it stutters and bogs away from the line. Lean fueling (due to modern emissions standards) may be the root of the issue, but riders can manage takeoffs with a conservative clutch hand and a liberal right wrist.

The narrow powerband may be a limiting factor, but the mid-range also dampens the boxer’s raucous vibrations. In the lower gears, the vibes are most prominent, buzzing through the bars and mini-floorboards. At highway speeds, however, the sensation is much more tolerable.

At 70 mph in sixth gear, the R 18 B lumbers along at a steady pace, though throttle pick up slightly lags. As a result, I regularly cruised at highway speeds in fifth gear to stay within the 3,000-4,000-rpm sweet spot, which yields the best passing power for emergency situations. While the power pulses and delivery presented challenges, the optional adaptive cruise control (ACC) smoothed out all the rough edges.

The Bosch-developed system operates similar to standard cruise control, but with a following distance button at the right switchgear, the rider remains in control of the semi-automated functions. Even in the closest setting, the three-second buffer between the BMW and the vehicle ahead leaves enough time for the evasive maneuvers. If that following distance is too close for comfort, two additional settings enable users to extend that cushion to a more cautious gap.

On the open road, ACC proved invaluable. Those familiar with motorcycle cruise control systems know that the technology not only covers ground in the most efficient manner but also provides much-needed rest for the rider’s right wrist. With ACC, on the other hand, the user is even freer to set it and forget it. Gliding down the road at 75 mph, I regularly let the system take me along for the ride while I added intermittent steering inputs. Even when a car cut into my lane, the R 18 B throttled down to a comfortable 65 mph in a matter of seconds to maintain my buffer zone.

In those situations, ACC kicked in immediately but not abruptly. I never felt like I (or the system) was out of control. Of course, pulling in the clutch or brake lever disengages the cruise control, but users can also override the system with extra throttle if they need to escape a hairy situation. The ACC is also quite intuitive, slowing to the set speed after a throttle burst or ramping up once the vehicle ahead switches lanes.

The system not only accurately distinguishes between cars in neighboring lanes, but if the fairing-integrated radar detects a vehicle ahead picking up speed, it proportionately adds throttle as well. In its category, BMW’s R 18 B is the first to adopt the Bosch-developed ACC and that gives the Bavarian bagger a definite edge in technology. However, there’s more to touring than gizmos and gadgets, and the R 18 B brings its own bag of tricks to the party.

Every Twist And Turn
While the standard R 18 favored a stance and style perfect for bar-hopping, BMW had to outfit the touring variant for cross-country travels. To make the handling more responsive, the firm steepened the bagger’s rake by more than five degrees. The 19-inch wheel may seem counterintuitive to those goals, but the R 18 B changes direction with the slightest input at the handlebars.

Shod in Bridgestone Battlecruise H50 tires, the larger front wheel and 49mm fork did a commendable job of communicating the differing road surfaces. From super slab interstates to gravel-strewn backroads to tar-snaked twisties, I always understood the bagger’s available grip. At lean, the front end was just as accurate, providing predictable feedback and response. However, it’s hard to shower the rear suspension with similar praise.

The R 18 B’s updated monoshock certainly improves on the standard model’s harsh rear end. With just 3.5 inches of travel, the original shock sent each bump and pothole straight through the rider’s back. To atone for that oversight, BMW jacked up the bagger’s back end to 4.7 inches of travel, delivering an ultra-plush ride. The Beemer practically negates all road irregularities as a result, smoothing out even the hardest hits. Unfortunately, the soft rear end and direct front fork don’t always get along.

At tip-in, the R 18 B is planted and predictable. Conversely, if the rider deviates from the original line or encounters mid-corner bumps, the rear wallows with a slight undulating action. As a result, the feel out back becomes vague and disconnected. If you select and stick to a line throughout the curve, the bike plows right through without so much as a wobble. Unfortunately, unforeseen adjustments quickly expose the buoyant back end. Of course, we don’t expect a bagger to hustle around corners, but a manually adjustable monoshock could go a long way to addressing the issue.

It’s a similar story with the brakes. The dual four-piston calipers and twin 300mm front discs provide enough stopping power in the end, but they don’t provide much in the way of initial bite or feel. For those that favor the front brake, BMW’s system distributes a portion of braking power to the single four-piston caliper and 300mm rotor out back as well. The linked brakes help shed speed more efficiently, but you can also feel the system borrowing braking power at the lever. That’s a disconcerting sensation when you’re descending a steep hill. Luckily, the rider aid only intrudes in select situations and heavy braking zones.

