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Omaha Police refuse motorcade access to Patriot Guard Riders

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from https://www.ketv.com

Omaha police: Only law enforcement in Cpl. Page motorcade for safety reasons

Patriot Guard Riders say they’ll follow behind motorcade.

OMAHA, Neb. — Omaha police said it’s not safe to have hundreds of motorcycles on the route that will only be blocked off for the fallen Marine Cpl. Daegan Page and his family to pass. The Patriot Guard Riders said it’s their honor to pay tribute to Page and still plan to follow the motorcade.

“I’m a bit flabbergasted with the decision. It really took me by surprise,” said Scott Knudsen, Nebraska State Captain, Patriot Guard Riders.

Knudsen and other Patriot Guard Riders said they’ve never been denied a place in a military motorcade and asked Page’s father for permission to be part of Friday’s event.

“We never go anywhere unless we are invited. We always seek out permission to achieve permission from appropriate people,” Knudsen said.

But Omaha police asked all groups to stay out of the motorcade for safety reasons, disappointing Knudsen and hundreds of riders coming from Western Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa.

“It’s really a shame that it has come to this, but we are in different times today. I don’t know all the details I’m certainly not blaming the Omaha Police Department or the sheriff’s department or anybody else,” Knudsen said.

“We decided for safety sake and not tie up the intersection,” said Steve Lahrs, Director of American Legions Millard Post.

Millard American Legion Riders were planning to join the escort to honor the fallen Marine until police asked them to stay parked on the sidelines.

“They are short-staffed and short-manned and it would create too much of a havoc for the city of Omaha to have hundreds of bikers blocking intersections,” Lahrs said.

In a statement to KETV, Omaha police said once again the decision is about safety.

“The ultimate goal for tomorrow’s motorcade escort of Marine Corporal Daegan Page is to safely transport him and his family from Eppley Airfield to the mortuary in Millard. We understand there are many organizations who want to assist us in this endeavor. We appreciate that and thank you. However, this motorcade is not a procession or parade. The route will be open, meaning traffic will be temporarily stopped just ahead of the motorcade to allow it to pass smoothly and safely. Once the motorcade is passed, traffic will again flow as normal. Only trained law enforcement officers with vehicles equipped with lights and sirens will be assisting with the motorcade to ensure the safety of all involved along the nearly seventeen mile route. We encourage the public to support Cpl. Page and his family along the route of the motorcade.

“On Friday, September 17th, the date of the funeral, there will be a closed route from St. Paul Lutheran Church to the Omaha National Cemetery. A closed route will allow the opportunity for organizations to safely assist with the procession at that time.”

That message came from Lt. Neal Bonnacci.

“We are absolutely not going to violate any laws and absolutely not go against their wishes and need to respect that and I do respect that,” Knudsen said.

“We start losing the reasoning behind the whole motorcade and it’s to show respect for the family and show respect for Cpl. Page,” Lahrs said.

Bonnacci also gave some safety tips to citizens wanting to pay honor on the motorcade route.

Citizens are encouraged to show their support along the route of the motorcade, but are reminded to allow room for the vehicles, and be mindful of the following:

• Park in compliance with parking regulations

• Ask permission before parking in private business parking lots

• Do not block private driveways

• Be patient if in traffic, and expect delays along the route

• Do not illegally park along the route, block intersections or impede the motorcade. Citizens are encouraged to utilize interstate overpasses for viewing, rather than stopping alongside the interstate.

Thanks to All Service Personnel: 9/11

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Thanks to All Service Personnel

I would like to take a moment and thank all service guys and girls including Fire Fighters, Police, medical folks and our military crew. They do a magnificent job every day under extreme circumstances especially now and on the days surrounding 9/11.

They live to a higher code, so brothers and sisters all over the country can ride free and safe. If you see a cop, a nurse, a fire fighter or a bro or broette in uniform today, say Thanks.

Ride Free Forever,

–Bandit

Bikernet.com and 5-Ball Racing: https://www.bikernet.com/

Richard Schultz collection of Vintage Motorcycles on display

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Seen with a 1919 Excelsior motorcycle with sidecar, motorcycle collector Richard Schultz will have vintage motorcycles on display Aug. 3-29 at the Betty Strong Encounter Center.

by Earl Horlyk from https://siouxcityjournal.com

The Betty Strong Encounter Center will rev up its engines as collector Richard Schultz brings his “Marvelous Motorcycles” to the center’s atrium Aug. 3-29.

Among the vintage motorcycles will be a 1938 Indian 4-Cylinder and a 1941 Harley Davidson Military Prototype.

A longtime rider from Le Mars, Iowa, Schultz began restoring vintage antique motorcycles and cars beginning in the late 1960s.

