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Motorcycle Vibrations Can Damage iPhone cameras as per Apple

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by Kim Lyons from https://www.theverge.com

by Edward Moyer from https://www.cnet.com

From Apple: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803

Motorcycle vibrations can degrade iPhone camera performance, Apple says

High amplitude vibrations can cause problems for the cameras’ gyroscopes

A new post on Apple’s Support forum https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803 says exposing iPhones to high-amplitude vibrations, “specifically those generated by high-power motorcycle engines” could degrade the devices’ camera system. The company recommends against mounting an iPhone on a motorcycle, as the vibrations may be transmitted via the bike’s handlebars and chassis.

Here’s the technical explanation from Apple:

If you accidentally move a camera when you take a picture, the resulting image can be blurry. To prevent this, some iPhone models have optical image stabilization (OIS).1 OIS lets you take sharp photos even if you accidentally move the camera. With OIS, a gyroscope senses that the camera moved. To reduce image motion, and the resulting blur, the lens moves according to the angle of the gyroscope.

Additionally, some iPhone models have closed-loop autofocus (AF).2 Closed-loop AF resists the effects of gravity and vibration to preserve sharp focus in stills, videos, and panoramas. With closed-loop AF, on-board magnetic sensors measure gravity and vibration effects and determine the lens position so that the compensating motion can be set accurately.

The OIS and closed-loop AF systems in iPhone are designed for durability. However, as is the case with many consumer electronics that include systems like OIS, long-term direct exposure to high-amplitude vibrations within certain frequency ranges may degrade the performance of these systems and lead to reduced image quality for photos and videos. It is recommended to avoid exposing your iPhone to extended high-amplitude vibrations.

The iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and all iPhones since the iPhone 7 have both optical image stabilization and closed-loop autofocus (as noted by MacRumors, the first outlet to spot the Apple support post). Both features are also vulnerable to magnetic interference from some iPhone accessories, Apple warned earlier this year, but removing the accessories should take care of that issue.

Additionally in the new post, Apple says if you’re planning to mount your iPhone to a scooter or a moped, it recommends using a vibration-dampening mount to lessen the risk to the phone and its camera system. And avoiding prolonged regular use of an iPhone mounted to a vehicle that produces lower-amplitude vibrations is also a good idea.

Apple says iPhone cameras can be hurt by motorcycle vibrations

High-power or high-volume motorcycle engines produce potentially damaging high-amplitude vibrations, so the company says don’t attach your phone to your hawg.

If you’ve been rockin’ down the highway with an iPhone mounted on your motorcycle, you might want to think again. On Friday, Apple said certain motorcycle engines can give your iPhone’s camera bad vibes.

“Exposing your iPhone to high amplitude vibrations within certain frequency ranges, specifically those generated by high-power motorcycle engines, can degrade the performance of the camera system,” the company said in a post on its support site.

The vibes are channeled through the chassis and handlebars, so you shouldn’t attach your phone to motorcycles with high-power or high-volume engines, the company said. It said mopeds and scooters, which tend to have small-volume or electric engines, are less of a concern but that you should use a vibration dampening mount and “avoid regular use for prolonged periods.”

The problem has to do with high-tech gyroscope- and magnet-based camera systems designed to compensate for shaky shots. Such systems, like optical image stabilization and closed-loop autofocus, make automatic adjustments if you accidentally move while taking a picture.

“The OIS and closed-loop AF systems in iPhone are designed for durability,” Apple said. But “long-term direct exposure to high-amplitude vibrations … may degrade the performance of these systems and lead to reduced image quality for photos and videos.”

For details on which iPhone models feature these camera systems, you can check out Apple’s post.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803

 

Daytona 2021 Photo Gallery on Bikernet

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From the Beach to the Bikes and the Babes
See all Photos by Jack McIntyre

Check out the pics from events such as True Grit Show, Cycle Source Show, Perewitz Paint Show, Boardwalk Show, Rats Hole Show, Main Street images, and much more from Daytona 2021.

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Triumph gives closer look at upcoming Trident in new images

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from https://www.expressandstar.com

Sports bike is undergoing final testing ahead of spring release.

Triumph has showcased its upcoming Trident in a series of up-close new images.

The Trident, which is set to hit UK dealerships in the spring, is the British bike manufacturer’s latest brand-new motorcycle and is now undergoing final testing at the firm’s Hinckley headquarters ahead of its full reveal in the coming weeks.

These new images show high-end Showa suspension and Nissin brakes, as well as Michelin Road 5 tyres. Though no details have been released about the Trident’s engine, Triumph has said that it will be A2 compliant which means it’ll produce a maximum of 94bhp.

The Trident is set to become the new entry point to the Triumph range

The photos also showcase the Trident’s LED lighting as well as the bike’s combination of retro-inspired and ultra-modern design features. The rear end of the motorcycle has the look of a classic racer, while the cut out tank is a nod to more classic bikes.

It’s set to become the new entry point to the Triumph range of motorcycles, sitting under the Street Twin and Street Triple S. Though full prices have yet to be revealed, it’s expected that it will cost under £8,000 when it goes on sale in order to contend with the likes of the Yamaha MT-07.

The Trident was first showcased last month as a full concept, though due to the bike’s entirely white paint scheme, it was difficult to make out the finer details of the motorcycle’s design. These photographs signal the end of a four-year programme of development, too.

During final testing, engineers will fine-tune the Trident’s characteristics. Triumph is pitching the bike as incorporating a ‘rider friendly chassis’, making the Trident into ‘the first choice for a new generation of Triumph riders’.

Budget Harley-Davidson 338R spied for first time

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by Ollie Barstow from https://www.visordown.com

The new Benelli-based Harley-Davidson 338R budget motorcycle is spied for the first time in images leaked on Chinese social media

The first images of the new Harley-Davidson 338R have leaked giving a glimpse of how the small, affordable Asian-built ‘baby’ Harley will look when it makes its debut later this year.

There was much talk about the new machine, which is a collaboration between Harley-Davidson and Chinese-firm Qianjang Motor, earlier this year but until now the model, codenamed HD350, had only been viewed in renders.

As such, this is the first time it has been seen in the metal after images emerged of a cropped side-view across Chinese social media.

The machine has been developed on the platform of recently-launched Benelli 302S (Qianjiang is the parent company for the Italian Benelli brand) and this view shows the main frame, wheels, suspension and brakes have been retained from the source.

Though we can’t see the front-end, which will likely feature a more familiar family face in-keeping with the Harley-Davidson signature style, the rather ostentatious badging should also help differentiate it from its Italian cousin.

The appearance of the Harley-Davidson 338R appears to be a step in the direction to confirming the machine’s existence, which was originally conceived under the American company’s erstwhile management structure.

Under the dubbed ‘More Roads to Harley’ strategy, the Harley-Davidson 338R was set to become an entry-level model target specifically at the Asian market and built locally.

However, new ownership and the so-called ‘Hardwire’ strategy that is set to focus Harley-Davidson’s attention on its core premium business and move the brand out of unprofitable markets – including India – suggests the 338R is rather at odds with this new approach.

Even so, Harley-Davidson could in theory maintain a separate range of badge-engineered models in specific markets, much like other manufacturers do with models that are designed, manufactured and sold in specific countries.

In short, don’t expect to see the Harley-Davidson 338R on sale in Europe or the United States any time soon if it indeed goes ahead to production.

Sam’s Bike Picks of the Week

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Hey,

We are living in such strange times. But through it all is the beauty and style of the custom bike or a gorgeous woman.

Choppers and custom motorcycles are an art form. Their glistening metal flake paint often tries to compete with the crimson clouds at sunset, just like the fine clean simplified lines of a custom motorcycle tries to compete with the lines of a slender woman’s body.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THIS PHOTO FEATURE ON BIKERNET

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Benelli BJ 1200 GT touring motorcycle images leaked – Weighs 338kg

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by Abhinand Venugopal from https://www.rushlane.com/

The upcoming Benelli BJ 1200 GT employs an upgraded version of the TNT 1130’s inline-three motor

Italian-origin motorcycle manufacturer Benelli, under China’s Zhejiang Qianjiang Motorcycle Group, is following an aggressive product strategy for the months to come. The company has unveiled or launched several interesting products in recent times while a few other models were leaked as spy shots or patent images.

The popular Benelli TNT 600i sold in our market has received a successor abroad, dubbed the Benelli 600N or QJ SRK 600. QJ Motor is a sister brand to Benelli of China. Benelli is also working on a higher Imperiale 530 cruiser, which could make its way to the Indian market in the near future as a strong rival to Royal Enfield’s single-cylinder BS6 range.

Now, leaked images of the upcoming Benelli BJ 1200 GT touring motorcycle have popped up on the internet. It is apparently the largest motorcycle to come out of Benelli’s Chinese parenthood. While it is too early to comment on its capabilities and overall quality, we expect it to be a substantially affordable alternative to full-on tourers such as the Honda Goldwing, Harley-Davidson Glide series, BMW K 1600 GTL, Indian Roadmaster, etc., that come at eye-watering price tags.

Benelli plans to launch the tourer sometime in the second quarter of 2021 if the ongoing COVID-19 crisis does not delay its plans further. Meanwhile, QJ Motor has already introduced its own version of the BJ 1200 GT for the Chinese police force. It wears a ‘QJ 1200’ decal. Either motorcycle locks horns with the CFMoto CF1250J — the biggest and most powerful made-in-China motorcycle yet.

The new Benelli BJ 1200 GT could be sold in potential European markets. Notable features or equipment highlights include keyless ignition, large semi-digital instrument console, full-LED lighting, powered mirrors, adaptive cruise control (camera + radar), TPMS (Type Pressure Monitoring System) and more. It does not feature a shaft-drive like the popular heavyweight tourers and makes-do with a conventional chain system. At a wheelbase of 1,550mm and kerb weight of 338kg, the Benelli BJ 1200 GT is still a mammoth. It rides on 17-inch wheels.

Powered by a 1,209cc inline-3 motor (developed over the familiar Benelli TNT 1130’s 1131cc engine), the BJ 1200 GT churns out roughly 134bhp and can attain a top speed of 220km/h. Full specifications are not available at present. To give a comparison, the BS4-compliant Benelli TNT 1130 R makes 135bhp @ 9,500rpm and 114Nm @ 7,500rpm. The BJ 1200 GT most likely packs a significantly higher torque figure to move its hefty body with ease.

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NEW BIKERNET AND BANDIT’S CANTINA PROGRAMS FOR 2020

To keep Bikernet moving forward in the New Year, we’ve shuffled things around a bit. We have decided to shut down all major advertising sales and will move all of Bikernet’s impressive library and 24 years of archived editorial content into Bandit’s Cantina, Bikernet’s subscription-supported section.

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All major content will be expanded into the Cantina.

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Motorcycles and Motorcycling in the USSR

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Motorcycles and Motorcycling in the USSR from 1939: A Social and Technical History
Hardcover – April 16, 2019 – available for Pre-Order on Amazon.com

https://www.amazon.com//dp/1787113140/

Motorcycles and Motorcycling in the USSR from 1939 provides the first accessible English language account of motorcycles in the Soviet Union. Concentrating on the wartime and postwar period until 1990, prior to the dissolution of the USSR in 1991, it covers the motorcycles produced, and looks at the way in which they were used at home and exported abroad.

Chapters cover wartime, models produced, the social character of Soviet era motorcycling, and wide-ranging sport. With planned rather than market-led production based around copies of pre-war German BMW and DKW models, the industry churned out hundreds of thousands of utilitarian and rugged machines that were very different from the more fashion-orientated machines produced in the West.

These motorcycles went under the place names of the producing factories: Ishevsk, Kovrov, Moskva, Minsk and, of course, the large flat twins produced in Irbit and Kiev under the Ural and Dnepr names. With a strong emphasis on Soviet era illustrations, the book provides an insight into a life, based on idealism and ideology that has now passed.

Photographs and images, many of them from private family collections, show Soviet bikes as well as popular imports Jawa from Czechoslovakia, and Pannonia from Hungary.

Hardcover: 128 pages
Publisher: Veloce Publishing
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-1787113145

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Colin Turbett got his first motorcycle at age 15 and has owned, built, and cried over mostly British bikes ever since. He currently looks after a 1949 BSA Gold Star, as well as a modern bike. Colin spent a long career in social work in the West of Scotland through which he was a successful textbook author. In recent years motorcycle trips to Eastern Europe have triggered an interest in the utilitarian machines produced there during the Communist years. He has always been interested in the history of the Soviet Union, and this book brings several of his passions together.