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BMW to Add New Cruise Control System to Motorcycles

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

For reasons that have to do with the way they are built and used, motorcycles do not benefit from the same wide array of comfort or safety systems developed for cars. Strides are being made though to have some of these technologies migrate to motorcycles as well.

As far as cars are concerned, cruise control has been around in some form or another from about the time they were invented, but for motorcycles adapting the tech proved a bit more complicated.

There are a few bikes out there with cruise control, such as the BMW S1000RR, or the Yamaha FJR-1300, but the tech is not widely available, and of course not as standard. BMW Motorrad plans to change that, and announced that it would “soon offer this type of rider assistance system.”

Called in BMW speak Active Cruise Control (ACC), it is a brand new system that has been developed together with Bosch. It can automatically regulate the speed at which the bike is traveling based on the speed set by the rider and the distance to the vehicle driving in front.

The system will try to maintain the distance from the vehicle in front as set by the rider, who can choose one of three settings. To calculate the distance, ACC uses a radar fitted at the front of the motorcycle, and it works together with some of the other systems on the two-wheeler, including the brakes and the ABS system.

The system can detect only moving vehicles, and will not react to stopped cars or traffic lights, BMW warns.

According to company, the new system is also able to automatically reduce speed during lean angle cornering, while at the same time trying to keep acceleration and deceleration within tolerable limits during an increased angle cornering.

The German bike maker did not say when the ACC will be rolled out and what models will get it.

Deadpool 2 Production Company Hit Big With Fine After Death Of Stuntwoman Joi Harris

By | General Posts

by Dirk Libbey from https://www.cinemablend.com

In the summer of 2017 while Deadpool 2 was in production, Joi Walker, a professional motorcycle racer who was working as a stunt performer for the first time, was killed when she was ejected from her bike and went through the plate glass window of a building. Now, the Vancouver-based production company, TCF Vancouver Productions LTD, has been fined nearly $300,000 by WorkSafeBC, the British Colombia equivalent of OSHA in the U.S.

The exact fine comes to $289,562 and is due to the finding that the production of Deadpool 2 was in violation of five requirements of Canada’s Workers Compensation Act and the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. The finding of WorkSafe BC, is that, among other things, the production failed to identify the hazards involved in the stunt or control the risks. The stunt performer was not only not wearing appropriate safety gear, but according to Deadline, she was actually instructed by the production not to do so.

Joi Walker was working as a stunt performer in place of Zazie Beats as Domino. The motorcycle stunt was Joi Walker’s first stunt performance on the film. This may have something to do with the fact that one of the other violations listed is the fact that the production failed to provide a new worker orientation for Walker.

Joi Walker’s death is not only not the only significant stunt accident in recent years, it’s not even the only significant one that took place on a motorcycle. Two years before the Deadpool 2 accident, a motorcycle crash on the set of Resident Evil: The Final Chapter left stuntwoman Olivia Jackson in a medically induced coma. And while Jackson ultimately survived her injuries, she was left with permanent damage, including an amputated arm. Jackson was recently awarded damages in a lawsuit against the film’s South African production company.

A stuntman on The Walking Dead fell to his death a month before the accident on the set of Deadpool 2.

More recently a stuntman on the set of F9 sustained a serious head injury in a fall. While this most recent injury is from this past summer, it appears that we’ve seen fewer serious injuries to stunt people more recently, which hopefully indicates that extra care is being taken to ensure safety of all involved.

Stunt people have, without question, the most dangerous job on any film set. They’re trained to be able to do these stunts safely, but there is always going to be risk. Considering the great amount of respect that many in Hollywood clearly do have for stunt performers, there’s little argument that nothing is more important than their safety.

WorkSafe BC says the purpose of the fine is to motivate the employer, and other employers, to comply with health and safety requirements. Deadpool 2 was ultimately dedicated to Joi Walker.

May is national Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month

By | General Posts

from https://www.limaohio.com

May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month and the Ohio State Highway Patrol reminds motorcyclists to ride trained and sober. As summer approaches, motorists should be aware of an increase in motorcycles on the roadways.

There were 3,585 traffic crashes involving motorcycles in 2019 that resulted in 165 deaths and 3,245 injuries. Overall, 79 percent of motorcycle-involved crashes resulted in at least one injury or death.

The patrol issued 1,552 citations to motorcyclists last year; 65% included a speed violation, 21% were for operating a motorcycle without a proper license and 6% were for OVI.

