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A visit to one of Japan’s motorcycle Shitno shrine

By General Posts

You don’t have to be a motorcycle enthusiast to visit here, but it helps
from https://soranews24.com

There are tens of thousands of Shinto shrines all over Japan and they come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. They also have a plethora of individual themes that visitors may want to visit for highly specific prayers such as scoring primo idol tickets or breaking up with a significant other.

For example, did you know that there are 17 motorcycles shrines that have been sanctioned by the Japan Motorcycle Association? Our reporter Mr. Sato sure didn’t and decided to check one out when he learned of them…which is strange because he’s never ridden a motorcycle in his life.

In fact, Mr. Sato is what’s known as a “paper driver” in Japan, which refers to a person who though licensed almost never gets behind a wheel. The irony in this is that even though paper drivers have almost no experience or confidence driving, they end up with pristine records and gold-class licenses identifying them as model drivers.

And so, Mr. Sato got his motor running aboard a train and then headed out on the highway via a bus and finally went looking for adventure in whatever came his way on foot.

And what came his way was the entrance to the Kashiwa no Mori Motorcycle Shrine, which was established on the property of BDS Co. Ltd., a company specializing in motorcycle auctions in Kashiwa City, Chiba Prefecture.

Upon entering the shrine precincts Mr. Sato saw four torii gates lined up in a row, dividing the shrine into four separate mini shrines. This was an unusual configuration so our reporter felt like he was in store for some special mojo on this shrine visit.

Beyond the first torii was a shrine dedicated to Motomu, the mascot of BDS. It was fitting in the sense that this shrine was on company grounds, but our reporter wasn’t sure why anyone would want to pray to or for Motomu, except maybe to give the rabbit a boost in the Yuru-Kyara Grand Prix rankings.

Next up was the main event, the shrine of all motorcycles in Japan. This shrine could be prayed to for a number of reasons such as motorcycle dealers hoping for good business, those hoping to get a motorcycle license, or anyone simply wishing to not bust their head open while out riding.

However, since Mr. Sato never touches bikes, there wasn’t really anything for him to do, so he moved on to the next one.

Clearly Kashiwa no Mori Motorcycle Shrine was looking to cater to a variety of interests, because through the next torii was a hole-in-one-shrine. This is where golfers can go to pray for a hole in one, or as we’ve seen before, pray not to get a hole in one.

Mr. Sato doesn’t really golf much either, so once again he shuffled on to the next torii gate which stood in front of a shrine where you could pray for family. Mr. Sato finally found something he had a direct connection to and decided to pray at this monument.

Like with a lot of shrines, on the precincts is a booth where you can buy items such as omamori charms and ema boards. They too were based on themes such as Motomu, motorcycles, and golf.

Not wanting to go home empty-handed, Mr. Sato bought a motorcycle omamori, but since he doesn’t have anything to do with those things he doesn’t really need any luck with them.

Instead, he decided to give it to his colleague Go Hatori. That Yamaha Tricity actually belongs to Go and has been affectionately called the “Hatoricity.”

Well, anyway… That omamori should at least help prevent Go from getting hit by a motorcycle while he’s out walking around everywhere.

Shrine information
Website at https://www.bds.co.jp/company/shrine
Kashiwanomori Motorcycle Shrine / 柏の杜オートバイ神社
Address: Chiba-ken, Kashiwa-shi, Kaneyama 771
千葉県柏市金山771

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adidas Originals and Past, Present, & Future of Kawasaki ZX

By General Posts

adidas Originals and Kawasaki Celebrate the Past, Present, and Future of ZX with Two Collaborative Sneakers

Herzogenaurach, 11th April 2022 – Born out of a shared passion for forward thinking design and unrelenting innovation, this season, adidas Originals and Kawasaki join forces to celebrate the history and future of ZX with two unique takes on the ZX8000 and ZX 5K BOOST silhouettes.

An icon that needs no introduction, Kawasaki has been at the forefront of the motorcycle manufacturing industry for decades. Known for its inimitable aesthetic approach, the brand’s signature sportbike brand – ZX™ – served as the inspiration for the adidas design team when they first introduced the original ZX500 sneaker in 1984.

