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Estate Planning for Motorcycle Collectors

By General Posts

Or What To Do With Your Beloved Bikes When You’re Not Around To Do It

By John Stein with images from Sam Burns

As motorcycle fanatics, we’ve all laid awake nights wondering how we could add to our collections when at this point in our lives, doing exactly the opposite probably makes more sense.

The reason, of course, is advancing age and the misguided belief that just because we love this stuff, our children will as well.

CLICK HERE To Read this valuable article about your priceless collection.

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Myth, Mystery & Weirdness of the legend of Ganja

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The mysterious weirdness about the legend of the ganja
by Amy Irene White with images from the Bob T. collection
10/29/2021

One of the most exasperatingly ridiculous brick walls in Washington DC is, the age-old conundrum of legalizing marijuana.

Throughout the years, marijuana has gone through many transformations in the public eye.

House Veterans Affairs Committee (HVAC) were scheduled to conduct a legislative hearing on Wednesday, October 13th, which included consideration of the bipartisan VA Cannabis Research Act of 2021, HR 2916. So far, there have been no updates, when I wrote this.

The legislation “would direct the VA to conduct clinical research with varying forms of medicinal cannabis to evaluate the safety and effects of cannabis on health outcomes of veterans with PTSD and veterans with chronic pain.”

CLICK HERE for a Feature Report on the State of the Myth, Mystery & Legend of Ganja

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Own the road and rent the ride with some Harley cool

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by Felicity Donohoe from https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk

From https://maps.harley-davidson.com/

From https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/content/rent-a-bike.html

If you’re looking for a road trip with a difference, then Harley Davidson may have the answer – and you don’t need to own a Hog to make it happen.

Seen in iconic movies such as Easy Rider – ridden by Peter Fonda – and even Arnie in Terminator 2: Judgment Day – nothing says cool like a Harley Davidson motorcycle, and if the highway has been calling you, this might be the way to get up close and personal with the American outdoors.

Motorcycling is an option to beat weekend traffic and find a different kind of freedom for your staycation – and you don’t need to fork out a fortune and own one of the bikes. In fact, you can rent one for a holiday with affordable cruising daily prices or touring per week rates, choosing from a wide range of models such as Heritage Classic bike or Ultra Limited.

And taking it a step further, Harley Davidson has an online ride planner that includes top trips around the States. Simply type in your start and finish, with customisable options such as preferred stops and overnight accommodation, if needed. The interactive planner works out your route and can generate on-road and – if you’re feeling brave – off-road routes for the adventurous rider.

There is 10% discounts for HOG (Harley Owners’ Group) members.

Ensure you have your motorcycle licence and equipment, including helmet, when hiring.

For the interactive ride planner go to maps.harley-davidson.com by clicking here.

What motorcycles can I rent?
A variety of new models are available at hundreds of convenient locations all around the world. Browse and enquire on-line or check your local Harley-Davidson® Authorized Rental Dealer for more information. Have a look at the current models to see which one appeals to you.

Where can I rent a Harley-Davidson® motorcycle?
There are hundreds of convenient locations all around the world where you can rent a bike for your holiday, extended test ride, or while your bike is being serviced.

How do I sign up?
Find a location on the rental locator and click “book online” or for locations in the USA book directly on www.eaglerider.com.

What happens after I inquire online?
You will receive a confirmation email. Outside the USA you will be contacted by the Harley-Davidson® Authorized Rental Dealer you selected to discuss your rental requirements.

When you pick up your rental motorcycle, ensure you bring your full driver’s license with the valid motorcycle endorsement, along with your major credit card and your sense of adventure.

What do I need to hire a bike?

  • A full and valid driver’s license with a motorcycle endorsement
  • A major credit card
  • The minimum age to hire varies globally, In the USA you must be 21.

What gear do I need?
You will need a helmet and the right gear to ensure you are comfortable and protected on your ride.

  • USA: DOT-approved helmets are required. All rentals include the free loan of DOT-approved half-shell helmets for riders and passengers. Many locations also loan 3/4 or full-face helmets free of charge, subject to availability at the time of pick-up.
  • Outside the USA: CE approved gear are required – helmet, pants, jacket, boots and gloves.

Your dealership may have gear you can hire or there is an extensive range in their showroom to buy.

Omaha Police refuse motorcade access to Patriot Guard Riders

By General Posts

from https://www.ketv.com

Omaha police: Only law enforcement in Cpl. Page motorcade for safety reasons

Patriot Guard Riders say they’ll follow behind motorcade.

