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Rolling with the All American, Most Innovative Half Shell

By General Posts

The KIRSH CHM-1 Lid by Prince Najar

Donny Devito, President and Chief Operating Officer of KIRSH Helmets, is the go-to guy for introducing the latest technology in helmets – the KIRSH’S CHM-1 Helmet Technology.

I met up with Donny at the 2022 Flying Piston Benefit during Daytona Bikeweek and discussed his latest product offering, the CHM-1, which features fluid displacement technology.

What is this Fluid Technology?
KIRSH’s innovative liner features fluid, not Styrofoam. Because of its fluid, it performs better at both low and high-energy impacts, from any direction at any one point in time.

KIRSH says that the silicone and fluid construct mimic the body’s natural protective functions. The brain sits in fluid in the skull. And now with this technology, the skull sits in the fluid within the helmet.

This allows for less mass, reducing impact torque, and a fluid buffer that more effectively protects the skull and brain… meaning that it has better brain protection. And the malleability of the liner ensures that it conforms uniquely to each user’s head, ensuring better protection and a custom fit, which means much greater comfort.

How does the CHM-1 Feel on a Ride?
I sent a text to Bill Brissette about his real-world road test with KIRSH. We set a time to confab about his test. Bill is a hardcore long-distance rider that within 4 months put 10,000 miles on a new bike wearing the CHM-1 helmet. Previous bikes clocked 112,000 miles in six years and 158,000 miles in nine years.

Bill Brissette on the gas with KIRSH
He said that in high wind conditions, riding between 65 to 80mph, the helmet acts like a gyroscope. “My head’s never been so steady and stable,” explained Bissette. “It’s really bizarre. I don’t know how else to describe it.”
Bill also said that the gel shapes to the contours of your head and at the same time you can feel cooling because you feel the air circulating around your head.

And the fit? “They really fit snug nicely across the face so I don’t have any strap smacking me or moving around or making a whiny noise in the wind,” commented Bill.

6 Questions with Donnie Devito, President of KISH Helmets
Question: Why when everyone is sourcing products overseas is he building an American-made product.

Donnie Devito – We found out that v-twin riders really valued American-made products. And we know it is better for the United States.

Question: KIRSH Helmets employ veterans and Americans with disabilities. Why is that important?

Donnie Devito – Both veterans and Americans with disabilities show up. They work hard and care about the work they do. And they get excited about doing things to make a difference.

Question: Why do you think that you get so much loyalty from your product?

Donnie Devito – The proof is in the ride. Riders come back and say how stable that helmet is. They experience the freedom of riding without having to think about the helmet. You don’t have to think about buffeting and the discomfort that comes from that or neck strain or head wobble. You can look around and actually enjoy your ride and focus more on the experience of riding.

Question: In Sturgis last year I saw a peculiar sight. At your booth, you were pulling helmets out of a refrigerator. Why?

Donnie Devito – It’s probably one of the best features. Riders can chill the liner for 10 minutes and get a couple of hours of a cool head.

Question: So what’s your most popular color of helmet?

Donnie Devito – Matte black or gloss black, no surprise there. Also very popular is our hydro-dipped patriotic helmet.

Question: Where can you get a helmet?

Donnie Devito – Check out the website at KIRSH Helmets. You can get it online from us or go to the dealer locator on the site. Also, check them out at the Indian Motorcycle Sturgis located at 2130 Main St, Sturgis, SD 57785.

Win a Signed Billy Lane Sons of Speed KIRSH CHM-1 Helmet

Experience the technology for yourself. A custom builder signed KIRSH helmet from the Flying Piston Benefit that features Billy Lane’s Son of Speed racing. It’s up for auction at the 2022 Sturgis edition of the Flying Piston Benefit. Check out the online Flying Piston Benefit silent auction – https://qtego.net/qlink/flyingpiston

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Summer Ride to Kolad Farmhouse

By General Posts

Friends as diverse as their range of motorcycle brands ride India’s Countryside

There is this wonderful group of riders who have accumulated a million kms and plenty more goodwill.

Musafirs motorcycle club started in 2010 and camaraderie, discovery, adventure, expertise and fun have ensured that they have been on a group ride almost every month since they started their club.

The word ‘Musafir’ literally means ‘traveller’.

There is plenty of information about The Musafirs group on their website and social media links.

Do check it out and follow them on social media in case you plan to visit India anytime for long-distance riding adventures to splendid destinations.

Their Website: https://themusafirs.com/

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/musafirsmotorcycleclub

The destination for 149th ride of Musafirs motorcycle group was Kolad.