Taking cues from Kawasaki’s instantly recognizable design philosophy of motorcycle and color palette, the collaborative ZX8000 sneaker features a White kangaroo leather upper, with Kawasaki Green leather overlays, blue map suede accents, and a Kawasaki Ninja® graphic on the lateral. Meanwhile, the ZX 5K BOOST boasts a Black TPU overlay and eye stays, Kawasaki green accents, a semi-transparent Black ripstop vamp, and a Kawasaki Ninja® logo on the toe-box.

Both sneakers are capped off with electroplated lace tips, shoe jewelry and heel pieces, as well as co-branded sock liners. Each pair then comes packaged in a custom box with a printed graphic of the latest Kawasaki Ninja® ZX™-10R, filled with tissue paper bearing a printed Kawasaki motorcycle sketch.

The launch of the adidas Originals and Kawasaki collaborative partnership is accompanied by an evocative campaign film which pays homage to Japanese motorbike culture by taking the viewer on an unexpected journey through the city’s streets.

Arriving on 14th April 2022, the collaborative ZX8000 and ZX 5K BOOST Kawasaki sneakers are available globally (excl. China) through adidas stores, adidas.com, Confirmed, and select retailers.

Additionally, the ZX 5K BOOST will also be available directly from Kawasaki*.

* In Japan, EU, USA, Canada, Australia, Thailand

About adidas Originals:
Inspired by the rich sporting heritage of adidas – one of the world’s leading sports brands and a global designer and developer of athletic footwear and apparel – adidas Originals is a lifestyle brand founded in 2001. Visit Website at http://adidas.com/

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Honda RC213V-S Breaks Auction World Record

By General Posts

An as-new example of Honda’s RC213V-S has just broken a new world record, becoming the most expensive Japanese motorcycle ever sold at auction.

Hosted by specialist automotive marketplace Collecting Cars, the ‘MotoGP bike for the road’ sold for a remarkable total sales price of £182,500.

The rare superbike has never been ridden and remains in its original flight case, with just one mile on the odometer. Having never left its shipping crate, the bike is totally pristine with absolutely no damage or wear.

Created with a focus on light weight and agility, the RC213V-S is a road-legal MotoGP bike, built around a hand-fabricated aluminium frame with carbon-fibre body panels and titanium fasteners, resulting in a dry weight of just 170kg.

Powered by a 999cc four-stroke V4 engine, this 2016 model also features the full HRC Race Kit, which comprises a recalibrated ECU, a titanium exhaust system, a front ram duct, a race-pattern quickshifter, a data logger and a remote control cable for the front brake lever. These upgrades reduce the bike’s total weight by 10kg and increase power output from 157hp to 215hp.

Also fitted are some of the highest quality components available, including Ohlins TTX front forks, powerful Brembo brakes and forged magnesium Marchesini Racing wheels.

Edward Lovett, founder of Collecting Cars, said:

“Honda’s RC213V-S is a thrilling, exquisitely crafted machine, and this example attracted global attention and extremely competitive bidding on Collecting Cars. We are proud to have achieved yet another world-record sales price – this time for an incredible road-legal MotoGP that will be a jewel in the new owner’s collection.”

To find out more information on this lot, visit Collecting Cars.
https://collectingcars.com/for-sale/2016-honda-rc213v-s-1

Compared to traditional car auctions, Collecting Cars offers significantly better value for sellers and buyers alike. For sellers, the detailed photographic presentation and professional descriptions mean their car is showcased in the best possible way, and is marketed to a huge captive audience of passionate enthusiasts. Furthermore, there is no listing fee, and they receive 100% of the hammer price.

For buyers, the premium on auction lots is levied at just 5% + VAT – substantially lower than traditional auction houses, which typically charge 12% or more – and is capped at £6,000. On hammer prices above £100,000 this means that the buyer’s premium is even less than 6%.

About Collecting Cars:
Collecting Cars is an online auction platform that curates consignments from around the world and markets them to a global audience.

The streamlined and transparent process makes buying and selling cars, motorbikes, and automobilia via its online auctions one of the most effective and hassle-free ways of transacting.