Schultz has been active in the Antique Motorcycle Club of America for more than 48 years and was its former national director. In addition, he has published two books for enthusiasts, including one about Henderson Motorcycles, that featured a forward by Jay Leno.

Admission to the Betty Strong Encounter Center and the adjoining Sioux City Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center is free. For information on the center’s programs, call 712-224-5242.

Patriots Motorcycle Ride throughout USA

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by Stuart Price from https://www.fourstateshomepage.com

JOPLIN, MO – Today was an ideal day to spend on a motorcycle, and that’s what a large group of riders did.

A group, that made its only official stop in the state of Missouri, in Joplin.

Hideout Harley-Davidson in Joplin was the one and only stop in the Show-Me State for the Nation of Patriots motorcycle ride.

An event that takes a single American flag on tour throughout the U.S. which starts on Memorial Day and ends on Labor Day.

Roger Beckley, who spent nearly 30 years in the U.S. Army had the honor of bearing the flag through his native state of Kansas.

“I retired in 2009. I’ve been to Iraq, Afghanistan and Kuwait, in today’s world, I don’t know how much respect is still out there for this flag and so when we can put it on a bike and ride it down the road and people see it coming, it makes them think what it is and what’s it stand for,” Says Beckley.

Beckley took an oath to carry the flag to honor the nation’s veterans, the enlisted, and their families.

On Saturday many of these same riders will be joined by others from Arkansas for its next destination, which will be fort smith, before eventually making its way back to Nevada.

This is the 12th year for the event and each year it starts and ends in the same state, this year it ends in Las Vegas.

But veterans aren’t the only riders who take part in the event, so do people like Ryan Mitchell, the regional commander for the Nation of Patriots, who rides with the procession through three of the four states: Missouri, Oklahoma, and Kansas.

He says it’s his chance to serve those that did serve their country.

“Raising money and helping veterans, I’m not a veteran but I do everything I can to help veterans and so this just fills my heart to see all these bikes and all these people show up and raise money to help the veterans that need it, um they’ve already gave us our freedom, it’s time for us to give them their freedom back.” Says Mitchell.

Once the flag makes it back to its state of origin, it’s retired and donated to a worthy veteran or volunteer.

Harley-Davidson Museum News

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Reopening, new exhibits, installations, programs, events and more

As a part of the Harley-Davidson Museum’s phased reopening, the H-D Museum will soon expand its hours of operation. Beginning Thursday, May 6, the H-D Museum and The Shop will be open Thursday through Sunday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant will also have expanded operations on Thursdays, with its hours of operation 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Thursday through Sunday.

And with a new installation arriving May 14, it’s the perfect opportunity to take advantage of the expanded hours. “The Harley Fox” bike will be on view in the Custom Culture gallery. This display showcases the explosive growth of women’s riding in the 1980s and draws a direct line from those efforts to the riders of today.

But don’t fret. Even if a trip to the H-D Museum isn’t in your plans just yet, our Virtual Gallery Talks, taking place Thursday evenings, aren’t going anywhere. This month, topics will include Harley-Davidson’s humble beginnings, the role H-D has played in U.S. military efforts and more.

Click Here to read all the new happenings at Harley-Davidson Museum.

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Triumph Over Tragedy For Local Motorcycle Company

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by Kelly Wise Valdes from https://www.ospreyobserver.com

Jared Weems from Riverview is no stranger to adversity. But, as Albert Einstein said, “In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.” No one knows this better than Weems. The 42-year-old is from a fourth-generation vintage motorcycle enthusiast family. He explained that the passion for all things involving vintage British motorcycles runs in his blood.

Weems was born in Tampa, but ultimately he was raised for the majority of his life in South Tennessee. After high school, he returned to the Tampa area and eventually joined the Army in 2003. He proudly served his country in Special Ops and spent a majority of his military time parachuting from airplanes. It was during this time that he married his wife, Breanne, and they had two children—a son, Austin, 13, and a daughter, Adelaide, 11.

After the onset of some health issues, Weems was medically discharged from the Army in 2018 and moved to Riverview. Unfortunately, his health issues proved to be serious and he was diagnosed with a brain tumor that caused seizures. It was at this time that he hit a low point in his life. “I sold my motorcycles and was unsure where my life was headed,” said Weems.

A pivotal moment took place when a friend came to visit and brought a painting from a famous artist, David Mann. Mann’s work mostly featured Harley Davidson bikes and his paintings were published regularly in Easyriders magazine for more than 20 years. During his lifetime, Mann painted only two pictures of a Triumph bike, and Weems was holding one of those pictures.

