Skip to main content
Tag

models Archives — Page 9 of 16 — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

Royal Enfield recalls 236,966 motorcycles on ignition coil defect

By General Posts

from https://www.financialexpress.com

Royal Enfield recalls Meteor 350, Classic & Bullet bikes sold.

The company states that the defect was discovered during routine internal testing and the issue has been clearly identified and isolated to specific batches of material.

Royal Enfield has announced a recall of three models in seven countries over a defect discovered in one of the parts. The defect is in the ignition coil that can cause misfiring, reduced vehicle performance, or rarely an electric short circuit. The three motorcycle models include the Meteor 350, Classic and Bullet. While the company is recalling Meteor 350 units built between December 2020 and April 2021, the Classic and Bullet units produced between January and April 2021 have been recalled.

In a press statement, Royal Enfield states that the defect was discovered during routine internal testing and the issue has been clearly identified and isolated to specific batches of material sourced from an external supplier.

The recall has been initiated as a precautionary measure, the statement continues adding that the issue is rare and does not impact all motorcycles manufactured during the mentioned period.

Is your motorcycle affected?
Close to 2,36,966 motorcycles of the Classic, Bullet and Meteor models will be recalled. As mentioned above, only those manufactured and sold between December 2020 and April 2021 for the Meteor, and between January and April 2021 for the Classic and Bullet.

The recall will be applicable to Meteor, Classic and Bullet motorcycles sold in India, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, Australia, New Zealand and Malaysia.

What to do?
The company states that only an estimated 10 percent of motorcycles will require replacement of the part. All recalled units will undergo inspection and if required, the defective part will be replaced.

Royal Enfield service teams, and/or local dealerships will reach out to consumers whose motorcycle Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) number falls within the manufacturing period mentioned. Consumers can also proactively reach out to their local Royal Enfield Workshops or call Royal Enfield to verify.

Yamaha YZF-R7 for 2022 Supersport

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 Breaks Cover as $9,000 Piece of New Japanese Supersport

For decades now, fans of Yamaha motorcycles treated themselves to a special range of bikes the Japanese company likes to call Supersport. The current lineup, comprising some five models, just got its sixth member this week.

YZF-R7 is how the new motorcycle is called, and it is supposed to slot right in between the entry-level YZF-R3 and the slightly meaner, mid-level YZF-R1. It has been created, says Yamaha, with new riders in mind but also for the more experienced ones looking for a more affordable two-wheeler with enough racing credentials.

Yamaha says the R7 was built from the ground up with a lightweight chassis and a steel frame. Compared to the other bikes in the family, it comes with improved rake, trail, and wheelbase dimensions (now 54.9 inches/139.4 cm), all tweaked to provide better handling during cornering.

Inside the frame sits a 689cc four-stroke, in-line two-cylinder engine running forged aluminum pistons and linked to a 6-speed transmission with multi-plate wet clutch. We have not been given the exact performance figures for the powerplant.

The frame and engine are supported by a 41-mm front fork with optimized spring rate. The fork is adjustable for preload, rebound, and compression. Stopping power is ensured by Brembo hardware.

The 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 also features a new full LCD instrument panel and larger display areas for the clock, gear, trip meter, and tachometer. There are new handlebar switches that allow the rider to control and select the features of the bike better.

Yamaha says the new R7 should be available in American showrooms in June in two colors, Team Yamaha Blue and Performance Black. The starting price has been set at $8,999, and the Japanese bike maker is already accepting reservations for the model. If you plan on getting yourself one, you can let Yamaha know here.

New top management at Norton Motorcycles announced

By General Posts

from https://www.financialexpress.com

TVS announces new top management at Norton Motorcycles: 2021 V4SS to launch soon.

With TVS infusing multi-million-pound investments, the Solihull facility will be the most advanced and modern plant that Norton has operated out of in its 122-year-old history.

TVS Motor Company (TVS), owner of The Norton Motorcycle Co Ltd (Norton), today announced that Dr Robert Hentschel has been appointed as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Vittorio Urciuoli as its Chief Technical Officer (CTO) of the historic Solihull-based motorcycle brand. Hentschel and Urciuoli will take up their new positions as John Russell steps down from his role as Interim CEO. Dr Robert Hentschel joins Norton from Valmet Automotive Holding GmbH & Co KG, where he has served as Managing Director since 2017.

Before that, he headed Ricardo Deutschland and Hentschel System and was also Director of Lotus Engineering. Vittorio Urciuoli’s former key roles within the global automotive industry include Director of URVI LTD, Head of Powertrain at Lotus Cars and Project Leader at Ferrari and Aprilia Racing.

TVS has created a plan for Norton to transform into the future. Along with the entire TVS team, I look forward to working together with them for the revitalisation of one of the world’s most storied brands. Under John’s tenure, with investment and support from TVS, Norton has returned to a firm footing and made marked improvements to engineering and product quality, which will be seen in the updated V4SS that will be launched soon. In addition, we have established a new, state-of-the-art global design, engineering, manufacturing and sales and marketing HQ in Solihull, Sudarshan Venu, Joint Managing Director of TVS Motors, said.

In January this year, Norton announced it would get back to work in full swing by March at its new facility at Solihull, Birmingham in the UK. The British manufacturer has moved its production base from its former headquarters at Donington Hall after its acquisition by TVS Motor Company in April last year.

With TVS infusing multi-million-pound investments, the Solihull facility will be the most advanced and modern plant that Norton has operated out of in its 122-year-old history. The production of the Commando Classic has also been resumed.

The V4SS will also be one of the first motorcycles to roll out as the company resumes operations. Limited to just 200 units, the V4SS boasts full carbon fibre bodywork contrasted by a bright finish on the frame and engine casing. It gets a single-sided swingarm and carbon fibre wheels. It is powered by a 1,200cc V4 engine that makes 200 bhp and 130 Nm of peak torque. Soon after the V4SS, the company is expected to unveil the updated V4RR as well.

