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Yamaha Supports SEAL-Naval Special Warfare Family Foundation

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from https://www.globenewswire.com

2020 Yamaha Wolverine X4 XT-R Edition Raffle Raises Money for SEAL Families

/EIN News/ — MARIETTA, Ga., March 19, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, recently provided a new 2020 Yamaha Wolverine X4 XT-R Edition Side-by-Side (SxS) to the SEAL-Naval Special Warfare Family Foundation (NSWFF) for auction at their annual fundraiser near San Diego, California. Built Real World Tough in the U.S. at Yamaha’s Newnan, Georgia, manufacturing facility, the Proven Off-Road XT-R Edition Wolverine X4 donation raised capital toward the organization’s mission of supporting SEAL members’ families. This marks Yamaha’s sixth year of aiding NSWFF, allowing more than $100,000 in funding to be raised for the much-deserved recipients.

“Yamaha is proud to continue supporting the SEAL-Naval Special Warfare Family Foundation and its mission of assisting the families of those who defend our freedoms,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha motorsports marketing manager. “We are honored to work with this highly esteemed organization and support their efforts of raising awareness and assistance for the brave and heroic NSWFF families.”

The SEAL-Naval Special Warfare Family Foundation is a San Diego based 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 2008 that raises awareness and funds for special programs in direct support of the NSWFF families on a local, national, and global scale. Further details on the NSWFF organization and fundraiser can be found at SEALFamilyFoundation.org.

In addition to all the durable and reliable attributes coming standard on every Yamaha SxS and ATV, including the industry’s only 10-Year Belt Warranty, the XT-R Editions lead the lineup with beefy radial tires, a heavy-duty WARN® winch, advanced suspension, and stylish paint and graphics package, all at an MSRP of $18,149.

Every Yamaha SxS and full-size ATV is proudly Assembled in the USA at Yamaha’s advanced manufacturing facility in Newnan, Georgia, for worldwide distribution. To view Yamaha’s entire Proven Off-Road ATV and SxS lineup and learn more, visit YamahaOutdoors.com. Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaOutdoors or search the following hashtags on all platforms: #Yamaha #REALizeYourAdventure #ProvenOffRoad #AssembledInUSA #Yamaha10YearBelt

Weston man builds epic motorcycle to promote saving lives through Be The Match donations

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WESTON – It’s a gleaming, curvy, sport-style motorcycle with a distinct Art Deco look, and there’s no other bike like it on Earth.

Mark Ecklund of Weston took two years of painstaking, detail-oriented work to build it, hand-fabricating most of its body work from thin aluminum. For just the tail section, the 53-year-old machinist took two weeks to patiently and gently tap — using a hand-held, hammer-like metal molding tool — a piece of aluminum into the shape he wanted.

The project represents the ability to save lives. Mark created the motorcycle to honor and promote Be The Match, a worldwide organization that works to match donors of life-saving bone marrow and stem cells to people suffering from blood cancers such a leukemia and lymphoma. In 2012, Mark donated stem cells that were used to save the life of a 53-year-old Pennsylvania man, who is a husband, father and grandfather.

Mark is a serial inventor who has built and designed things such as a one-person hovercraft, a safety faucet that prevents scalding and an improved version of a compound bow, and it’s his habit to enthusiastically and compulsively throw himself into projects. But even for his standards, this motorcycle, once a brand-new Indian cruiser, is special.

A year after the transplant, Ecklund and the stem cell recipient, Todd Euen of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, met and became instant friends. The experience was so gratifying that Ecklund can’t even begin to explain it. All he can say is that the motorcycle is a physical manifestation of those feelings, and a vehicle to promote Be The Match. He and his wife, Chris Ecklund, are doing anything they can to encourage people to register for Be The Match donations.

“We want to bring that awareness to people, to have more people register,” Chris said.

The motorcycle is a work of art, Mark said, “that is more of a campaign.”

‘Forever grateful’

Todd, a controller at a Ford dealership, was diagnosed with leukemia in July 2012. In order to save his life, doctors rushed him to Pittsburgh, located about 66 miles west of Johnstown. If Todd hadn’t gotten treatment, he likely would have died within two weeks, doctors told him.

“I was in shock,” Todd said.

He received Mark’s donation in a procedure done on Christmas Eve of 2012.

