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Motorcycle Theft Prevention and Recovery with GPS

By General Posts

All the things that make motorcycles great also make them attractive for thieves.

Unfortunately for bike owners, stealing a motorcycle is much easier than stealing a car, and it is very profitable too. Motorcycles are prime targets for criminals of all kinds, which can cost you dearly.

Among all anti-theft devices, motorcycle trackers offer the most effective theft prevention and recovery systems to owners. Motorcycle ownership is an extremely challenging task considering the dangers that lurk in every corner, but GPS tracking devices can prevent that dreaded outcome.

Report Prepared by Rewire Security

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5-Ball Leathers’ Pit Crew Vest

By General Posts

The lightweight Pit Crew Vest from 5-Ball Leathers is made from ballistic nylon. Ballistic nylon was originally was designed in WWII to repel flying shrapnel.

The collar on the Pit Crew Vest is a mandarin style – unfolded stand up style – measures 1 ¼”, leather trim around arm holes and leather trim accents on front flaps. It features:

  • (2) Cary pockets
  • (2) chest pockets with snap closures
  • Leather trim on 2 side pockets with zipper closures
  • (2) ¼” leather band around the bottom of the vest
  • Side flaps with 2 snaps to adjust your fit.

CLICK HERE TO BUY

http://shop.bikernet.com/product-category/leather/5-ball-leathers/

Our lead designer, Bob Kay, put all his experience with riding across country to rallys like Sturgis and the Smoke Out and combined his product knowledge from positions at Nempco, Biker’s Choice, and American Ironhorse and infused that passion into our newest vest. Bandit added his design elements and together the 5-Ball Leathers’ Pit Crew Vest was born.

This vest comes with leather accents, two gun pockets (or for phone, cameras or tools) with holsters, several outside pockets, and an exclusive Bandit media pocket in the inside back, so you can carry your favorite Cycle Source issue, or your court file, if you’ll be standing in front of a judge.

5-Ball Leathers’ leather accents utilize Buffalo leather due to its excellent resistance to abrasion and wind. We honor those road warriors of the past with top-quality motorcycle gear.

We created a line of 5-Ball Jackets, vests and Jak Shirts for tough environments with industrial-strength construction. Whether you are heading to Sturgis or cross town in a rainstorm, our 5-Ball leather delivers comfort, security and good looks.

At 5-Ball Leathers we design shirts, jackets and vests and then go out and torture test them. We refine our designs to ensure they are multi-task garments. That’s why our stuff has so much storage and why the pockets are so deep. We keep your gear safe and secure.

THE LAYERING STRATEGY – The purpose of layering is to keep you comfortable, insulated and protected. Often times a t-shirt, hoodie and a 5-Ball Jacket, Vest or Shirt is all you need. Then the rider is able to modulate their comfort level by adjusting their layers. Our leathers can easily be rolled up and stowed in your saddlebags or on your handlebars when not needed.

5-Ball garments are used as the mid-layer or outer layer depending upon riding conditions. Usually 3 layers are identified as follows:

  • Inner layer provides comfort by keeping the skin dry
  • Mid layer provides warmth. Also called insulating layer
  • Outside layer protects from wind and/or water and works as protection over the other two layers

A 5-Ball Cut delivers a cool & easy ride

Motorcycle Clubs and the One Percenter

By General Posts

It’s no secret that Americans love outlaws, from the legends and lore of rebellious (and illegal) acts by the Founding Fathers, to the bushwhacking and bank-robbing capers of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, to the “bad boy” music of Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and Dr. Dre.

American culture and mass media have led inexorably to characters that embody this bad-boy attitude – a recent example being Jax, the heartthrob outlaw biker star of the TV show “Sons of Anarchy”. Western society has a long established canon from which we “learn” about society from fictional dramas. And the more we watch shows like “Sons of Anarchy,” the more a news story will seem to fit our mental construct of “how those people are.” The same is true of popular TV crime dramas’ portrayal of American minorities’ involvement in violent crime. And it seems that every time outlaw motorcycle clubs are portrayed in the news, it’s because of something terrible, such as the deadly events in Waco, Texas. Add to this the fact that the outlaw biker narrative has been largely controlled over time, not by members of the culture, but by outsiders and the misconceptions grow.

The term 1%er was first used in print in the pages of Life Magazine during the 1960’s. The article was a contrived response to an AMA rally in Hollister CA, after encouraging certain individuals to get drunk and ride through town the media then reported on ‘drunken’ motorcycle clubs giving rise to the popular misconception of bikers and also the movie The Wild One. The American Motorcycle Association stated that 99% of the people at their events were God fearing and family oriented. The other 1% were hard riding, hard partying, non mainstream type people. Thus the term 1%er found its place in popular vernacular.