Historic Off-Road Show at the Harley-Davidson Museum

By General Posts

by Skyler Chun from https://www.milwaukeemag.com

Preview: A Historic Show at the Harley-Davidson Museum. Learn all about the history of off-road motorcycling at the Harley-Davidson Museum.

A new exhibit – about the storied past of off-road motorcycles and the people who rode them – has rolled into the Harley-Davidson Museum.

“There’s a deep history here with this type of riding,” exhibits curator David Kreidler says, adding that the company has long made special motorcycles designed to be ridden across difficult terrain. After all, when the company was founded in 1903, roads weren’t widely paved, and riders needed to be able to maneuver their bikes across rutted earth, or dodge fallen logs and debris.

The “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” exhibit was created to coincide with the introduction of the Pan America adventure-touring motorcycle.

One of the highlights of the exhibit, “Off-Road Harley-Davidson,” is the LiveWire, the company’s first all-electric motorcycle. The bike was featured prominently in the Apple TV+ show “Long Way Up,” which followed Ewan McGregor and his friend motorbiking from South America to Los Angeles. Older bikes are also on display.

While the museum is open to the public, it’s planning virtual events as well. To replicate the experience of walking through the galleries, Kridler will lead tours of the exhibit space that viewers can access online if they’d rather not visit in person.

“Off-Road Harley-Davidson” looks back at Harley’s history of all-terrain motorcycles. Visit the Harley-Davidson webpage for more information.

“Off-Road Harley-Davidson” exhibit celebrates the company’s past
by Mark Gardiner from https://www.revzilla.com

To celebrate the launch of its Pan America adventure bike, The Motor Company recently mounted a lovely exhibit called “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” at its museum in Milwaukee. Unfortunately, just as the exhibit was due to open to the public, a surge in COVID cases forced Milwaukee County to close museums!

I recently got a private tour of the exhibit from curator Dave Kreidler. You too can join Dave for a virtual gallery chat on Thursday (cost $6 or free for museum pass holders). The museum expects to reopen to the public next month.

The Pan America has been engineered for everything from comfortable touring to exploring gravel or dirt backroads and taking sand, mud and the occasional river crossing in stride. That might seem like a radical change for Harley-Davidson, but only if you forget that the company’s been selling motorcycles for more than a century. For the first few decades of its existence, sand, mud, and water crossings weren’t off-road challenges — they were features of American roads.

Harley-Davidson is older than 99.9 percent of U.S. paved roads

The first modern asphalt roads were paved in the mid-1800s, before cars and motorcycles. Bicycles became popular in the 1880s and bicyclists were the first group to lobby governments for improved roads. Still, by 1900 less than five percent of America’s roads were paved. There was a bit of an asphalt boom during the First World War, but it was limited to roads connecting manufacturing centers to ports. The war in Europe convinced the U.S. Army that trucks — and roads that could support them — were a strategic asset.

After the war, the Army sent 79 vehicles, 260 enlisted men and 35 officers, including a young Lt. Col. named D. Eisenhower, on a cross-country convoy to demonstrate the practicality of trucks and the need for better highways. They traveled from Washington, D.C. to San Francisco on the Lincoln Highway. Eisenhower returned dismayed by the dismal state of the country’s roads and bridges. Dozens of flimsy wooden bridges were destroyed by the Army convoy!

Little was done to improve the situation until the Works Progress Administration improved and paved about half a million miles of roads as part of the New Deal. Many farm-to-market roads were paved; one New Deal slogan was “Get the farmers out of the mud!”

Ike never lost his interest in road construction and as president he signed the bill that created the Interstate Highway System.

That’s a roundabout way of pointing out that the first 100,000 or so Harley-Davidson motorcycles were used on a mix of surfaces that riders of today would say called for an ADV bike, if not a full-on dual-sport. Back then, though, there were just “motorcycles.”

Curator Dave Kreidler shows “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” exhibit

The exhibit’s not arranged chronologically. “We organized it in five sections, based on the type of riding that the company was selling to people,” Dave said as we stood in front of a 1964 BTH model.

Sold as the Scat, the BTH was a 175 cc two-stroke that’s recognizable as a dual-sport in spite of its rigid rear end and a plunger fork with only a couple of inches of travel. It was one of the last models in a line of lightweight motorcycles based on the German DKW RT 125. (DKW’s intellectual property was essentially seized as war reparations, and versions of the RT 125 were sold as BSA Bantams in Britain, Harley-Davidson Hummers in the United States and the MMZ M-1A Moskva in Russia.)

The Scat was a road-legal trail bike sold with a high pipe, high fenders, and fairly knobby trials-pattern tires. An extra-low final-drive ratio was available as an option. It was one of many Harley-Davidsons that, over the years, were marketed as perfect vehicles for hunters and anglers.

Next up were a couple of displays devoted to touring in the 1910s and ’20s, which would be considered pretty intense adventure-touring by today’s standards.

In 1914, the Model 10-F was Harley-Davidson’s flagship. It had a two-speed gearbox and a “step starter” that allowed it to be started without putting it up on its rear stand. That was a real advantage if you were in terrain where there was no firm, level spot for the stand.

While researching this exhibit, Dave found a 1914 article in H-D’s dealer magazine describing a young naturalist named Hamilton Laing, who dropped by the Juneau Avenue factory on a ride from New York City to western Canada.

“I got kind of interested and poked around a little bit more on the internet for him,” Dave told me. “Lo and behold, he became a fairly well known naturalist, worked for the British Columbia Museum, and they had all of his papers.”

