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The Year Is 2025 and Yamaha Just Released Its New XT 500 “H20” Edition

By | General Posts

by Cristian Curmei from https://www.autoevolution.com

2025 is not so far off. But if things work out as they should, it’s possible we could see something like this XT 500 H2O on our streets. Fingers crossed for this concept.

Yamaha’s XT 500 is an iconic two-wheeler. Manufactured between 1976-1989 with a four-stroke single cylinder engine, this enduro motorcycle pushed out a top speed of 82 mph (132km/h) and 28.03 lb-ft (38 Nm) of torque.

One of the main features of the XT was that the front tire was a whole three inches larger than the rear one. This allowed for it to be equally versatile on the road and off it. It’s to this motorcycle that Maxime Lefebvre, the author of this rendering, pays tribute. But I frankly can’t see much of a resemblance. Just look at this beast of imagination.

The initial design started with a spin on the retro body style, keeping true to the shape, but giving it a more modern appeal. From there, that design was taken and modified for specific purposes, resulting in three different models. The first concept was a smart bike, the second concept a lightweight version, and a third was dubbed the “Inexhaustible.”

But that wasn’t the end. Lefebvre took a shot and got together with the Yamaha design team and after the meeting was over, decided to go nuts and truly free up his creativity.

I wish I had a meme right now with Morpheus saying, “What if I told you that this motorcycle is designed to function only on water?” Nothing else. That’s right. The design includes an engine made to run solely on water. Composed of many smaller sections, each with its own specific function to keep you moving, but all of it centered around H2O as the fuel.

It should work like this. The main water tank holds the water and from there a pump feeds it into a pressure system where it can be used to power the engine at the rear of the bike. We have absolutely no details about the way the engine functions, and I’m sure this is no coincidence. If I designed a motor to function on water, only a select few would know about it.

But we have some info as to the components within the system. We can guess that the engine builds pressure and then shoots this pressurized water at the motor, basically the same way a water-wheel works.To do so the flow of water passes through an injector to make sure no pressure is lost.

The result of this type of engine should be a lack in noise. And because it runs on water, it’s considered environmentally sustainable.

The body has the classic enduro look with a few accents to make it more futuristic. After all, it is 2025. We can see a use of white, blue and black to highlight and designate components.

Let’s talk a little about the body and accents for the bike. The front fork breaks away from the classic tube design we’re used to. Large disk brakes and Yamaha calipers on both sides of the front wheel let you know this thing means business. Something I found neat was the steering mechanism for the bike. It doesn’t seem to be steered by conventional means. The handlebars and fork are not attached in any direct way. This leads me to believe that when you turn the handlebars a motor within the frame should take care of steering.

The rear swingarm houses the injection components of the motor that I mentioned earlier, but also the return system to pull unused water back into your tank. This same water is just to be used again, creating an endless flow of power. To take care of suspension, a heavy duty springless shock absorber gives you a smooth ride no matter your terrain.

The blue wheels have no specific purpose, they’re just for show, to accent the overall use of water in the bike. Another color variation exists too, dubbed the collector edition, it includes yellows instead of whites, and purples instead of blues.

If this thing ever makes out of the concept stages and into production, it will be marketed as inexpensive, lightweight, and within everyone’s reach.

The Yamaha Civante is the company’s first 28mph e-bike in the US

By | General Posts

by Napier Lopez from https://thenextweb.com/

Yamaha might be best known for its instruments and motorcycles, but it was also the first company to introduce modern e-bikes, way back in 1993. While it may not be as big in the modern e-bike world as the likes of Bosch or Bafang, the company’s motors have made their name with brands such as Giant and Haibike, and the company has recently been expanding its own first-party line-up too. Today, the company is taking a big step forward in the e-bike world by announcing its first 28mph (Class 3) e-bike to available in the US market, the Yamaha Civante.

Previous Yamaha e-bikes in the US Market were Class 1 bikes, limited to 20 mph like most e-bikes. While that’s good enough for many users, some feel safer being able to keep up with faster traffic, and riders with longer commutes want to arrive at their destinations more quickly. Of course, others just have the need for speed.