Be The Match requires that donors and recipients wait a year after procedures before connecting with each other. After that year passed, Todd contacted Mark to get to know him and thank him.

“I didn’t know what to expect when I met him. He basically saved my life,” Todd said. “It was real emotional when we met. … Our family is forever grateful to him.”

‘I knew exactly what I was going to do’

Chris and Mark decided to become donors when Mark turned 35. They both regularly give blood, and it was Mark’s idea to do more.

“We just wanted to help people,” Mark said.

They found Be The Match, did a little research, and then, almost on a whim, drove to the Appleton office of Be The Match to register. Chris still hasn’t been matched with a recipient.

“I’m really jealous of Mark,” she said.

After meeting Todd , Mark came up with the idea to design and build the Be The Match motorcycle. He talked about his plans with Chris, and she agreed that they should purchase the 2015 Indian Scout to convert. Chris didn’t quite grasp what her husband had in mind; she thought it would be a light modification of the new Indian model.

As Mark started to the project, “I thought, ‘We spent all this money to tear it apart,'” Chris said.

Mark visualized his motorcycle from the start. “I knew exactly what I wanted. I knew exactly what I was going to do,” he said.

He wanted something that would be magnetic to other motorcycle enthusiasts. And even though Chris didn’t know the details, she’s been married to Mark for 29 years. So she wasn’t surprised when he spend nearly all his free time working on the bike. Nor was she surprised at the result.

They take the motorcycle to races and shows. First riders come see the bike, then Chris and Mark go into their Be The Match spiel, and often Chris will get people to register for donations on the spot. (It requires filling out a form and doing some cheek swabs to get DNA samples.)

Jess Klingberg, the Be The Match community engagement specialist based in Appleton, said the motorcycle is magnet for potential donors, helping sign up potential donors by the dozen. She attended a motorcycle rally with the Ecklunds. “That motorcycle turns a lot of heads,” she said.

Todd accompanied Mark and Chris to one show near Pittsburgh, and even though he’s gotten to know Mark and his all-in attitude, he was still surprised at how much gusto both Mark and Chris display when promoting Be The Match.

“They have jumped all in,” Todd said with a laugh.

Be the Match Radiothon

A live, over-the-air Radiothon for Be the Match will be held from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. March 19 on the Wausau rock radio station WIFC-FM 95.5 Jess Klingberg, the Be The Match community engagement specialist who works in the organization’s Appleton office, will be on air to explain details about the program and tell stories about what Be The Match can mean for individuals dealing with cancer.

Harley-Davidson T-Shirt Quilt Sells for $11,500, Money Goes to Charity

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For more than a century, the Harley-Davidson name has grown so large that now it far exceeds the confines of just motorcycle manufacturer moniker. For some people – and they are not few – Harley has become a way of life.

For true fans of the brand there are few things that cannot be associated with this famous American name. From motorcycle-related hardware to less-so items, there are countless ways in which the brand is honored.

One strange, yet apparently very satisfying way the Harley name is used around the world is quilts. There is an entire industry dedicated to them, and the Internet is flooded with people bragging or trying to sell their quilts.

You can generally buy a Harley-Davidson quilt for sums that start from around $100 for a twin-sized U.S. bed. But this one here, pictured above, was sold at the end of February for $11,500.

It went for so much because there’s a story behind it. It was made by a British Columbia quilter named Bobbi Pardy to help Adaura Cayford, a 9-year-old currently undergoing treatment for an inoperable brain cancer.

Pardy spent around 60 hours assembling the quilt from donated T-shirt wearing the Harley-Davidson name and logos, sent to her from places as far as Saudi Arabia and Ecuador.

Once ready, the quilt was sold at the end of a 10-day auction event for $11,500. And even if that seems a lot, just think Adaura’s medication costs $5,000 per month, according to Alaska Highway News.

“I had to do something,” the creator of the quilt said according to the source. “I thought this was something I could do. It’s my time and that’s it. It’s a really cool T-shirt quilt.”

Despite the effort made by these people from British Columbia, Adaura’s fight continues. For those willing to help, a Go Fund Me page has been created where more money can be donated.

European motorcycle police begin mission trip to South America

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.- A group of European motorcycle police is currently taking part in a mission trip to South America, offering support to Catholic missionaries in poor communities.