“Being trained and wearing the proper equipment are two ways motorcyclists can be responsible when riding this summer,” said Lt. Jonathon Gray, commander of the Van Wert patrol post. “All motorists should share the road and be aware of their surroundings, as well as other vehicles using the roadway.”

Ohio law requires helmets for riders under 18 and drivers with less than one year of motorcycle experience. Passengers on motorcycles must wear helmets when the driver is required to do so.

Yamaha’s GNCC University Scheduled to Return for 2020

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from https://motorcycles.einnews.com/

Experts Offer Training for Aspiring ATV and Motorcycle Competitors at Snowshoe Mountain Resort

/EIN News/ — MARIETTA, Ga., April 08, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Yamaha Motor Corp., USA’s, annual Grand National Cross Country (GNCC) University is scheduled to return to Snowshoe Mountain Resort in West Virginia this June 24 to 26 during the 2020 GNCC series. While the racing season has been postponed, Yamaha remains committed to bringing back this inspiring and educational hands-on event for up-and-coming racers when the race series resumes.

“We are looking forward to another great GNCC University this year and are working closely with Racer Productions and Snowshoe Mountain Resort to ensure we are not only prepared to host a successful event per the current schedule, but we do so appropriately and safely based on current conditions,” said Steve Nessl, Yamaha’s Motorsports group marketing manager. “A primary reason this event is so popular with attendees is because it affords ambitious amateur riders the opportunity to grow their skill set with the help of seasoned pros and champions. They are then able to put their learnings into practice that same weekend at one of the most challenging GNCC races of the year.”

“I look forward to GNCC University at the Snowshoe Campus every year,” said Tim Cotter, GNCC University’s Dean of Dirt. “The University promotes a unique learning environment for off-road riders paired with the best athletes in the world. Their classroom is a 10,000-acre lab with every kind of obstacle you can imagine, allowing the GNCC University attendees to substantially improve their off-road riding performance upon graduating.”

A panel of current and pastime Yamaha racing champions and professionals will instruct as many as 80 total students in either ATV- or motorcycle-related sessions. Celebrating 26 years of racing at a pro-level, XC1 Pro ATV rider Johnny Gallagher will lead this year’s Yamaha Racing ATV instructors, along with five-time GNCC XC1 Pro ATV champion – and current undefeated series leader – Walker Fowler, and 12-time WXC ATV champion Traci Pickens. The two-wheel class will be led by seven-time AMA National Enduro Champion and AmPro Yamaha Racing team owner Randy Hawkins, five-time AMA National Hare Scramble Champion Jason Raines, XC1 Open Pro motorcycle rider Layne Michael, XC2 250 Pro motorcycle rider Michael Witkowski, along with the WXC bike competitors Rachael Archer and current unbeaten series leader Becca Sheets.

During the GNCC University, students will participate in lectures about sportsmanship, training, proper nutrition, and mental preparation, along with practicing how to tackle hills, grass tracks, woods, rocks, mud, and starts in a competitive setting. Groups will be determined according to bike size and rider skill level to ensure everyone is learning with comparable peers.

Reservations are on a first-come, first-serve basis with 80 openings evenly split between ATV and motorcycle disciplines. Tuition for GNCC University starts at $300 per student. To be the first in line for registration information on the 2020 Yamaha GNCC University, message @YamahaOutdoors on Instagram or Facebook.

For more information on the bLU cRU program, including all guidelines and requirements for ATV, SxS, and Off-Road Motorcycle racing, visit YamahabLUcRU.com. To view the entire Proven Off-Road ATV, SxS, and Off-Road Motorcycle lineup and learn more, visit YamahaMotorsports.com. Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaOutdoors or search the following hashtags on all platforms: #Yamaha #YamahaRacing #REALizeYourPodium #REALizeYourAdventure #ProvenOffRoad #bLUcRU #AssembledInUSA #Yamaha10YearBelt #YXZ1000R #YFZ450R #YZ125X #YZ250X #YZ250FX #YZ450FX

Motorcycle safety foundation helps prepare riders for Arizona’s roads

By | General Posts

Kimberly Chapman was known as the “ultimate motorcycle enthusiast,” earning a national reputation for being a motorcycle community advocate.

The 55-year-old was killed in 2011 when she collided with a vehicle that pulled in front of her at a Phoenix intersection.

