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Veterans plan Memorial Day motorcycle ride despite roadblock

By General Posts

by Angie Angers from https://www.baynews9.com

It’s a Memorial Day tradition for tens of thousands of veterans to ride their motorcycles to the nation’s capital.

Pentagon had blocked their permit request, but vets say they are going regardless

This time, the event was nearly in jeopardy.

Every May for more than 30 years, veterans from all over the country have made the trip to honor those gone and those still missing in action.

“Not only continue the tradition of holding Congress and the government accountable for trying to find these over 82,000 missing veterans, but also for veteran suicide,” said organizer Tom McNamara with AMVETS.

McNamara says they’re expecting roughly 100,000 veterans and they’d received nine out of the 10 permits needed to make the trip happen.

But just recently, defense officials denied their application to use the Pentagon’s parking lot like they have for the last three decades.

“Using our satellite views on how we’re going to stage motorcycles, and a month ago they came back and said, ‘No, we’re not gonna do it, and didn’t give us an answer as to why,’” McNamara said.

Officials of the Pentagon later cited COVID safety concerns and left AMVETS scrambling for another plan.

Now Rep. Brian Mast is involved and is accusing leaders of blocking the tradition.

He sent a strongly-worded letter to Congress pushing them to reconsider.

McNamara says — either way — the veterans are using their constitutional right to protest and will be coming to D.C. no matter what.

“As our First Amendment right, these people are coming anyway, we’re going to be there anyway. So now, we’re just lining up on the streets,” he said.

They just want to keep the tradition alive.

“Let’s just say Congress will know about it,” McNamara said with a laugh.

The ride is set to take place on May 30. Organizers say they will release a final schedule and route for the event within the week.

View AMVETS website for the event at https://amvets.org/rolling-to-remember-demonstration-ride/

Official Website for the event is https://www.rollingtoremember.com/

Damon Motorcycles new members

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A big welcome to Doug & Michael!

At Damon, we continue to expand and grow our team to deliver not just a ride, but an enhanced experience for the next-generation of motorcyclists.

Thus, we are proud to welcome CMO & VP Brand Doug Penman and Head of Design Michael Uhlarik to Damon’s executive team.

Doug Penman, CMO & VP, Brand – “I look forward to creating the most exhilarating, unexpected, and fierce mobility brand the motorcycle industry has ever seen.”

Michael Uhlarik, Head of Design – “I’m excited to design the Damon motorcycles of the future… and to cement the company’s legacy as the leading innovator in two-wheel safety, technology, and performance.”

An international award-winning motorcycle designer and product planner, Uhlarik created the market-leading Yamaha TZR-50 and the award-winning Yamaha MT-03. He has also contributed to designs for the R6, FJR1300, & M1 MotoGP bike, collaborated on motorcycles such as the Aprilia Dorsoduro, SportCity, & Atlantic, and authored the Derbi Rambla.

Penman is an entrepreneur and creative with broad-ranging venture capital, marketing strategy, and brand expertise. He has launched and accelerated the momentum for Intel, Microsoft, Volvo, Toyota Scion, Peugeot, SanDisk, QuantumScape, Dell, Coca-Cola, UBTech, and Philips.

As pioneers in their respective fields, Doug and Michael are tightly aligned on both purpose and creative vision to fuse the functions of product design and brand & marketing.

Their work will ultimately give you a more charged, inspired, and personal riding experience.

Celebrate with us.
2021 Green GOOD DESIGN Award
We’re honoured to win an accolade from the oldest and most established awards program for the most innovative and visionary new product design worldwide. ⁠

2021 Fast Company World Changing Idea Award
We’ve been recognized with an “Honorable Mention” in the Transportation category for this prestigious award.

21 New Damon Family Members
We’ve welcomed 21 new individuals from all around the world in the past month. And we’re still hiring!

You can join Damon, too.
Become a Damon Brand Ambassador
Love talking about us and sharing our bikes on social media? Do it officially as a Damon Brand Ambassador.

We’re building relationships with passionate, creative influencers and content creators, who share our vision in making motorcycling better, safer, and smarter! Could this be you?

Join the Team
We’re in search of top-tier talent for all departments from Engineering to Marketing. Help us change the world.

View our current openings and apply for your next challenge.

More Motorcycle Safety Awareness campaigns by authorities

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California Highway Patrol asking motorists to drive with caution

from https://www.kget.com

The California Highway Patrol is recognizing May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

The department says as the weather warms up, more and more motorcycles and cars are expected to be hitting the road. Preliminary data from the CHP’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System show more than 500 people were killed in motorcycle-involved crashes in California in 2020 and more than 11,500 people were injured.

Here in Kern County, at least eight people have died in motorcycle crashes so far this year.

The CHP is asking motorcyclists to be responsible and properly equipped. They’re also asking drivers to watch out for motorcyclists on the road.

CHP: Motorcycle safety requires everyone’s attention
by Jaime Coffee, Information Officer II, California Highway Patrol from http://antiochherald.com

The warming weather and increasing number of vehicles traveling on California’s roadways offer a timely reminder of the importance of motorcycle safety awareness for motorcyclists and motorists alike. By recognizing May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) emphasizes safe riding and driving practices for everyone.

