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Steve McQueen’s cherished off-road motorcycle to be sold

By General Posts

1971 Husqvarna is one of the King of Cool’s most loved bikes and could fetch £150k at auction

by Rob Hull from https://www.thisismoney.co.uk

  • The 1971 Husqvarna 400 Cross is one of around 200 bikes owned by the actor who often entered races
  • It is said to be in ‘last ridden by McQueen’ condition and ‘not started’ since his ownership
  • It is a later version of the bike the King of Cool rode in On Any Sunday – that one sold in 2018 for $230k
  • Bonhams says it is ‘the best known of all McQueen’s Huskys by virtue of a known provenance and documents’
  • Auction house will offer it to the highest bidder at its sale in California on Friday – estimate is $130k-$180k

A motorcycle belonging to the King of Cool, Steve McQueen, will go under the hammer on Friday and could sell for £150,000.

The 1971 Husqvarna 400 Cross is said to be one of the actor’s favourite bikes in an extensive collection, and it hasn’t been modified since he last rode it.

The off-road motorbike will be offered to the highest bidder on Friday at the Bonhams Quail Lodge auction held during Monterey Car Week in California.

One of the most iconic scenes from a McQueen film was the Great Escape motorcycle jump, where his character Captain Virgil Hilts leaps over a barbed wire fence in his dramatic escape from the Nazi prisoner of war camp in the legendary WW2 film.

The six-foot jump over the fencing wasn’t performed by the King of Cool himself in the 1963 hit – it was stunt man and frequent McQueen body double, Bud Ekins – as the actor later revealed his inexperienced riding skills meant he would not have been able to complete the stunt at the time of shooting.

However, McQueen’s close friendship with Bud and his brother Dave Ekins, and his passion for motorcycles, saw the silver screen star become an accomplished off-road racer.

In interviews years after The Great Escape, he stated he would have then been competent to complete the famous jump scene.

His love of two wheels also partly inspired the 1971 motorcycle racing documentary film On Any Sunday, in which the Indiana-born actor features riding a similar Husqvarna off-roader – that one sold in October 2018, also at a Bonhams auction, for $230,500.

At one point in his life, McQueen reportedly owned up to 200 motorcycles. Among them was the 1971 model up for grabs this week. It was produced by the Swedish brand that was dominating the motocross world during the generation (pictured, McQueen riding a similar bike in 1970)

It’s one of many the King of Cool had, but this is claimed to be his favourite.

And, if the seller is to be believed, it has not been ridden since it was in the hands of the silver screen icon.

McQueen riding a Husqvarna 400 Cross in 1970

The 400 Cross combined fearsome power and superb handling thanks to its lightweight frame and single-cylinder 400cc engine, but was also renowned for being difficult to ride.

It was produced in a period before plastics were used in motorcycle manufacturing, meaning it has a sculpted aluminium fuel tank with a polished section to help reduce marring where the rider meets the bike.

While McQueen had various examples that were used as ‘parts bikes’ for spares, this wasn’t the case with frame number MI3845 being sold this week.

Bonhams says it is ‘perhaps the best known of all McQueen’s Huskys by virtue of a known provenance and documentation from the time it was acquired by the star and remaining in his possession as one of his go-to bikes for the rest of his life’.

It was sold as lot 664 at the Steve McQueen Estate Auction at Imperial Palace in November 1984, in Las Vegas, Nevada, and has since passed through three subsequent owners before being acquired by the vendor 11 years ago.

The certificate of authenticity, plus the bill of sale issued to the buyer at the 1984 Estate Auction, and the original registration document in the name Solar Productions accompany the lot. To complete the paperwork file, the original 1984 auction lot tag also accompanies the machine when it goes to the block on Friday.

The bike is described by the seller as being in ‘last ridden by McQueen’ condition, and ‘not started’, with all the dents and scratches from the King of Cool’s hard riding.