Months later, some of Chapman’s friends spearheaded the creation of the Arizona Motorcycle Safety and Awareness Foundation, a nonprofit that advocates for safer practices for motorcyclists and eliminating distracted driving in the state.

“She was heavily involved in the motorcycle community,” said Mick Degn, the foundation’s executive director.

“I’ve been a motorcycle rider and been involved in motorcycle organizations and we just felt that there wasn’t anything that was really being done to help be preventive in regard to motorcycle crashes. So myself and seven other folks formed AMSAF.”

“As we spent time looking at what we wanted to accomplish, our biggest thing was to help reduce crashes and fatalities and promote motorcycle safety and awareness,” Degn added.

In Arizona, 150 motorcyclists were killed in crashes in 2018, a decrease from the 161 killed in 2017.

In Tucson, fatalities doubled from 7 to 15 from 2018 to 2019.

The foundation, which primarily focuses on educating riders of all levels, used a pilot scholarship program to reduce the cost of motorcycle training, an expense reaching upwards of $300, according to Degn.

By 2014, the foundation’s mission expanded to allocating monthly scholarships.

So far, more than 3,500 Arizona riders have been trained.

The foundation’s statewide effort has received support from the Arizona Governors Office of Highway Safety, the Arizona Department of Transportation, the Arizona Trauma Association and various organizations in the medical and law enforcement fields.

“We’ve seen an increase in motorcycle registrations — there’s 400,000 plus people registered, but at the same time we also see that even though they’re registered motorcyclists at the end of the day, they’re not trained,” said Alberto Gutier, director of the highway safety office.

“One of the issues that we have with motorcycles is the lack of what I call mutual respect. Motorcyclists need to respect the vehicles and follow the rules of the road and cars also need to have some respect for the motorcycle community.”

In November, the governor’s office provided a $50,000 grant for the foundation’s efforts.

It’s being used to fuel the foundation’s newest effort of operating the state’s first helmet scholarship program for motorcyclists.

“Arizona is a choice state on wearing a helmet, but if you’re going to wear a helmet we want people to wear a good helmet, a department of transportation helmet that’s going to protect them,” Degn said.

The foundation has helped more than 100 riders get discounted helmets, working with five vendors in the state, including RideNow Powersports and Cycle Gear in Tucson.

After applying for the scholarship and giving a $50 tax-deductible donation, the foundation provides $125 off a helmet. The sellers tack on an additional 25% discount.

“You wouldn’t believe the number of phone calls I get from parents who want to get their kid a motorcycle, but they want them to take a motorcycle course first and they want to get them a good helmet,” Degn said.

“We help them in both ways … we’ve been able to save them money in both areas and now they can help their child.”

The scholarship saves riders hundreds of dollars for a full-coverage helmet, which could cost nearly $600.

While “safety is hard to sell,” according to Degn, the foundation’s future includes finding partners with large Arizona employers and organizations as they continue to promote their mission.

“That’s why we have to continually talk about distracted driving, sharing the road, meaning looking out for each other, looking out for the two-wheeled vehicle and the four-wheeled vehicle down the road,” he said.

Major traffic switch headed to I-10 near Ruthrauff: Construction crews are shifting traffic on Interstate 10 near Ruthrauff by the end of the week.

On Friday, all westbound I-10 lanes will shift to the westbound frontage road and all eastbound lanes will shift to the westbound I-10 lanes by Saturday.

Crews will work from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m., reducing I-10 to one lane in each direction.

The Sunset Road exit ramp from westbound I-10 will move to the southeast, ADOT says. This exit will provide direct access to westbound I-10 frontage road businesses.

Electric scooters can help cities move beyond cars v pedestrians

By | General Posts

by Alex Hern from https://www.theguardian.com

The government is showing signs of legalising electric scooters on roads, but new laws should be about safety, not horsepower

If there’s one thing we can all agree on, it’s that being hit by a scooter hurts less than being hit by a bike. That may sound like a strangely negative place to start, but it’s sort of fundamental to why I’m glad the government is finally showing signs of legalising the use of electronic scooters on public roads across the UK.

The current state of the law is a mess. Its broad strokes are reasonable enough: powered vehicles require an MOT and registration to use on public roads, while unpowered vehicles do not. Pavements are for foot traffic only. Access requirements complicate matters, but only a little: wheelchairs, both manual and powered – legally, “class three invalid carriages” – can go on pavements, while some – class four – can go on roads as well.