The bicycle is certainly built for speed. It has an aggressive geometry and omits fenders, racks, or a kickstand – though there are mounting points should you want to install them later, and front light is included (Yamaha‘s rear rack has an integrated rear light). It also comes with flat-resistant, e-bike rated tires, mid-depth wheels, hydraulic disc brakes and a Shimano 10-speed drivetrain with a double chainring. Importantly, it’s actually fairly light for an e-bike, coming in at 43.4 lb on the medium frame despite the high-power motor and battery.

The bike uses Yamaha‘s 500W PWSeries SE Motor, capable of of 70nm torque and supporting cadences up to 110rpm; Yamaha promises that even if you exceed the motor’s baked in speed-limit, it won’t just cut off power suddenly, instead providing a smooth transition for your own pedaling power. The bike includes four assist modes ranging from a 50 percent boost on Eco mode to a 280 percent boost on the high setting. The bike also comes with a removable 500 watt-hour battery.

Yamaha doesn’t provide a range estimate, perhaps because it can vary dramatically with your riding speed, assist level, weight, and terrain, but a 500Wh battery with a mid-drive motor should have no trouble dealing with most commutes. If I had to guess, I’d put it in the ballpark of estimate 30 to 60 miles for an average weight rider in higher assist modes, but I’ve reached out to Yamaha for more information. And as with all e-bikes, you can always ride them like a (heavy) normal bike should the battery run out.

I also appreciate that Yamaha‘s high-speed charger can fill up the battery to 80 percent in just one hour — great for longer trips. Most e-bike chargers are painfully slow — more of an overnight affair.

he bike is available in three frame sizes and one color(white with black and blue accents), and is priced at a $3,399. While certainly expensive, that’s actually on the lower end of the price spectrum for a 28mph e-bike with a high-end and high-torque mid-drive motor. Moreover, Yamaha provides a 3-year warranty on the electronics, compared to the 1 or 2 years offered by most competitors.

The bike will be available “this summer” at Yamaha dealers throughout the states.

Stripped Down Yamaha SR Winning Loser Is All About Bare Minimum Hardware

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s Two-Wheeler Month here at autoevolution, so expect to see some of the craziest builds in the industry being featured here over the next 30 days, no matter the category they play in: motorcycles, scooters, bikes, and anything in between.

For what it’s worth, we’ll be trying not to flood your screens with Harleys and such because, believe it or not, there are other motorcycles out there that can be customized just as easily, and with probably the same spectacular effect.

Take this thing here. This rat rod of a motorcycle was once a Yamaha SR 250, but was modified and christened Winning Loser. It was according to the Spanish garage that made it, El Solitario MC, its first “ever bike to be built from scratch.”

The build as you see it in the gallery above was created as the company’s first project, meant to take part in the now defunct Metamorfosis Masiva build-off competition held in Spain. It wasn’t expensive to make, just €1,000 ($1,100) having been spent on it, but it sure required quite a lot of time to get in this shape: 500 hours, according to El Solitario.

Riding very close to the ground, the motorcycle is stripped even of its most essential hardware. There is no battery (replaced by a “68.000 microfarads capacitor” to provide the needed sparks) and not even a properly sized fuel tank – the tiny one fitted on it can hold just 0.8 gallons of fuel (3-liters).

The motorcycle was made to look beat down on purpose, and that effect was mainly achieved by using things one doesn’t usually use in bike making, like metric wrenches that are used as struts to help the rear go down, and bicycle handlebars fitted upside down on flanders risers.

The bike is not for sale, but it works and it’s riden from time to time by the garage’s crew.

Yamaha Announces Arrival of 2021 Ténéré 700 in U.S.

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Customers to Begin Receiving Highly-Anticipated Adventure Touring Motorcycle in Early June

MARIETTA, Ga. – May 22, 2020 – Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (YMUS) today announced the 2021 Ténéré 700 arrival for the U.S. market beginning the first week of June. Earlier this year, Yamaha connected with customers interested in making the first Ténéré 700 purchases through the company’s website and dealer network, and orders started taking place today.

While the first shipment of Ténéré 700 motorcycles are expected to sell out, additional inventory will be arriving at authorized Yamaha dealerships for purchase later this summer and fall.