To date, the Collecting Cars platform has sold more than 5,300 lots, and total sales value generated for sellers exceeds £191 million. The multi-national auction company has headquarters in London, and offices in Munich, Sydney, and Los Angeles.

More than 90% of sales since launch have happened without a physical viewing, underscoring the significant trust that Collecting Cars has earned among its customers.

Visit Website at: https://collectingcars.com/

Try the Climate Quiz by CO2 Coalition

By General Posts

The Great Climate Change Debate is one of the “hottest” issues before the public and policy makers today.

How much do you know about the subject?

Or possibly, the real question is one attributed to American humorist Will Rogers: “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble, it’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”

Find out your Climate IQ by taking our Climate Quiz: the answers may surprise you.

CLICK HERE To Take the Climate Quiz Now

The CO2 Coalition was established in 2015 as a 501(c)(3) for the purpose of educating thought leaders, policy makers, and the public about the important contribution made by carbon dioxide to our lives and the economy.

Brat Style Custom Indian Super Chief

By General Posts

Go Takamine Adds Classic Vintage Touch to the 2022 Indian Super Chief

by Neil Storz with photos by Jeff Millard

Cool custom motorcycle built by Japanese bike builder and Brat Style founder, Go Takamine.

Go customized a 2022 Indian Super Chief Limited for X-Men and Mad-Max: Fury Road star, Nicolas Hoult.

In true Go style, he took a clean, minimalist approach to the build – adding vintage elements with the bike’s modern performance.

CLICK HERE To Read this Photo Feature Article on Bikernet.com

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Pre 30th Yokohama Hot Rod Custom Show 2021

By General Posts

Pre 30th Anniversary YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW 2021
Dec. 5, 2021 at Pacifico Yokohama

YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW OFFICIAL WEBSITE

https://www.yokohamahotrodcustomshow.com/

Pre 30th Anniversary YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW 2021
Date: Sunday December 5, 2021
Location: Pacifico Yokohama
Nearest Hotel : Yokohama Intercontinental Hotel

MQQNEYES Official Website (English Edition)
https://www.mooneyes.co.jp/en/

YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW, organized by MOONEYES, is the largest indoor custom car and motorcycle show in Japan. The event features vendor spaces, custom paint contest, pinstripers and so much more wrapped up in a one-day show.

In order to prevent the spread of the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), the Yokohama Hot Rod Custom Show 2021(HCS) will be taking sufficient measures in accordance with the Guideline for COVID-19 by Pacifico Yokohama. In addition, in accordance with the guideline of restrictions on holding the event, the event will be held with the social distancing necessary to prevent the spread of infection.

Before coming to the event, we would like to ask for your understanding and cooperation to hold a safe event. Please read through it carefully and purchase the ticket and come to the event, after understanding the content enough.

ADMISSION TICKET

Advance Ticket 3,800yen (12 & under Free)
General Advance Ticket for Yokohama Hot Rod Custom Show 2021 (HCS).

General Admission Ticket (Dec, 5) 4,800yen (12 & under Free)
General admission tickets will not sell out so, you will be able to purchase tickets in advance from our physical store in Honmoku, Yokohama MOONEYES Area-1 and MQQN Cafe till the day before the event December 4th (Saturday), closing time of our store.

Due to the prevention of the spread of the COVID-19, please purchase the Advance Ticket.

To keep the safety management for all participants and visitors we will ask you to fill out your Name, Address (Address or Phone Number or Email Address), Attendance Number on the back of the tickets. This is a rule to prevent COVID-19 which is issued by the venue.

If you are able to purchase or pick up the ticket before the event please, fill out the back of the ticket in advance to prevent taking time before entering the event.

If you already have the ticket please fill out the backside in Advance. If you are purchasing the ticket at the gate on the day of the event Dec. 5th(Sun), please bring your writing tools. We will prepare some writing tools, but to prevent the spread of the virus, we recoomend you to bring your own.

If you already purchased the tickets online, we strongly recommend you to pick up your ticket at MOONEYES Area-1 prior to the show.

TIME SCHEDULE

At the Pre 30th Anniversary YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW, we are preparing exciting programs for every one to enjoy from OPEN to CLOSE.