OMAHA, Neb. — Omaha police said it’s not safe to have hundreds of motorcycles on the route that will only be blocked off for the fallen Marine Cpl. Daegan Page and his family to pass. The Patriot Guard Riders said it’s their honor to pay tribute to Page and still plan to follow the motorcade.

“I’m a bit flabbergasted with the decision. It really took me by surprise,” said Scott Knudsen, Nebraska State Captain, Patriot Guard Riders.

Knudsen and other Patriot Guard Riders said they’ve never been denied a place in a military motorcade and asked Page’s father for permission to be part of Friday’s event.

“We never go anywhere unless we are invited. We always seek out permission to achieve permission from appropriate people,” Knudsen said.

But Omaha police asked all groups to stay out of the motorcade for safety reasons, disappointing Knudsen and hundreds of riders coming from Western Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa.

“It’s really a shame that it has come to this, but we are in different times today. I don’t know all the details I’m certainly not blaming the Omaha Police Department or the sheriff’s department or anybody else,” Knudsen said.

“We decided for safety sake and not tie up the intersection,” said Steve Lahrs, Director of American Legions Millard Post.

Millard American Legion Riders were planning to join the escort to honor the fallen Marine until police asked them to stay parked on the sidelines.

“They are short-staffed and short-manned and it would create too much of a havoc for the city of Omaha to have hundreds of bikers blocking intersections,” Lahrs said.

In a statement to KETV, Omaha police said once again the decision is about safety.

“The ultimate goal for tomorrow’s motorcade escort of Marine Corporal Daegan Page is to safely transport him and his family from Eppley Airfield to the mortuary in Millard. We understand there are many organizations who want to assist us in this endeavor. We appreciate that and thank you. However, this motorcade is not a procession or parade. The route will be open, meaning traffic will be temporarily stopped just ahead of the motorcade to allow it to pass smoothly and safely. Once the motorcade is passed, traffic will again flow as normal. Only trained law enforcement officers with vehicles equipped with lights and sirens will be assisting with the motorcade to ensure the safety of all involved along the nearly seventeen mile route. We encourage the public to support Cpl. Page and his family along the route of the motorcade.

“On Friday, September 17th, the date of the funeral, there will be a closed route from St. Paul Lutheran Church to the Omaha National Cemetery. A closed route will allow the opportunity for organizations to safely assist with the procession at that time.”

That message came from Lt. Neal Bonnacci.

“We are absolutely not going to violate any laws and absolutely not go against their wishes and need to respect that and I do respect that,” Knudsen said.

“We start losing the reasoning behind the whole motorcade and it’s to show respect for the family and show respect for Cpl. Page,” Lahrs said.

Bonnacci also gave some safety tips to citizens wanting to pay honor on the motorcade route.

Citizens are encouraged to show their support along the route of the motorcade, but are reminded to allow room for the vehicles, and be mindful of the following:

• Park in compliance with parking regulations

• Ask permission before parking in private business parking lots

• Do not block private driveways

• Be patient if in traffic, and expect delays along the route

• Do not illegally park along the route, block intersections or impede the motorcade. Citizens are encouraged to utilize interstate overpasses for viewing, rather than stopping alongside the interstate.

Eight of the Fastest Street-Legal Motorcycles You Can Buy in America

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

It begins with the story of the legendary Suzuki Hayabusa. When that beast launched back in 1999, it triggered a hurricane of anxiety among various manufacturers – and it all came down to the top speed of the bike – a stunning 194 mph.

The Hayabusa represented a quantum leap in speed and made it the fastest motorcycle you could buy and ride on the streets. In fact, it took the title away from the already insanely fast Honda CBR1100XX Super Blackbird, and it did it by a startling 14 mph.

In answer, Kawasaki announced the creation of the Ninja ZX-12R, and it promised a top speed of more than 200 blistering miles per hour. That announcement led regulators to consider tamping down the lust for speed among manufacturers, and it also led to what’s come to be known as The Gentleman’s Agreement among the top motorcycle manufacturers across the globe.

As the story goes, the “agreement” called on manufacturers to set the upper limit on motorcycle speed at 200 mph. Since then, that agreement has been violated to varying degrees, and here are some of the motorcycles that flirt with – and exceed – the barrier posited by The Gentlemen’s Agreement.

The Yamaha YZF-R1M, which purports to achieve a top end of 185.7 mph, has itself become legendary for its on and off-track precision and power. The R1 line and the street legal R1 models achieve their punch following a power-and-less-bulk formula.

Offering lightweight carbon-fiber construction and powered by an explosive 998cc, liquid-cooled “cross-plane” inline-four, the R1 creates 200 hp and offers 89.2 lb-ft torque. When that kind of juice moves through its 6-Speed manual, the R1M does 0-60 mph in a snot-loosening 2.3 seconds. One of these beasts will set you back just over $26,000 USD.