The ride was in a single-line formation. The neon-green reflective vests are for most of the riders. The red ones are for ‘Pilots’, ‘Pointers’ and ‘Shepherds’.

CLICK HERE To Read this Travelogue from Incredible India – at Bikernet.com

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The “Biker Lives Matter” Organization

By General Posts

Rogue with his son Dale and grandson Reese – a family that rides together.

Click Here to Get Involved – http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

Article by Rogue – Founder of Biker Lives Matter, Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame

I have been asked a lot why I and some others started an organization named Biker Lives Matter and why it is important to me. My answer is simple, there is a need for an organization that calls attention to the tragic loss of lives and livelihoods from motorcycle crashes.

In the 1970s, I became involved in motorcycle rights and safety. At the time, motorcycle injury and death rate were high so the government and insurance companies began trying to pass laws that they hoped would help protect motorcyclists when crashes happened.

I have been riding motorcycles for 69 years and both my life and that of the others who ride has always been important to me.

I have seen many people injured and I know too many that have died.

I consider myself one of the lucky ones to still be riding at the age of 83 years old.

CLICK HERE To Read this insightful feature article on Bikernet.com

SUPPORT Biker Lives Matter – Visit website to know more: http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

REVIEW: Polo Helmet from Biker Lid

By General Posts

Product Review by Bandit

When I came across an Australian Hamster, Keith McClure, who was manufacturing light, tough and DOT approved Polo helmets I had to check them out, test them and have them modified by George “The Wild Brush.”

The fact that this helmet meets and exceeds D.O.T. Safety Standards FMVSS 218 ….

POLO Helmet sits low and snug won’t blow back in the wind.

Simple! Mushroom or no mushroom look? Go for the Low-profile Polo No Mushroom Head Helmet.

CLICK HERE To Read this Product Review Only On Bikernet.com

Check Out the Polo and Beanie Helmets at Biker Lid Website.

https://bikerlid.com/

AMA Champion Roland Sands and Nitro Circus star Andy Bell team up

By General Posts

Roland Sands, left, Andy Bell and Erik Bond inside the joint headquarters of Roland Sands Design and Sweatpants Media

from https://lbbusinessjournal.com/ by Brandon Richardson

‘Nitro Circus’ star, ex-motorcycle racer team up to open creative business campus in Zaferia

A gearhead and an adrenaline junkie meet at a trade show. There is no punchline.

Andy Bell and Roland Sands hit it off immediately nearly 20 years ago and have been friends ever since. The two went on to create separate businesses—Roland Sands Design and Sweatpants Media—and, after years of operating out of their respective headquarters, have come together to create a joint home base in Long Beach’s Zaferia neighborhood.

The companies together purchased a multi-building property at 1365 Obispo Ave. with a vision for a creative campus. Along with their firms, the graphics company Spin Imaging and Moxi Roller Skates also will call the campus home in a building separate from Sands’ and Bell’s space.

“We just wanted like-minded but different companies here to fuel a vibe of people that are stoked and doing rad stuff,” Bell said.

“People we can hang out with,” Sands added. “Fabrication, 3D fabrication, film, photography, graphics, printing—it’s all here. Almost any project is possible here, and that’s a pretty special thing.”

The friends almost missed out on the space, Sands said. The building was listed in 2018, but he was not in a position to take on the project by himself—and Bell was not ready to jump into such a massive undertaking. But when another buyer went into escrow on the site, the pair said they instantly knew they made a mistake.

“This place was built in the ’40s, and it’s gorgeous,” Sands said.

After months in escrow, the deal fell through, and Bell and Sands pounced. They bought the property for about $3 million in July 2019.

The Roland Sands Design custom motorcycle shop inside the company’s new Long Beach headquarters

The tenant had a few months left on their lease, so the roughly $2.5 million buildout did not get underway until just before the pandemic, which slowed progress on the rehab. But after nearly two years, the companies are celebrating their grand opening Saturday.

The space features a retail store (open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.), a screening theater, 3D and other fabrication facilities, a wood-working space, a motorcycle garage, design rooms and a slew of offices. It also includes a bar, a two-chair barbershop for special events for clients that could also be utilized by a tattoo artist, and dozens of motorcycles and helmets on display.

A third building is currently set up as a jam space for musician friends of Bell and Sands. The room has a stage and is full of vintage and modern musical equipment. The two said they have toyed with the idea of turning it into a legitimate music venue, but that won’t happen until well into the future, if at all.

