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Motorcycle gang donates RM25k to Kelantanese dad with special needs kids

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by TAN MEI ZI from https://www.malaymail.com

They may look like rebels but a group of Malaysian motorcyclists proved that they have hearts of gold after helping a single father and his special needs children.

In a Facebook post, Geng Motorsport member Aresif Pok Are shared how the group collected donations totalling RM25,140 for Mohd Zain Abdullah, whose three children are living with cerebral palsy.

Mohd Zain gave up his job to look after them after his wife passed away from breast cancer in 2016, Berita Harian reported.

When he returned to work, the Kelantanese father-of-seven could only take up a job as a carpenter near his house as he needed to commute back home frequently to attend to his children’s needs.

Mohd Zain’s 21-year-old son also had to put off work to help care for his younger siblings who require assistance with everyday tasks such as bathing and eating.

The family’s story of hardship caught the attention of Geng Motorsport after it made the rounds on social media and WhatsApp groups.

Made up of motorcycle clubs from Kelantan and Terengganu, the Geng Motorsport members banded together to ride to Mohd Zain’s residence in Kampung Kok Keli to present him with a monetary gift to ease his burdens.

The group’s spokesperson Ardy Datok Agos added that it was the biggest donation the group has ever collected throughout their history of charitable deeds, according to KitaReporters.

Aresif said they continued to receive financial aid for Mohd Zain even up until the last minute.

“Thank you to everyone who donated, even up until the last second there were still people who wanted to contribute.

“The struggles faced by Mohd Zain truly touched our hearts and we pray that he remains strong and under God’s care always,” wrote Aresif.

Dallas Harley Owners Group hosts quilt raffle, toy drive

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by Kim Everett from https://thegarlandtexan.com

The Dallas Harley Owners Group, founded in the mid-1980s, is involved in numerous charitable and fundraising activities. One of the main events is the MotorCops for Kids Toy Run. The owners’ group, the Dallas Harley Davidson dealership and the Garland and Grand Prairie Police Departments work together, with help from the Shriners, to host the event.

In conjunction with the toy run, the group holds a quilt raffle and the money from raffle tickets, along with registration fees paid by toy run participants, are donated to Shriners Hospitals for Children – Galveston. Event participants also bring toys that are distributed to local children. The group’s hard work has enabled them to donate $400,000 to the hospital and donate countless toys to children.

The late Jerry Patterson and Steve Dye, Grand Prairie police chief, were the two principal founders of the toy run. Patterson, along with his wife, Viola, was involved in getting the charitable programs started. She said that his passion was helping kids.

This year’s quilt is the result of 280 hours of work. All of the quilts are made with Harley Davidson bandanas collected from around the world by club members and their friends and families.

The design is chosen in February, the quilt is constructed, and the hand-quilting begins in the spring. Julie Steger is the principal designer and constructor. They start early so they can enter their creation in the group quilting category competition at the State Fair of Texas. They have won first place as well as four third-place ribbons.

Gloria Barnes, Angela Kennerly, Viola Patterson, Wendy Yeater and Steger are the principle quilters, but a large number of people from all age groups join in the quilting, even if it was just to put in a stitch or two.

Tradition dictates that Paul Langford, the owner of Dallas Harley Davidson, puts in the first stitches. Susan Gabbard, the group’s director puts in the last stitches. A few core quilters meet on Saturdays during the spring.

The goal is to sell 5,000 raffle tickets, which are available at Dallas Harley Davidson, 1334 West Centerville Road in Garland. Tickets will be available Nov. 17 until the time of the drawing, which is after the toy run. (See details below.) Tickets are $1 each.

Being a part of the quilt project is important to those who participate.

Steger once heard someone say, “We don’t pave parking lots. We don’t paint walls. Our money goes strictly to the needs of the children.” That sentiment has stayed with her.

The charitable projects are important to each one of the main quilters.

“I was a recipient of these kinds of fundraisers as a child,” Steger said. “We were very poor and I always wanted to grow up and be that someone that helped others. That’s why I do this.”

Yeater volunteered when she was a child.

“My parents volunteered when I was growing up,” she said. “I am a nurse and I work at a children’s hospital in the Metroplex…when I heard about Motorcops for Kids, I knew I would volunteer. There is nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer who is willing to give time to a cause.”

Barnes concentrated on riding when she first joined the club, but when she found out about the quilting project, she wanted to get involved. An accomplished rider, she won the 2014 statewide Motorcycle Rodeo for all Harley Davidson riders in the state of Texas.