Laing’s papers included a memoir of another epic ride, from Brooklyn to Oakland in 1915. Laing “talks about the motorcycle in very poetic terms,” Dave said. “There’s this great passage where a speeding car passes him in Pennsylvania, and he goes on for a few paragraphs about how the motorcycle is a superior form of transportation, if you just want to stop and smell the roses. You know, not much has changed actually in that regard.”

The British Columbia Museum noted that although Laing kept his motorcycle for several more years, he did most of his work travel in Canada by canoe. An intrepid fellow!

Another period touring display is a 1921 WJ Sport, one of Harley-Davidson’s rare boxer twin offerings. “The popularity of this machine for cross country touring is due in part to its ability to travel even a burro trail,” bragged an advertising copywriter of the time.

“We wouldn’t call this a lightweight today,” Dave said. “But it was lighter than our Big Twin. The engine was easier to work on and it got good fuel mileage.” In 1921, those were important considerations. Touring riders had to perform most of their own maintenance and repairs; gasoline was expensive and often was only available from mechanics or automobile and motorcycle dealers.

Although you can see that the WJ doesn’t have much ground clearance, it does have a forgivingly low center of gravity, which was surely a boon when picking one’s way through difficult terrain at slow speed.

The next display we looked at was devoted to purpose-built race bikes. Enthusiasts had raced H-D’s heavy big twins in tough off-road events like Michigan’s Jack Pine Enduro forever but by the mid 1950s lighter, purpose-built off-road motorcycles dominated in the dirt.

The 1958 XLCH Sportster was a true production racer, sold without lights. “In some ways you could say that this was our first real off-road motorcycle,” David noted. (The first road-going Sporty — equipped with a headlight — came the following year.)

Both the Sportster and an elegant 1972 ERS Sprint scrambler evoke an era of spare and elegant production racers like the company’s KR and XR flat track bikes. The Sprint was one of the models that emerged from H-D’s acquisition of the Aermacchi company, which happened in two stages. It purchased a half interest in the Italian firm in 1960, then AMF-Harley-Davidson purchased full control in 1974.

One thing that’s conspicuously missing from the exhibit is an Aermacchi two-stroke motocross bike. Harley-Davidson fielded a factory team in the AMA 250 cc Championship on and off between 1975 and 1979. The ’75 MX-250 was produced for one year only. It used an adapted Kayaba fork instead of rear shocks. Although it was not really a competitive motocrosser, Bruce Ogilvie won the 1975 Baja 500 on it.

In 1978, they produced another limited run of MX-250s but the chassis was instantly obsolete compared to the monoshock Yamaha YZ250. The Aermacchi motor made good power but it was peaky as hell. Harley-Davidson sold Aermacchi to the Castiglioni brothers later that year and abandoned its AMA motocross effort altogether in 1979. In spite of its checkered history, the MX-250 is a bit of a cult bike with the vintage MX crowd.

Just because you can do it doesn’t mean you should

The most compelling display may be a much abused 1985 FXRP police model. It’s hard to imagine anything further from a factory off-roader. But Charlie Peet, a Harley-Davidson enthusiast from Florida, chose that bike for his mount in the 9,000-mile Trans-Amazon Rally held in 1988.

Peet’s police bike was modified at a Ft. Lauderdale Harley dealership. They fit a larger fuel tank from a BMW, saddlebags, a skidplate, handguards, extra lights, and louder horns! It was shipped to the starting point in Cartagena, Colombia. It baffled the 170-odd other competitors. Most were two-person teams in cars or trucks; the six other motorcycles entered were all purpose-built dirt bikes.

“They voted Charlie least likely to finish because not only was he on this thing, but he didn’t have a support team,” Dave told me. “It was really dangerous. Normally with rallies, you have sweep teams; there were none. Every country handled its own leg of the rally. The maps were a mess. At one point, Charlie was riding and looking at his map, and what he thought was a road was actually the border between two provinces.”

In spite of that, he was one of four motorcyclists to reach the finish in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Harley-Davidson engineers convinced the company to acquire Peet’s FXRP so they could study it. Evidently they couldn’t believe it had finished the race either.

The FXRs were the first new models released after the management bought Harley-Davidson back from AMF. The chassis was developed with input from a young pup named Erik Buell, and there are people who claim these are the best hogs ever farrowed. Be that as it may, this 1,137 cc beast, which weighed 683 pounds, was a crazy choice for the Trans-Amazon Rally.

Into the modern era

The exhibit also includes a 2006 Buell Ulysses and Ewan McGregor’s LiveWire from the recent Long Way Up TV series.

The Ulysses, recently profiled on Common Tread, is another short-lived model that became a cult fave once it was discontinued. In this case, the whole Buell brand was killed off. It’s often seemed to me that Harley-Davidson employees dare not speak the Buell name, but perhaps the Ulysses reputation will be rehabilitated to help establish the Pan America’s bona fides.

McGregor’s LiveWire might be cool to see but next to Charlie Peet’s FXRP, McGregor and Boorman’s ride was little more than a jaunt.

All of this leads to, of course, the Pan America. Even the museum doesn’t have one of its own yet. The bike on display at the moment is a late prototype or early production model that belongs to the Parts & Accessories side of the business. They used it to test the fit of components and as a photo model.

With the exception of the Ulysses, the motorcycles on display in “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” are too old to be thought of as Pan America progenitors, so it’s up to you to decide whether the exhibit serves to bolster faith in Harley-Davidson’s ADV chops. That said, I admire The Motor Company’s sense of its own history, which obviously includes a lot of very adventurous riding that is nicely shown off in this exhibit. As I’ve come to expect from the Museum, the lighting and displays are beyond reproach.

David Kreidler scoured his employer’s extensive archives for photos, copies of old ads, and other ephemera which round out the stories of the motorcycles on display. As noted, a few models were conspicuous by their absence but it’s better to leave visitors wanting more than footsore and overwhelmed.