Next up on this rogues gallery is the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. This KTM is a naked hypersport bit of lunacy that packs a 1301 cc, 75-degree V-twin motor into a novel frame. The 1290 Super Duke R wacks the limits of physics to the tune of 180 hp and cranks out 103 lb-ft of torque.

At a svelte 462 lbs. dry weight., the Super Duke R covers 0-60 mph in just 2.6 seconds and is limited to 186 mph. If you must have one, this KTM will set you back right around $18,000 USD.

The Hayabusa is back, and the 3rd Generation variant uses the same 1340cc inline-four motor to produce a healthy 188 hp and 110 ft-lbs of torque and covers 0-60 mph in a serviceable 3.2 seconds.

While it’s now restricted to 186 mph top speed, it does its progenitors proud. It will be priced at just north of $22,000 USD.

The BMW S1000RR represented a huge technological leap for the time, and when it launched in 2009, it was packed to the brim with electronics and rider-assist features unheard of even for the sophisticated ‘ultra bikes’ of the time.

The latest iteration, the 2021 BMW S1000RR is powered by a water/oil-cooled inline-4 motor that generates a stunning 205 hp and 83 lb-ft of torque.

In ‘Race Pro Mode’ it covers 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds and is capable of reaching a top speed of 192 mph. All that performance does not come cheap and the sticker price is expected to come in around $30,000.

An Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory is a sublime example of Italian design and engineering and an amazing achievement when you consider the fact that the has only been in the game since the end of the Second World War. Aprilia is dedicated to motorcycle sports and they use the competitive anvil to forge their lightning-fast and supple machines.

The RSV4 1100 Factory is powered by a 1099cc V4 engine which turns out 217 hp and 90 lb-ft of torque. And perhaps most critically, it weighs just 390 lbs and that finely-balanced power-to-weight ratio means it can do 0-60 mph in just 2.9 seconds and achieve a reported top speed of 198.8 mph. The Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory sports an MSRP of $25,999.

Known for the subtlety and innovative character of their designs, Ducati remains iconic for their blend of finish, style and pure power. The Panigale V4R combines carbon fiber and their signature desmodromic engine, Desmosedici Stradale R 998 cc Inline-4, produces 221hp straight out of the factory and you can ramp that power up to 234 hp with the addition of an Akrapovic full-racing exhaust.

The Desmosedici Stradale motor puts out 92 lb-ft of torque and travels from 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds before ultimately achieving a top speed of 199 mph. You can be the proud owner of a 2021 Ducati Panigale V4R for just under $23,000.

As we near the top of this list, we find a pair of Kawasakis perched near the pinnacle. The ZH2 and the Ninja H2 are both said to be capable of 200+ mph, and these novel supercharger-boosted motorcycles feature 998cc inline-4 motors that crank out 200 hp and 101 lb-ft of torque.

The ZH2 with the ability to cover 0-60 mph in under 3 seconds and reach a top speed of more than 200 mph also represents a devil’s bargain of sorts. For 2021, Kawasaki ZH2 is priced at just over $17,500.

The lunatic Kawasaki Ninja H2R – with a stated top speed of 248 mph, is a track-only machine and therefore not allowed on our list. The H2R does hold the record holder for top end speed as it reached a snot-loosening 250 mph in just 26 seconds. For 2021, the Kawasaki Ninja H2 is priced at $29,500.

But the bike at the top of the list of mad-dog bikes you can ride on the street belongs to the Lightning LS-218.

Electric motorcycles are clearly the future, and the neck snapping torque offered up by an electric motor is surely attractive to wild fools in search of speed at all costs.

The Lightning LS-218 is powered by a 380V electric powerplant coupled to any of three battery packs: 12, 15, or 20 kWh. At its top tuning settings, this nearly silent monster churns out 200 hp and 168 lb-ft of torque and can reach a top speed of 218 mph.

Coupled with a demented 0-60 mph time of just 2.2 seconds, it takes the top slot when it comes to streetworthy guts. The 2021 Lightning LS-218 comes in at around $39,000 USD out the door.

Of course, most of these figures are reported by the manufacturers and results may vary according to conditions and tuning…

Upcoming Motorcycle Events in 2021

By General Posts

from https://www.lawtigers.com

We’ve created a database of motorcycle rallies, group rides, multi-day biker events, and more for you to choose from. These are for riders of all experience, though we encourage you to read up and choose events that are suitable for you and whoever you’re traveling with. Most of all, we hope you find an awesome adventure (or 5) to go on!