Comfy Confines
Even if the R 18 B’s bag of tricks is a mixed bag, the infotainment system draws from BMW’s industry-leading interface. Unlike the R 18’s stripped-down controls and throwback circular speedometer, BMW throws the kitchen sink at the bagger’s new fairing. Four analog gauges report remaining fuel, speed, rpm, and voltage while the 10.25-inch TFT boasts enough room for a dual-pane layout. Using’s BMW’s intuitive Wonder Wheel and menu button, the user can access trip data, local radio stations, smartphone media, navigation, and bike settings.

While the system puts endless options at the rider’s fingertips, navigating those options with the Wonder Wheel and menu button can become cumbersome. Accessing certain submenus requires punching the menu button while others involve a lateral press on the Wonder Wheel. With practice, your left thumb develops the muscle memory necessary for jumping through the folders quickly, but a simplified interface would also speed up the process. Additionally, the turn Wonder Wheel is located next to the turn signal switch, and I embarrassingly pushed the wrong control during many a left-lane change.

As for the infotainment system’s performance, the Marshall speakers deliver crisp, clear audio. With two fairing-mounted speakers and optional subwoofers in each bag, the sound literally envelopes the rider. During testing, the system worked seamlessly with Apple iOS devices but frequently encountered connectivity issues with Android smartphones. Upon connecting, the interface offered full operation of the phone’s media, but functionality would suffer after a second startup. Disconnecting and reconnecting the device restored full control to the rider, but I eventually switched to the radio to avoid the hassle.

The rest of the R 18 B’s cockpit prioritized comfort and convenience as well. With wide buckhorn bars sweeping back to the rider, the upright position suits long-distance road trips. The broad fork-mounted fairing mitigated buffeting but the short windshield left turbulent air dancing on the top of my helmet. A taller windscreen from BMW’s catalog will easily remedy that situation for taller riders, but anyone under five foot, eight inches will be just fine with the stock shield.

Further back, BMW raised the seat 1.1 inches over the standard model’s saddle to relax the bend at the rider’s knees and the adjustment worked. Due to the massive outboard cylinders, the bagger’s legroom hasn’t increased over the R 18, but the taller seat does help relieve stiff knees during long journeys. On the other hand, extra padding on the touring seat would have gone a long way as well, but my bony back end typically endured the 225 miles between fill-ups.

The features that I can’t praise enough are the heated seat and hand grips. During my travels, I hit spots of rain and heavy winds. The chill temperatures eventually receded by the afternoon, but the five-level heated accessories allowed me to maintain my mileage quota in relative comfort. The premium features made the long stints in the saddle more enjoyable than ever, but they all come at a price.

Bringing It Home
Starting at $21,495, the 2022 BMW R 18 B slightly undercuts the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide’s MSRP ($21,999). However, BMW’s Premium Light Package (hill start assist, adaptive headlight, reverse assist, and Marshall subwoofers) tacks on $2,300. The Select Package (alarm system, locking fuel cap, heated seat, tire pressure monitor, and electric bag locks) adds another $1,275 to the price tag. Throw in Roland Sand Designs milled cylinder covers, an engine housing cover, a two-tone black wheelset, and Vance & Hines slip-ons, and the asking price swiftly approaches $30,000.

Many riders will opt for the base package, but a fair share will also order the works, and for good reason. Features such as the tire pressure monitor system, heated seat, and Marshall Gold Series Audio amplify the R 18 B’s touring chops. However, it’s a solid package in stock trim. No, the new Beemer isn’t a death blow to Harley-Davidson, but it’s a worthy competitor. At 877 pounds, it has 22 pounds on its main rival, but it’s also the only bike in the category to offer adaptive cruise control and a 10.25-inch TFT display. The R 18 B may not be BMW’s endgame either, but it definitely changes the game for bagger customers.

Every Angle of the New BMW R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental in Huge Gallery

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

BMW Shows Every Angle of the New R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental in Huge Gallery

Enough time has passed since BMW pulled the wraps off the new members of the R 18 family, the B and Transcontinental, so the enthusiasm about them might have gone down a bit. In an attempt to remind people these new two-wheelers are ready to hit the roads, the Bavarians threw online yet another huge gallery showing the motorized beasts.

You can enjoy most of them on BMW Website, and you can top them off with the already large set of pictures BMW released when the bikes were unveiled. Before you get into that though, a quick reminder about what these ones are all about.