In addition to this week’s virtual debut of the exhibit, the museum is planning to reopen to the public on March 5 with hours of 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

Norton Motorcycles Head Of Design Takes Aim At Ducati

By General Posts

by Bryan Campbell from https://www.forbes.com

Norton Motorcycles Head of Design Simon Skinner thinks the British brand has what it takes to go head-to-head with Ducati.

Admittedly, Norton taking aim at Ducati is a very, very bold aspiration. Considering the Norton name is just as synonymous with bankruptcy and financial turbulence as it is with beautiful motorcycles, you’d be forgiven for taking the current brand revival with a handful of salt. I spoke with a refreshingly candid Norton Motorcycles Head of Design Simon Skinner via video call, who said this time will be different. While there is an incredible amount of bias in that claim, this time around there’s evidence elsewhere to back it up.

Back in January 2020, Norton entered the UK equivalent of Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The following April, the British brand was purchased by the third-largest Indian motorcycle manufacturer, TVS Motors. Now Norton has a new temporary factory in Birmingham, UK, is on a hiring spree and as Skinner puts it, ”the shackles have come off, in terms of design and innovation.” If this sounds at all familiar, there are similar plotlines going on at Jaguar Land Rover with Tata and Volvo and Lotus via Geely. Success isn’t guaranteed, but having a potent resource like TVS certainly helps.

Speaking with Skinner, I wanted to hear just how Norton plans to not just take on Ducati and become its British equal.

Bryan Campbell: Is Norton looking to follow Ducati’s lead on creating an accessible entry point with a Scrambler-esque model paired with top-tier sportbikes?

Simon Skinner: Absolutely. We’ve already designed the 650cc parallel-twin range of motorcycles — the Atlas Nomad and the Ranger — and they are comparable to the Ducati Scrambler. Ours is probably a bit more modern, a bit more capable in terms of the geometry and weight of the bike. We have a slightly smaller engine with the 650cc compared to the 800cc of the Ducati, but it’s got the same power.

The bikes in the “lifestyle” class tend to be more lifestyle-ly than capable. Where the Ducatis are a little bit of both, with the Desert Sled leaning to the more capable end of the spectrum. The Norton Ranger is very similar to the Desert Sled in that way.

Campbell: Traditionally, Norton has been a small volume manufacturer. Is the focus of the new facility meant to buck that trend?

Skinner: Yes. I’m not allowed to get into the numbers, but TVS has already invested large sums in the business and the new facility in Birmingham, in the UK, is a temporary facility. It’s 75,000 square feet, but it’s still only temporary for 3-5 years while we find a more permanent home in the local area. TVS very much have volume aspirations not far off from the production numbers of Ducati. However, the current temporary facility can handle up to 7,000 bikes per year.

Campbell: In the past year, especially in the United States, ADV motorcycles and dual sports have taken off and part of that is due to what those bikes can offer at their price points. The bang-for-buck value is undeniable. If Norton is looking to capitalize on that rising tide, where will the brand’s bar for entry be?

Skinner: An Atlas Nomad is just under £10,000 and that’s our entry-level model. If we come down from that, only time will tell, but it’s usually depending on the volume we can achieve. Our volume will never be at the level of say, Honda, but to get the combination of luxury and volume we’re chasing, it’ll be somewhere near Ducati pricing. And I can’t see us dropping below that, at least not while we’re building the brand back up.

Campbell: Stepping away from the cold hard numbers for a bit. In terms of design, where is Norton pulling inspiration from?

Skinner: Norton, traditionally, is an innovative, cutting edge, modern company. Some people think Norton a classic company, but it’s not at all. The Norton Commando, when it was launched in 1968, was the fastest superbike in the world and the Manx chassis bikes dominated race tracks year after year. That’s all down to the technology and innovation that was used. That’s where Norton needs to be again.

So, from a design perspective, I’ve employed a diverse group of designers and created an environment where they can thrive. We take our inspiration from all over but we do look at the past — the design cues, the styling cues, the ethos behind the brand — where Norton’s tend to be low, sleek, have a strong character line down the bike and are really evocative.

But on the other hand, we need to be a modern company similar to the way Ducati is a modern company. They’ve accomplished so much in history, but that doesn’t mean they make every bike look like a 916. We need to go beyond that. To go back to the glory days of Norton, we need to be innovative and right at the bleeding edge of technology and design.

It’s also natural to look to the automotive industry because it’s so advanced and there are so many resources being put into it, in terms of technology and design. The big difference is a motorcycle is more of an integrated design and engineering project. A car is clad in metal and plastic and all the engineering happens underneath. Whereas on a motorcycle, it’s all on display, so there a very few components that aren’t both functional and aesthetic.

My goal is to create an environment and process within Norton that combines engineering and design. Now we have the resource in TVS and we can take that design and engineering ethos and give it some power. The shackles have come off.

Campbell: The comparisons and competition to Triumph will be inescapable. In terms of product focus, will Norton focus on vintage-styled bikes as well as modern sportbikes, similar to Triumph’s current strategy?

Skinner: For us, it will be the other way around. We are going to do modern bikes. That’s a given. The question is, are we going to classic bikes? If we remain completely true to the Norton ethos of innovation and modernity, then we don’t do classic bikes. But let’s be honest, there’s such a huge market for motorbikes like the Triumph Bonneville and it would be crazy to ignore it.

With that said, if we most certainly will be in the modern design space. If we do a sports tourer, an ADV, or a sportbike, they will all be modern bikes.

Campbell: Drawing comparisons from the automotive industry, it sounds like Norton is in the same position Volvo and Lotus were when Geely came in and provided funding and resources. Is that a fair assessment?

Skinner: It is. Obviously, we’ve got a new owner and new shareholders to answer to and everything we need to do needs to be commercially viable. But, at the same time, TVS recognizes we have some real talent within the Norton team who have never had the opportunity to be let loose. Also similar to when Tata took on Jaguar Land Rover, it allows us the freedom to operate and gives us knowledge and personnel, so the resources go beyond just putting money in the bank.