“Julie is probably the one that has inspired me the most because she is such a giver,” Barnes said. “She gives a lot and it’s awesome to see. This is a great group.”

Kennerly was impressed by the members’ involvement in supporting the charities.

“When my husband, who has now passed away, and I joined the chapter, we could see that the charities were really important to the group,” she said.

Kennerly described another of their Christmas projects. Group members adopt Garland area families and buy clothes and toys for the children and food for the family. On Christmas Eve morning the gifts and food boxes are delivered by a group of riders — and they have Santa with them – which the kids love.

“That’s a fabulous way to celebrate Christmas,” she said. “It means a lot to me.”

Patterson agreed with the other women’s sentiments about helping others.

“Nothing warms anyone’s heart more than giving of yourself to others,” she said. “It is probably the biggest pleasure you can ever have in life.”

MotorCops for Kids Toy Run – Sunday, Nov. 17 at 1:30 p.m. Ride begins at Dallas Harley Davidson, 1334 West Centerville in Garland and ends at the Hella Shrine Temple. Register in person during regular business hours at Dallas Harley Davidson.

Auckland Mayor Phil Goff joins motorcycle ride for Ronald McDonald House

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by Laine Moger from https://www.stuff.co.nz/

Auckland Mayor Phil Goff has swapped his suit for motorcycle leathers to lead motorcyclists in a rally for Ronald McDonald House Charities.

The annual ride, called the Ronnie Run, was organised by the Ulysses motorcycle club and raised just under $7000.

Goff, a keen motorcyclist, said he didn’t get to go out on his Triumph Bonneville as often as he’d like to.

So the Sunday ride was a good excuse to put his gear on and go for a ride with like-minded people, he said.

The event attracted about 140 riders, ranging from young children to people in their 80s.

It started in Albany on the North Shore and ended at Ronald McDonald House next to Starship Children’s Hospital. Police helped marshal the group along its journey.

Goff said he’d been commandeered by the group to come on a charity ride during his election campaign.

While he said he couldn’t at that stage, he promised to make the next one – a promise that he made good on on Sunday.

Ronald McDonald House Charities New Zealand (RMHC) supports families when their child is in a hospital and away from home.

The Ronald McDonald House and Ronald McDonald Family Room helps to relieve family stresses like paying for a place to sleep near the hospital, organising family meals and needing a friendly ear to listen on tough days.

In 2018, it provided more than 4300 people with accommodation and support free of charge at its facilities.

“For all of us with kids and grandkids, the worst thing you would want to have happen would be to have them affected by a life-threatening illness,” Goff said.

“[RMHC] is one way in which we can stop the stress of families.”

Riders visit House of Harley-Davidson, bring non-perishable food for Hunger Task Force

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from https://fox6now.com/

GREENFIELD — The House of Harley-Davidson held a customer appreciation event on Saturday, Oct. 26 — and all for a great cause.

Riders of all ages were invited to the motorcycle dealership to listen to live music, carve up some pumpkins and enjoy some great food.

Those who visited were encouraged to help the House to “Stuff the Truck” — by bringing a non-perishable food item. If they did, they got free food from the Milwaukee H.O.G. Chapter. All donations were headed for the Hunger Task Force.

Veterans find purpose, support through motorcycle rides

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by Patrick Filbin from https://www.stripes.com/

(Tribune News Service) — Chris Mathison served three tours in Iraq over a 14-month period.

As a U.S. Army infantryman, he was in charge of millions of dollars worth of equipment, led a team of fellow infantrymen and, all things considered, was a soldier who was depended upon and good at his job.

When he came back home to Tennessee, he had a hard time adjusting.

The Nashville native moved to Cookeville after he got out of the service in 2011 and tried to find a stable job.

“I’ve probably been through 10 jobs,” Mathison said. “It’s hard to find something that fits. You don’t feel like you belong, there’s no sense of purpose or belonging.”

He went to school and received an associate’s degree, but even school was a tough adjustment.

“I remember very fondly when I got out, I was going through a sociology class,” Mathison recalled. “As we were flipping through the book, I found a picture of my unit in Iraq and it just kind of blew my mind.”

Mathison, 35, had a whole life behind him that he had a hard time talking about. Not only was the subject matter sensitive, he couldn’t find like-minded people to talk to. As an infantryman, he was surrounded by people who were going through the same things as he was, living through the same experiences.

When he came back home, he was taking general education courses with 19-year-olds.

“That was interesting,” he said with a smirk.

Soon after he got out, Mathison signed up for his first program with the Wounded Warrior Project, the country’s largest veterans charity organization.

He enrolled in the organization’s TRACK program, which had a curriculum meant to heal, develop and train the mind, body and spirit of each wounded warrior through two semesters of college.

It also incorporated peak performance training, health and wellness training, personal finance advice and a physical education program.

Ever since, he’s been a loyal supporter of the organization that helps veterans in a number of ways.

Wounded Warriors also helped Mathison get certified in scuba diving.

One of the newest programs in Georgia is a 12-week mental health workshop that kicks off with a three-day motorcycle road trip across North Georgia.

Jon Blauvelt, a public relations specialist with Wounded Warriors, said the program is designed to give veterans an outlet to manage PTSD, traumatic brain injury and other invisible wounds of war while connecting with nature and fellow veterans.

Motorcycles play a huge role in the therapy. Through wind and throttle therapy, reflective discussion and several weeks of follow-ups, the group of eight veterans from Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Texas and Florida will experience a once-in-a-lifetime trip while bettering themselves mentally and spiritually.

“When you’re on one of these big bikes, all you’re thinking about is the bike,” Blauvelt said. “I’m on this bike, here are my surroundings, here’s the weather, but you’re not thinking about PTSD or [traumatic brain injury], you’re not thinking about what happened before and you’re not thinking about the future. You’re thinking about the present moment.”

It’s a perfect fit for Mathison, who is also a part of the Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association.

Mathison and the seven other riders strolled in at the Harley-Davidson store in Dalton, Georgia, on Tuesday afternoon for a lunch hosted by the motorcycle shop.

Cynthia Allgood, manager of the store, said it was a privilege to host the veterans who sacrificed so much for the country without asking for anything in return.

“Something like this gets you together with like-minded individuals and you can talk about everything and it creates a really good atmosphere,” Mathison said. “You’re able to make some really good friends that I would not have met.”

Paris Harley-Davidson, Adam Sandoval set new world record

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by Macon Atkinson from http://theparisnews.com

Paris Harley-Davidson and philanthropist Adam Sandoval have set a new Guinness World Record for continuous Harley-Davidson motorcycles on parade.

In an event dubbed Bring it Home 2019, 3,497 motorcyclists from across the country rode their Harley Davidson bikes through Paris on a 3.5 mile ride, the Guinness official announced. The record has been taken from Hellas Motorcycle Club of Patras, Greece, which previously held the record set May 22, 2010, with 2,404 Harley-Davidsons making a 2.8-mile trip.

Paris’s parade raised money for Motorcycle Missions, a nonprofit that helps first responders with PTSD. The $15 per bike registration fee was donated entirely to the nonprofit, with over 3,400 pre-registrations, said event organizer Molly Beaudin, who is also a dealer development manager for Paris Harley-Davidson.

“I don’t even know what to say. Let’s hear it for America. We officially brought it home,” Sandoval said.

See Sunday’s edition of The Paris News for more coverage of the parade.

Toys for Tots motorcycle ride on Sunday

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By Emily Blume from https://www.kwqc.com

DAVENPORT, Iowa. Every year TV6 plays a big role in making sure that every child wakes up Christmas morning with a present. This is all part of Toys for Tots and some are getting a jump start on their shopping this weekend!

The Toys for Tots Motorcycle Run with ABATE of Iowa- District 15 and the USMC Reserves have their 35th Annual ride this weekend. The event kicks off at 11:00 am at Wal-Mart on West Kimberly in Davenport, Iowa. The ride itself will get going at 1:00 p.m. and ends at the Hobby Lobby parking lot in Bettendorf. The admission is one new toy per person, visible on the bike. They are asking that you don’t bring stuffed animals, or throw candy, as they’re looking out for safety and health.

Everyone is welcome Sunday, October 6th to support the ride and you don’t need a bike to donate- they’ll be collecting at the start and end of the ride.

Motorcycle ride raises money for St. Jude

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September 13, 2019 by Clint Eiland at https://www.wbbjtv.com

DYERSBURG, Tenn. — More than 200 motorcycles, nearly $1 million and 450 miles.

Those are just some of the numbers involved in St. Jude Rides.

“Almost 400 people total, and to see it all come together, and to be here in Dyersburg, it is just overwhelmingly emotional,” Jill Libert, development specialist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, said.

“One of the most well organized events that I’ve ever been a part of,” Stann Wiebler, marketing manager at Walter Brothers Harley Davidson, said. “They do so much planning. The police do a phenomenal job of getting us here safely.”

The trip started Thursday in Peoria, Illinois, where riders began a six-hour drive to Dyersburg. The motorcade arrived in Memphis on Friday, where they delivered a check worth around $1 million to St. Jude.

Wiebler’s father helped start the event 13 years ago, and Stann has done it the last six years. He says this event is one of his favorites.

“It’s a huge event in our family. It’s part of our business anymore. No decision goes in to our business these days without thinking about St. Jude and how it would affect it,” Wiebler said.

“It’s a very passionate group. They fund raise all year long with asking family and friends. They really are outstanding and selfless,” Libert said.

Each rider raised at least $1,000, with one couple even raising $40,000.

“Kids are precious. Thank you to all the people who are here to do this,” Kevin and Debbie Onnela said.

As they rode into the hospital parking lot, the patients and employees were there to welcome them.

“Patients, doctors, they all come out into the streets, and they have signs and balloons, screaming and yelling, a lot of tears flowing on these big, bad motorcyclists as they’re coming in seeing the kids,” Wiebler said.

“They do a lot for the kids. And I’m pretty impressed about that. They do a lot,” rider Brian Bruen said.

Organizers with the group say they raise more money each year.

10 Back to School Safety Tips from Red Cross

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Red Cross Offers 10 Ways to Help Keep Students Safe As They Get Ready to Head Back to School 

Los Angeles, August 15, 2019 — The school bells will be ringing soon as summer vacation ends and students across Los Angeles head back to class. The American Red Cross offers these steps to help make the trip back to the classroom a safe one.

GETTING TO SCHOOL SAFELY

  1. If your student rides a bus to school, they should plan to get to their bus stop early and stand away from the curb while waiting for the bus to arrive.
  2. Students should board the bus only after it has come to a complete stop and the driver or attendant has instructed them to get on. They should only board their bus, never an alternate one.
  3. All students should stay in clear view of the bus driver and never walk behind the bus.
  4. Cross the street at the corner, obeying traffic signals and staying in the crosswalk.
  5. Never dart out into the street or cross between parked cars.
  6. If children ride in a car to get to school, they should always wear a seat belt. Younger children should use car seats or booster seats until the lap-shoulder belt fits properly (typically for children ages 8-12 and over 4’9”), and ride in the back seat until they are at least 13 years old.
  7. If a teenager is going to drive to school, parents should mandate that they use seat belts. Drivers should not use their cell phone to text or make calls and avoid eating or drinking while driving.
  8. Some students ride their bike to school. They should always wear a helmet and ride on the right in the same direction as the traffic is going.
  9. When children are walking to school, they should only cross the street at an intersection, and use a route along which the school has placed crossing guards.
  10. Parents should walk young children to school, along with children taking new routes or attending new schools, at least for the first week to ensure they know how to get there safely. Arrange for the kids to walk to school with a friend or classmate.

SCHOOL IN SESSION, SLOW DOWN!

Drivers should be aware that children are out walking or biking to school and slow down, especially in residential areas and school zones. Motorists should know what the yellow and red bus signals mean.

  • Yellow flashing lights indicate the bus is getting ready to stop and motorists should slow down and be prepared to stop.
  • Red flashing lights and an extended stop sign indicate the bus is stopped and children are getting on or off. Drivers in both directions must stop their vehicles and wait until the lights go off, the stop sign is back in place and the bus is moving before they resume driving.

KEEP LITTLE ONES SAFE

  • Keeping all students safe is the primary concern for everyone, but there are special steps for parents of younger kids and those going to school for the first time:
  • Make sure the child knows their phone number, address, how to get in touch with their parents at work, how to get in touch with another trusted adult and how to dial 9-1-1.
  • Teach children not to talk to strangers or accept rides from someone they don’t know.

BE PREPARED FOR EMERGENCIES

  • Know what the emergency plan is at your child’s school in case a disaster or an unforeseen event occurs. Develop a family emergency plan so everyone will know who to contact and where to go if something happens while children are at school and parents are at work. Details are available at redcross.org/prepare.
  • The Red Cross First Aid App provides instant access to information on handling the most common first aid emergencies whether it be before, during or after school. Download the app for free by searching for ‘American Red Cross’ in your app store or at redcross.org/apps.
  • Learn and practice First Aid and CPR/AED skills by taking a course (redcross.org/takeaclass) so that you can help save a life.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossLA or @CruzRojaLA.