The R18 came into existence more than a year ago, as BMW’s return to the cruiser segment. Being such an important model, it was gifted with the most “powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production.” Called Big Boxer, it is a piece of 1,802cc in displacement and rated at 91 hp at 4,750 rpm, and a maximum of 158 Nm of torque at 3,000 rpm.

Before the two new models were introduced, the family comprised the standard cruiser and the Classic. And now there are four.

The B, which is supposed to stand for bagger, comes with a low windshield, slimmer seat, and a large fairing. The Transcontinental on the other hand is fitted with a larger windshield, additional headlights, and a top case at the rear.

Both hold in their frames the same engine we mentioned earlier, not modified in any way, and are gifted with a larger fuel tank, 10.5-inch TFT screen, and even an area with inductive charging for smartphones. Three riding modes, Rain, Roll, and Rock, are on deck to help riders better navigate their way, and each bike is fitted with automatic stability control and drag torque control.

On the U.S. market, the cheapest R 18 is the standard one, which sells for $15,995. The most expensive is the Transcontinental, priced at $24,995, while the B sits somewhere in between, at $21,945.

Limited Edition from Indian Motorcycle & Jack Daniel’s

By General Posts

INDIAN MOTORCYCLE, JACK DANIEL’S® & KLOCK WERKS® KUSTOM CYCLES CELEBRATE AMERICAN CRAFTSMANSHIP WITH LIMITED-EDITION MOTORCYCLE

Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse Pays Homage to Tennessee Rye Whiskey with Premium Amenities, State-of-the-Art Technology & Custom Rye Metallic Paint with Gold and Green Accents

Minneapolis, MN – October 14, 2021 – Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, and Jack Daniel’s®, America’s first registered distillery, along with Klock Werks® Kustom Cycles have partnered to celebrate American craftsmanship with the introduction of the Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse. Marking the sixth year of the bold partnership and limited-edition series, the 2022 Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse draws inspiration from Jack Daniel’s® renowned Tennessee Rye whiskey – each product embodying the same spirit of innovation to break the mold and exemplify world-class craftsmanship.

With only 107 available globally, the Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse

makes a bold, one-of-a-kind statement. Its custom Rye Metallic paint with gold and green accents nod to the high-touch crafting process of Jack Daniel’s® Tennessee Rye whiskey, while the bike’s premium amenities and state-of-the-art technology deliver unmatched comfort and performance.

“We’re proud to continue this unique partnership with Jack Daniel’s® and Klock Werks® – two respected brands with whom we share the age-old American ethos of uncompromising quality and craftsmanship,” said Aaron Jax, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle. “The Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse takes our award-winning bagger to an even higher level, representing the highest levels of premium technology and craftsmanship – just as Jack Daniel’s® has done with its Tennessee Rye whiskey.”

With custom-inspired style and technology at the forefront, key features for the 2022 Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse include the following:

Bold, Exclusive Design

The attention to detail and spirit of innovation that has made Jack Daniel’s® Tennessee Rye whiskey a bold, unique success has been imparted throughout the design of the limited-edition motorcycle. Along with its custom paint, the motorcycle features a numbered Jack Daniel’s® Montana Silversmiths® badge, custom engraved rider and passenger floorboards, and a genuine leather, Jack Daniel’s® custom-stitched seat.

Premium Amenities & Technology

Premium features aboard the Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse, include a Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight and Pathfinder S LED Driving Lights, electronically adjustable rear suspension preload, Powerband Audio, a stylish flared windscreen, low-rise handlebar, and more.

Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight and Pathfinder S LED Driving Lights

The adaptive headlight from Indian Motorcycle senses the bike’s lean angle and activates individual LED projector beams to provide unprecedented visibility. With 15 individual LED lenses that adjust in real-time to bike lean angle, patent pending technology, and the industry’s first adaptive high-beam feature, the Pathfinder Adaptive LED Headlight delivers unparalleled illumination of the road ahead – whether upright and traveling in a straight line or leaned over to carve a turn.

Fox® Electronically Adjustable Rear Suspension Preload

The Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse has Fox® electronically adjustable rear suspension preload which allows riders to adjust their rear suspension preload from the convenience of their infotainment system. To do this, riders will select if there’s a passenger and simply enter the approximate weight of what is being carried on the motorcycle. The electronically adjustable rear suspension preload handles the rest and sets the preload for optimal riding and handling.

Powerband Audio

Loud and clear. The Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse features the premier Indian Motorcycle sound system, Powerband Audio. With upgraded fairing speakers and added saddlebag speakers, Powerband Audio is up to 50% louder than stock audio.