“Motorcyclists who are responsible, informed, and properly equipped can help reduce rider deaths and injuries,” CHP Commissioner Amanda Ray said. “Motorists are also key to reducing crashes by being aware of the dangers and challenges of motorcycle riding. Taking the time to look twice for motorcyclists can save a life.”

“Motorcycle riders are more vulnerable out in the elements, which is why it is important for drivers to always be mindful of riders,” California Office of Traffic Safety Director Barbara Rooney said.

With more than 1.4 million licensed riders, motorcycles are a popular mode of transportation for Californians, another reason motorcycle safety awareness is paramount. Preliminary data from the CHP’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System show more than 500 people were killed in motorcycle-involved crashes in California in 2020 and more than 11,500 people were injured.

As part of its continual motorcycle safety program, the CHP strongly encourages all riders, new and experienced, to enroll in the California Motorcyclist Safety Program (CMSP). The CMSP has 98 training sites throughout the state and trains approximately 55,000 motorcyclists each year. For more information or to find a training site near you, visit californiamotorcyclist.com or motorcyclesafetyca.com.

Motorcyclists can help protect themselves by always wearing the proper safety gear, including a U.S. Department of Transportation-compliant helmet, observing the speed limit, riding defensively, and always riding sober. Drivers should always look at their mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes and always keep a safe distance.

The CHP promotes motorcycle safety with the Get Educated and Ride Safe (GEARS) program, funded by a $750,000 grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. All eight CHP field Divisions will hold outreach events to promote motorcycle safety throughout 2021 under the GEARS grant.

The mission of the CHP is to provide the highest level of Safety, Service, and Security.

TxDOT urges motorists to ”Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles’
from https://www.heraldbanner.com

Despite less traffic on the road in 2020 and a 2% reduction in motorcycle crashes, safety officials are alarmed by a 17% increase in Texas motorcycle fatalities compared to 2019. On average, a motorcyclist is killed in a crash on Texas roads every day—last year 482 died. Motorcyclists account for 12% of all traffic fatalities statewide.

May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, and the Texas Department of Transportation’s annual “Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles” campaign gets underway to call attention to the safety precautions motorists can take to protect motorcyclists and themselves. In 2020, in the 7,481 motorcycle crashes in Texas, 1,856 motorcyclists were seriously injured and 482 were killed.

“May through October is an especially dangerous period for motorcyclists in Texas,” said TxDOT Executive Director James Bass. “Of all the motorcyclist deaths in Texas during 2020, more than 61% happened in that period. It’s so important to remember that these motorcyclists don’t have the same protections that drivers in vehicles have, and that’s why we’re urging all motorists to stay watchful and alert when traveling alongside motorcycles so everyone can reach their destination safely.”

The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) reports that fatal crashes between motorcyclists and drivers often occur when drivers misjudge the motorcycle’s distance and speed and make left turns in front of an oncoming motorcyclist. Last year, almost one-third of Texas motorcycle fatalities occurred in an intersection or were intersection-related. TTI also points to driver inattention as a contributing factor to motorcycle crashes.

TxDOT has these safety tips for drivers to protect motorcyclists and prevent crashes:

  • Take extra care when making a left turn. It’s safest to let the motorcycle pass to avoid turning in front of the rider.
  • Pay special attention at intersections. Nearly one in three motorcycle fatalities happens at a roadway intersection.
  • Give driving your full attention. Even a momentary distraction, such as answering a phone call or changing the radio station, can have deadly consequences.
  • Look twice when changing lanes. Check mirrors, check blind spots, and always use turn signals.
  • Give motorcyclists room when passing them. Move over to the passing lane and don’t crowd the motorcyclist’s full lane.
  • Stay back. If you’re behind a motorcycle, always maintain a safe following distance. When a motorcyclist downshifts instead of applying the brake to slow down, it can catch drivers off guard since there are no brake lights to signal reduced speed.
  • Slow down. Obey posted speed limits and drive to conditions.

The “Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles” campaign is a key component of #EndTheStreakTX, a broader social media and word-of-mouth effort that encourages drivers to make safer choices while behind the wheel, like wearing a seat belt, driving the speed limit, never texting and driving and never driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. November 7, 2000 was the last deathless day on Texas roadways. #EndTheStreakTX asks all Texans to commit to driving safely to help end the streak of daily deaths on Texas roadways.

Texas Motorcycle Fatalities Increased by 17% in 2020
by Demetrius Harper from https://www.nbcdfw.com

More than 2,300 motorcyclists were killed or seriously injured on Texas streets and highways last year.

The Texas Department of Transportation says the number of motorcycle riders killed on Texas roadways spiked in 2020.

TxDOT said 2,300 motorcyclists were killed or seriously injured on Texas streets and highways in 2020. Of the nearly 7,500 crashes involving motorcycles that were reported in 2020, 482 were fatalities — a 17% increase over the year before.

The Irving Police Department made a similar plea last month after a motorcycle officer was seriously injured when he was struck by a driver who turned in front of him.