Moto for Peace is a non-profit organization founded in 2000 by Italian police officers to travel the world on motorcycles to carry out humanitarian, social and evangelistic work. The group promotes values of solidarity, friendship and cultural exchange while contributing to educational, healthcare and sanitation projects.

The organization has expanded to include active police officers from Spain, Germany, and other European countries. Their previous efforts include donating motorcycles to doctors in rural Nepal, raising money for a water purifier in Ethiopia, providing medical aid in various parts of Africa, and completing construction on an orphanage in Bolivia.

The current team is comprised of 16 Italian, German and Spanish police. They departed for Chile Jan. 29 and plan to visit Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Peru over the course of two months.

The mission’s purpose is to support the commitment of Catholic missionaries in South America along an 8,700 mile route, visiting the communities where the missionaries work under conditions of poverty, lack of resources and social instability.

Since their arrival in Chile, the police officers have visited homes for the elderly and orphans in three cities. They also visited the offices of the Archdiocese of Santiago and met with Archbishop Celestino Aós. In a video posted on the archdiocesan website, Aós expressed his joy at “meeting people who stand up and work for peace.”

Celestino Suárez, the vice president of Moto for Peace, told ACI Prensa, CNA’s Spanish language news partner, that the current mission is being carried out with the collaboration of the Vatican’s Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development. The agency learned about the group’s work in 2018 and encouraged it to visit South America again, their second trip since 2007.

The Flying Piston Custom Striders Auction Group for 2019

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Tiny Strider Customs Steal the Show at Mecum Las Vegas

The Custom Strider Program is an initiative of The Flying Piston Benefit produced by Marilyn Stemp of Iron Trader News and Jeff Najar of Biker Pros to raise awareness and funds for non-profits and individuals in the biker community. Each year a new class is unveiled at the Flying Piston Benefit Builders Breakfast at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip the first Sunday of Sturgis Rally.

READ THE FULL COVERAGE – CLICK HERE

Motorcycle Club Donates 400 Teddy Bears To Camden County Police To Comfort Children During Traumatic Events

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from https://philadelphia.cbslocal.com

Teddy bears are making a difference in Camden County. The Brothers In Blue Motorcycle Club donated 400 teddy bears to the police department in Camden on Thursday night.

Officers will use the stuffed animals to provide comfort to children involved in traumatic events.

“We are extremely grateful to the Brothers in Blue for their compassion and generosity,” said Chief Joseph Wysocki. “These bears will be kept in police vehicles and always on hand to comfort a child. We are working to ensure that even during traumatic incidents, interactions with our officers are seen are meaningful and positive.”

The bears will be kept in police vehicles.

Canton veteran who lost leg rides again thanks to customized motorcycle

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by Kelly Byer from https://www.cantonrep.com

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer get back on the road.

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer ride a motorcycle for the first time in eight years.

More importantly, he said, the fall program renewed his faith in humanity.

“I was left for dead on the side of the road,” he said. “So, during my time in this last seven or eight years, I have lost a lot of faith in people. A lot.”

In 2011, a drunken driver pulled in front of Zollicoffer’s 1995 Kawasaki motorcycle on state Route 800. The now retired U.S. Marine Corps and Army National Guard veteran had completed three tours in Iraq and was scheduled for deployment to Afghanistan.

Another person came across the early morning wreck and stopped to help. Zollicoffer, a 53-year-old Canton resident, spent months in a coma and had his left leg amputated at the hip.

This past Veteran’s Day, he received a modified trike at the Makers For Veterans closing ceremony. His family’s safety concerns had kept Zollicoffer from pursuing a costly trike, but they talked and accepted what it meant to him beforehand.

He’s taken a few rides.

“I can’t even describe the feeling, when you get that wind blowing through your hair,” joked Zollicoffer, who has a shaved head.

Makers for Veterans

The Colorado-based nonprofit Challenge America began the Makers for Veterans program (CAMVETS) in 2019. It brought together volunteers with various expertise to solve challenges posed by veterans.

Dallas Blaney, executive director of Challenge America, said the inspiration came from a similar initiative in Israel. Challenge America members participated in the international program and wanted to recreate the experience in the United States.

Blaney described it as “human-centered design applied to the veterans space.” The process begins by asking participants, selected from across the nation, what they want to do that they haven’t been able to.

“That forces the veterans to frame their challenges in a positive way,” Blaney said.