It even retains all of the McQueen-implemented modifications, which includes a leather gear shift protector and a spare spark plug he duct-taped to the frame in case it was needed while out riding.

The bike is expected to attract a winning bid in the region of $130,000 (£107,500) to $180,000 (£149,000) when the hammer drops at the end of the week, according to Bonhams’ estimation.

‘The preservation of MI3845 is a credit to the discerning owners post McQueen who have preserved MI3845 in its original McQueen owned state,’ the auction house said.

‘While other McQueen motorcycles have come to light in recent times, there can be no doubt as to the history and originality of this machine.

‘It is a ‘blue chip’ piece of McQueen memorabilia, if you like, suitable for shows, demos – after some sympathetic recommissioning – or museum display use, using the legend ‘as last ridden by the late and utterly charismatic Steve McQueen’ as a fitting epitaph.’

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Used Volkswagens and Autonomous Cars

By General Posts

Auction Market Growth

This is for those committed to keep driving alive

Never Stop Driving ! Two things are on my mind: A recent sale of a used Volkswagen and a podcast in which Elon Musk said Tesla cars will have Level IV autonomous capability in 2023. I think the two are related. Let me explain.

While I would not mind an autonomous pilot myself from time to time, I am first and foremost a driver. The one thing I’ve had in common at all my gigs is that I have no off-hours from cars. I spend nearly every waking minute either working on cars; driving cars, whether around town or, my favorite, long road trips; racing; or passing on my enthusiasm.

Your humble narrator fathoms deep in the car thing.

–by Larry Webster from Hagerty.com

Read this Editorial Article on Bikernet.com by Clicking Here.

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A 1940 Indian Four sold for $89,000

By General Posts

This 1940 Indian Four is said to have been restored under prior ownership and was acquired by the selling dealer in 2016. The bike is finished in dark red over a black frame and powered by a numbers-matching 77ci inline-four paired with a hand-shifted three-speed transmission. Equipment includes a sprung leather solo saddle, a chrome luggage rack, a side stand, a foot-clutch, a leaf-spring front end, a four-into-one exhaust system, a chrome engine guard, plunger shocks, 18″ wire-spoke wheels, and center and side stands. This Model Four is offered by the selling dealer in Oregon with a clean Michigan title.

It was sold on popular online automotive buy-sell auction website for Vintage and Classic vehicles: https://bringatrailer.com

Essentials
Seller: 911r
Location: Portland, Oregon 97227
Listing Details

Chassis: 440413
Engine: DD0413
305 Miles Shown, TMU
Numbers-Matching 77ci Inline-Four
Three-Speed Hand-Shifted Transmission
Dark Red Paint
Skirted Fenders
Cognac Leather Sprung Seat
Leaf-Spring Front End
Plunger Shocks
18″ Wire-Spoke Wheels
Four-Into-One Exhaust System
Chrome Luggage Rack

Private Party or Dealer: Dealer
Additional charges from this dealer: USD $0
Lot #72267

SOLD FOR USD 89,000 on May 06, 2022.

The bike was restored in dark red over a black frame under previous ownership. Equipment includes a side stand, a horn, footboards, skirted fenders, and sprung cognac leather solo saddle embellished with fringe and jeweled nailhead trim as well as a chrome luggage rack, engine guard, rear fender guard, frame guards, and center and side stands.

Wire-spoke 18″ wheels wear Coker blackwall tires. Suspension consists of a leaf-spring fork in addition to dual plunger shocks mounted on either side of the rear axle. Braking is from drums at both ends.

A chrome steering damper knob and cross-braced handlebar sit between the aluminum dash and polished headlight bucket. Instrumentation includes a 130-mph speedometer, an ammeter, a keyed ignition, a trip meter, and a five-digit odometer showing 305 miles, 10 of which have been ridden by the selling dealer. Total mileage is unknown.