Campbell: You could argue financial distress is almost as synonymous with the Norton name as is beautiful, fast motorcycles. Having TVS as a resource is one way to help mitigate history repeating itself, but how does Norton plan to shake that reputation?

Skinner: It’s true Norton has been through the mill, so to speak and interestingly, as a brand, it has always come out the other side with a good reputation. Regardless of who’s owned Norton, they’ve always understood what the brand means and I think that’s the strength of the brand.

Norton has been up and down financially over the years and this is the most recent chapter. TVS see themselves as the guardian and custodian of the brand, not the owners and that’s a welcomed relief. They could have taken a meaningless 200cc motorcycle, slapped a Norton badge on it, and charged a few more dollars. What they actually want to do is give Norton structure and stability and have the mindset that they need to look after it for future generations.

The quality will filter down into the product because TVS won’t compromise their beliefs for Norton. They want to build a motorcycle that leads the world in innovation, technology, design and quality. It won’t happen overnight, but that’s the vision. It’s a challenge, for sure, but TVS have that desire and drive.

Campbell: What’s the production timeline look like with those goals in mind?

Skinner: We have about 18 months before the new product starts to filter through. But we need a bit of time to fully adopt the new engineering quality, procedures and processes. When we launch in May and start production, those bikes will be the highest quality Nortons ever built in over a decade, if not ever. We’re taking it step by step and it’s going to take a period of time to have the processes in place, the structure and get the right people on the team.

When we went into administration, we had 55 employees. We now have 125 and we’re still hiring and that’s without selling any motorcycles yet. That’s a statement of TVS’s intent and investment: they want to put the people in place to make this the best brand in the world and make the best motorcycles in the world.

Husqvarna motorcycles partnership with clothing brand Replay

By General Posts

from https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com

Husqvarna rides in ‘Replay’ edition of Vitpilen 701, 701 Supermoto and 701 Enduro LR. The bikes are in partnership with clothing brand Replay

Swedish automaker Husqvarna has introduced a range special edition variants of Vitpilen 701, 701 Supermoto and 701 Enduro LR in partnership with Italian clothing brand Replay.

The Vitpilen 701 is a cruiser with a large single – cylinder engine mated to a lightweight chasis. The 701 Supermoto takes things off road with a 74hp single-cylinder engine bound to a 148kg chasis. The 701 Enduro LR is for those who wish to go a bit further off the tarmac. The LR which stands for Long range is due to its massive fuel tank, nearly twice the capacity of the standard 701 Enduro.

More details about the bikes are yet to be made public. The manufacturer has also promised that more models are on the way under the partnership with Replay that began in 2020.

It marked the beginning of a new chapter for both Husqvarna Motorcycles and REPLAY, as Husqvarna Motorcycles re-entered the Moto3 World Championship, while REPLAY took a strategic step into the motorcycle sector, the statement read.

Creating a 1916 Harley-Davidson from only an original engine

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Recreating a historic Harley-Davidson racing model without the original parts except the original engine.

Believe it or not, it’s been 118 years since the foundations of the company we now know as Harley-Davidson were laid. Somehow, the company managed to get through two hot world wars, a cold, long one, and more near-death experiences that we care count.

Such a long history means there are more models in the company’s past than in its present (and some, might argue, more than in the future). Some are so old it’s literally impossible to come across one, and people have to turn to all sorts of gimmicks to get their hands on a historic model.

Like the guys behind this build did. Trying to bring back one of Harley’s historic racing models, a Swedish museum by the name of MC Collection got their hands on an original motorcycle engine from 1916 and built a bike around it, trying to capture the essence of what was once the Model 11K racer.

The engine belonged to a Model F, and was slapped inside a full loop frame constructed (together with the forks) by former German road racing cyclist Christian Henn. The frame presents itself just like it did on the original Harley of more than a century ago, in the so-called keystone configuration, with stressed members and steel engine plates.

This way of building racers gave them better handling but, perhaps equally as important, allowed for the cylinder to be removed with the powerplant still fitted on the bike, allowing for quick intervention during races, if they were required.

This 1916 Harley was put together in Sweden more than a decade ago, and in the meantime it made it to the U.S. It was listed as for sale during the Mecum motorcycle auction this weekend, and it got sold for $57,750. As a side note though, whoever bought it will only be using it as a museum piece, because it is not street legal.

BMW celebrates 40 years of GS with Special Editions

By General Posts

by Inigo Roces from https://mb.com.ph

Easily one of BMW Motorrad’s most popular line of motorcycles is the GS. Standing for Gelände/Straße (on and off-road), the very first model debuted in 1980 in the form of the R80 G/S. The R80 featured innovative technology like the use of the shaft drive, and was later entered into the Paris-Dakar Rally.

Since then, the GS has continued to evolve with its engine displacement growing and the lineup expanding to become the family that we know it as today. To date, BMW Motorrad has been able to hand over more than 1.2 million BMW GS models to customers, worldwide.

In celebration of its 40 years of success, BMW is offering special 40 Years of GS limited edition models, each with a unique livery, across its lineup.

In a virtual launch, BMW unveiled the six motorcycle models that will be sporting this unique livery and features: the BMW G 310 GS, F 750 GS, F 850 GS, RnineT Urban GS, R 1250 GS, and the R 1250 GS Adventure. These special editions will only be available in 2021 in limited numbers while supplies last.

Each 40 Years GS limited edition motorcycle comes with a unique design that pays homage tothe pioneer of the enduro motorcycle segment, the BMW R 100 GS in ‘bumblebee’ livery.

G310 GS
The special edition lineup begins with the G 310 GS (P320,000.00). This most accessible member of the GS family, it comes with ride-by-wire technology, an LED headlight and indicators, adjustable brake and clutch levers, ABS, a stainless steel exhaust, and a luggage rack fitted as standard.

F 750 GS
Next up is the first of the parallel twins, the F 750 GS (P855,000.00). This middleweight adventure bike is fitted with an LED headlight with daytime running lamps and LED indicators, keyless ride system, a 6.5 inch full-color TFT display. It also comes with the enviable electronic riding aids like Riding Modes Pro (Dynamic and Enduro), Gear Shift Assistant Pro, ABS Pro, Dynamic Traction Control with MSR, Tire pressure control and a 12V and USB power socket.

F 850 GS
Higher up on the lineup is the F 850 GS (P975,000.00). Similar to the F750, it has an LED headlight with daytime running lamps and LED indicators, keyless ride system, a 6.5 inch full-color TFT display. It also comes with the enviable electronic riding aids like Riding Modes Pro (Dynamic and Enduro), Gear Shift Assistant Pro, ABS Pro, Dynamic Traction Control with MSR, Tire pressure control and a 12V and USB power socket. The F 850 also gets the enviable gold wheels.

RnineT Urban GS
Easily the hot rod of the family is the RnineT Urban GS (P1,275,000.00). This model will appeal to those that enjoy customizing with its Option 719 cylinder head covers, gold wheels, LED headlight with daytime running light, and speed indicator with on-board computer.

Among its electronic features are ABS, Riding Modes Pro (including Riding Mode Dirt), Cruise Control, an ASC. It doesn’t have to be confined to the city with features like off-road tires and heated grips.

R 1250 GS
Naturally, the flagship R 1250 GS and GS Adventure also get the 40 Years of GS treatment.

These include black and yellow Option 719 cylinder head covers, short sport windscreen in yellow, gold handlebars, gold wheels, full LED headlight with adaptive cornering function and cruising light, keyless ride, and heated grips.

Among its electronic features are Riding Modes Pro (with Dynamic, Dynamic Pro, Enduro, and Enduro Pro modes), customizable modes, Dynamic ESa with automatic load leveling and damping, Gear Shift Assistant Pro, Hill Start Control Pro, and Dynamic Stability Control with Dynamic Brace Control.

They’re now available at all BMW Motorrad dealers.

Harley-Davidson’s renewed focus on touring bikes drives upbeat forecast

By General Posts

by Reuters from https://www.investing.com

U.S. motorcycle maker Harley-Davidson (NYSE:HOG) on Monday reported a better-than-expected quarterly profit and raised its full-year forecast for sales growth, as its focus on bigger and profitable touring bikes boost demand, sending its shares up more than 8%.

Since the middle of last year, the Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based company, which has struggled to grow sales for the past several years, shifted its focus to big bikes, traditional markets such as the United States and Europe, and older and wealthier customers.

In February, the motorcycle maker unveiled a new turnaround plan that targets low double-digit earnings growth through 2025.

The company said its retail sales, a measure of demand at its dealerships, surged 30% to 32,800 motorcycles in North America in its first quarter.

Retail sales in Europe, Harley’s second biggest market outside the United States, slumped 36% to 4,900 motorcycles, due to the company’s decision to stop selling its smaller and less profitable Street or Sportster motorcycles and shipping delays as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The company said lower sales incentives and a cut in its selling, general and administrative expense lifted its motorcycle business operating margin by over 10 points to 18.5%.

It now expects motorcycles business revenue to grow in the range of 30% to 35% in 2021, up from its prior estimate of between 20% and 25%.

Harley’s net income jumped over threefold to $259 million in the quarter ended March 28, from $70 million a year earlier. On an adjusted basis, the company earned $1.68 per share, beating analysts’ average estimate of 88 cents per share, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.

The company’s revenue rose to $1.42 billion from about $1.30 billion.

New Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition

By General Posts

Released today, the new 2022 Triumph Motorcycles Scrambler 1200 is now more refined than ever. The Scrambler 1200 XC is built for sublime all-road fun and the range-topping Scrambler 1200 XE sets the benchmark for specification and off-road capability. Additionally, the Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition is limited to just 1,000 units and brings unique style and specifications to the ultimate Scrambler.

With all the Triumph Motorcycles Scrambler 1200 XC and XE’s category-dominating specification and style, incredible torque delivery and signature soundtrack, the new 2022 update delivers lower emissions whilst retaining all the thrilling performance, high power and torque that they are renowned for. Alongside the 2022 generation Scramblers comes a new beautiful and unique limited edition that celebrates the most famous movie star, stunt and motorcycle in history, with the Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition.

Thrilling Performance 

  • New engine update with lower emissions
  • New exhaust system update with improved heat distribution
  • High power 1200cc Bonneville twin engine with dedicated Scrambler tune
  • 81 LB-FT at a low 4,500rpm and 89HP at 7,250rpm

Dual-purpose Classic and Adventure cross-over

  • Commanding riding position with wide adjustable handlebars
  • Superior rider comfort
  • 21” front wheel, properly capable of going scrambling

Category-leading specification and state-of-the-art technology

  • Öhlins long travel fully adjustable RSUs and long travel Showa forks
  • Twin Brembo M50 radial monobloc callipers
  • Long-travel aluminum swingarm
  • Full-color TFT instruments with illuminated switches
  • Up to 6 riding modes, including Off-Road Pro (XE)
  • Optimized cornering ABS and optimized cornering traction control (XE)
  • All-LED lighting
  • Keyless ignition, single button cruise control and USB charging socket

21st century Scrambler-defining style and premium details

  • Iconic silhouette with sculpted bench seat and signature high level twin exhaust
  • Beautifully engineered side-laced tubeless wheels
  • Seamless fuel tank with brushed aluminum Monza cap
  • 70+ accessories, including new Dakar inspired fly screen

NEW Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition

  • Individually numbered limited edition with only 1,000 available worldwide
  • Unique Steve McQueen branding on the tank and handlebar clamp
  • Exclusive Competition Green custom paint scheme
  • New high specification with premium Scrambler accessories fitted as standard
  • Certificate of authenticity features the signatures of Triumph’s CEO,
    Nick Bloor and Chad McQueen, son of the legend himself, Steve McQueen.