A team — built “from scratch” — with skills relevant to the individual’s challenge then meet at a kickoff event. That is followed by about eight weeks of planning and work culminating in a three-day workshop.

CAMETS then works with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other partners to identify prototypes to patent and undergo additional product development.

“So that we can get those promising solutions out to market where other veterans and civilians, too, can benefit from these things,” Blaney said.

CAMVETS coordinated a spring and fall program. From 17 total projects, Blaney said, the partners produced 15 working prototypes and, so far, filed for five provisional patents.

Blaney said a digital service dog application designed to help a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder is expected to be the first product ready for market.

Both programs were held in the Cleveland area, not far from where Blaney grew up. He said the region has a great blend of medical, manufacturing, entrepreneurial, academic and innovative institutions.

The Cleveland Clinic, Bio Enterprise and St. Edward High School are some of CAMVETS’ partners.

“It just seemed like such an amazing fit, and it’s a very friendly place to do business,” Blaney said.

The nonprofit likely will host another program in Northeast Ohio this year, but only one. He said CAMVETS plans to expand to a new city.

Zollicoffer’s custom trike

De Ann Williams, executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission, heard about a CAMVETS opening during a conference and nominated Zollicoffer. It was the first she’d heard about the organization, but she thought the program might produce a longer-lasting prosthetic leg.

Zollicoffer used to play basketball and entered the program thinking he’d leave with a prosthetic for athletic activities.

“With the level of my amputation, that was close to impossible,” he said. “So they started asking questions.”

Zollicoffer, who grew up riding motorcycles, then told his team he’d like to ride again.

“As a motorcycle enthusiast myself, I understood and respected that,” Williams said.

Zollicoffer worked ’hand-in-hand” with his team as the plan evolved — from modifying his prosthetic leg to modifying a three-wheeled motorcycle. However, he said he wasn’t privy to the end product until the Veteran’s Day reveal.

When he was asked to visit a Harley Davidson store as the project wound down, Zollicoffer began to wonder if he’d get a new trike. He later learned that sitting on a $35,000 motorcycle was more for measurement.

The engineers, students and other makers on Team Z turned a two-wheel 1972 Harley Davidson into a trike by replacing the rear portion with wheels from a 1978 Mustang. They also moved the typical, left-side motorcycle gears to the right.

“So, it was a totally customized job,” Zollicoffer said.

Community comes together

After he saw the trike, Zollicoffer saw the executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission.

“I turned around and there’s De Ann standing there,” he said. “That’s when it became clear to me that the whole outreach team got together and they did this thing.”

CAMVETS has paid the “lion share” of most projects, Blaney said. The local commission, though, was tasked with raising $5,000 to buy the bike, which was complemented by donated parts.

Williams said she believes the plan to have the bike donated didn’t work out, so the commission reached out to area service organizations. They had the money within a few days.

“I was just beside myself,” she said. “I couldn’t believe the community came together like that.”

The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 38 was the major donor. Others were American Legion Post 548, American Veterans Post 124, and Coyote Motorsports.

DAV Commander David May said the project aligned with the group’s mission to assist disabled veterans.

“We’re happy to do it,” he said.

Those involved with CAMVETS said they were glad to learn of the program and plan to volunteer or recommend it to other veterans in the future. Zollicoffer said he made “lifelong friends.”

“We’ll definitely stay in touch with CAMVETS,” Williams said. “I think that that’s definitely going to be a partnership that I hope lasts for a long time.”

Kawasaki Raises Nearly $100,000 For Charities in 2019

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Foothill Ranch, Calif. – Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A., has proudly supported several local and national charities in raising hundreds and thousands of dollars in 2019, supporting worthy causes with cash and product donations, as well as VIP racing fan experiences at Monster Energy Supercross. The charitable efforts of Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. and its employees have nearly exceeded $100,000 in value.

“The charities Kawasaki has chosen to work with are a fundamental part of our community,” said Bill Jenkins, SVP Sales and Operations. “We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to support charities such as the Boys and Girls Club of South Coast Area, the CHiPs for Kids Toy Drive, Honoring our Wounded Military (HOWM), Orange County Police Canine Association, and The ALS Association – Orange County Chapter. We have supported these organizations with both financial and product donations for their causes to help our community where we can.”