“I wanted to build the Triumph bike that Mann had painted,” said Weems. “The painting was something of Mann’s creation—it wasn’t a bike that ever really existed.”

Weems was motivated by his new goal—a ground-up build of the 1952 Speed Twin Triumph from the Mann painting. Weems used this new purpose and his shop as a place of refuge and healing. His intention was to use his savings to build the bike, take it to bike shows, then sell it to recover his costs. The other good news is that Weems’ health had stabilized, and he has now been seizure-free for nearly three years.

Subsequently, his return to Riverview also gave Weems the opportunity to join the staff at The Chapel at FishHawk, currently serving as the director of ministry and leading community-based life skills classes.

It was through this outreach that he met with Cindy Tilley, founder of Forgotten Angels, a nonprofit organization that focuses on helping children that have aged out of the foster care system. Tilley was looking for fundraising ideas to raise money to help build more tiny houses on a property for the foster children.

During the meeting, Weems had an epiphany. “God’s voice said to me, ‘Give them the motorcycle.’”

The ball was rolling, and Weems even had several of the young men from Forgotten Angels help finish the motorcycle build with him. The motorcycle is now being raffled off to support Forgotten Angels.

The raffle is underway until Friday, March 19. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased at www.weemsmotorco.com/raffle. For information about preservation, restoration, repair or custom builds of vintage British motorcycles, visit www.weemsmotorco.com.

Kawasaki Raises Nearly $100,000 For Charities in 2019

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Foothill Ranch, Calif. – Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A., has proudly supported several local and national charities in raising hundreds and thousands of dollars in 2019, supporting worthy causes with cash and product donations, as well as VIP racing fan experiences at Monster Energy Supercross. The charitable efforts of Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. and its employees have nearly exceeded $100,000 in value.

“The charities Kawasaki has chosen to work with are a fundamental part of our community,” said Bill Jenkins, SVP Sales and Operations. “We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to support charities such as the Boys and Girls Club of South Coast Area, the CHiPs for Kids Toy Drive, Honoring our Wounded Military (HOWM), Orange County Police Canine Association, and The ALS Association – Orange County Chapter. We have supported these organizations with both financial and product donations for their causes to help our community where we can.”

Kawasaki’s efforts helped to raise $45,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of South Coast Area by donating two 2020 Jet Ski® STX®160 personal watercraft and two VIP Monster Energy Kawasaki Team Supercross experience. The items were auctioned off at the Boys and Girls Club of South Coast 2019 Great Futures Gala.

With the holidays fast approaching, Kawasaki employees always make sure to support those in need by providing toys and other gifts for the California Highway Patrol’s ninth annual CHiPs for KIDS toy drive. In 2019, Kawasaki team members stepped up once again to help deliver a happy holiday to families in Southern California.

Amongst the many important charitable causes Kawasaki supports is the Honoring Our Wounded Military Foundation. For 2019, Kawasaki donated a 2019 Jet Ski® Ultra® LX for the Honoring Our Wounded Military live auction, that helped to raise $40,000, which enabled the foundation to achieve more than $195,000 in donations for 2019.

The ALS Association’s Walk To Defeat event became close to the hearts of many Kawasaki employees in 2019, with many participating on Team Tamura in the ALS Association — Orange County Chapter event. Kawasaki helped to raise more than $1,300 for the organization in tribute to former Kawasaki President Yoshi Tamura, helping ALS Association — Orange County Chapter raise more than $283,000 in 2019.

Kawasaki also raised $1,500 for the Orange County Police Canine Association in 2019.

And as 2019 comes to an end the Kawasaki Motors Corp. Charitable Match Contribution Program employees have additionally raised nearly $10,000 for various charities serving an array of causes across the country.

Veterans find purpose, support through motorcycle rides

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by Patrick Filbin from https://www.stripes.com/

(Tribune News Service) — Chris Mathison served three tours in Iraq over a 14-month period.

As a U.S. Army infantryman, he was in charge of millions of dollars worth of equipment, led a team of fellow infantrymen and, all things considered, was a soldier who was depended upon and good at his job.

When he came back home to Tennessee, he had a hard time adjusting.

The Nashville native moved to Cookeville after he got out of the service in 2011 and tried to find a stable job.

“I’ve probably been through 10 jobs,” Mathison said. “It’s hard to find something that fits. You don’t feel like you belong, there’s no sense of purpose or belonging.”

He went to school and received an associate’s degree, but even school was a tough adjustment.

“I remember very fondly when I got out, I was going through a sociology class,” Mathison recalled. “As we were flipping through the book, I found a picture of my unit in Iraq and it just kind of blew my mind.”