The air-cooled 77ci inline-four produced 40 horsepower when new and is equipped with a single carburetor, a chrome air cleaner, Auto-Lite ignition, and a four-into-one exhaust with a ceramic coated exhaust manifold and chrome heat shield. An oil pressure gauge is mounted to the crankcase and an AGM battery with an Indian-style cover was installed by the selling dealer.

Power is routed to the rear wheel through a three-speed non-sequential transmission that is shifted using a tank-mounted hand lever on the right and a clutch pedal on the left.

The bike is titled by its engine number, DDo413, the last three digits of which match the number stamped on the frame, a photo of which can be viewed in the gallery.

CHECK OUT more Photos at the auctioneer website:
https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1940-indian-four-2/

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Honda RC213V-S Breaks Auction World Record

By General Posts

An as-new example of Honda’s RC213V-S has just broken a new world record, becoming the most expensive Japanese motorcycle ever sold at auction.

Hosted by specialist automotive marketplace Collecting Cars, the ‘MotoGP bike for the road’ sold for a remarkable total sales price of £182,500.

The rare superbike has never been ridden and remains in its original flight case, with just one mile on the odometer. Having never left its shipping crate, the bike is totally pristine with absolutely no damage or wear.

Created with a focus on light weight and agility, the RC213V-S is a road-legal MotoGP bike, built around a hand-fabricated aluminium frame with carbon-fibre body panels and titanium fasteners, resulting in a dry weight of just 170kg.

Powered by a 999cc four-stroke V4 engine, this 2016 model also features the full HRC Race Kit, which comprises a recalibrated ECU, a titanium exhaust system, a front ram duct, a race-pattern quickshifter, a data logger and a remote control cable for the front brake lever. These upgrades reduce the bike’s total weight by 10kg and increase power output from 157hp to 215hp.

Also fitted are some of the highest quality components available, including Ohlins TTX front forks, powerful Brembo brakes and forged magnesium Marchesini Racing wheels.

Edward Lovett, founder of Collecting Cars, said:

“Honda’s RC213V-S is a thrilling, exquisitely crafted machine, and this example attracted global attention and extremely competitive bidding on Collecting Cars. We are proud to have achieved yet another world-record sales price – this time for an incredible road-legal MotoGP that will be a jewel in the new owner’s collection.”

To find out more information on this lot, visit Collecting Cars.
https://collectingcars.com/for-sale/2016-honda-rc213v-s-1

Compared to traditional car auctions, Collecting Cars offers significantly better value for sellers and buyers alike. For sellers, the detailed photographic presentation and professional descriptions mean their car is showcased in the best possible way, and is marketed to a huge captive audience of passionate enthusiasts. Furthermore, there is no listing fee, and they receive 100% of the hammer price.

For buyers, the premium on auction lots is levied at just 5% + VAT – substantially lower than traditional auction houses, which typically charge 12% or more – and is capped at £6,000. On hammer prices above £100,000 this means that the buyer’s premium is even less than 6%.

About Collecting Cars:
Collecting Cars is an online auction platform that curates consignments from around the world and markets them to a global audience.

The streamlined and transparent process makes buying and selling cars, motorbikes, and automobilia via its online auctions one of the most effective and hassle-free ways of transacting.

To date, the Collecting Cars platform has sold more than 5,300 lots, and total sales value generated for sellers exceeds £191 million. The multi-national auction company has headquarters in London, and offices in Munich, Sydney, and Los Angeles.

More than 90% of sales since launch have happened without a physical viewing, underscoring the significant trust that Collecting Cars has earned among its customers.

Visit Website at: https://collectingcars.com/

Discovery of huge fuel-can stash reveals 500 rare artifacts

By General Posts

from https://www.hagerty.com by Charlotte Vowden

A shedload of surprises: Discovery of huge fuel-can stash reveals 500 rare artifacts

Editor’s note: In the interests of preserving the authentic whiff of petrol that pervades this remarkable story from our U.K. colleagues, we have made only slight concessions to an American lexicon. All quotations remain untouched.