Ride Command

Riders will also receive the luxuries of the Indian Motorcycle industry-leading seven-inch display powered by Ride Command with Apple CarPlay®, which delivers an easier, more customized level of control for music, navigation preferences, and mobile device information. In addition, Ride Command provides riders with traffic and weather overlays, key vehicle information, and extensive customization capabilities.

PowerPlus Liquid-Cooled V-Twin

Featuring the liquid- cooled, 108 cubic-inch PowerPlus engine, the Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse delivers a class-leading 122 horsepower and 128 ft-lbs. of torque.

Riders looking to add custom style and improve sound can add a PowerPlus Stage 1 Air Intake with the Indian Motorcycle Stage 1 Oval Slip-On Muffler Kit. To unleash 10% more horsepower and 3% more torque, riders can upgrade to the Indian Motorcycle PowerPlus Stage 2 Performance Cams.

“Just as the Indian Challenger breaks the mold for American baggers, so does our Tennessee Rye for American whiskey with its unique distilling process and bold finish,” said Greg Luehrs, sponsorships and partnerships director for Jack Daniel’s®. “This year’s bike perfectly embodies what our rye is all about – innovation and a relentless, uncompromising drive to craft American products of the highest quality.”

Each Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse will come with a custom, co-branded bike mat with the corresponding motorcycle number (#001-#107).

Starting at $36,999, the Jack Daniel’s® Limited Edition Indian Challenger Dark Horse is exclusively available through Indian Motorcycle dealerships.

The order window will open on October 21, 2021, at 12:00pm EST and close once all bikes are sold. Each Indian Motorcycle dealer will have a chance to place orders during the window and will then contact the lucky buyers when the order has been confirmed. To ensure the rider is in contention for a purchase, each customer needs to fill out the form on IndianMotorcycle.com and contact their Indian Motorcycle dealership. Each bike will be built as a model year 2022 with delivery starting October 2021.

For more information on Indian Motorcycle, or to find a dealer, visit IndianMotorcycle.com and follow along on Facebook®, YouTube® & Instagram®.

What is Hub-center Steering Motorcycle & Why it is Better

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Hub-center steering is one of several different types of front-end suspension and steering mechanisms used in motorcycles and cargo bicycles. It is essentially a mechanism that uses steering pivot points inside the wheel hub rather than a geometry that places the wheel in a headstock like the traditional motorcycle layout.

Perhaps the most venerable example of the idea came in the form of the 1930 Majestic. This Georges Roy design used a novel pressed-steel monocoque chassis, and it incorporated an automotive-type chassis with hub-center steering. Other bikes had already used the configuration in such machines as the Ner-A-Car and the Zenith Auto-Bi, but the Majestic made it lovely to behold.

Another bike, the Vyrus 984 C3 2V Razzetto, was one such motorcycle that used hub-center geometry.

Vyrus is a small Italian motorcycle manufacturer based in Coriano, Italy, and their bikes such as the “Tesi” – Thesis in Italian – had their designs originate from a university engineering project linked to the motorcycle legend Massimo Tamburini. The Tesi, and the Vyrus 984, were instantly identifiable by their use of their hub-center steering front suspension and steering arrangement.

Those fabulously expensive bespoke motorcycles have been called “functional works of art,” and they look a bit like something you might see in a video game.

In hub-centered bikes, the front wheel is attached to a swingarm with a shock and an internal pivot point. Steering is achieved using those linkages to turn the wheel on a pivot point. Hub-center steering has been employed on motorcycles for more than a century, but the design, despite what some engineers say offers a distinct advantage, never took hold.

But the founder of Vyrus, Ascanio Rodorigo, once worked for Bimota as a race mechanic and engineer during the 1970s and his tenure there lasted until 1985. When Rodorigo finally left Bimota, he started his own company but partnered with Bimota on the hub-center-steered Tesi. He then went on to take the steering concept deeper and refined it for his own company’s motorcycles.

A Ducati dual spark bored out to 1,079cc and making 100hp L-twin provides the power for the 319 lbs (145 kg) Vyrus 984 bike, and it’s delivered to the road for via a six-speed transmission.

Now builders like Bryan Fuller of Fuller Moto, Revival Cycles, and others have built beautiful machines which harken back to the hub-centered glory days of the Majestic. Builders such as Stellan Egeland used a hopped-up 1200 boxer engine from a BMW HP2 Sport. He also added his own hub-center steering setup from ISR to a frame he made from a 2391 steel tube. The ISR kit is a thing to behold.

Revival’s ‘The Six,’ which features a ballsy Honda CBX motor, is another take on the hub-steer geometry. It was commissioned by museum owner and bike collector Bobby Haas for his Haas Moto Museum in Dallas and made by Revival’s Alan Stulberg and his crew.

Stulberg said the commission was aimed at paying homage to the Art Deco classic Majestic and added that he and the team became “obsessed with its design language and flow” since they first saw the bike at the Barber Museum.

Hub steering systems don’t dive as much under braking and hard cornering as do conventional telescopic fork setups. They push braking forces back into the chassis more efficiently rather than transferring immense bending forces to a pair of upright forks. The ride experience is exceptional as braking performance throughout corners is greatly enhanced.

It works like this: A wheel hub pitches back and forth on a central pivot and is supported by two large steering arms actuated by handlebars. The handlebars connect to the front steering and swingarm using complex linkages. A fixed arm connects a pull-and-push rod on either side of the hub-center to help steer the bike. The geometry also includes a second pair of static rods to ensure the axle stays level with the bike’s mass.

While hub steering has a number of clear advantages, its downfall is that it is considerably more expensive to manufacture and maintain and requires exceptionally experienced mechanics to tune and repair.

But it does look good, works more efficiently from an engineering standpoint, and directly addresses the most important factor in the motorcycling experience: braking.

The Majestic – Artistic Design from the 1920s
from https://www.odd-bike.com

While the engineering of the Majestic might have been relatively conventional, what was unprecedented was the styling, the hallmark of the Majestic to this day.

All the oily bits were fully enclosed under louvered panels, with partially enclosed fenders covering the wheels at both ends. The rider was completely isolated from the grime and muck of the running gear and powertrain, perched upon a sprung saddle and controlling the machine via levers and bars that poke through the all-encompassing body.

Presented in 1929, the prototype Majestic (which was reported as Roy’s personal machine) featured an air-cooled 1000cc longitudinal four-cylinder engine from a 1927-28 Cleveland 4-61. This would not remain for production, however.

While at least two Majestics were built with a 750cc JAP V-twin (arranged, like a much later Moto-Guzzi , with the Vee transverse and the heads poking through the bodywork) and records note that JAP singles, a Chaise Four, and at least one Gnome et Rhone flat twin were also employed, the majority of production machines coming out of Chartenay featured air-cooled Chaise engines.

These were overhead valve singles featuring unit two or three-speed gearboxes operated by hand-shift, available in 350cc and 500cc displacements. Distinctive for their single pushrod tube that resembles a bevel tower (but contains a pair of tightly-spaced parallel pushrods) and external bacon-slicer flywheel, these powerplants were a favourite of French manufacturers during the interwar period and were used by a variety of marques in lieu of producing their own engines.

The base price of the Majestic was 5200 Francs for a 350 with chain final drive; an extra 500 Francs netted you optional shaft drive.

An additional option that is rarely seen on surviving examples was a fine “craquelure” paint option that was applied by skilled artisans. It involves a process of deliberately screwing up the paint job in the most controlled and flawless way possible, applying a contrasting top coat over a base using incompatible paints that will cause the top coat to crack in a uniform fashion, something like a well-aged oil painting or antique piece of furniture.

The result is spectacular – and perhaps a bit tacky, giving the machine the appearance of a lizard skin handbag. (Maybe a later Rock Star would have loved to ride it as the “The Lizard King” ? )

The Majestic was impeccably stable at higher speeds compared to the other motorcycles of that era.

It was also agile and light footed in a way that similar machines, like the Ner-A-Car, were not.

The relatively low weight, around 350 pounds, carried with a very low centre of gravity made for tidy handling that was more than up to the meagre output offered by the powerplants.

Majestic was targeting a clientele that didn’t really exist: the gentlemanly rider who might desire a superior (read: expensive) machine as a stablemate to their elegant automobiles.

Georges Roy’s previous design produced under the name “New Motorcycle”

Georges Roy’s earlier 1927 brand called New Motorcycle was a far better barometer of things to come, predicting the style and design of machines that would emerge during the 1930s and beyond. The Majestic has far less impact and was more of a curiosity than predictor of trends to come.

Georges Roy’s brilliance as a designer is unquestionable, and deserves more praise than he ever earned during his lifetime.

Majestic is a little bit of elegance floating on the sea of staid machines that clutter up the history books.

Georges Roy was a French industrialist and engineer born in 1888 who achieved success in the textile business – specifically in knitting and sewing equipment. He was, however, an early adopter of motorcycling at the turn of the 20th Century – reportedly his first machine was a Werner, a Parisian machine that introduced the term “Motocyclette” in 1897.