Mathison, 35, had a whole life behind him that he had a hard time talking about. Not only was the subject matter sensitive, he couldn’t find like-minded people to talk to. As an infantryman, he was surrounded by people who were going through the same things as he was, living through the same experiences.

When he came back home, he was taking general education courses with 19-year-olds.

“That was interesting,” he said with a smirk.

Soon after he got out, Mathison signed up for his first program with the Wounded Warrior Project, the country’s largest veterans charity organization.

He enrolled in the organization’s TRACK program, which had a curriculum meant to heal, develop and train the mind, body and spirit of each wounded warrior through two semesters of college.

It also incorporated peak performance training, health and wellness training, personal finance advice and a physical education program.

Ever since, he’s been a loyal supporter of the organization that helps veterans in a number of ways.

Wounded Warriors also helped Mathison get certified in scuba diving.

One of the newest programs in Georgia is a 12-week mental health workshop that kicks off with a three-day motorcycle road trip across North Georgia.

Jon Blauvelt, a public relations specialist with Wounded Warriors, said the program is designed to give veterans an outlet to manage PTSD, traumatic brain injury and other invisible wounds of war while connecting with nature and fellow veterans.

Motorcycles play a huge role in the therapy. Through wind and throttle therapy, reflective discussion and several weeks of follow-ups, the group of eight veterans from Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Texas and Florida will experience a once-in-a-lifetime trip while bettering themselves mentally and spiritually.

“When you’re on one of these big bikes, all you’re thinking about is the bike,” Blauvelt said. “I’m on this bike, here are my surroundings, here’s the weather, but you’re not thinking about PTSD or [traumatic brain injury], you’re not thinking about what happened before and you’re not thinking about the future. You’re thinking about the present moment.”

It’s a perfect fit for Mathison, who is also a part of the Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association.

Mathison and the seven other riders strolled in at the Harley-Davidson store in Dalton, Georgia, on Tuesday afternoon for a lunch hosted by the motorcycle shop.

Cynthia Allgood, manager of the store, said it was a privilege to host the veterans who sacrificed so much for the country without asking for anything in return.

“Something like this gets you together with like-minded individuals and you can talk about everything and it creates a really good atmosphere,” Mathison said. “You’re able to make some really good friends that I would not have met.”

Miles for Military motorcycle ride

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New Castle to Dover, Aug. 10

IHeartMedia Wilmington announced its 15th annual Miles for Military motorcycle ride to benefit USO Delaware is set to begin at 10:45 a.m. Aug. 10 at the Delaware National Guard Training Facility, 1197 River Road, New Castle.

IHeartMedia Wilmington’s on-air personalities Christa Cooper, Whiskey, Randy, Kat, Courtney and Benny Panella will host the event, one of the largest motorcycle rides crossing Delaware. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Participants will ride down south Route 9 and finish at Dover International Speedway.

“We are excited about our partnership with iHeartMedia Delaware for the Miles for Military motorcycle event,” said Bruce Kmiec, director for USO Delaware. “It has grown over the years into a household name event. We are floored by the amount of support we get for our current military and their families by all the riders that attend this amazing event. The money raised provides some funding to over 50 USO Delaware military support events and programs we hold each year.”

The event will culminate with a free Family Fun Day from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m at Dover International Speedway, 1131 N. Dupont Highway. Festivities will include live music from local group Party Fowl and DJ Rob Tyler, country line dance lessons with DJ Steve Carroll, face painting, a photobooth, cornhole games and demonstrations by the Dover Fire Department and the Delaware State Police SCUBA and Mounted Patrol Units.

Sponsors and supporters of the event include the Delaware Law Enforcement Motor Units, A-1 Sanitation, Budget Rooter, Middletown Tent and Events, Shamrock Printing, Where Pigs Fly, Hogs and Heroes, Pepsi Beverage Company of Wilmington, Sean O’Hanlon’s Dunkin’ Herr’s, Party Princess Productions and ASAP Screen Printing.

Registration is $20 per motorcycle/driver and $10 for a passenger, available online and the day-of the event.

For registration and more, visit ihr.fm/2MJyR4n.

Motorcycle Riders Foundation Honors Memorial Day

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Memorial Day is the day we honor all the men and women that never made it home. The Motorcycle Riders Foundation appreciates the sacrifices that allow us the freedoms that we cherish today. Their sacrifices and victories are what helped make our country great.

Freedom is not free.

“It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived.” — General George S. Patton

Dating back to the American Civil War when it was known as “Decoration Day,” the practice of placing flowers on the graves of fallen soldiers is not only done in remembrance of the men and women who have served in the United States Armed Forces, but also to honor the freedom in which they upheld.