Kawasaki’s efforts helped to raise $45,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of South Coast Area by donating two 2020 Jet Ski® STX®160 personal watercraft and two VIP Monster Energy Kawasaki Team Supercross experience. The items were auctioned off at the Boys and Girls Club of South Coast 2019 Great Futures Gala.

With the holidays fast approaching, Kawasaki employees always make sure to support those in need by providing toys and other gifts for the California Highway Patrol’s ninth annual CHiPs for KIDS toy drive. In 2019, Kawasaki team members stepped up once again to help deliver a happy holiday to families in Southern California.

Amongst the many important charitable causes Kawasaki supports is the Honoring Our Wounded Military Foundation. For 2019, Kawasaki donated a 2019 Jet Ski® Ultra® LX for the Honoring Our Wounded Military live auction, that helped to raise $40,000, which enabled the foundation to achieve more than $195,000 in donations for 2019.

The ALS Association’s Walk To Defeat event became close to the hearts of many Kawasaki employees in 2019, with many participating on Team Tamura in the ALS Association — Orange County Chapter event. Kawasaki helped to raise more than $1,300 for the organization in tribute to former Kawasaki President Yoshi Tamura, helping ALS Association — Orange County Chapter raise more than $283,000 in 2019.

Kawasaki also raised $1,500 for the Orange County Police Canine Association in 2019.

And as 2019 comes to an end the Kawasaki Motors Corp. Charitable Match Contribution Program employees have additionally raised nearly $10,000 for various charities serving an array of causes across the country.

Enter To Win This Amazing Pair Of BMW R100 Cafe Racers

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from https://www.rideapart.com/

Built by UpCycle Garage in Anaheim, California, these bikes have been exquisitely restored by the inimitable Johnny Nguyen.

If the bike you’re riding doesn’t have that wow factor, or even worse, you only have ONE motorcycle, you should enter to win this incredible pair of BMW R100 Café racers. Click here to enter and use promo code RIDE1 to double your entry tickets just for reading RideApart. Plus, your donation will support TRI Industries, a wonderful company we’ve worked with before that hires veterans in the Chicago area.

Click here to enter and use promo code RIDE1 to double your entries for free!

This prize package consists of a 1982 BMW R100RS and 1988 BMW R100RT that have been restored and customized by Johnny Nguyen of Anaheim’s UpCycle Garage. They are engineered for form and function. While they look similar, Nguyen included some key differences so he could tell them apart, not the least of which is their complimentary green and silver paint jobs.

Both bikes are powered by BMW’s famous 980cc boxer mills which now sports matching vintage-style valve covers and velocity stacks. They also each exhale via pie-cut stainless steel exhaust systems, but the 2-into-1 exhaust exits low on the right of the silver RS while the pipes converge into an Akrapovič slip-on muffler under the seat of the green RT. Nguyen has also updated the bikes with completely modern electronics, including app-controlled lighting and keyless start with the touch of a button. Their style is vintage, but their hardware is cutting edge.

Entering this giveaway also means you’ll be donating to a worthy cause. We love partnering with companies that give away great cars for good causes, and this company is one of our favorites. RideApart has worked with TRI Industries in the past, and we vouch for their legitimacy as a charity worth supporting. You can learn more about TRI Industries here.

To enter, click here and use promo code RIDE1 at checkout to automatically double your entries

 

York City Police Department receives motorcycle donation

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by Valeria De Leon from https://fox43.com

York – It’s the season of giving and one York County police department has a new ride thanks to a local organization.

America’s 911 Foundation donated a brand new 2019 Harley-Davidson police motorcycle to the York City Police Department on Saturday.

Each year, the organization gives away a motorcycle to police departments, this one is the 20th one they have donated to police.

Chief Troy Bankert York City Police said the motorcycle unlike a vehicle, helps them spark a conversation with the community and better their relationship.

“It gives us a good opportunity to interact with the community without being inside of a car, it’s more personal but at the same time it lets us have some mobility,” said Chief Bankert.

“These are people who protect us and put their lives on the line every day,” said Roger Flick, America’s 911 Foundation promotions manager, “and they want to keep their community safe and we want to help them do that.”

The organization also holds a motorcycle ride to remember those who lost their lives on September 11th.

The York Police Department takes part in that ride, so organizers said they were more than happy to announce the winners of this year’s raffle.