Alan Pooley’s pursuit of petroliana was purely sentimental, but the collection of more than 500 automotive artifacts that he amassed during three decades of buying for love not money is so remarkable that it could fetch up to £65,000 (roughly $88,600) at auction. Including over 250 oil cans, 60 two-gallon fuel canisters, and dozens of enamel signs, oilers, and pourers, it is set to go under the hammer later this year.

“The important thing about this collection is that it is completely fresh to the market, but the exciting bit about it is that no one really knew about it,” says Tom Godsmark, an associate and vintage specialist at Cheffins auction house, the agency managing the sale.

“It’s a big collection in terms of scale, but it’s the extensiveness that’s so interesting because it ranges from little items such as lapel badges, old match boxes, and advertising pencils for Rudge bicycles to a fully restored petrol pump.”

Among the pieces which the late Mr. Pooley carefully stored, restored, and displayed in sheds at his home in Norfolk is a two-gallon fuel can that, to the untrained eye, stands out because of the large lightning bolt and bold lettering embossed on its side. Those in the know will recognize it as one of the few surviving examples of a limited-edition run of Shell Racing cans that were produced in the 1930s. With an estimated value of £400 to £600 (approximately $545–$818), it’s one of the rarest pieces of memorabilia to have been discovered in its original condition.

An automotive body finisher by profession, Alan, who passed away in 2020, was equipped with the skills and patience to rejuvenate items in a state of distress and spent a great deal of his spare time doing so. “It could be quite a long process, but he was a master of the art and was able to bring them back up to a really good standard, it gave him a huge buzz,” explains Alan’s partner, Karin Burleigh.

His penchant for rescuing fuel canisters from ruin (originally known as “motor spirit” cans) extended to vessels produced by the Scottish Oil Agency, Mobiloil, Alexander Duckham & Co Ltd, and Anglos Taxibus Spirit. “If it wasn’t for him, some of those cans wouldn’t be in existence anymore, they would have just rusted into a little heap on the floor,” says Burleigh, who considers the “best” of the three sheds Mr. Pooley used to house his automotive memorabilia is the one in which he arranged his favorite pieces—on every available surface.

From to floor to ceiling—where oil pourers, Shell-branded hard hats, and Castrol Racing baseballs caps hung on hooks that he had fastened into the timber beams supporting the roof—Alan had curated his own at-home exhibition that showcased the containers, canisters, tins, tools, and signs that he treasured the most. “You name it, it was all there,” says Godsmark. “My first thought was Crikey! I imagine he liked going in there and just admiring it. I suspect it was a bit of a sanctuary for him.”

As a boy, Burleigh reveals, Alan cherished the time he spent with his grandfather, and as a man, the tools and Francis-Barnett water cycle that he inherited from him held huge nostalgic value. It’s this relationship and those heirlooms—which are not for sale—that she believes sparked Alan’s passion for automobilia and subsequent apprehensiveness to let any of it go. “He may have sold one or two things, but the majority stayed here,” she says. “Looking at the collection it looks like we spent our whole time at boot sales and auto jumbles, but honestly, we didn’t.”

With so many items in need of a new home, the collection will be divided into lots and auctioned gradually so as not to flood the market. “Collectibles such as gas pumps, fuel advertisements, enamel or tin signs are continually seeing a growth in value as the market continues to gather pace,” says Godsmark. “Values can be hugely varied, ranging from a few hundred pounds for a good example of an oil can right up into the tens of thousands for the best of class in petrol pumps.”

Of the six vintage motorcycles found in Mr. Pooley’s collection, Godsmark tips the 1937 499cc Norton Model 18 and 1966 649cc 650SS Norton as the ones likely to attract the highest bidders due to their condition, low mileage, and thorough documentation.

Making the decision to part with Mr. Pooley’s collection has been incredibly difficult for his three grandsons, who were entrusted with its care upon his passing, and the family’s biggest hope is that each of the items will find their way to “someone who will love it like Alan did.”

Launch of Honda CB750 & Dick Mann at AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

On Twitter by Honda Powersports: Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann, American Honda sends its heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and fans. Mann’s 1970 Daytona 200 win aboard the CR750 (the racing version of the CB750 four-cylinder) was momentous in Honda’s history Thank you, Dick, and godspeed.

The Honda CB750 Changed the Way Motorcycles Were Made, Raced and Sold

Though now highly prized for their potential as re-imagined cafe racer machines, the venerable Honda CB750 was – back in its infancy – the bike that changed the game.

So how did it happen that the Japanese took over the worldwide motorcycle manufacturing industry? To a large extent, it came down to the creation of a single model.

With five consecutive championship titles under their belts, Honda decided to withdraw from the World GP circuit in 1967 with a plan to develop high-performance consumer motorcycles at the forefront of their vision.

While Honda exported more than half of their output back in the mid-’60s, they didn’t make a large-displacement sport bike model which would appeal to the hardcore rider in the U.S.

And it’s not like the honchos at Honda failed to notice that glaring deficiency. Sales of Honda motorcycles in America were flagging in 1966, and the company knew a brand-new worldview was in order. While the company had created the Dream CB450 in 1965, they were still being outgunned by big bikes from other makers. The CB450 sold well, but for the vast majority of American riders, it just didn’t have the requisite zing and bottom-end torque they craved.

What really drove Yoshiro Harada, the head of Honda product development at the time, was hearing the news that Britain’s Triumph was deep in the development process of a high-performance, 3-cylinder 750 cc engine. With the ante thus upped, Honda laid out plans to compete by creating their own 750 cc engine, which would lay down 67 horsepower to overtake the juice you could get from the 66-horsepower Harley-Davidson’s 1300 and the proposed Triumph Triple.

Though Honda was already the industry’s leading maker of motorcycles (due in no small part to the success of the most popular motorcycle in history, the Super Cub), the introduction of the CB750 sought to become the world’s top manufacturer of quality motorcycles as well. They were up against some formidable competition as comparable models from Triumph, BMW, and Harley were already on the road.

So what were the targets? Honda wanted to make a long-range, high-speed touring machine, so they turned to science for answers in the form of a newly-minted paradigm dubbed “ergonomics.”

Those targets included: Stability at highway cruising speeds, a reliable and cooled braking system that would handle frequent rapid decelerations from high speed, minimal vibration, and noise to fight rider fatigue on long hauls with a rider position which complimented the smoother power plant, lights and instruments which were large, gauges which were easy to read, easy maintenance and servicing for all the various modules of the bike and the use of top-quality materials and production techniques.

Perhaps the most significant innovation for Honda’s showpiece bike? The adoption of disc brakes. While that design decision proved costly and time-consuming, it was also a stroke of brilliance and one which made the CB750 a favorite of the serious riding set.

Released to the U.S. public in January 1969, the announcement of the new bike’s retail price, $1,495, was met with stunned silence at a dealer meeting in Nevada. The other shoe had officially dropped. Large-displacement bikes were selling at that time for between $2,800 and $4,000, and the 2,000 dealers on hand for the announcement exploded into applause when they recovered their wits.

And they had good cause for their optimism. The CB750 immediately commanded a premium sales price in dealer showrooms of between $1,800 and $2,000 to get one out the door.

Featuring an integrated crankshaft and metal bearing to replace the split-type, press-fit crankshaft with a needle bearing used in previous Honda motors, the CB750 was a great leap forward in design as well as price.

As great as this new machine was, the company initially had a serious problem. They could only manage to make something like five bikes a day, and that was clearly not enough to meet the demand for what had become a major hit with the market. Production was pushed to 25 units per day and then to 100 units, but that still left an enormous pile of backorders building up under and an entirely expected sales landslide.

It became clear that the production of the original sand-molded crankcases would never meet the rate requirements of mass production, so the factory switched over to producing crankcases of a metal, die-cast construction. The bikes were such a hit with the riding public that the production of engines and chassis was moved to a Suzuki factory in mid-1971. The “sandcast” CB750 models are now fetching enormous prices from collectors of up to ten and fifteen times higher than their new-off-the-line premium price back in the day.

But what really made the bikes a smash hit with the public?

Performance. Pure and dependable performance.

The factory racing team at Honda R&D took the new machines to compete at a 10-Hour Endurance Race in August 1969 to coincide with the commercial launch of the big bike, and Honda dominated, notching one-two finishes with the teams of Morio Sumiya and Tetsuya Hishiki taking first place and Yoichi Oguma and Minoru Sato pulling in a close second.

The deal was done when rider Dick Mann blew away the field on his CR750 during the AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race run during March 1970. The field was now wide open for large-displacement Japanese bikes, and in 1972, Kawasaki launched the 900cc ZI to compete on the big-bike stage…and the rest is, as they say, history.

Bonhams announces its first motorcycle auction in Italy

By General Posts

Bonhams Motorcycles Says Buongiorno Italia with Debut Sale at Moto Dei Miti

FIRST MOTORCYCLE SALE IN ITALY 1-3 APRIL 2022 AT WORLD-RENOWNED MUSEUM OF GENESIO BEVILACQUA

2011 ALTHEA WORLD SUPERBIKE AND SUPERSTOCK CHAMPIONSHIP WINNING MOTORCYCLES ARE EARLY HIGHLIGHTS

Bonhams is proud to announce its first motorcycle sale in Italy – in the world-renowned Moto dei Miti museum, created by paddock great Genesio Bevilacqua, founder of the Althea Racing team, which will be staged on 1-3 April 2022.

The weekend sale is the result of a new partnership with Genesio, which will see his museum, located in Civita Castellana (on the outskirts of Rome) provide a fitting venue for the 100-plus collectors’ motorcycles to be offered.

Telling the story of the evolution of motorcycle racing over the past 50 years, the museum represents Genesio’s own racing experience – as amateur rider and professional team manager – and his passion for two-wheeled sport and culture, featuring some of the most important sports and competition motorcycles of the modern era.

Genesio became General Manager in 2007 of the start-up Althea Racing Team, which picked up trophies in the World Superbike and Supersport series, winning both world championship titles in 2011, with Carlos Checa and Davide Giugliano respectively riding to victory. In 2016, with BMW as partner, Althea again won the World Superstock Championship, with Raffaele Da Rosa in the saddle.

The ex-Carlos Checa, 2011 World Superbike Championship-winning Ducati 1198 F11 estimate for sale is €110,000 – 130,000

Genesio will offer 27 machines from his collection for sale in the debut auction, including the two 2011 World Champion motorcycles: Carlos Checa’s Ducati 1198 RS and Davide Giugliano’s Ducati 1198 F12 and one of Raffaele De Rosa’s victorious BMW S 1000 RRs from 2016.

All motorcycles in the collection are ‘on the button’ and ready to race, having been maintained in the museum’s dedicated workshop, by technicians with years of experience in the paddock, and have recently ridden by Genesio and other riders.

Ben Walker, Global Head of Bonhams Motorcycles, said: “We are really excited to be hosting our debut sale in Italy – arguably THE land of motorcycles – and to have the ‘man who defeated giants’ as our new partner.

“”Genesio’s spectacular private museum will provide a stunning backdrop for the sale, and we are delighted that it will be open to the public for the preview and the auction itself.”

Genesio Bevilacqua, General Manager Althea Racing Team, said: “I am happy and proud to partner with Bonhams to bring to Italy their first auction dedicated to motorcycles and to the history of motorcycles, in which Italy has always played a vital role.

“Moto dei Miti is, without a doubt, the best location to hold this great event. Bonhams’ heritage and professionalism will attract the attention of international collectors and will play an important part in growing the collectors’ market for the motorcycles of the last 50 years”.

Further important collectors’ motorcycles and collections are currently being invited for consignment to this new sale.

Contact: ukmotorcycles@bonhams.com for further details.

Bonhams digital auction platform Expands into Europe

By General Posts

from https://www.bonhams.com/press_release/32734/

The Market by Bonhams digital auction platform is set to launch across Europe in September, marking the latest expansion for one of the leading and fastest-growing online marketplaces for classic and collectible car and motorcycle auctions.

The Market by Bonhams EU launches for bids on Wednesday 8 September 2021, with the first sales closing on Wednesday 15 September 2021. It marks the latest development in Bonhams Motoring’s ‘always on’ motoring strategy which has a growing focus on daily online auctions.

Since its conception in 2016, The Market has become one of the most successful market offerings, combining traditional auction practices on an innovative, exciting digital platform. Delivering industry-leading expertise across the platform’s premier digital offering, The Market has a proven track record for delivering results, service and quality.

By expanding the platform internationally, The Market is meeting growing appetite and demand from buyers and sellers across Europe to reach a wider, more global audience.

Launching The Market by Bonhams internationally marks a natural progression following the success of the platform in the UK. In 2020, The Market sold £10.6m of hammer value over 640 auctions, while in this current year in the UK, it is working successfully towards a hammer value of £20m. The Market has also had a sale rate of more than 90% for the last four years.

In July 2021 the platform sold an ultra-rare metallic blue 1989 Ferrari F40, which had become a worldwide social media star, for a record-breaking £1,000,500, the first seven-figure result for an online platform in the UK and Europe.

Users worldwide will be able to benefit from using the same platform that has been successfully deployed in the UK, with the added enhancement of the platform being translated in to multiple languages.

All of the established benefits of The Market by Bonhams will be available as part of the launch. Buyers will ‘pay what they bid’ when using the platform, meaning there is no buyers’ commission. The Sellers’ Commission remains at 5% (+VAT). This is the lowest in the industry and means that vendors receive 94% of the vehicle’s sale price. The cars and their customers will be looked after by the same team that has been delivering 5-star TrustPilot service for the past five years.

Maarten ten Holder, Managing Director of Bonhams Motoring, said: “The Market by Bonhams’ success lies in its technology, transparency and client service. It is a natural progression for our Bonhams Motoring business to expand into Europe and provide this premier service to a wider audience. Our EU expansion marks a key milestone for our ‘always on’ approach.

“Prospective clients want to have choices when working with auctioneers and we are now able to provide these options, from live sales to online timed auctions and daily online sales via The Market. There is clearly an appetite from buyers and sellers for this service and the launch marks the next step in our motoring strategy.”

Tristan Judge, Director at The Market by Bonhams, said: “It has always been our ambition to reach a wider, more global audience, and launching The Market across Europe delivers that objective. We have a proven track record for delivering results, service and quality and we look forward to continuing this internationally.

“The platform has proved a resounding success since it was launched five years ago, and now the service is backed by Bonhams’ heritage and history, leveraging their established market position across Europe.”

“We have always had great interest from European buyers and sellers on The Market UK. Our left-hand drive cars were already popular with our European customers, so it is natural for us to expand fully across Europe.”

The Last Crocker Ever Built

By General Posts

The Duesenberg of Motorcycles
By Steve Klein with images from the Bob T. Collection

The Crocker motorcycle has long been known as “The Holy Grail of Motorcycling” due to its rarity.

It also carries the nomenclature, “The Duesenberg of Motorcycles,” due to its hand built high-quality, and finally “America’s Superbike,” due to its performance. Three titles suggesting strongly that no other machine has reached such a high pinnacle of acclaim.

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