Then, in the 1980s, the law was modernised to support the first generation of electric bikes. Fitted with simple motors that aided hill climbs, it felt silly to ban them as electric vehicles, and so a new category – the “electrically assisted pedal cycle” – was invented, and the laws amended further in 2015 to remove weight limits, allow for four wheels and increase the maximum power of the motor.

Which means, as the law stands, you can ride a four-wheeled vehicle of potentially unlimited weight, largely powered by a motor up to 15.5mph, on public roads without training, licensing or registration. But not an electronic scooter. Nor, for that matter, a 5kg, 10mph “hoverboard”, unlikely to hurt anyone save its rider.

Looking at the laws from the ground up, the distinguishing characteristic should be safety, not how a vehicle is powered. It’s hard to argue that an electric motor is inherently more dangerous than pedal power. In fact, given the variability of human strength, it’s almost possible to argue the opposite: electric motors in e-bikes are capped at 250W of power, after all, but no such limit is possible for people, where a fit cyclist can easily exceed 300W or more.

And so a set of regulations which allowed, alongside bikes, skateboards and scooters, electric vehicles of limited weight, power and speed is surely the only justifiable outcome of any consultation.

But more than justifiable, such a set of rules would be good. One of the truisms of the cycling world is that the safest thing for cyclists on the road is more cyclists on the road. It’s not all about public policy and accessible cycle lanes: sheer weight of numbers is important too, in forcing other road users to treat cyclists as a viable third transportation mode, rather than just annoying slowpokes ripe for close passes and aggressive overtakes.

Expanding that constituency, to encompass a wide variety of mid-speed vehicles, would only help push cities towards the tipping point where they can consider transport beyond a simple car/pedestrian binary. And that’s a point every city needs to reach, sooner rather than later, in the face of a climate crisis that much see car usage drastically curtailed.

But. While laws need to be rewritten to support electric scooters, they don’t necessarily need to support the peculiarly American model of dumping a load of scooters on a pavement and hoping enough people will ride them before they get stolen or damaged for the unit economics to work out favourably. That model, unfortunately, has defaulted to its present state: unregulated, unmanaged and cutthroat, with councils left fighting back with nothing but their powers to prevent littering.

Here, the trade-off is more painful. Dockless rideshare – of bikes, e-bikes or e-scooters – can be great for promoting access, but it can also harm those least able to cope, as anyone who has tried to navigate a wheelchair or pram around a pile of Uber bikes knows. Micromobility can succeed with or without the Silicon Valley business models – but it can’t succeed without being given a chance on the roads.

AI-Driven Electric Motorcycle Shows Self-Driving Tech Is About More Than Autonomous Driving

By | General Posts

by John Koetsier from https://www.forbes.com/

Damon Motorcycles unveiled its new electric motorcycle today at CES in Las Vegas, calling it “the world’s smartest, safest and most powerful electric motorcycle.”

My first thought: it can’t be both the most powerful and the safest.

Then I kept reading.

And I started believing it might be possible.

First off: the power. The Damon Hypersport has “over 200” horsepower, which is a lot for a motorcycle. But even more impressively, it delivers 200nm of torque at zero RPMs … the classic electric vehicle advantage. (Although how RPM means something in an electric motor is a mystery to me.) Thanks to that power, the bike has a top speed of 200 miles/hour.

Which, by the way, doesn’t sound very safe.

But the safety features are impressive.

As you’d expect in a motorcycle, they’re not about crumple zones or air bags.

Instead, they’re about intelligence. Specifically, predictive intelligence: what’s around me, where is it going and what do I need to avoid? The Hypersport will track the speed, direction and acceleration of up to 64 moving objects around the bike, Damon says.

Damon calls it the “CoPilot 360º advanced warning system.” CoPilot 360 uses cameras, radar and “other sensors” to know what’s around and alert riders to threats, the company says.

“We spent the last three years developing an AI-powered, fully connected, e-motorcycle platform that incorporates CoPilot, our proprietary 360º warning system … Damon motorcycles will be the safest, most advanced electric motorcycles on the market.”
– Jay Giraud, co-founder and CEO, Damon Motorcycles

That’s not just about what’s ahead of you. The system “looks around corners,” although I’m sure it’s not bending any laws of physics, and keeps an “eye” on the rear to see what might be coming from behind.