Motorcycle clubs were historically born of a love of the machine, racing, riding and from military service. Gangs began for various reasons as well, but largely as a form of protection for outsiders or ethnic immigrants residing in inner cities. Their social structure is overwhelmingly democratic from the local to the international levels. Officers are democratically elected and hold office so long as they meet the memberships’ needs.

In contrast, Motorcycle Gangs can be seen as more autocratic than democratic, where leaders emerge more for their charismatic leadership and illicit earning abilities than for their abilities to run organisations. Motorcycle clubs are organised hierarchically, with strictly defined chains of command and lines of communication. MCs elect secretaries whose jobs are to maintain meeting minutes, keep track of committees and chairs, and see that old business is complete and new business is on the agenda. Treasurers also are elected officials and they attend to fiduciary responsibilities such as collecting membership dues, paying clubhouse expenses and financial planning for the future. Both secretaries and treasurers are required to produce written documents for the membership to review and approve during each meeting.

It’s not easy becoming a patch-holder. Many have compared “prospecting” – the process of earning full membership – to that of military basic training, where the individual is broken down in order to be reformed into a part of a collective: To think not of one’s self but of others, and to understand that one’s actions or inactions impact the team and the organisation. But prospecting takes months and sometime a year or more (5 years for one MC). Prospecting is physically, emotionally, and intellectually demanding and not everyone can do it. A significant amount of social status is conferred upon those with the steel to make it. Perhaps this is the only obvious similarity between MCs and gangs.

MC is generally reserved for those clubs that are mutually recognised by other MC or outlaw motorcycle clubs. This is indicated by a motorcyclist wearing an MC patch, or a three piece patch called colours, on the back of their jacket or riding vest. Outlaw or 1%er can mean merely that the club is not chartered under the auspices of the AMA, implying a radical rejection of authority and embracing of the “biker” lifestyle as defined and popularised since the 1950s and represented by such media as Easyriders magazine, the work of painter David Mann and others. In many contexts the terms overlap with the usual meaning of “outlaw” because some of these clubs, or some of their members, are recognised rightly or wrongly by law enforcement agencies as taking part in organised crime.

That sense of brotherhood was on display at a funeral for a patch-holder slain at Waco. Members of the Hells Angels, Bandidos, Mongols, Vagos and more than 50 other motorcycle clubs come together in peace to mourn the passing of a man who touched the lives of so many in his community. To them, he was much more than a biker or a patch-holder — he was their Brother, with all the familial love, respect, and honour that that word conveys. Possibly such a gathering has never happened before. This convergence of contrasting MCs was no media stunt. There were no media in the funeral that day (although there was one white, unmarked van, out of which came uniformed men clad in body armour and armed with assault rifles).

Perhaps the singularly most important distinction between outlaw motorcycle clubs and gangs is evidenced through philanthropy. Many motorcycle clubs are closely intertwined with charity work: MC family members are or have been affected by the maladies the charities seek to eradicate, and members of the local community are in legitimate and immediate need. MCs support a wide variety of local, national, and international charities that seek to end disease, poverty and hunger, but especially supported are disabled veterans organisations. Charity is to members of motorcycle clubs as petrol and oil are to their machines. For some, it’s a major reason why they join and stay in MCs.

Clubs have been observed providing 24/7 security at battered women’s shelters, holding motorcycling events such as Poker Runs to raise money for local families whose homes were destroyed by fire or natural disasters, or to help families stricken by some other tragic event get on their feet. If a member of the community is in legitimate need, and the MCs are able to help, they almost always do. Even if it’s just “Passing the Hat,” where patch-holders literally pass around a baseball cap into which members place what cash they can spare. This might not seem like much, but to a family in desperate need of short-term assistance, this can mean the difference between having electricity and water and going without.

The above puts perspective on the recent statement that certain US law enforcement officials and organisations have labeled outlaw motorcycle clubs as a domestic terrorist threat, something is that is obviously more concerning since many of these clubs are made up of veterans who have fought bravely in recent wars for their country.

Meet The White House’s New Chief Climate Change Skeptic

By General Posts

William Happer, a Princeton scientist who is doubtful of the dangers of climate change, appears to be leading a White House challenge to the government’s conclusion that global warming is a threat.

Twenty five years ago, William Happer had an encounter with the White House that ended badly.

At the time, in 1993, the Princeton professor was taking a break from academia to direct scientific research at the U.S. Department of Energy. He turned a skeptical eye toward one of then-Vice President Al Gore’s favorite issues: the risks posed by chemicals eating away at ozone in the stratosphere and letting in dangerous ultraviolet radiation. As the story goes, Happer went to the White House and told Gore’s staff he saw no evidence that the ozone hole actually was hurting anyone.