This year’s YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW has many Limited Items!

Beginning with Hot Item of VANS X MOONEYES Shoes, this year celebrating the BLACK FLYS 30th Anniversary we have special collaboration sunglasses and there will be zip hoodie T-shirt and other Clothing and Rat Fink Item. Limited quantity, Special Items will sold out soon so, don’t miss it!

Event Information ※ Date may change without notice.

2021 Dec. 5th(Sun)
Pre 30th Anniversary
YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW 2021 (Scheduled)
Pacifico Yokohama (YOKOHAMA)
Contact:Official Website
http://yokohamahotrodcustomshow.com/

2021 Dec. 31st(Fri)
MOONEYES Area-1, MOON Cafe
working usually till Dec. 31st(Fri)

2022 Jan. 1st(Sat), 2nd(Sun)
MOONEYES Area-1, MOON Cafe New Year’s Holiday

2022 Jan. 3rd(Mon)
New Year Sale

Business Hours
MOONEYES Area-1 : 12:00 -19:00
MOON Cafe : 12:00 – 20:00

2022 Jan. 9th(Sun)
Sidewalk Sale
MOONEYES Area-1 (Yokohama)
Contact:Official Website
https://www.mooneyes.co.jp/

2022 Mar. 26th(Sat)
3rd Surf City Market Place by the Sea
Harbor City Soga (Chiba)
Contact:Official Website
https://www.mooneyes.co.jp/scmp2021/

2022 May 15th(Sun)
34th MOONEYES Street Car Nationals ®
Odaiba N.O.P Area (Tokyo)
Contact:Official Website
https://www.streetcarnationals.com/

Other Upcoming Event Schedule are HERE
https://www.mooneyes.co.jp/en/2017-event-schedule/

Honda Rebel 500 & 1100 Cruiser 2022 Debuts

By General Posts

from https://www.rushlane.com/ by Arun Prakash

Honda presently has three models in the Rebel range of cruisers- Rebel 250, Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100

Honda has updated its cruise lineup for 2022 specifically for Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100 in European markets. Both motorcycles offer a typical cruiser experience to riders with their signature old-school design and ergonomics.

About a month ago, Honda reinvented the entry-level Rebel 300 in a down-sized version as Rebel 250.

2022 Honda Rebel 500 Colour Options
The Japanese bikemaker has introduced new colour options for Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100. Honda is offering a new paint scheme called Pearl Organic Green in Rebel 500. This option will be available alongside the current paint schemes on offer namely Graphite Black, Mat Axis Gray and Matte Jeans Blue Metallic.

The latest addition to the colour palette is a stark contrast to dark and stealthy shades currently available for Rebel 500. On the other hand, Rebel 1100 sees the addition of a flashy new colour called Pearl Stallion Brown. The paint scheme also benefits from the blacked-out components lending the motorcycle a sporty dual-tone appeal.

Rebel 500- Specs
Apart from the added colour options, there have been no changes made in either of the cruiser bikes in terms of mechanicals or features. Rebel 500 is powered by a 471cc parallel-twin motor that also propels CB500X and CB500R.

This unit pushes out 47 bhp at 8500rpm and a peak torque of 44.6Nm at 6000rpm. This engine is paired with a 6-speed transmission via a slip-assist clutch. The motorcycle rides on 16-inch front and rear wheels that are shod with fat 130-section front and 150-section rear rubber respectively.

Suspension setup comprises 41mm telescopic forks at front and twin shock absorbers at rear. Braking duties are handled by a 296mm front disc and a 240mm rear disc aided by a dual-channel ABS.

Rebel 1100
Specs Coming to the flagship Rebel 1100, the cruiser is powered by a 1084cc SOHC liquid-cooled, parallel-twin, 270 degree crank motor which pumps out 86 bhp at 7000rpm and a peak torque of 98Nm at 4750rpm. This engine also propels Africa Twin adventure bike and is mated to either a 6-speed manual transmission or a DCT automatic gearbox.

The diamond frame of Rebel 1100 sits on Preload-adjustable 43mm cartridge-style front forks and twin piggyback shock absorbers at rear. Rebel 1100 rides on 18-inch front and 16-inch rear wheels shod with tubeless tyres. Braking duties are handled by 330mm disc up front and 256mm disc at rear complemented by a dual-channel ABS.