And, it will learn your driving habits and adjust accordingly, using onboard artificial intelligence.

“We prioritized data-driven thinking at the epicenter of the company, employing radical innovations in sensor fusion, robotics and AI,” Dom Kwong, the co-founder and CTO of Damon Motorcycles, said in a statement. “This level of deep learning and connectivity are unprecedented, ensuring each rider a smarter, safer and connected ride; not only for individuals but for entire communities, with the goal to reduce incidents worldwide.”

To connect riders and power the bike’s AI and other advanced features, it includes 4G, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

Of course, there are two big questions:

One: will riders actually be safer with warnings about oncoming objects, or will they prioritize what they see on the screen versus watching the road? Will a flood of alerts distract them or make them safer?

And secondly: with software, the devil’s in the details. Few transportation companies that aren’t named Tesla do it well. Will this startup be able to ship these advanced technologies in a usable, friendly and safe way?

Damon says yes, citing the foundation of their software:

“By building it on BlackBerry’s best-in-class technology that is safety certified, Damon motorcycles will be the safest, most advanced electric motorcycles on the market,” says CEO Giraud.

That’s BlackBerry QNX, which is built by the former mobile giant, now re-focused on software solutions.

Ultimately, we’ll know when the bike ships.

The Hypersport is available for pre-order now on the Damon website. Pricing begins at $24,995 before any applicable EV tax credits.

And the range? 200 miles on the highway, 300 miles in the city, according to the company.

Damon’s Electric Motorcycle Will Have 200-Mile Range, 200mph Speed, Safety Suite

By | General Posts

by Bill Roberson from https://www.forbes.com

2019 was a big year for the nascent electric motorcycle niche, and it looks like 2020 is going to start with another shock to the system with Vancouver B.C.-based Damon Motorcycles announcing some eye-opening performance numbers and cutting-edge safety tech for their upcoming machine, called the Hypersport. A prototype Hypersport and specifications were revealed Tuesday morning at the 2020 CES electronics expo in Las Vegas.

Damon claims the Hypersport will be be capable of some fairly hyper numbers, including 200 horsepower, a 200 mile-an-hour top speed, and 200 miles of highway range, as well as 300 miles of range in urban riding. Additionally, the Hypersport will be bristling with technology heretofore unseen on most any motorcycle, including on-the-fly adjustable ergonomics and a car-like rider safety system.

Damon had previously sent out emails ahead of the CES reveal teasing the fact that “200” was their “magic number,” so while it might have been easy to deduce those figures, they still stand out against the specs of competing bikes, which often struggle to achieve half of those performance figures.

A run of 25 premium high-spec bikes with a price of $40,000 will be the focus of an initial Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, while a more mass-market Hypersport will come in at $24,995. The crowdfunding campaign will complement additional financial backing from Round 13 Capital, Techstars, Fontinalis, Extreme Venture Partners and Pallasite Ventures.

Ahead of CES, Damon CEO Jay Jiraud told Forbes.com the Hypersport will feature their exclusive on-the-fly adjustable ergonomics package, called Shift, and an extensive rider awareness/safety system they call CoPilot. The Shift ergo system will be able to change things like seat height, handlebar height and footpeg location, changing the riding position from a tucked-in sport posture to a more standard-style sit-up arrangement for more comfortable city riding. The bike itself has the form of a sleek sports machine. And while a specific torque figure was not released, Jiraud told Forbes.com the Hypersport will make a “s**tload of torque.” Some of the features can be seen in this video from Damon:

Forbes.com was the first publication to take Damon’s two test bikes for rides this past summer, including the shape-shifting Hypersport prototype and another test machine outfitted with an array of cameras, sensors and electronics designed to give riders a digital heads up on what’s happening around them via a sensor package not unlike what many cars now feature.

Jiraud explained that his vision is to give Hypersport riders more comfort, range and utility from the bike, while also introducing pre-collision safety features that, as of now, have been largely missing from motorcycles while they have gotten ever more sophisticated in cars.