First launched in 2018, the Triumph Scrambler 1200 has rapidly become a modern Triumph icon, setting a new benchmark in its category thanks to its class-leading riding capabilities both on-road and off-road, its state-of-the-art technology, outstanding specifications and extensive customization options.

Born from an unparalleled Triumph Scrambler bloodline, including the world’s first production scramblers, raced for fun and glory by legendary racers such as Bud Ekins and Steve McQueen, the new generation has featured in multiple extreme off-road competitions, including the Mexican 1000 and the Spanish Bassella race, repeatedly demonstrating their class leading capability.

A major highlight in the success of the new generation came with it featured in the 25th James Bond movie, No Time To Die, where it received high praise from Lee Morrison, James Bond Stunt Coordinator, who said “the whole stunt team realized very quickly that these were amazing bikes”.

ALL OF THE SCRAMBLER 1200’S CLASS LEADING CAPABILITY.

The 2022 Scrambler 1200 XE and XC represent the latest generation of one of the most capable and unique motorcycles on the market, and one of Triumph’s highest specification models ever. A genuine, class-defining cross over of two motorcycle worlds, with the iconic style and character of a Triumph Modern Classic, combined with the capability and specification of a full-on adventure motorcycle.

ENHANCED FOR 2021

Updated for 2022 along with all of Triumph’s iconic modern classic line-up, the new Scrambler 1200 XC and XE features an engine evolution that maintains all the Scrambler’s renowned power and torque delivery and delivers lower emissions. Additionally, the new generation update brings a revised exhaust system that delivers improved heat distribution.

FULL SPECIFICATIONS

Thrilling Performance
The Scrambler 1200 is powered by the latest evolution of Triumph’s characterful 1200cc high-power British twin. With a low inertia crank and a high compression cylinder head, plus a dedicated Scrambler tune, specifically developed to give the perfect balance of power and torque delivery for both road and off-road riding, the result is incredible torque from low down right through the rev range.

Peak torque hits 81 LB-FT at just 4,500rpm, while peak power of 89HP arrives at 7,250 rpm. The distinctive Scrambler sound, produced by the 1200cc 8-valve parallel twin engine, is delivered by the twin high level exhaust system with improved heat distribution.

Category-Dominating Specification and Capability

The 2022 Scrambler 1200 offers a category-dominating level of specification and equipment that gives these motorcycles such unique cross-over Classic and Adventure capability.

The class-leading long travel suspension delivers incredible off-road capability and ground clearance, with 250mm wheel travel front and rear, designed for riding across the toughest of terrains, as well as a supremely comfortable road riding experience. Both the Öhlins twin spring rear shocks and high specification upside down Showa front forks are fully adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping, providing excellent comfort and control across a wide range of surfaces: from city streets right through to rocky off-road tracks.

Superior stopping-power is guaranteed by the category-leading Brembo M50 radial monobloc calipers, with twin 320mm floating discs on the front, and the Brembo caliper with single disc, on the back.  Such outstanding braking power is managed by the ABS that comes as standard on both models.

Enhancing the multi-purpose character of the Scrambler 1200, high specification wire spoked wheels with aluminum rims and a side-laced design, come as standard, allowing the use of tubeless tires. Dual purpose adventure-focused Metzeler Tourance tires are the standard fit, while for more extreme off-road use, Pirelli Scorpion Rally are recommended as an approved alternative option.

The 21” front wheel contributes to the Scrambler 1200’s incredible off-road capability and commanding riding position, and gives great visibility ahead, both when commuting and off road. This, combined with the wide adjustable handlebar position and the adjustable folding foot controls on the XE model, give the Scrambler 1200 its commanding poise and stance.

Class-Leading Technology

Packed with the state-of-the art technology and rider aids, the new Scrambler 1200 XC and XE really set the benchmark. Both models feature the full-color TFT instruments offering two different design themes, each with three display layout options, allowing the rider to alter the amount of information shown, according to their preferences. The TFT start-up sequence can also be personalized with the rider’s name. The multi-functional TFT display is controlled via the intuitive and easily accessible handlebar mounted 5-way joystick and other switches, all of which are backlit for easy navigation in the dark. High and low contrast displays ensure the TFTs are readable in all lighting conditions, while the adjustable screen angle suits every rider’s height thanks to the possibility of adjusting it.

The new Scrambler 1200 is also pre-enabled for the accessory-fit My Triumph connectivity system. This allows the rider to access phone calls, operate music, use turn-by-turn navigation and manage a Go-Pro through an intuitive handlebar control and TFT interface.

Triumph’s latest generation ride-by-wire ensures responsive and precise throttle control at all times, and enables the 6 riding modes – Road, Rain, Sport, Off-Road, Off-Road Pro (available on the XE only) and Rider-Configurable. The riding modes, which can be selected while on the move (with the exception of the Off-Road and Off-Road Pro modes) adjust throttle response, traction control and ABS settings for enhanced safety and optimum performance in all riding conditions.

The Scrambler 1200 XE also features optimized-cornering ABS and optimized-cornering traction control, both of which automatically adapt the level of intervention to maintain the optimum ride, at any lean angle. These features are managed by the Inertial Measurement Unit which measures the roll, pitch, yaw and acceleration rates of the bike in order to calculate the lean angle and optimize braking and traction control, accordingly, ensuring greater rider stability.