Take a look at the first look video below, from TravelMoto channel.

Turning a Cuddly Honda Super Cub into a Beast

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Cuddly Honda Super Cub Turns Into Beast, Looks Meaner Than Some Harley-Davidsons

Like it or not, even the many fans of the Honda Super Cub have to admit this particular two-wheeler is not exactly custom material. The underbone machine is a huge customer favorite, but most of the time we don’t get to see the results of investments made in customization processes.

The Super Cub is one of the longest-running nameplates in the Japanese bike maker’s portfolio. It was introduced all the way back in the late 1950s, and since that time, it sold over 100 million units, becoming in effect the world’s most-produced motor vehicle (and that includes cars).

Given the huge number of them on the market, it was only natural for some owners to customize their rides even if, as said, we don’t get to see such projects all that often. Yet this week, thanks to a garage called K-Speed, we’re treated to exactly that, a too-good of a Super Cub not to discuss.

The Japanese say this is their first custom Super Cub C125, but even so, they seem to have nailed a look that might even put some Harleys to shame. The conversion rides closer to the ground than its stock siblings, the front end has been completely restyled, and much larger wheels than we’re used to were fitted front and back.

The rear end has been chopped as well, making the motorcycle look more like a vintage bike than an overgrown scooter. The black paint spread head to toe enhances that impression even more.

Click Here to See Details of this custom Honda Super Cub by K-Speed.

K-Speed says no changes were made to the thing’s engine and brakes, but even so, the price is about three times higher than that of a stock machine. Whereas, for instance, you could buy the 2021 Super Cub C125 for just under $4,000, this one has a retail price of over $13,000.

Visit K-Speed Website at: https://k-speed.com/

Launch of Honda CB750 & Dick Mann at AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

On Twitter by Honda Powersports: Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann, American Honda sends its heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and fans. Mann’s 1970 Daytona 200 win aboard the CR750 (the racing version of the CB750 four-cylinder) was momentous in Honda’s history Thank you, Dick, and godspeed.

The Honda CB750 Changed the Way Motorcycles Were Made, Raced and Sold

Though now highly prized for their potential as re-imagined cafe racer machines, the venerable Honda CB750 was – back in its infancy – the bike that changed the game.

So how did it happen that the Japanese took over the worldwide motorcycle manufacturing industry? To a large extent, it came down to the creation of a single model.

With five consecutive championship titles under their belts, Honda decided to withdraw from the World GP circuit in 1967 with a plan to develop high-performance consumer motorcycles at the forefront of their vision.

While Honda exported more than half of their output back in the mid-’60s, they didn’t make a large-displacement sport bike model which would appeal to the hardcore rider in the U.S.

And it’s not like the honchos at Honda failed to notice that glaring deficiency. Sales of Honda motorcycles in America were flagging in 1966, and the company knew a brand-new worldview was in order. While the company had created the Dream CB450 in 1965, they were still being outgunned by big bikes from other makers. The CB450 sold well, but for the vast majority of American riders, it just didn’t have the requisite zing and bottom-end torque they craved.

What really drove Yoshiro Harada, the head of Honda product development at the time, was hearing the news that Britain’s Triumph was deep in the development process of a high-performance, 3-cylinder 750 cc engine. With the ante thus upped, Honda laid out plans to compete by creating their own 750 cc engine, which would lay down 67 horsepower to overtake the juice you could get from the 66-horsepower Harley-Davidson’s 1300 and the proposed Triumph Triple.

Though Honda was already the industry’s leading maker of motorcycles (due in no small part to the success of the most popular motorcycle in history, the Super Cub), the introduction of the CB750 sought to become the world’s top manufacturer of quality motorcycles as well. They were up against some formidable competition as comparable models from Triumph, BMW, and Harley were already on the road.

So what were the targets? Honda wanted to make a long-range, high-speed touring machine, so they turned to science for answers in the form of a newly-minted paradigm dubbed “ergonomics.”