However, the CoPilot system will differ from the automotive systems in that it won’t have the ability to take over operation of the motorcycle; it only gives warning cues about possible dangers around the rider. The reason for the non-intervention is that a motorcycle is an inherently unstable platform, unlike a car, and unexpectedly taking control of the bike away from the rider in any way could result in a crash. Instead, the CoPilot system uses video screens, a rear-facing camera, multiple radar units and position sensors, small LED lights and handlebar vibrations to let the rider know what is happening around the motorcycle. Again, CoPilot does not activate the brakes or affect steering, although Jiraud did not rule out those features in some iteration much farther down the line as A.I. systems, vehicle interconnectivity and other technologies improve.

During a test ride of the system several months ago, I found the tech to be innovative and effective. While it does add some input to the rider while in operation, I found that even after a few miles, it became second nature to see, feel and understand the warning system’s cues.

Likewise, riding the sleek electric bike with the adjustable ergos was also interesting. While some modern bikes allow owners to tailor things like seat height, handlebar rise and footpeg placement, those adjustments typically have to be made with tools while the bike is stopped, and once made, riders are essentially stuck with them until they can be changed again with tools.

Damon’s Shift system works more like your car’s interior. Using a bar-mounted controller, the seat can rise and fall, the bars can move up and down and the footpegs will lift or lower. While the test bike had only two positions for the ergos, Jiraud said future versions would be more adjustable for a true custom fit. Best of all, the Shift system is adjustable while riding.

BlackBerry On Board

Damon CEO Jay Giraud has made some key moves to bring his vision of an electric bike with all the elements of the two test bikes rolled into one battery-powered package. A key development in the quest to get the data-hungry CoPilot system up to par performance-wise was a partnership with BlackBerry and implementation of the BlackBerry QNX suite to power and talk to the numerous sensors, radars and other tech involved in CoPilot. There will also be 4G cellular connectivity.

Once famous for their cellphones, BlackBerry has largely transitioned to a company that makes control systems that work behind the curtain in numerous data systems, with a focus on cars and medical equipment. The QNX system has been installed in over 150 million vehicles and is used by almost all top automakers worldwide, so it’s quite a coup for Damon to have them dip into the electric motorcycle world at this early stage.

Alta Influence

Clearly, this is not Jay Jiraud’s first tech rodeo. While the Damon team was spooling up the Hypersport, Jiraud also added a key player in Derek Dorresteyn, from now-defunct but long-time electric motorcycle maker Alta Motors. Dorresteyn signed on as COO at Damon, which will need his expertise to tease out the promised performance figures for the Hypersport models. Even though both are legacy technologies, batteries and electric motors are two parts of a rapidly developing tech frontier that is seeing huge investments by both corporate and even state-sponsored players.

Jiraud told Forbes.com that Dorresteyn was in the midst of working on a “completely new” electric superbike powertrain system at Alta when the company closed up shop, and he brings a wealth of expertise to Damon. Among the bike’s tech features Jiraud talked about with Forbes ahead of CES was a 700-plus volt, liquid-cooled 20kWh battery pack for the Hypersport, which would be quite large for a motorcycle, but Jiraud says the Hypersports’ architecture can handle the battery pack and that the battery will not be the typical rectangular lump found in many current electric bikes. For comparison, the largest battery available on the class-leading Zero SR-F is just over 16kWh (the standard battery is 14.4kWh), with the bike tipping the scales at a tick over 500 pounds. Meanwhile, the Harley-Davidson LiveWire uses a 15.5kWh pack. Jiraud says he is planning on keeping the weight of the Hypersport under 500 pounds through design and weight-saving measures.

A Challenging Future

The transition of the motorcycle industry from gas to electric has lagged (with some exceptions) behind that of cars due to the challenges of design as well as the space and weight-sensitive platform a motorcycle presents, but battery and motor advances in the bike industry can also represent opportunities to the EV industry as a whole. With the addition of Dorresteyn from Alta, Blackberry’s QNX handling the tech and a clutch of investors, Damon may be in position to lead in terms of range, safety and power once the Hypersport arrives. But things can change fast in the EV world, so stay tuned.

The Damon Hypersport prototype bike can be seen at BlackBerry’s booth at CES 2020. Deliveries are slated for 2021.

 

LIVALL Launches and Debuts New Smartphone-Connected Cycling Safety Helmet at 2020 International CES

By | General Posts

With smart lighting, hands-free operation, fall detection, voice navigation, SOS alarm, and more, the breakthrough new LIVALL BH51M Neo helmet is a quantum leap forward in safety and protection for cyclists

LAS VEGAS, Jan. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — CES (#44513, Hall D, Sands)LIVALL, a pioneer in smart and safe helmets for cyclists and outdoor enthusiasts, today announced the U.S. product launch and debut of the BH51M Neo to their current line of award-winning smart and safe helmets at the 2020 International CES. In booth #44513, Hall D, Sands LIVALL will demo and showcase their entire line of helmets during the duration of CES from January 7–10, 2020.