Bell and Sands each had a career riding motorcycles—the latter racing on the roads of the U.S., the former flying through the air in freestyle motocross—before they met each other in the early 2000s at a motorcycle trade show in Indianapolis.

Sands, a Long Beach native, grew up around motorcycles.

“I was fully immersed in the culture because my dad was in the motorcycle industry,” Sands said, adding that he would work in his dad’s shop as a kid.

In 2005, after a racing career that included winning the 1998 American Motorcyclist Association 250cc Grand Prix Championship, Sands turned his success—and name—into a brand. The firm specializes in creating custom bikes and parts (some of which are 3D-printed). The company has grown to include a clothing and apparel line as well as a racing team.

Bell, meanwhile, was not so much into the technical side of the sport.

“I’m more of an adrenaline junkie,” Bell said, sitting in his new office complete with a beer tap. “I never liked building and working on the s—, I liked riding and jumping them.”

After his professional freestyle motocross career, Bell went on to become a stuntman, appearing on numerous TV shows and films, including “Rob Dyrdek’s Fantasy Factory” and “Jackass 3D.” Most notably, Bell starred in the “Nitro Circus” films and MTV series alongside Travis Pastrana and a host of other extreme-sport athletes.

Bell founded Sweatpants Media in 2012.

“I needed a change from getting hurt for a living and all the crap we used to do,” Bell said. “I didn’t know anything about production, but I’d been around it as talent. I’ve never owned a real business before and a decade later, here we are.”

Today, Sweatpants has numerous high-end clients, including Toyota, Red Bull, Mercedes, Lexus and Japanese powertool manufacturer Makita. With over 15 million views on YouTube, Sweatpants’ “The Pitch” for Toyota was the most widely viewed commercial in the U.S. in the third quarter, Bell said.

“The Pitch” – 2022 Toyota GR Supra Commercial by Sweatpants Media (15 million+ views since June 2021)

Bell and Sands try to utilize each other and their respective businesses as much as possible. The companies have teamed up on projects, including creating a custom bike for BMW with an accompanying video. After the premiere, the pair and their wives rode BMW bikes around Italy’s Lake Como.

On another project, Sweatpants flew three Toyota trucks into Vietnam and then drove them across the country. Sands and Bell were two of the three drivers who made the trek.

“We don’t like to fake s—,” Bell said. “Instead of pretending we were in Vietnam and pretending we flew trucks under helicopters, we actually did it. There is a tinge of adventure in everything we do.”

“We like to combine work and play,” Sands added.

Sands convinced Bell to move into a house around the corner from his on Naples Island in 2010. The best friends were neighbors for years before Sands moved to Park Estates.

For the last 12 years, Los Alamitos was home to Sands’ business, but he said he has always wanted to open a space in his hometown, closer to where he lives. For nearly nine years, Sweatpants operated out of the historic Villa Riviera in Downtown. But the two are looking forward to the quasi-business merger.

“We’re stoked. It’s fun being best friends and business partners,” Bell said. “There’s a little bit of yelling and a lot of hugging; a lot of wanting to punch each other and then a lot of wanting to drink beers together.”

“Thankfully for us,” Sands added, “we want to drink with each other more than we want to fight.”

The Roland Sands Design retail space at the company’s new joint headquarters with Sweatpants Media

Proposed new regulations for Autocycles in Massachusetts

By General Posts

Proposed new regulations for 3-wheel autocycles

from https://www.bostonherald.com by Boston Herald Wire Services

Proposed regulations of autocycles will be on the schedule when Massachusetts lawmakers hold a virtual public hearing Tuesday.

An autocycle is a three-wheeled motor vehicle that meets federal safety standards for a motorcycle. Unlike motorcycles, however, autocycles typically include a steering wheel, a seat for the driver and occasionally seats for passengers. The driver and passengers are not required to straddle the vehicle like a motorcycle.

One of the bills under consideration would create new safety measures for autocycles including requiring the driver and passengers to wear helmets, requiring autocycle manufacturers to equip the vehicles with safety belts which must be worn by drivers and passengers, and barring children under eight from riding in one.

Anyone who operates an autocycle without wearing a safety helmet or safety belts would face a fine of no less than $25 under the bill.

Massachusetts Lawmakers Weigh New Regulations for Autocycles

from https://www.nbcboston.com by The Associated Press

An autocycle is a motor vehicle with three wheels on the ground that meets federal motor vehicle safety standards for a motorcycle

Proposed regulations of autocycles will be on the schedule when Massachusetts state lawmakers hold a virtual public hearing Tuesday.

An autocycle is a motor vehicle with three wheels on the ground that meets federal motor vehicle safety standards for a motorcycle. Unlike motorcycles, however, autocycles typically include a steering wheel, a seat for the driver and occasionally seats for passenger.

One of the bills under consideration would create new safety measures for autocycles. Those include requiring the driver and passengers wear helmets, requiring autocycle manufacturers to equip the vehicles with safety belts and barring children under eight from riding in an autocycle.

Own the road and rent the ride with some Harley cool

By General Posts

by Felicity Donohoe from https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk

From https://maps.harley-davidson.com/

From https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/content/rent-a-bike.html

If you’re looking for a road trip with a difference, then Harley Davidson may have the answer – and you don’t need to own a Hog to make it happen.

Seen in iconic movies such as Easy Rider – ridden by Peter Fonda – and even Arnie in Terminator 2: Judgment Day – nothing says cool like a Harley Davidson motorcycle, and if the highway has been calling you, this might be the way to get up close and personal with the American outdoors.

Motorcycling is an option to beat weekend traffic and find a different kind of freedom for your staycation – and you don’t need to fork out a fortune and own one of the bikes. In fact, you can rent one for a holiday with affordable cruising daily prices or touring per week rates, choosing from a wide range of models such as Heritage Classic bike or Ultra Limited.

And taking it a step further, Harley Davidson has an online ride planner that includes top trips around the States. Simply type in your start and finish, with customisable options such as preferred stops and overnight accommodation, if needed. The interactive planner works out your route and can generate on-road and – if you’re feeling brave – off-road routes for the adventurous rider.

There is 10% discounts for HOG (Harley Owners’ Group) members.

Ensure you have your motorcycle licence and equipment, including helmet, when hiring.

For the interactive ride planner go to maps.harley-davidson.com by clicking here.

What motorcycles can I rent?
A variety of new models are available at hundreds of convenient locations all around the world. Browse and enquire on-line or check your local Harley-Davidson® Authorized Rental Dealer for more information. Have a look at the current models to see which one appeals to you.

Where can I rent a Harley-Davidson® motorcycle?
There are hundreds of convenient locations all around the world where you can rent a bike for your holiday, extended test ride, or while your bike is being serviced.

How do I sign up?
Find a location on the rental locator and click “book online” or for locations in the USA book directly on www.eaglerider.com.

What happens after I inquire online?
You will receive a confirmation email. Outside the USA you will be contacted by the Harley-Davidson® Authorized Rental Dealer you selected to discuss your rental requirements.

When you pick up your rental motorcycle, ensure you bring your full driver’s license with the valid motorcycle endorsement, along with your major credit card and your sense of adventure.

What do I need to hire a bike?

  • A full and valid driver’s license with a motorcycle endorsement
  • A major credit card
  • The minimum age to hire varies globally, In the USA you must be 21.

What gear do I need?
You will need a helmet and the right gear to ensure you are comfortable and protected on your ride.

  • USA: DOT-approved helmets are required. All rentals include the free loan of DOT-approved half-shell helmets for riders and passengers. Many locations also loan 3/4 or full-face helmets free of charge, subject to availability at the time of pick-up.
  • Outside the USA: CE approved gear are required – helmet, pants, jacket, boots and gloves.

Your dealership may have gear you can hire or there is an extensive range in their showroom to buy.

5 Best Motorcycle Routes to See Fall

By General Posts

One of the best parts about owning a motorcycle is having a front-row view to all things nature. There’s nothing standing in between you and all the colors of the natural world. Fall is one of the best times to go cruising through the wilderness. Leaf peepers are known for chasing bright yellows, reds, and oranges all over the country as autumn sets in. Chances are there’s a great leaf-oriented stretch of road near you.

Get Your Bike Ready for the Trip

Before you head out on your trip, make sure you have everything you need to explore the open road. Some of these routes can be quite remote, so you need to have a plan in case things take a turn for the worst.

Above all else, use helmet communication to keep in touch with your loved ones on your trip, especially if you stray far from home. You should be able to call for help or check your GPS without taking your eyes off the road. You drove all this way to look at the leaves, after all.

Looking down at your phone can be a recipe for disaster. You also need to keep your hands on the handlebars at all times to stay in control. Use a Bluetooth motorcycle helmet to use your electronic devices hands-free for more peace of mind behind the wheel.

Find a Bluetooth motorcycle helmet with speakers that produces clear audio. You need to balance the sound of your music, call, or GPS with the sounds of the road in case another driver needs to get your attention.

Your phone may not be there to rescue if you get lost or get into a wreck. Consider bringing along paper maps of your destination and a backup communication system, such as two-way radio, in case you don’t have access to cell service.

Inspect your motorcycle to make sure it’s ready for the trip at hand. Add air to the tires, if needed. You should know the approximate distance of your trip. Check the mileage and consider visiting your local mechanic if it’s been over a year or 6,000 miles since your last tune-up.

Tunnel of Trees – Michigan

The country’s “third coast” is known for its rich forestry and sprawling coastlines and Michigan’s Tunnel of Trees is perhaps the best example of both. The branches of the trees extend over the road, creating what looks like a tunnel.

Most of the action takes place on M-119. You can catch it at the north end of Petosky. The tunnel official starts in Harbor Springs. Follow the route for another 20 miles around the edge of Lake Michigan. The bluff, which runs around 140 feet above sea level, keeps you up high for a panoramic view of the coast. Be sure to slow down or stop when taking in the sights. The state road narrows at several points, including the infamous Devil’s Ridge. Lots of drivers will probably have their eyes on the trees, so don’t be surprised if they make a mistake.

Coastal Route One – Maine

Route One has a reputation across the East Coast. It makes for a stunning drive, whether you’re coming from Key West, Florida or New York City. We suggest taking it all the way north to Maine, where you’ll see some of the most picturesque roads of your life. New England is full of many charms, including open farmland, quaint towns full of history, and weaving coastlines, and Route One lets you see the best of everything.

You’ll need to take I-95 about 90 minutes north of Boston to the Maine border. From there, hop on Route One to cruise through small towns like towns as Kennebunkport and Ogunquit, both of which are teeming with lush forestry. The road takes you along the coast, which gives you the chance to explore the area’s many islands, nooks, and peninsulas. You’re bound to pass a lighthouse or three.

There’s a certain humble charm to the remote towns of Northern Vermont. Turn down the noise of your engine to enjoy the peace and quiet as the water laps against the rocky shore. Wildlife can get pretty bold in the more rural parts of the state. Don’t be surprised if you run into a moose as soon as you get out of the city.

San Juan Mountain Skyway – Colorado

If you love the mountains, head out west to Colorado to experience the thrill of the San Juan Mountain Skyway. The road gets its name for its steep incline and sharp turns. The road goes from 6,200 feet above sea level near the city of Cortez to over 11,000 feet near what’s known as the Red Mountain Pass.

It gives you the ultimate mountain experience, complete with expansive river valleys, peaks over 14,000 feet tall, and trees that feel larger than life. The arching road gives you a cascading view of the trees during the fall. You can see several miles into the distance in some parts.

The road starts in Durango, CO, the largest city on the path. This is the time to stock up on supplies. Your choices start to thin out from here. Follow the road north via U.S. 160 to Mancos. Consider stopping by Rocky Mountain National Park and Mesa Verde National Park while you’re in the area if you feel like seeing more of what this iconic state has to offer. It continues for a total 235 miles, or 7 hours, going all the way up to Telluride and Silverton.

It’s best to start your trip in the early fall, as some roads turn icy early in the season. The mountains have a climate all their own, so be prepared to encounter some snow along the way. Bring along a few extra layers to stay warm on your motorcycle as temperatures fluctuate.

Nothing beats the gorgeous palette of fall foliage. Chart a course for one of these autumn destinations to enjoy the ride of your life.

BMW Vision AMBY showcases excellence against H-D Serial 1 e-bikes

By General Posts

SOURCE: https://www.autoevolution.com/

SOURCE: https://www.financialexpress.com/

BMW unveils Vision AMBY electric bikes: 300+ km range, 60 km/h top speed!
BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY Breaks the Norm With Striking Design and Advanced Tech

Of BMW’s 2021 IAA display, a very interesting one is the BMW i Vision AMBY, a peddle electric bicycle that boasts three speed ratings – 25 km/h for cycle tracks, 45 km/h for the city and 60 km/h for multi-lane roads (although, higher speeds would require a licence as well).

The i Vision AMBY also gets the rest of fancy EV features like geofencing which can be used for automatically adjusting its speed. It is one of five different concept vehicles with which the BMW Group is presenting at the IAA Mobility event.

While users of the BMW i Vision AMBY have to constantly pedal in order to benefit from the assistance of the electric drive system, BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY accelerates via a throttle grip

One of the five concept vehicles showcased by BMW at IAA Mobility 2021 is truly innovative – neither a bike or a motorcycle, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY blends the best of each category with advanced connectivity and geofencing technology.

BMW unveiled two electric vehicles with two wheels under the “Adaptive Mobility” (AMBY) concept. Both of them come with three speed levels for different types of road, and require an adequate driving license, insurance license plates, and a helmet for riding at maximum speed. Compared to the BMW i Vision AMBY that requires constant pedaling, the Motorrad Vision uses the throttle grip and features footrests instead of pedals, like a motorcycle.

According to BMW, while it resembles a bicycle, the new Motorrad Vision flaunts the features of a powerful motorbike, including an 830 mm-tall (32.6”) seat, a large bicycle fork, a small headlight with the U-shaped BMW Motorrad light signature, and the fact that it’s accelerated from the handlebars. However, at 65 kg (143 lbs), it’s lighter than typical motorbikes, which makes it more agile and manageable.

Instead of manually selecting the riding mode – 25 kph (15.5 mph) on cycle paths, 45 kph on inner-city roads (27.9 mph), 60 kph (37.2 mph) on multi-lane roads and out of town, geofencing technology and the HERE map service could be enough for automatically adjusting speed levels.

This way, the vehicle could determine the type of road and adjust the speed accordingly, without any intervention. Plus, the license plate would act as an innovative display, where the operating mode would be visible for the other road users.

The problem is that, at the moment, there’s no legal basis for this “modular speed concept”. This is where the Motorrad AMBY becomes a true pioneer, because it’s precisely intended to help bring out the legislation that will regulate this concept in the near future.

No future driving or riding experience can be envisioned without connectivity, and the BMW specially developed app allows the rider to activate the motorbike, while providing access to basic functions and status data.

While additional features such as an optimized ABS system or a tire pressure monitoring system could make the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY even safer and more efficient, this concept motorbike already reflects a truly innovative spirit that redefines the boundaries between bikes and motorcycles.

PRESS RELEASE: 6 SEPTEMBER 2021

As a completely new concept between bicycle and motorbike, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY taps into fresh possibilities for the innovative, urban mobility of the future. It is one of five different concept vehicles that the BMW Group will use at the IAA Mobility 2021 in Munich to showcase its vision of individual mobility in and around the urban setting.

Under the common umbrella of electric mobility, digitalisation and sustainability, these five pioneering concepts form a versatile and sustainably conceived mobility mix on two and four wheels that comprehensively addresses a highly diverse range of mobility needs.

BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY and BMW i Vision AMBY.

AMBY stands for “Adaptive Mobility”. The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY and the BMW i Vision AMBY (see BMW i Vision AMBY press release) interpret the fundamental idea of adaptive urban mobility on two wheels based on differing facets. Both vehicles are electrically powered with three speed levels for different types of road. The drive allows up to 25 km/h on cycle paths, up to 45 km/h on inner-city roads and up to a top speed of 60 km/h on multi-lane roads and out of town. A helmet, insurance licence plates and the relevant driving licence are required to be able to travel at higher speeds, however. While the BMW i Vision AMBY as a high-speed pedelec requires constant pedalling in order to gain assistance from the electric drive, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is accelerated using the throttle grip and has footrests instead of pedals, as is typical of a motorcycle.

The modes available to the rider are stored in the app on the smartphone that connects to the respective AMBY vision vehicle.

Manual selection of the speed level is conceivable, as is detection of the road by means of geofencing technology, thereby allowing automatic adjustment of the top speed. As there is currently no legal basis for such a vehicle with a modular speed concept, the idea behind the AMBY vision vehicles is to prompt legislation that will enable this kind of set-up. In this way, the BMW Group is demonstrating that it will continue to be involved in providing mobility options in big cities in the future and offers innovative solutions.

New stimuli for emotional mobility on two wheels.

“The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY takes us into new territory. For us, the focus is on user behaviour – the question is: how will customers want to get around in the future? What will they expect their vehicle to be capable of? This was precisely the starting point of our deliberations. Our aim was to develop an extremely emotional vehicle for smart mobility in and around the city that offered maximum freedom. The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY really does enable our customers to experience urban life in a whole new way, cover distances more flexibly and “break free” of the city from time to time, too. At the same time, BMW Motorrad is consistently pursuing its electromobility strategy for urban conurbations. It’s a fascinating introduction to the world of BMW Motorrad that also promises maximum riding pleasure,” explains Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design BMW Motorrad.

The design – the DNA of BMW Motorrad.

The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY defies all existing categories: visually akin to the world of bicycles, it is a motorbike at heart. Its slender proportions promise ruggedness and adventure, while its design suggests clear echoes of the expressive style and layout of an BMW Enduro motorbike. With chunky treads on both the 26-inch front wheel, which has a thinner tyre, and the 24-inch rear wheel with its more rounded tyre, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY clearly shows that it is both willing and able to go anywhere. The firmly integrated seat with a height of 830 mm is just as typical a motorbike feature as the fixed footrests.

The seat also acts as a design element over the flat, rising upper frame section, creating a striking flyline. This produces a completely new, fresh look for BMW Motorrad – a link between the e-bike and motorbike world.
The large energy storage unit and drive unit form a dark graphic block at the centre of the frame.

The large-dimensioned bicycle fork on the front wheel features protectors and gives the entire front section a more massive, powerful look. A small headlight with the U-shaped BMW Motorrad light signature is a clear reference to the roots of the concept, as is the double LED element as a tail light. Another BMW Motorrad feature is that the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is accelerated from the handlebars, as is customary on a motorbike.
With a total weight of just 65 kg, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is significantly lighter than other motorbikes, ensuring it offers excellent manoeuvrability and agility.

Colour and material concept featuring depth and unexpected details.

As compared to a conventional combustion engine, the concept of the electric drive in the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY means there is little in the way of visible mechanics.
For this reason, its technical heart is deliberately disguised and showcased in a striking machine-like style. This accentuates the highly elaborated colour and material concept, which goes well beyond the traditional dark underlying colour scheme and use of white highlights.

In its use of materials, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY cross-references two other concept vehicles that will also see their world premiere at the IAA Mobility 2021: The BMW i Vision Circular and the BMW i Vision AMBY. The trim material used on the energy storage unit – known as “floating grey polymers” – is also used in the bumper of the BMW i Vision Circular. It consists of recycled plastic and can itself be fed back into the material cycle at the end of the product lifecycle. Meanwhile the material used for the seat is also to be found in the saddle of the BMW i Vision AMBY and in the tyres of the BMW i Vision Circular. Based on recycled plastic granulate and sporting a fascinating terrazzo look, it demonstrates how several materials can be given a second life with a new form and function.

Asymmetrical design of the sides of the vehicle.

In keeping with the unexpected, self-assured character of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY, its two sides have deliberately been designed distinctively. On both sides, the white “AMBY” lettering catches the eye above the light-coloured drive unit, making a striking statement as a stylised graphic on the trim of the energy storage unit. While the lettering on the left gains additional visual depth from a colourfully shimmering, iridescent drop shadow, the inscription on the right appears deliberately without a drop shadow. Below the energy storage unit there are two iridescent elements that add a further accentuation.

On the right-hand side of the vehicle, three small turquoise blue tubes visibly emerge from the silhouette, clearly alluding to the electric heart of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY. Next to this is a quote by Markus Schramm, Head of BMW Motorrad: „Electro-mobility will be very significant for the future of motorcycling. We foresee a slew of upcoming products with a focus on electric propulsion, particularly in the field of urban mobility. And I’m not only thinking of classic scooters here, but also of alternative modern, emotional products. Electro-mobility on two wheels needs to be really fun and adventurous and BMW is committed to developing corresponding products.”

On closer inspection, the interplay between the technoid pixel font with the classic serif font reflects a great attention to detail at several points: together these bridge the gap between the past and the future – just like the vision vehicle itself. The coordinates on the right are a reference to the BMW Motorrad Design Studio in Munich, where the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY came into being. On the opposite side, the letters “AMBY” also appear in Morse code, but with dashes visualising the dots. In their perfect interplay, all these carefully conceived details create a unique graphic and a highly contemporary sense of style.

The smartphone as the key.

The specially developed app enables the user to activate the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY for riding, read in their stored driving licence classes and make use of the appropriate insurance cover on an on-demand basis as required. In this way, the app performs the classic key function while also making use of the customary identification options provided by the smartphone such as Face ID. Basic functions and status queries (e.g. current charge status) are available as in the BMW App. Further developments and adjustments to the software can be provided to customers at any time via over-the-air updates.
The smartphone shown in the vision vehicle charges inductively on the magnetic holder in the rider’s lower field of vision. These connectivity options would also allow anti-theft protection and the freely programmable immobiliser to be offered as basic functions.
And the answer to the question “Where is my BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY?” would be just a click away on the smartphone, too.

Geofencing as a key technology.