CLICK HERE TO SEE NATIONAL MOTORCYCLE EVENTS AND THE EVENTS NEAR YOU.

Register for Free Rider Benefit Card, Immediately includes:

  • $10,000 Hit-and-Run Reward
  • $10,000 Bike Theft Reward
  • Free Legal Advice for all Motorcycle Matters
  • Free Motorcycle Repair or Replacement Assistance
  • Free Document Holder

Toll-Free 24-Hour Accident Hotline to answer your questions 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by simply calling 1-800-LAW TIGERS (529-8443).

Have a look at https://www.lawtigers.com/resources/rider-benefit-card-sm-2/

What to Do in the Event of Motorcycle Injury and Accident

By General Posts

from https://www.lawtigers.com

Motorcycle riders love the speed, excitement, and endorphins of riding- it’s why we get on the bike in the first place. However, most riders realize we aren’t immune to some risk every time we go on an adventure- or a quick trip to the store, for that matter. One of the dreaded scenarios is the possibility of getting into a motorcycle accident, but we have to acknowledge that possibility and plan for how to deal with it in advance. We’re going to go over some motorcycle injury and accident statistics, what to do should you or a loved one find yourself in an accident, and how to treat the physical, emotional, and legal follow-up.

Injury Concerns and Prevention
While collisions and other road incidences can cause financial damage, the true concern is protecting you, your passengers, and any other people involved. As a rider, you should always follow ATGATT (All the Gear, All the Time). This means you should be wearing a full face helmet, proper riding gloves, a protective vest, riding pants, and motorcycle boots. Do not substitute non-riding specific versions of these, as they are not made to stand up to road rash and other trauma stress.

While this may seem like an excessive amount of caution (trust us, we understand the notion of the wind whipping in your face on the open road), proper protection can reduce risk of injury or fatality by 37 percent and 68 percent, respectively. When the most prevalent injuries in major motorcycle crashes include nerve damage, spinal cord injury, foot injuries, broken bones, and head trauma, this level of increased protection is well worth paying attention to.

If you or another person involved in an accident are in need of medical attention, do not waste time calling the paramedics and the proper authorities. Often, there is an element of shock even if you aren’t seemingly injured, and short-term decision making is difficult. It is important to breathe, relax, and let medical professionals assess everyone before you depart from any moderate-to-serious incident. Even if it is a single-vehicle incident, you need to be sure that you are fully healthy and there is no damage to report to you or your bike, as an insurance claim will often be rejected without proper proof.

What to Do in the Event of an Accident
The likelihood of being involved in a motorcycle accident over the course of one’s riding career statistically outweighs that of being involved in a car accident. However, : studies have also shown that this is due to a skew in personality type and safety precautions among a select group of riders. The statistics won’t matter if you are involved in an accident- what you do next will, though.

In the event you are conscious and able to move, the first thing you need to do is make sure you are safe, no matter what type of accident you are in. This means getting yourself out of harm’s way and making sure that you are stable and able to appraise the situation. Next, call 911 and report the accident.

From there, if there is another party involved, go check on them.. If they are ok, size up the damage to your respective vehicles. Make sure you haven’t damaged their property before attending to yours- this is an annoying detail in the moment, but one that will help you avoid further incidents.

Finally, you will want to be documenting everything for legal purposes, insurance claims, and any other follow-up necessary. Take photos, write down key information, and get statements from witnesses if possible. We know it will be a stressful time, and you may be dealing with injury and mental distress, but if you take the time for these steps, your insurance and lawyers will have the best information possible to support your case.

Who to Call After a Motorcycle Accident
After an accident, it can be scary, shocking, and humbling. It is perfectly normal to take your time trying to sort out what happened, and hopefully count your blessings that you were wearing gear and are not severely injured. Once the moment has slowed down, you will need to contact your insurance agency and in some cases, a motorcycle accident lawyer.

For your insurance, you will need to get them the details of the motorcycle crash: who was involved, the claim of fault, and any damage to the bike and other vehicle(s) that is necessary to report. Preserve evidence by taking pictures and making a list of things you described on the phone. If there is an insurance or legal dispute, it is important to maintain consistent information, which can be difficult during the aftermath of a crash if you try to do it by memory.

If there is another party involved, you should have documentation of what they claimed for personal injury and damage to their property. The same consistency in that reporting will be key for settling disputes between two insurance agents or if they try to take you to court for being at fault.

In the event you are an accident victim and the other party has fled, you should look to get any eyewitness accounts or information that may help your case. Law Tigers offers a $10,000 hit-and-run reward to help find and prosecute these reckless people.