Gore was annoyed, and Happer lost his job.

Today, Happer is back in the White House, still fighting against what he considers unfounded claims that our globe is in danger. But this time, his cause is backed by the man in the Oval Office.

Happer, 79, joined the staff of President Trump’s National Security Council last fall. And according to documents first leaked to The Washington Post, he appears to be pushing the White House to mount a challenge to the government’s official assessment of climate change, which calls climate change a serious national security threat.

On Thursday, the chairs of four different committees in the House of Representatives sent a letter to President Trump expressing concern about “recent reports that the National Security Council (NSC) is planning to assemble a secret panel, led by a discredited climate change denier, to undermine the overwhelming scientific consensus on the nature and threats of climate change.”

The four Democrats called it “deeply concerning that Dr. Happer appears to be spearheading” that effort.

Happer is an intriguing and controversial figure. He was born in India when it was a British colony, the son of a Scottish military officer and an American medical missionary. His mother, with young Will in tow, spent part of World War II working as a physician at the secret Manhattan Project site in Oak Ridge, Tenn. The family later settled in North Carolina.

Happer became a physicist. He taught at Columbia University and joined the faculty at Princeton University in 1980.

“He is a damn good scientist,” says Steven Koonin, a prominent physicist who is now a professor at New York University and who has known Happer for 30 years. “There are two really significant contributions associated with him.”

One of them made it possible to capture much better images of people’s lungs; the other allows astronomers to see the stars more clearly.

At the same time, Happer acquired a reputation as a contrarian, quick to challenge conclusions that struck him as unproven — especially when it came to environmental science.

That reputation was cemented by Happer’s confrontation with Gore’s staff over risks posed by the ozone hole. The incident was widely covered in scientific publications — Physics Today ran an article headlined “Happer Leaves DOE Under Ozone Cloud For Violating Political Correctness.”

Koonin thinks Happer was doing what a scientist should, demanding better evidence. “I think it sensitized him to the squishiness, if you will, of a lot of the environmental science,” he says.

Some of Happer’s scientific critics, though, see it as something more: a visceral distrust of scientists who study environmental risks.

Over the past decade, Happer has waged a fierce campaign aimed at debunking fears of global warming caused by emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

In a speech to a 2015 conference organized by the Heartland Institute, which has railed against restrictions on emissions from fossil fuels, Happer scoffed at these fears, calling them an Alice-in-Wonderland fantasy. “When I got into this area and started learning about it, I learned that when I looked at CO2, I should assume that it caused harmful warming, extreme weather, Noah’s flood, you know. I remember thinking, ‘Are they mad?’ ”

Carbon dioxide is actually good for the planet, Happer claims; it’s like fertilizer and makes crops more productive.

“We’ve got to push back vigorously on the demonization of fossil fuels,” he said in his speech. “They’re not demons at all. They’re enormous servants to us.”

Some of Happer’s colleagues at Princeton are reluctant to talk publicly about him; it’s like discussing a relationship that got messy.

“I mean, I liked him. We went off for coffee after our committee meetings a couple of times,” says Michael Bender, an emeritus professor of geoscience and climate researcher.

Bender says he wouldn’t do it now, though. It’s partly because of the scientific dispute, because he thinks Happer is misreading the evidence. But it’s also because of Happer’s style — he’s labeled climate science a cult and accused other scientists of whipping up climate fears to boost their own careers. Most offensive for Bender: Happer once said the “demonization of carbon dioxide is just like the demonization of the Jews under Hitler.”minnn

“You know, there came a point where he attacked my colleagues’ integrity,” Bender says, “and I felt like I couldn’t have a cordial relationship with him after that.”

Happer, who last fall went to work in the White House as a senior aide to the National Security Council, wasn’t authorized to comment for this story.

Robert Socolow, another Princeton colleague, has mixed feelings about Happer’s post. Socolow’s own biography — first a physicist, then a specialist on the environment — makes him a kind of bridge between Happer and the environmental scientists on Princeton’s campus. He doesn’t doubt Happer’s technical grasp of climate science but says that “everybody has areas of irrationality.”

“I think the environment in general, and climate change in particular, is an area of Will’s irrationality. But nonetheless, I think he can accomplish something” in his current job, Socolow says.

Socolow hopes that while in the White House, Happer will behave less like an argumentative physicist and more like the kind of person who has to prepare for every possibility — including those that strike him as unlikely.

“A military person doesn’t underestimate the enemy. A business person doesn’t underestimate the competition,” Socolow says. And even if, as Happer insists, there’s uncertainty about the course of climate change, the U.S. can’t afford to underestimate those risks.