Instead of choosing the riding mode yourself, geofencing technology combined with the detailed HERE map service could provide the required parameters for automatically adjusting speed levels (25/45/60 km/h) and the matching insurance cover. This technology enables the vehicle to detect the type of road, cycle path or slow-traffic area currently being used so that the maximum permitted speed can be automatically adjusted. In this way, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY would transform from a vehicle similar to an S-pedelec to something that is more motorcycle-inspired. The user cannot override the mode. The required licence plate takes the form of an innovative display surface, so the mode selected at any given time can be easily recognised and read by other road users.

Additional technological innovations are conceivable for the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY, too: an optimised ABS system could further increase safety, as could an automatic high beam or brake light assistant, as well as daytime running lights. A tyre pressure monitoring system such as the one already available as an optional extra in BMW Group motorcycles is also conceivable. Finally, potential safety features could also include a distance radar with a range of up to 140 m to provide a visual and acoustic warning in the app when there is a vehicle approaching from behind.

The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY shows one possible manifestation of what the modern, urban mobility of tomorrow might look like. It is intended as a blueprint to drive forward conversations about future-oriented travel in cities.

Figures of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY.

Battery: not specified

Output: not specified

Vmod1: up to 25 km/h

Vmod2: up to 45 km/h

Vmodmax: up to 60 km/h

Range: approx. 110 km (combined according to WMTC)

Wheels: Studded spoke wheels with 26-inch front and 24-inch rear

Seat height: 830 mm

Unladen weight: approx. 65 kg

Fact or Fiction – Helmet Use

By General Posts

from Motorcycle Riders Foundation at http://mrf.org/

On a nearly annual basis the media in this country is inspired to report stories about motorcycle fatalities on our nation’s roadways. Invariably, these stories paint motorcycle rider deaths as a product of irresponsible riders who live in states that have some level of helmet choice. Frequently they report statistics that prove their narrative but fail to paint a full and complete picture. The lens with which these stories are reported often takes the naïve view that crashes can be made “safer” if only bikers somehow followed government helmet mandates.

The only true solution to motorcycle safety and reducing fatalities are proactive measures, which prevent a collision from occurring at all, rather than reactive steps that may or may not offer some level of injury mitigation only after a crash has already taken place. Rider education, which prepares motorcyclists to interact with other roadway users by learning and practicing the skills necessary for hazard avoidance and developing a strategy to deal with real world traffic, is the primary component of a comprehensive motorcycle safety plan. Additionally, educating all motor vehicle operators to be alert and free of impairment as they share the road with others is critical in deterring crashes caused by inattention.

When coming across these stories keep in mind some facts that are omitted from their reports.

Fact: Over the last decade motorcycle related deaths have varied between years but for the most part remain flat. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) data from 2019 shows 5,014 deaths, a decrease from the 2008 5,307 deaths NTSHA recorded. In that same time period registered motorcycles increased from 7.7 million in 2008 to 8.7 million ten years later. In other words, there are a million more bikes on the road and there were 300 less deaths.

Fact: Twenty-nine percent of motorcycle riders involved in fatal crashes in 2017 were riding without proper licensure at the time of the collision. A valid motorcycle license includes a rider having a valid driver’s license with a motorcycle endorsement or possessing a motorcycle only license. Proper training and licensing are fundamental parts of motorcycle safety, taking unqualified riders off the road is a commonsense solution to lowering motorcycle fatalities.

Fact: The lack of a helmet mandate in the 31 states who have allowed freedom of choice does not prohibit someone from choosing to wear a helmet. In fact, a 2019 U.S. Department of Transportation audit showed that states without mandatory helmet laws still saw 56.5% of riders choose to wear a helmet.

Fact: A 2019 U.S. Department of Transportation Fatality Analysis Reporting System report showed that in crash study data, where helmet use was known, 36% of motorcyclists killed were not wearing a helmet. Conversely 61% of motorcycle fatalities involved a rider wearing a helmet. The remaining 3% had unknown usage. These numbers closely mirror NHTSA data on overall helmet usage which shows 64% of riders wearing helmets.

Fact: Despite the constant drum beat from safety advocates, the media and Washington D.C. bureaucrats about the ills of helmetless riders, state legislatures continue to trust the judgment of bikers. Just last year Missouri passed a modified helmet law allowing the choice to ride without a helmet to those who are qualified. In at least three other states, West Virginia, Maryland, and Nebraska there are active campaigns to change their helmet mandates and let those who ride decide.

Ride With The Leaders ™ by joining the Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) at http://mrf.org/ or call (202) 546-0983