Recovery After a Motorcycle Accident
One of the most difficult parts of any magnitude of motorcycle accident is the recovery and subsequent trust to get back on the bike. There can be chronic physical injuries that prohibit or change your riding style, and PTSD from crashes. To help you physical and emotional recovery:

  • Consult professionals for any injuries or emotional trauma you have.
  • Don’t dwell on things that weren’t your fault, and learn from actions that were.
  • Take rehab assignments seriously- riding is tough enough on your body already.
  • Take your time in recovery if necessary. Often we can exacerbate the injuries or lingering PTSD from a crash by trying to push through them.

If you follow safety procedures before rides, know what to do in a high-stress collision situation, and are willing to follow proper recovery protocols, it will make a lifetime of motorcycle riding much easier to navigate.

How to Find a Motorcycle Injury Lawyer
Dealing with legal cases is not exciting for anyone who has just been in a motorcycle accident. However, it is often necessary, and you need to have the best representation. If you are looking for motorcycle injury lawyers, you have to know who to trust and should elect for a specialty firm.

The Law Tigers are a national team of personal injury law firms, industry professionals, and riders that support the motorcycle riding community, and advocate for all riders and their families when impacted by an injury. We’ve spent decades working with the community we love, and nothing is more important than keeping you safe in every respect. If you need representation following a collision, please reach out today (CLICK HERE) – we’re ready to get through this together.

Highway Bill Unveiled for 2021

By General Posts

Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure unveiled its 2021 highway bill, titled the Investing in a New Vision for the Environment and Surface Transportation (INVEST) in American Act. As you may remember, every five years Congress is required to reauthorize many of the highway related spending bills it passes. The current highway bill, known as the FAST Act, was given a one-year extension last year and is set to expire in September of 2021. The bill introduced Friday is a key component of the major infrastructure spending push the Biden Administration has made a top priority.

For the last two years, the Motorcycle Riders Foundation and its members have diligently educated and lobbied lawmakers about the need to include motorcyclist specific priorities in a new highway bill. These grassroots efforts were given a boost with the inclusion of three major motorcyclist specific items in the bill. The Democrat lead bill includes the following provisions in its nearly 1,300 pages of text:

  1. Expanded prohibition on motorcycle only check points, including prohibiting using the clothing or apparel of riders or their passengers to profile or target bikers.
  2. Reestablishment of the Motorcyclist Advisory Council, which gives bikers a voice within the Federal Highway Administration. Included in the bill, a seat on the council is specifically designated for a “representative of a national motorcycle foundation.”
  3. Inclusion of motorcycles as a specific category that autonomous vehicle studies must account for during the testing of this new technology. Additionally, a motorcyclist rights organization is assigned a seat on an autonomous vehicle working group at the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The road ahead for a massive infrastructure plan remains uncertain. Negotiations between the House, Senate and White House will be contentious and as always political. However, what is certain is that the work of MRF members has ensured that motorcyclists are being heard in Washington, D.C. and as this newly released legislation shows they are being prioritized.

NCOM Biker Newsbytes for May 2021

By General Posts

World legislative news from Bill Bish of National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM).

The National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) is a nationwide motorcyclists rights organization serving over 2,000 NCOM Member Groups throughout the United States, with all services fully-funded through Aid to Injured Motorcyclist (AIM) Attorneys available in each state who donate a portion of their legal fees from motorcycle accidents back into the NCOM Network of Biker Services (www.ON-A-BIKE.com / 800-ON-A-BIKE).

Click Here to read the NCOM Motorcycle News on Bikernet.

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Laws for riding motorcycles

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by Wells Foster, Chivon Kloepfer from https://www.wlns.com

Laws for motorcyclists are a little different than ones for regular cars. Local legal expert Bryan Waldman breaks down the differences in this Legal Edge report.

First, motorcyclists must have the correct kind of insurance. Then, they need a motorcycle endorsement on their driver’s license.

Michigan does not require all motorcyclists to wear a helmet, but you first must reach a few milestones.

Everyone on a motorcycle under 21 must wear a helmet, regardless of their experience on a bike. They must also have had a motorcycle endorsement for at least two years and/or pass a safety test. You must also have extra insurance coverage to cover medical bills.

In Michigan, motorcycles are not considered motor vehicles, meaning insurance works a little differently. Motorcyclists don’t need to purchase any fault insurance. As long as a motor vehicle is involved, a motorcyclist is entitled to benefits.

For example, if a motorcyclist spins out and crashes on some gravel by themselves, no fault benefits will activate. However, if they are involved in a near-miss with a car, the benefits do activate.