Those targets included: Stability at highway cruising speeds, a reliable and cooled braking system that would handle frequent rapid decelerations from high speed, minimal vibration, and noise to fight rider fatigue on long hauls with a rider position which complimented the smoother power plant, lights and instruments which were large, gauges which were easy to read, easy maintenance and servicing for all the various modules of the bike and the use of top-quality materials and production techniques.

Perhaps the most significant innovation for Honda’s showpiece bike? The adoption of disc brakes. While that design decision proved costly and time-consuming, it was also a stroke of brilliance and one which made the CB750 a favorite of the serious riding set.

Released to the U.S. public in January 1969, the announcement of the new bike’s retail price, $1,495, was met with stunned silence at a dealer meeting in Nevada. The other shoe had officially dropped. Large-displacement bikes were selling at that time for between $2,800 and $4,000, and the 2,000 dealers on hand for the announcement exploded into applause when they recovered their wits.

And they had good cause for their optimism. The CB750 immediately commanded a premium sales price in dealer showrooms of between $1,800 and $2,000 to get one out the door.

Featuring an integrated crankshaft and metal bearing to replace the split-type, press-fit crankshaft with a needle bearing used in previous Honda motors, the CB750 was a great leap forward in design as well as price.

As great as this new machine was, the company initially had a serious problem. They could only manage to make something like five bikes a day, and that was clearly not enough to meet the demand for what had become a major hit with the market. Production was pushed to 25 units per day and then to 100 units, but that still left an enormous pile of backorders building up under and an entirely expected sales landslide.

It became clear that the production of the original sand-molded crankcases would never meet the rate requirements of mass production, so the factory switched over to producing crankcases of a metal, die-cast construction. The bikes were such a hit with the riding public that the production of engines and chassis was moved to a Suzuki factory in mid-1971. The “sandcast” CB750 models are now fetching enormous prices from collectors of up to ten and fifteen times higher than their new-off-the-line premium price back in the day.

But what really made the bikes a smash hit with the public?

Performance. Pure and dependable performance.

The factory racing team at Honda R&D took the new machines to compete at a 10-Hour Endurance Race in August 1969 to coincide with the commercial launch of the big bike, and Honda dominated, notching one-two finishes with the teams of Morio Sumiya and Tetsuya Hishiki taking first place and Yoichi Oguma and Minoru Sato pulling in a close second.

The deal was done when rider Dick Mann blew away the field on his CR750 during the AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race run during March 1970. The field was now wide open for large-displacement Japanese bikes, and in 1972, Kawasaki launched the 900cc ZI to compete on the big-bike stage…and the rest is, as they say, history.

Crushing the Record for the World’s Longest Motorcycle the American Way

By General Posts

by Cristina Mircea from https://www.autoevolution.com

The title for the longest motorcycle in the world belongs to an Indian who built one that measures 86 ft and 3 in (26.29m). Bharat Sinh Parmar holds the Guinness World Record since 2014. That didn’t sit well with the guys from Bikes and Beards, who decided to bring that record to the United States, using a vintage Japanese bike.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with it, Bikes and Beards is the YouTube channel of SRK Cycles, a bike dealer based in Pennsylvania. This isn’t their first unusual vlog, as the whole purpose of the channel is to redefine the way you use a motorcycle and push the boundaries of human creativity. In case you haven’t slept well at night wondering if you can run a motorcycle underwater for 10 minutes, do browse their channel and you’ll find out.

The common approach for others who’ve tried to build a long motorcycle has been to place the engine and the drive train on the front, then add a long swingarm and then the wheel in the back. But there’s a simpler way to do things, which is to build two square tubes at both ends of the bike and have them welded on the motorcycle. The long frame would then get connected to those tubes.

The guys’ bike, a 1980 Honda CB750 Custom motorcycle, ended up measuring 108 ft, which was a success, not to mention the fact that everything was accomplished within one week.

In order to break the record, the motorcycle had to prove it can actually handle itself on the road, taking turns and everything. Bharat Sinh Parmar had to ride his for 308 ft (93.8 m) without putting his feet down, to break the previous record. But the Bikes and Beards guys took their stretched bike for a 1,058 ft (322 m) ride, crushing the Indian’s record.

Have A Look At The VideoBlog: