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Making Art While You’re High at It

By General Posts

Text and Photos by Jeff Najar.

I sent some tins to Atomic Bob in Ohio to do some of his magic.

You might be familiar with Mr. Atomic. He’s become part of the 5-Ball Racing Team by Bandit. His company is Atomic Dice.

With Atomic Bob, you never know what you will get back, but you do know it will be cool and you do know it will be out of the box. Mr. Atomic always pulls it off.

Each letter is unique but they also flow together. And their size fills the space on the sides of the tank.

CLICK Here to Read this Photo Feature on Bikernet.com

Read about significant medical benefits and natural remedies in this unique motorcycling feature article.

* * * *

The Salt Torpedo is to be raced at Bonneville Salt Flats. Illustrations on by Atomic Bob.

Introducing Tim Struck Limited Edition Signature Series Wearable Art

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INTRODUCING Our TIM STRUCK Limited Edition Signature Series Wearable Art Button-Downs & T-Shirts!

ORDER TODAY!

Check Out the Website: https://american-brands.com/

SIGNATURE SERIES BUTTON-DOWNS & T-SHIRTS
We have searched out some of the industry’s leading artists to form a collaboration that we call our “Signature Series”. Our goal is to get their talent transformed from canvas to fabric, we call this Wearable Art. Keep a lookout as this Collection continues to grow while we work with world-wide talented artists that can now get their masterpieces on the backs of passionate enthusiasts like you!

HIGH QUALITY INDUSTRIAL DIGITAL PRINTING
We use the latest technology with the highest quality digital printers for the brightest, fullest colors that you will see but not feel on the fabric. There is a small branded woven label on the edge of your garment.

POLYESTER/COMBED RING SPUN COTTON FABRIC T-SHIRTS
Enjoy an athletic mixture of 65/35 Poly/Combed Ring Spun Cotton for a tee that can keep up with you. With shoulder-to-shoulder taping and heat-set to minimize shrinkage, you’ll be able to enjoy this tee every day. Designed in our CLASSIC FIT.

Visit https://american-brands.com/

HIGH QUALITY HEAT PRESSED PRINT
We use top of the line print transfers that establish our popular color matched look. All applications are applied to your garments using high end industrial heat press machines in the U.S.A. including a small branded woven label on the edge of your garment.

FASHION WITH FUNCTION
Our apparel is designed by bikers for bikers that transitions easily from on – to off the bike styling. Our apparel is functional enough to ride in and fashionable enough to live in so you can spend more time riding and less time changing your attire.

 

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Golden Age Kit from reputed Florida based NMoto custom Co

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Nmoto Nostalgia based on present day BMW R Nine T inspired by BMW R7 pre-war prototype

from https://www.autoevolution.com by Cristina Mircea

Golden Age Streamliner Concept Turns Your BMW C 400 X Scooter Into an Art Deco Masterpiece

Massively spread all across the globe, the pre-war Art Deco style is all about glamour and luxury.

It left its mark on everything from buildings to jewelry, fashion, and of course the automotive industry. Aiming to recapture those exuberant times when style and craftsmanship were the norm, Nmoto welcomes motorists back into the Golden Age, with one of the coolest motorcycle concepts we’ve seen.

Born in France before World War I, the Art Deco international style impressed through its richness and exuberance, using expensive and rare materials. But it was also about modernism, trying to express the technological progress of those times.

Nmoto is a custom motorcycle manufacturer based in Florida and its creations make constant appearances at prestigious museums, festivals, and events such as the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, and the likes. There are currently eight models in its lineup, and the Golden Age is one of them.

Announced last year, the Golden Age motorcycle concept is a true masterpiece characterized by a vintage look and modern features. It is the newest design released by Nmoto, aiming to take you back to a time when transportation was about speed but also about skill and style.

Described as a modern incarnation of the 1936 Henderson Courtney Prototype, the bike is based on BMW’s C 400 X scooter. For those who are not familiar with the aforementioned prototype, it was a custom motorcycle built in 1936, at the peak of the Art Deco movement, by O. Ray Courtney. The guy specialized in building custom bikes and this particular one was inspired by the 1930 KJ Henderson and was his most popular build. Also as a side note, Henderson was a motorcycle manufacturer who was renowned for making the fastest and biggest bikes between 1912 and 1931.

Modern incarnation of 1936 Henderson Courtney Prototype, the bike is based on BMW’s C 400 X scooter

Back to our Golden Age, Nmoto sells this model as a kit for the BMW C 400 X scooter, which is powered by a 350cc engine that produces 35 hp. It can reach a top speed of almost 140 kph (87 mph). While its design is as retro and Art Deco as it gets, this streamliner is conceived to offer all the modern features and convenience of the C 400 X.

The Golden Age has a low center of gravity, it is powerful and makes for a great city cruiser, which is no wonder, given that it is based on the C 400 X. The design and reduced weight of BMW’s mid-size scooter make it a practical urban commuter that can tackle dense traffic and tight alleys.

Nmoto’s Golden Age custom bike kit comes in four finishes, with black, red, white, and teal being your available options. You can’t go wrong with either of them, as they all look absolutely gorgeous. The motorcycle is quite hefty at 425 lb (193 kg) and can hold two helmets, for both you and a passenger.

The bike keeps all the modern features of the C 400 X, including the connectivity dashboard with a 6.5” display, keyless ignition, Bluetooth connectivity, ABS (anti-lock braking system) and ASC (automatic stability control), Brembo disc brakes, the heated seat, and on-board computer, to name the most important of them.

Nmoto’s Golden Age kit includes a carbon fiber body made of nine pieces, front and rear subframes that are powder-coated, new headlight housing and adapter, new turn signal housings, as well as the headlight, turn signals, and rearview mirrors. You also get Golden Age badges for the rear part of the body, a kidney grille, side moldings, and grilles for the rear, an exhaust system relocation kit, premium mountings (original BMW Torx screws), and of course, instructions on how to assemble everything.

Starting at $12,490, the Golden Age kit is now available to order.

Visit their Website at: https://nmoto.com/

Perewitz Paint Show Photo Gallery

By General Posts

No one has a paint show as the Perewitz crew has.

Photos and Text by Jack McIntyre

It’s amazing what the artists come up with regarding concepts, ideas, colors, and layouts.

This particular show was in Daytona at the Broken spoke & is a perfect example of the rest of their shows. Enjoy.

CLICK HERE To See the Perewitz Paint Show Photo Gallery only on Bikernet Cantina.

Jack McIntyre covers all major Motorcycle Events all year round.

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Lou Kimzey: the Original Editor/Publisher of Easyriders Magazine

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Lou Kimzey on the bike Bandit built for him

By J.J. Solari with photos by Kim Peterson and Pete Chiodo

Bandit worked with the guy every day. In fact, he was hired by the guy. Basically sight unseen, just from an inquiry Bandit made on the phone about a motorcycle he built that the new rag might want to take pictures of. Kimzey said “You want a job here?”

As Bandit very interestingly put it – his apparently “mystical” abilities to successfully defy the publishing industry AND to be immune to published criticism by them.

But they all knew he was there.

In fact, I am prepared to say that Lou Kimzey is in a club with only two people in it: “The Club of Editors Who Advanced America.” The other is John W. Campbell.

CLICK HERE To Read the Important History and Legacy of Lou, Motorcycling & Easyriders.

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What is Hub-center Steering Motorcycle & Why it is Better

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by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Hub-center steering is one of several different types of front-end suspension and steering mechanisms used in motorcycles and cargo bicycles. It is essentially a mechanism that uses steering pivot points inside the wheel hub rather than a geometry that places the wheel in a headstock like the traditional motorcycle layout.

Perhaps the most venerable example of the idea came in the form of the 1930 Majestic. This Georges Roy design used a novel pressed-steel monocoque chassis, and it incorporated an automotive-type chassis with hub-center steering. Other bikes had already used the configuration in such machines as the Ner-A-Car and the Zenith Auto-Bi, but the Majestic made it lovely to behold.

Another bike, the Vyrus 984 C3 2V Razzetto, was one such motorcycle that used hub-center geometry.

Vyrus is a small Italian motorcycle manufacturer based in Coriano, Italy, and their bikes such as the “Tesi” – Thesis in Italian – had their designs originate from a university engineering project linked to the motorcycle legend Massimo Tamburini. The Tesi, and the Vyrus 984, were instantly identifiable by their use of their hub-center steering front suspension and steering arrangement.

Those fabulously expensive bespoke motorcycles have been called “functional works of art,” and they look a bit like something you might see in a video game.

In hub-centered bikes, the front wheel is attached to a swingarm with a shock and an internal pivot point. Steering is achieved using those linkages to turn the wheel on a pivot point. Hub-center steering has been employed on motorcycles for more than a century, but the design, despite what some engineers say offers a distinct advantage, never took hold.

But the founder of Vyrus, Ascanio Rodorigo, once worked for Bimota as a race mechanic and engineer during the 1970s and his tenure there lasted until 1985. When Rodorigo finally left Bimota, he started his own company but partnered with Bimota on the hub-center-steered Tesi. He then went on to take the steering concept deeper and refined it for his own company’s motorcycles.

A Ducati dual spark bored out to 1,079cc and making 100hp L-twin provides the power for the 319 lbs (145 kg) Vyrus 984 bike, and it’s delivered to the road for via a six-speed transmission.

Now builders like Bryan Fuller of Fuller Moto, Revival Cycles, and others have built beautiful machines which harken back to the hub-centered glory days of the Majestic. Builders such as Stellan Egeland used a hopped-up 1200 boxer engine from a BMW HP2 Sport. He also added his own hub-center steering setup from ISR to a frame he made from a 2391 steel tube. The ISR kit is a thing to behold.

Revival’s ‘The Six,’ which features a ballsy Honda CBX motor, is another take on the hub-steer geometry. It was commissioned by museum owner and bike collector Bobby Haas for his Haas Moto Museum in Dallas and made by Revival’s Alan Stulberg and his crew.

Stulberg said the commission was aimed at paying homage to the Art Deco classic Majestic and added that he and the team became “obsessed with its design language and flow” since they first saw the bike at the Barber Museum.

Hub steering systems don’t dive as much under braking and hard cornering as do conventional telescopic fork setups. They push braking forces back into the chassis more efficiently rather than transferring immense bending forces to a pair of upright forks. The ride experience is exceptional as braking performance throughout corners is greatly enhanced.

It works like this: A wheel hub pitches back and forth on a central pivot and is supported by two large steering arms actuated by handlebars. The handlebars connect to the front steering and swingarm using complex linkages. A fixed arm connects a pull-and-push rod on either side of the hub-center to help steer the bike. The geometry also includes a second pair of static rods to ensure the axle stays level with the bike’s mass.

While hub steering has a number of clear advantages, its downfall is that it is considerably more expensive to manufacture and maintain and requires exceptionally experienced mechanics to tune and repair.

But it does look good, works more efficiently from an engineering standpoint, and directly addresses the most important factor in the motorcycling experience: braking.

The Majestic – Artistic Design from the 1920s
from https://www.odd-bike.com

While the engineering of the Majestic might have been relatively conventional, what was unprecedented was the styling, the hallmark of the Majestic to this day.

All the oily bits were fully enclosed under louvered panels, with partially enclosed fenders covering the wheels at both ends. The rider was completely isolated from the grime and muck of the running gear and powertrain, perched upon a sprung saddle and controlling the machine via levers and bars that poke through the all-encompassing body.

Presented in 1929, the prototype Majestic (which was reported as Roy’s personal machine) featured an air-cooled 1000cc longitudinal four-cylinder engine from a 1927-28 Cleveland 4-61. This would not remain for production, however.

While at least two Majestics were built with a 750cc JAP V-twin (arranged, like a much later Moto-Guzzi , with the Vee transverse and the heads poking through the bodywork) and records note that JAP singles, a Chaise Four, and at least one Gnome et Rhone flat twin were also employed, the majority of production machines coming out of Chartenay featured air-cooled Chaise engines.

These were overhead valve singles featuring unit two or three-speed gearboxes operated by hand-shift, available in 350cc and 500cc displacements. Distinctive for their single pushrod tube that resembles a bevel tower (but contains a pair of tightly-spaced parallel pushrods) and external bacon-slicer flywheel, these powerplants were a favourite of French manufacturers during the interwar period and were used by a variety of marques in lieu of producing their own engines.

The base price of the Majestic was 5200 Francs for a 350 with chain final drive; an extra 500 Francs netted you optional shaft drive.

An additional option that is rarely seen on surviving examples was a fine “craquelure” paint option that was applied by skilled artisans. It involves a process of deliberately screwing up the paint job in the most controlled and flawless way possible, applying a contrasting top coat over a base using incompatible paints that will cause the top coat to crack in a uniform fashion, something like a well-aged oil painting or antique piece of furniture.

The result is spectacular – and perhaps a bit tacky, giving the machine the appearance of a lizard skin handbag. (Maybe a later Rock Star would have loved to ride it as the “The Lizard King” ? )

The Majestic was impeccably stable at higher speeds compared to the other motorcycles of that era.

It was also agile and light footed in a way that similar machines, like the Ner-A-Car, were not.

The relatively low weight, around 350 pounds, carried with a very low centre of gravity made for tidy handling that was more than up to the meagre output offered by the powerplants.

Majestic was targeting a clientele that didn’t really exist: the gentlemanly rider who might desire a superior (read: expensive) machine as a stablemate to their elegant automobiles.

Georges Roy’s previous design produced under the name “New Motorcycle”

Georges Roy’s earlier 1927 brand called New Motorcycle was a far better barometer of things to come, predicting the style and design of machines that would emerge during the 1930s and beyond. The Majestic has far less impact and was more of a curiosity than predictor of trends to come.

Georges Roy’s brilliance as a designer is unquestionable, and deserves more praise than he ever earned during his lifetime.

Majestic is a little bit of elegance floating on the sea of staid machines that clutter up the history books.

Georges Roy was a French industrialist and engineer born in 1888 who achieved success in the textile business – specifically in knitting and sewing equipment. He was, however, an early adopter of motorcycling at the turn of the 20th Century – reportedly his first machine was a Werner, a Parisian machine that introduced the term “Motocyclette” in 1897.

Harley-Davidson 9 hp Scooter up for Auction

By General Posts

from https://www.financialexpress.com

The Harley-Davidson scooter was considered ‘highly maneuverable and well balanced’ and definitely looks nice with its identifiable aesthetic from the early 1960s. Now, more than a vehicle, it is a piece of art.

Imagine you’re minding your business selling V-twin motorcycles from Milwaukee and then you see a manufacturer from Japan selling nippy compact imported bikes and little scooters in a market you’d been very popular in. What do you do? Simple, build a scooter yourself. And so Harley-Davidson did when in the late 1950s, Honda surfaced as a competitor.

Harley’s answer was called the Topper.

The Topper remained in production for only five years with production estimates in a four-digit figure, Jalopnik writes in a report. Barring the electric concepts Harley now has, the Topper was the only scooter the manufacturer ever built and also mass-produced. One of these has been found and is now heading for auction at Mecum’s Las Vegas Motorcycles 2022 auction.

Unlike the big V-twin that power H-D motorcycles, the Harley-Davison Topper was powered by a two-stroke single-cylinder that delivered between 5 to 9 hp. It came in three models. It is not known which one of them is heading to Mecum.

All that power was sent to its wheels through a continuously variable transmission. American Motorcyclist magazine from November 1959 mentions a pull start cord hidden in the chrome instrument cluster.

The Topper was considered ‘highly maneuverable and well balanced’ by the same magazine and definitely looks nice with its identifiable aesthetic from the early 1960s. Now, more than a vehicle, it is a piece of art.

Imagine being able to say you own a Harley-Davidson scooter today. And if you want to, you could. Mecum’s auction is set to begin on 25 January 2022 until the 29th of the month. Interested? Look for the Harley-Davidson Heritage Collection.

Kirk Taylor’s 2018 Strider Custom is back

By General Posts

by Marilyn Stemp

Kirk Taylor’s L’il Cha Cha was among the very first class of Tiny Strider Customs, a program of the Flying Piston Benefit that supports All Kids Bike – an organization that’s on a mission to teach every kid how to ride a bike as part of kindergarten PE class.

Custom creations are unveiled at the Flying Piston breakfast in August at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip then auctioned at the Mecum motorcycle event in Las Vegas the following January. Proceeds fund bike-riding programs for elementary schools.

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BMW makes big impression at its first Sturgis Rally

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by Siandhara Bonnet from https://rapidcityjournal.com

Bikers may see caricatures of themselves in a weeklong mural that will disappear after the 81st Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.

Oleg Satanovsky, product communications manager at BMW, said this is the first year BMW has been in Sturgis and wanted to do “something cool.”

“We’ve never really had a motorcycle that fits as a cruiser,” he said. “Last year we would’ve been here for the first time, but COVID-19 got in the way. Finally we were able to take everything, everything’s been packed up and we were waiting for it to start up this year.”

Satanovsky said people can submit photos by tagging BMW on social media. Throughout the week, an artist will add caricatures to a mural that features a BMW motorcycle and a rider in black and white spray paint.

Two artists from New York worked on the mural, along with another artist who works on caricatures.

After the week is over, the mural will disappear from Sturgis, but it’ll be online.

BMW isn’t selling anything at its stand on the northeast side of Main Street in Sturgis, but it is displaying its new R 18 model motorcycles.

Satanovsky said people are welcome to test drive the new model. Those who don’t have a license but are interested in the new model can sit on a bike that’s held on a stand.

“You can start it up, feel like you’re riding it, shift through the gears and learn how the motorcycle works without having a motorcycle license,” Satanovsky said.

The mural will be on display at the BMW stand on Main Street in Sturgis through Saturday.

More Mettle: Motorcycles and Art that never quit

By General Posts

by Rogue

On Sunday August 8th Michael Lichter invited members of the media and the motorcycle industry to the Grand Opening of his 2021 Motorcycles As Art Exhibition held at the Buffalo Chip. The exhibit is open to the public, free of charge for the entire rally.

The exhibit is free and open to the public at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip Event Center from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 7 through Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021.

It features a collection of custom motorcycles from the world’s most celebrated builders that’ll show you the spectrum of history and possibilities inherent in custom motorcycling.

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