Benefitting from lower energy consumption, increased durability and greater visibility, the Scrambler 1200 mounts LED lights front and rear, and LED indicators (market specific). The headlight incorporates LED daytime running lights, which deliver better visibility and a distinctive front-end style (market specific).

Additional high specification rider-focused technology, standard on both of the 2022 Scrambler 1200 models, includes torque-assist clutch, cruise control, keyless ignition, under-seat USB charging socket and the internal wiring ready to plug in the accessory fit heated grips, which have 3 modes and are accessed through a really intuitive button built into the left grip.

Modern Custom Style with Category-Leading Finish and Detailing

Combining Triumph’s original Scrambler DNA, with beautifully crafted modern custom style, these bikes deliver all the hallmarks of a genuine scrambler. From the iconic silhouette with its high-level twin exhaust, to the commanding height and poise, the new 2022 Scrambler 1200 XC and XE have true scrambler-defining style.

Just like every Bonneville, the engine presents the distinctive machined engine fins and black engine covers with its classic maker’s-mark triangular Triumph engine badge. These models also have a category-leading standard of finish and detailing, with authentic features such as the seamless sculpted 4.2-gallon fuel tank, with brushed aluminum Monza fuel cap and brushed stainless strap. The custom-looking bench seat with stitched ribbing and Triumph branding completes the striking silhouette while delivering the optimal riding position and comfort when tackling any type of ride.

To complete the unmistakable scrambler style, the Scrambler 1200 features minimal aluminum mudguards, sculpted side panel with brushed aluminum Scrambler 1200 badge, aluminum bash plate and wide-set handlebars. And, the Scrambler 1200 XE gets even more, with hand guards, Brembo MCS lever, gold forks and the crafted aluminum long travel swingarm, which is longer on the XE, with a high specification shot blasted and anodized finish.

The new 2022 Scrambler 1200 XC and XE are available in three colors: Cobalt Blue with a Jet Black stripe, Matte Khaki Green with a Jet Black stripe or the single tone Sapphire Black option.

70+ Genuine Triumph Accessories

The Scrambler 1200 XC and XE have a range of over 70 Genuine Triumph Accessories. These have all been designed and tested alongside the bike to the same exacting standards and allow the rider to personalize their bike with enhanced style and practicality, increased comfort, luggage, protection, and security.

The comprehensive list of accessories ranges from a new Dakar-inspired fly screen to the durable and practical rugged pannier and tank bag, all adding greater touring capability. There is also a high-level front mudguard, handlebar brace and headlight grille, plus practical options including a center stand, fog lights and heated grips.

NEW SCRAMBLER 1200 STEVE MCQUEEN EDITION

Celebrating the most famous movie star, stunt and motorcycle in history, the new Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition brings all the new-generation 2022 Scrambler 1200 XE’s category-dominating specification, go-anywhere adventure-bike capability and state-of-the-art technology, and adds its own premium Steve McQueen paint scheme and extensive list of beautiful unique details. Fully equipped with a selection of premium Scrambler accessories, fitted as standard, the McQueen Edition is now officially the highest specification Scrambler 1200 ever.

Inspired by a genuine motorcycle legend

Inspired by the original competition-spec Triumph TR6, made famous by the legendary barbed wire jump in the iconic 1963 Second World War classic “The Great Escape”, the Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition has been developed in partnership with the McQueen family. Chosen to ride in the film by McQueen, over a period-correct German military motorcycle, the Triumph TR6 used in the jump was created by a British Triumph dealer and ISDT Gold Medal racer Ken Heanes, with an ISDT suspension set-up designed for robust stunt work.

Unique limited edition 

With just 1,000 Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition models available worldwide, each bike is individually numbered on the beautiful billet-machined handlebar clamp, which also features a laser etched Steve McQueen signature. For even greater exclusivity, each bike comes with a unique certificate of authenticity stating the bike’s VIN number, and carrying the signatures of Triumph’s CEO, Nick Bloor, and also Chad McQueen, son of the legend himself, Steve McQueen.

Exclusive details and finish

The unique paint scheme features a Competition Green tank with brushed foil knee pads, exquisite hand-painted gold lining, gold heritage Triumph logos, dedicated Steve McQueen tank graphic, brushed aluminum Monza cap and brushed stainless steel tank strap. The distinctive Steve McQueen Edition will also feature the aluminum high level front mudguard as standard, which, along with the rear mudguard, will also be painted in Competition Green.

In addition to the standard 1200 XE’s class leading specification, the Steve McQueen Edition comes fitted with engine protection dresser bars, which add another layer of ruggedness. Fabricated from stainless steel tubing, these have an electro-polished finish and offer additional protection to the clutch and alternator covers.

A laser cut and pressed aluminum radiator guard, with laser etched Triumph branding, also comes as standard, giving additional protection from loose stones while optimizing air flow.

The Steve McQueen Edition also features a premium brown bench seat, with stitched ribbing and Triumph branding, which further enhances the overall classic style and elegance.

Aside from movie stardom, Steve McQueen was also renowned for his Triumph Scrambler desert racing, which makes the Scrambler 1200 XE the perfect base for the exclusive edition, thanks to its class-defining capability both on and off-road. The new McQueen Edition shares all of the acclaimed XE specification and performance, including the 2022 engine and exhaust system updates. Being a genuine cross-over motorcycle, it has all the capability of a full-on adventure bike with the iconic style inherited from its legendary Scrambler lineage.

The new Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition is also pre-enabled for the accessory My Triumph Connectivity System. This allows the rider to access phone calls, operate music, use turn-by-turn navigation and manage a Go-Pro through the intuitive handlebar controls and TFT interface.

Pricing and Availability

Scrambler 1200 XC                $14,000 USD / $15,200 CAD             Available June, 2021

Scrambler 1200 XE                $15,400 USD / $16,300 CAD             Available June, 2021

Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition          $16,400 USD / $17,800 CAD             Available June 2021