Customers who ordered their Ténéré 700 motorcycles today were also given the opportunity to purchase one of two accessory packs. The Rally Pack features a skid plate, main stand, engine guard, radiator protector, chain guide, mono-seat rack and tank pad. The Tour Pack features a main stand, engine guard, side case stays and a set of side cases with locks. All accessories for the 2021 Ténéré 700 can be found at www.shopyamaha.com.

The Next Horizon is Yours
With a spirit of adventure embedded in their DNA, Yamaha Adventure bikes are rugged, tough and reliable. Each Ténéré model in the Adventure Touring segment opens up the possibilities of endless travel and enables riders to discover a feeling of utter freedom where the only limits exist within a rider’s imagination.

To find out more about the 2021 Ténéré 700, visit https://www.yamahamotorsports.com/adventure-touring/models/tenere-700.

For more information related to all Yamaha products, visit YamahaMotorsports.com.

Follow Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA, through your favorite social media site:
#Yamaha #YamahaMotor #YamahaMotorUSA

Spec Showdown: Triumph Rocket 3 Vs. Yamaha VMax

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by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

Power cruisers punch out.

For 2019, Triumph upped the ante on the Rocket 3 with the introduction of an entirely new generation. The upgrades included a new look and also a bigger engine which is no small feat considering the Rocket 3 already rocked the biggest production motorcycle engine on the market. Just like that, a new benchmark was set in the power cruiser segment. 

While the definition of power cruisers is rather broad, there’s only handful of 1,500cc-plusmodels the Rocket 3 can measure up toConsidering the Triumph sits at the top of the category with a higher price tag, we thought we’d take a look at how it compares to one of its more affordable competitors, its Japanese counterpart, theYamaha VMaxLet’s have a look at how the two models compare on paper. 

2020 Triumph Rocket 3R 2020 Yamaha VMax
Engine: 2,458cc, water-cooled, inline-three cylinder 1,679cc, liquid-cooled, 65-degree V4
Bore, Stroke, Compression: 110.2mm x 85.9mm, 10.8:1 90mm x 66mm, 11.3:1
Transmission and Final Drive: gears, shaft 5 gears, shaft
Performance: 165 hp/163 lb-ft -/123 lb-ft
Weight 641.5 pounds (dry) 683 pounds (wet)
Price: $21,900  $17,999

Performance 

Of course, we can’t talk power cruisers without discussing their performance. The Rocket 3 boasts the biggest production motorcycle engine of the industry which gives it an undeniable appeal versus the Yamaha. That being said, though its engine is almost half the size of the Rocket (displacement wise), the VMax can pull its own weight and give the Triumph a run for its money. 

While the Rocket 3 produces more torque than the Vmax (163 versus 143)there’s a possibility that the Japanese power cruiser outperforms its British counterpart on the pony front.  While Yamaha doesn’t disclose any horsepower figures, several sources suggest it produces “over 170 horsepower”, possibly even 200, according to some. That’s easily between 5 to as much as 35 hp more than the Rocket. Because the numbers aren’t from Yamaha, however, we can’t take them into consideration.  

What Yamaha does confirm, however, is that the VMax has a higher compression ratio than the Rocket 3 which means you get more bang (literally) for your buck.  

As for weight, the two companies both showcase different information. Triumph sticks to the dry weight (without the fluids) while Yamaha gives a more reallistic, ready-to-operate weight. Fueled up and ready to go, the Rocket 3 likely weighs about the same as the VMax, give or take a couple of pounds. Based on manufacturer-provided date, this means that the Rocket 3 offers the best power-to-weight ratio (unless Yamaha eventually confirms a horsepower figure.) 

Cruising

Though they like to flex their massive engines and show off their muscles, the Rocket 3 and the VMax are cruisers above all. How well do they perform on that front? Pretty darn well if I may say so.  

Neither Triumph and Yamaha have lost sight of their models’ role in their respective lineups and in the segment they compete in. As good as high-performance ratings look, riders are also interested in the ride itself—or shall we say the “cruise”? For that reason, both companies offer a wide range of elective accessories owners can outfit their cruisers with. The selection in both ranges includes saddle bags, luggage racks, heated grips, taller windscreens, etc. Triumph also offers the Rocket 3 GT which comes fully loaded with a number of additional accessories for a $700 premium over the Rocket 3 R’s starting price.  

Whether you prefer British or Japanese muscle, both offer equally good customization options to help make them more cruising and travel friendly. While creature comfort and equipment weigh heavy in the balance when buying a bike you’d like to travel onthe range is also another factor to consider. This is where the Rocket 3 gets to shine.  

The Triumph is armed with a 4.8-gallon fuel tank and despite the size of its engine, it’s rated at a reasonable 32.43 miles per gallon (mpg). This means that you should be able to get roughly 155 miles out of a single tank. The Yamaha has a smaller, 4-gallon tank. With a fuel economy rating of 27 mpg, this means you should get 108 miles out of a full tank of gas.   

Price 

There’s a healthy $4,000 different between the Yamaha and the Triumph. Interestingly, the despite the price gap, both models have a lot to offer in terms of standard equipment. However, the Rocket 3 does have a leg (or a wheel?) up on its competitor thanks to such standard features as Bluetooth connectivity, navigation, Showa suspension hardware, a beefier engine (of course), and cruise control. Plus, let’s not forget that the Triumph badge tends to come with a small premium anyway.  

While the VMax has quite the striking the design, this generation of the model has been around for over a decade compared and the platform is quite old by the industry’s standards. That being said, though it offers fewer standard features than the Rocket, the VMax manages to stay competitive and relevant thanks to its price also dating from 2009. Launch MSRP was $17,990 11 years ago which at the time was considered premium. A $9 increase in the span of a decade is more than reasonable. 

In Conclusion

The new-generation Triumph Rocket 3 is a beast worthy of its legacy with a bigger, meaner engine and some serious cruising chops. It doesn’t hold a candle to its American competitors. At $21,900, Triumph makes sure that customers get a good deal for their money by loading the bike up with features. Look-wise, from a subjective point of view, it’s also the better-looking bike with a flowing silhouette, dual headlight, and an overall assembly that looks more “finished”.

That being said, while the platform is a bit long in the tooth despite a few recent updates, the Yamaha VMax is just quirky enough to deserve to be on any cruiser lover’s shopping list. Between its massive air ducts and eclectic silhouette, the model stands out, for better or for worst. Plus, the 2.5L inline-three might be the biggest, most powerful engine of the two but the V4 has the most distinct sound.

The Rocket 3 is the power cruiser poster child and the VMax is the weird but endearing cousin.

Other Features

Wheelbase: 66 inches 66.9 inches
Seat Height: 30.4 inches 30.5 inches
Brakes: Dual 320mm discs with Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial monobloc calipers front, Single 300mm disc, Brembo M4.32 4-piston monobloc caliper back, Cornering ABS Dual 320mm wave-type discs6-piston calipers with Brembo master cylinder front,  

298mm wave-type disc, single-piston caliper with Brembo master cylinder back 

Suspension Showa 47-mm inverted fork front, Showa monoshock with reservoir RSU with remote hydraulic preload adjuster 52mm inverted fork front, Single shock with remote reservoir and remote adjustable for preload back.
Features: High-specification Avon Cobra Chrome tires, LED headlight, 2nd generation TFT instruments, Four riding modes, Hill-hold control, Cruise control, Keyless ignition, USB charging port, Free ‘MyTriumph’ app.  slipper clutch, ABS, drag-style instruments, LCD.

Yamaha Motorsports Launches “Deliver Your Ride” Program

By | General Posts

from https://motorcycles.einnews.com

Program Supports Dealer Deliveries of New ATV, Side-by-Side, Motorcycle, and Snowmobile Products to Customers’ Homes Where Possible

/EIN News/ — MARIETTA, Ga., April 27, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, launched an all-new “Deliver Your Ride” program supporting Yamaha dealers that are able to complete vehicle purchases remotely and then deliver the product directly to customers. The new program includes ATV, Side-by-Side, motorcycle, and snowmobile products, and is available nationwide wherever dealers can legally and safely participate.

“Yamaha is working hard to support our dealer network and their customers during these difficult times,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports group marketing manager. “It’s not business-as-usual for anyone, yet we know people may still want to buy and enjoy new Yamaha products where possible and appropriate based on their local laws and regulations.”

The new Deliver Your Ride initiative was announced to Yamaha dealers on April 17, 2020, as a temporary program and Yamaha is working diligently with dealers to assist with the implementation. Interested customers can contact their local Yamaha dealer or visit YamahaMotorsports.com to determine availability in their area. This is a voluntary program and Yamaha is encouraging each dealer to determine the feasibility based on their local laws and capabilities.

For details regarding all Yamaha products, visit YamahaMotorsports.com. Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaMotorUSA or @YamahaOutdoors.

Yamaha’s GNCC University Scheduled to Return for 2020

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from https://motorcycles.einnews.com/

Experts Offer Training for Aspiring ATV and Motorcycle Competitors at Snowshoe Mountain Resort

/EIN News/ — MARIETTA, Ga., April 08, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Yamaha Motor Corp., USA’s, annual Grand National Cross Country (GNCC) University is scheduled to return to Snowshoe Mountain Resort in West Virginia this June 24 to 26 during the 2020 GNCC series. While the racing season has been postponed, Yamaha remains committed to bringing back this inspiring and educational hands-on event for up-and-coming racers when the race series resumes.

“We are looking forward to another great GNCC University this year and are working closely with Racer Productions and Snowshoe Mountain Resort to ensure we are not only prepared to host a successful event per the current schedule, but we do so appropriately and safely based on current conditions,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports group marketing manager. “A primary reason this event is so popular with attendees is because it affords ambitious amateur riders the opportunity to grow their skill set with the help of seasoned pros and champions. They are then able to put their learnings into practice that same weekend at one of the most challenging GNCC races of the year.”

“I look forward to GNCC University at the Snowshoe Campus every year,” said Tim Cotter, GNCC University’s Dean of Dirt. “The University promotes a unique learning environment for off-road riders paired with the best athletes in the world. Their classroom is a 10,000-acre lab with every kind of obstacle you can imagine, allowing the GNCC University attendees to substantially improve their off-road riding performance upon graduating.”

A panel of current and pastime Yamaha racing champions and professionals will instruct as many as 80 total students in either ATV- or motorcycle-related sessions. Celebrating 26 years of racing at a pro-level, XC1 Pro ATV rider Johnny Gallagher will lead this year’s Yamaha Racing ATV instructors, along with five-time GNCC XC1 Pro ATV champion – and current undefeated series leader – Walker Fowler, and 12-time WXC ATV champion Traci Pickens. The two-wheel class will be led by seven-time AMA National Enduro Champion and AmPro Yamaha Racing team owner Randy Hawkins, five-time AMA National Hare Scramble Champion Jason Raines, XC1 Open Pro motorcycle rider Layne Michael, XC2 250 Pro motorcycle rider Michael Witkowski, along with the WXC bike competitors Rachael Archer and current unbeaten series leader Becca Sheets.

During the GNCC University, students will participate in lectures about sportsmanship, training, proper nutrition, and mental preparation, along with practicing how to tackle hills, grass tracks, woods, rocks, mud, and starts in a competitive setting. Groups will be determined according to bike size and rider skill level to ensure everyone is learning with comparable peers.

Reservations are on a first-come, first-serve basis with 80 openings evenly split between ATV and motorcycle disciplines. Tuition for GNCC University starts at $300 per student. To be the first in line for registration information on the 2020 Yamaha GNCC University, message @YamahaOutdoors on Instagram or Facebook.

For more information on the bLU cRU program, including all guidelines and requirements for ATV, SxS, and Off-Road Motorcycle racing, visit YamahabLUcRU.com. To view the entire Proven Off-Road ATV, SxS, and Off-Road Motorcycle lineup and learn more, visit YamahaMotorsports.com. Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaOutdoors or search the following hashtags on all platforms: #Yamaha #YamahaRacing #REALizeYourPodium #REALizeYourAdventure #ProvenOffRoad #bLUcRU #AssembledInUSA #Yamaha10YearBelt #YXZ1000R #YFZ450R #YZ125X #YZ250X #YZ250FX #YZ450FX

Muscle Bikes: Triumph Rocket 3 vs Yamaha V-Max vs Ducati Diavel vs Indian FTR 1200

By | General Posts

by Syed Shiraz from https://www.ibtimes.co.in/

Muscle bikes are the rebels of the motorcycle world. Let’s take a look at a few of them before the electrics finally take over.

What are muscle bikes? Well, the simple definition is: Muscle bikes are street legal drag bikes that can also cruise comfortably. In other words, these are bikes that can amble along easily with the laziest of cruisers but can also fluster the quickest sportbikes on dragstrips. Let’s take a look at some of the best muscle bikes in India.

Triumph Rocket 3

The Rocket 3, since 2004 when it was first launched, has held the record for being the motorcycle with the biggest engine in the world among series production motorcycles. It used to come with a monstrous 2.3-liter inline-three motor, but Triumph apparently thought that it was not big enough so they gave the all-new Rocket 3 launched last year a 2.5-liter mill.

It now makes a locomotive pulling 221 Nm of torque, which is again the highest figure in the world among all production motorcycles. While at it, they also brought the weight down of the motorcycle by 40 kilograms! It’s priced at Rs. 18 lakh.

Please note that all prices mentioned in this article are ex-showroom, PAN India prices.

Yamaha V-Max

This motorcycle has long been discontinued, but it earns a mention here as it’s the one that started it all, that too way back in 1985! In fact, it did something back then that no other motorcycle in this list (yes, not even the Rocket 3) does even right now—it made way more horsepower than the fastest sportbike of its time!

The 1985 Yamaha V-Max was pushing around 145 horsepower when the fastest motorcycle of the time, the Kawasaki GPZ900R, was making just around 115! The torque figures were not any less astounding either—the Yamaha produced more twisting force (112.7 Nm) than what Honda’s Gold Wing of the time (GL 1200) made (105 Nm).

Imagine any of the current muscle bikes making more than the Ducati Panigale V4 R’s 234 hp while still making more torque than the current Honda Gold Wing’s 170 Nm.

Well, the last V-Max was not far behind. It was producing close to 200 horsepower, which was more or less on a par with what the fastest motorcycles were making (Suzuki Hayabusa, Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14 R, BMW S1000 RR, Ducati Panigale 1299, etc.; the V4 R was nowhere in the picture back then). Torque output too, at 167 Nm, was not much less than the current Honda Gold Wing’s 170 Nm.

The V-Max was being sold for around Rs. 30 lakh by Yamana India. Used examples are hard to come by as owners don’t part with them easily.

John Abraham rides one.

Ducati Diavel and X Diavel

These are Ducati’s repeated unsuccessful attempts at making cruisers. They really wanted to make cruisers but ended up making drag bikes instead. The buyers aren’t complaining though.

The lightest motorcycles in this group are also the best handling of the lot. Prices start at Rs. 17,50,000 for the X Diavel and Rs. 17,70,000 for the Diavel.

Indian FTR 1200

The only muscle bike that will keep going even after the road ends, which makes it the best Indian for Indian conditions. It’s almost as light and as good a handler as the Ducatis, but cheaper than both of them. Prices start at Rs. 14.99 lakh.

Yamaha XT-Reme Terrain Challenge Returns to Iconic Loretta Lynn Ranch

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Yamaha Owners Event Showcasing Proven Off-Road Vehicles Returns for Third Year

/EIN News/ — MARIETTA, Ga., March 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, announces its third-annual XT-Reme Terrain Challenge (XT-R Challenge) for Yamaha YXZ, Wolverine, and Grizzly owners, friends, and families. The three-day event will be held October 2 through 4 at the famous Loretta Lynn Ranch in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee.

Designed to deliver fun via formidable off-roading trails and obstacles, the XT-R Challenge brings extreme drivers, riders, and weekend warriors who own a Yamaha together for a weekend of great behind-the-wheel action and excitement. Drivers and spectators experience an enjoyable weekend of camping and entertainment with fellow friends, family, and adventure-seekers alongside Yamaha employees.

“The Yamaha XT-R Challenge is the perfect opportunity for owners to put their Proven Off-Road Side-by-Sides and ATVs to the test in mild-to-wild terrain,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports group marketing manager. “The event continues to grow each year and we’re ecstatic to have everyone back this October. The XT-R Challenge has become the ultimate showcase for Yamaha durability and reliability, as well as a great way for our customers to REALize their Adventure alongside other off-road enthusiasts.”

The third annual event will feature an off-road course with varying natural terrains and man-made obstacles specifically designed to put participants and their Proven Off-Road Yamaha Wolverine, YXZ1000R, and Grizzly vehicles to the test. Additional activities include demo rides, music, games, activities – including those for children – and more!

Entries in the XT-R Challenge are limited. More announcements, details, and registration information will be released soon on XTRemeTerrainChallenge.com and the Yamaha Outdoors social channels.

BMW F900 R review: Nothing like a naked roadster on a freezing day

By | General Posts

by Geoff Hill from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Starring in his own remake of Freezy Rider, our man Hill tackles the elements to see if the Beemer has what it takes in the tough middleweight sector and finds it’s close, but not quite a cigar

It was freezing, raining and blowing a gale – and I was on a bike with zero miles and new tyres.

Perfect conditions, then, for pushing the limits of the Bavarian firm’s naked roadster whose mission, should it choose to accept it, was to give a good spanking to Triumph’s new Tiger 900 and the established and very popular Yamaha MT-09.

“Mmmm. I’d start in Rain mode if I was you,” said Ian at the dealership, slapping me cheerily on the back and going back to his nice warm office, the swine.

Oh well, I was obviously being punished after getting home from back to back launches in southern Spain and Morocco, and at least first impressions of the Beemer were good – compact but comfortable riding position, tilting you forward in a mildly sporty fashion on to the bars to give you a view of decent mirrors and a fairly simple but informative TFT screen.

A quick toggle of the Mode button through Road, Dynamic and Dynamic Pro into Rain, another toggle of the Electronic Suspension Adjustment to solo rider with luggage to take account of the fact that I’m heavier than the average ride, three presses of the heated grips button to get them up to the maximum setting – and I was off.

The fuelling at low revs was slightly snatchy and acceleration in Rain mode was a stately affair, and was never going to set my pants on fire, particularly since they were now soggy anyway.

Why BMW designs very expensive suits with the waterproof lining on the inside is a mystery to me. I wore one for a round-the-world trip and, in heavy rain, everything in the outside pockets got soaked.

Anyway, where was I? Ah yes, on the F900 R in the rain.

Good points so far – the quickshifter on the SE model I was riding was perfect, snicking seamlessly through the six-speed box both up and down, and handling was light and neutral, although I was still taking it relatively gently on those shiny new tyres, even though with traction control, I was unlikely to come a serious cropper.

With Brembos and big twin discs up front, stopping was linear and progressive, with cornering ABS on the SE model to give me a nice warm feeling of safety.

Oh, wait, that nice warm feeling wasn’t the ABS – it was the heated grips, which were so good that even in the sub-zero temperatures, my pinkies were in danger of bursting into flames and I had to wind them back to the 2 setting.

Right, that was it – I was bored with Rain mode, and the roads were drying out a bit anyway, so it was toggle time again, to Road mode, and while I was at, changing the suspension mode from Road to Dynamic.

That was more like it – progress became satisfyingly swift, accompanied by a meaty rasp from the exhaust and, with the bike hunkered down and firmed up, it flung itself into corners with a nice combination of enthusiasm and precision.

Things got even better in Dynamic mode and I think once the tyres were scrubbed in, I’d leave it in that all the time and use Road if it was raining.

On the base model, you only get Rain and Road riding modes, sadly, and no Electronic Suspension Adjustment.

The verdict? The Yamaha MT-09 is more powerful and aggressive, but the BMW makes peak power and torque at lower revs. It’s also cheaper and has more tech, including the electronically adjustable suspension, which makes it more user-friendly and a slightly plusher ride, and with BMW luggage attached, more suitable for touring.