LIVALL’s helmets combine visibility with connectivity for commuter and leisure cyclists. The company’s newest smartphone-connected helmet specifically addresses the needs of E-Bike, E-scooter and Electric motorcycle riders. LIVALL’s RS1 helmet is a smart helmet specifically designed for skiing, snowboarding, and other outdoor winter activities.

Debuting in the U.S. at CES, the new BH51M Neo, is a robust, waterproof, fashionable smart helmet that is simple-to-use, comfortable, and packed full of genuinely useful smart tech, including all the existing features of its multi-award-winning predecessor, the BH51M.

“We are delighted to debut this game-changing new connected smart helmet at CES 2020; a show that has evolved to become the perfect fusion of technology and mobility in recent years,” said Bryan Zheng, Founder and CEO, of LIVALL. “In all facets of transportation safety is the preeminent concern, and this is especially true for cyclists who are exposed and constantly in harm’s way. LIVALL aims to create a safe cycling ecosystem; for us, safety is the ultimate luxury. The new BH51M Neo represents a quantum leap forward in safety and protection for the everyday cyclist, and all of us at LIVALL are proud to bring this breakthrough new safety innovation to the cycling and urban mobility community.”

New Features – exclusive to the BH51M Neo:

Front and Brake Warning Lights
The front warning lights work together with the 270° taillights, to protect the user’s security in all directions. When the built-in gravity acceleration sensor detects a significant deceleration, the front and taillights will be highlighted for eight seconds to draw front and rear vehicles’ and pedestrians’ attention.

Auto-Off and Anti-Loss Alarm
Auto-off ensures maximum battery longevity, turning off automatically when the helmet is disconnected from the phone and inactive for 15 minutes.  Anti-loss alarm is activated when the helmet is connected to your phone and the distance between helmet and phone exceeds 15m, both the helmet and phone will alarm.

Key Features of the BH51M Neo include:

  • Smart Lighting (Automatic Sensor Lighting / Wireless Turn Signals) – Smart lighting integrates adaptive technology to ensure your visibility in dark conditions. Operate wireless LED turn signals via handlebar remote control to alert traffic of turning direction for enhanced visibility and rider safety.
  • Fall Detection – In the event of an accident, the emergency system will kick in automatically and send your GPS location to your emergency contacts.
  • Press for SOS   – If in distress, press the red button on the remote for five seconds and your emergency contacts will receive an alert message with your GPS location.
  • One-Click Answer   – Answer phone calls using the remote control and enjoy clear sound both ways with the helmet’s built-in Bluetooth speakers and wind-proof microphone.
  • PTT Walkie-Talkie – Easily communicate with your fellow cyclists using the Walkie-Talkie function when riding in a group.
  • Voice Navigation – Listen to GPS voice navigation via the built-in speaker with your connected smartphone.
  • Stereo speakers – Quality music, audiobook and podcast playback is delivered through Bluetooth stereo speakers strategically placed above the ears, allowing you to stay alert to surrounding traffic.
  • Compatible with Strava, iHealth and Siri through the LIVALL Riding app.

The BH51M Neo will retail with an MSRP of $169.00 USD on Amazon.com and is available in graphite black or sandstone grey.

Meetings/Demos At CES:
Members of the media and industry contacts wishing to book a specific date/time for demo and briefing can contact Megan Kathman, Skyya PR at megan@skyya.com and 651-785-3212. Those seeking images, B-Roll, and additional information, can also access the LIVALL press kit.

About LIVALL:
Located in Shenzhen, LIVALL Tech Co., Ltd. is adept at developing, designing and manufacturing fashionable and multifunctional patented helmetphones to maximize riders’ safety. With more than 170 patents and advanced equipment, LIVALL has strict standards and massive production capacity to meet the huge market demand. With a primary focus on product innovation and product experience, this firm has received recognition and trust from the industry and the users. Furthermore, it obtained more than 30 awards and over 10 international certifications including CPSC1203, EN1078, CE, FCC, NCC, ROHS, BQB, etc.