Nov. 7, 2000 was the last deathless day on Texas roadways.

Authorities remind people about safety and motorcycle awareness

By General Posts

State Authorities in California, Maryland and Wisconsin announce recommendations for safety and awareness on Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month

DMV reiterates safe riding practices in respect to Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month
by The Bakersfield Californian from https://www.bakersfield.com

The California Highway Patrol is emphasizing safe riding and driving practices in May as part of Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

In a news release, the CHP said that more than 500 people were killed in motorcycle-involved crashes in California in 2020 and more than 11,500 people were injured. There are more than 1.4 million licensed riders in the state, the CHP said.

With those numbers in mind, the agency strongly encourages all riders to enroll in the California Motorcyclist Safety Program. The CMSP has 98 training sites throughout the state and trains approximately 55,000 motorcyclists each year. For more information or to find a training site near you, visit californiamotorcyclist.com or motorcyclesafetyca.com.

The CHP added that motorcyclists can help protect themselves by wearing proper safety gear including a U.S. Department of Transportation-compliant helmet, following the speed limit, riding defensively, and always riding sober. Drivers should always look at their mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes and always keep a safe distance.

The CHP promotes motorcycle safety with the Get Educated and Ride Safe program, funded by a $750,000 grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. All eight CHP field divisions will hold outreach events to promote motorcycle safety throughout 2021 under the GEARS grant.

“Motorcyclists who are responsible, informed, and properly equipped can help reduce rider deaths and injuries,” CHP Commissioner Amanda Ray said. “Motorists are also key to reducing crashes by being aware of the dangers and challenges of motorcycle riding. Taking the time to look twice for motorcyclists can save a life.”

May Is Motorcycle Safety Month Maryland State Police Urge Extra Caution
from Maryland Government

(PIKESVILLE, MD) – The Maryland State Police are urging drivers to keep safety in mind during “Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month” being observed in May.

As the weather gets warmer, more motorcycles are on the roads, and more traffic crashes are reported between vehicles and motorcycles. About 15% of all fatal crashes in Maryland involve motorcycles according to the Maryland Department of Transportation. On average, more than 60 motorcyclists die in traffic crashes on Maryland roads every year, and an additional 1,700 people, both riders and passengers, are injured in Maryland traffic crashes, according to statistics provided by the Maryland Department of Transportation.

If you are driving a car;

  • Share the road. Allow motorcycles the full width of the lane at all times.
  • Use care when driving near a group of motorcyclists.
  • Check mirrors and blind spots for motorcycles, especially before changing lanes, merging, and at intersections. The motorcycle’s size makes it difficult to judge their speed and distance.
  • Always signal if changing lanes so others know your intentions.

If you are operating a motorcycle;

  • Always wear a helmet and protective gear.
  • Carry your license with you and obey all traffic laws.
  • Stay in the middle of the traffic lane for better visibility.
  • Obey speed limits. Speeding is a factor in about 30% of motorcycle crashes according to the Maryland Department of Transportation.

Everyone on the roads should use extra caution during inclement weather, and never drive while impaired or distracted. Try to anticipate the moves of other vehicles on the road. Recognizing Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month will keep everyone safer on Maryland roads.

State Patrol reminds motorists to look twice, share the road with motorcycles
by Racine County Eye from https://racinecountyeye.com

Motorcycle fatalities increased 40% in 2020 over the previous five years’ average. May is national “Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month” and the Wisconsin State Patrol is asking motorcyclists and all other motorists to share the road, be alert and safe. 2020 preliminary data for Wisconsin shows there were 2,095 motorcycle crashes, 1,788 motorcyclists injured, and 112 motorcycle fatalities.

As warm weather returns, more motorcyclists will be on Wisconsin roads. “Drivers must be in the habit of looking for motorcyclists,” Wisconsin State Patrol Captain Jason Zeeh said, “and motorcyclists should watch for other vehicles and get properly trained and licensed. Together we can save lives.”

Motorcycle crashes often occur when a car or truck driver changes lanes, turns left or pulls out in front of a motorcycle. Motorcycles are smaller and more difficult to see, especially in your blind spot. Failure to yield the right of way to another vehicle (state law 346.18) can result in a $175 citation, but penalties are much more severe if the violation results in someone getting injured or killed.

Motorcyclists can do their part by getting properly licensed, wearing visible and protective equipment, and carefully scanning ahead for potential hazards such as gravel, debris or wildlife in the roadway.

Motorcyclists have two options to get the required Class M license: pass a motorcycle driving skills test after making an appointment at a Division of Motor Vehicles service center or successfully complete a WisDOT-approved rider education course. Motorcyclists who successfully complete an approved safety course earn a skills test waiver used to obtain their Class M license.

“Whether a person is brand new to motorcycling or a returning rider, a safety course is a wise investment,” Captain Zeeh said. “Safety along our roadways requires all drivers to share the road, watch their speed, eliminate distractions and be alert.”

ABATE 31st annual safety ride

By General Posts

from https://www.wgrz.com

Buffalo-area motorcyclists take part in 31st annual safety ride. The American Bikers Aimed Toward Education event aims to remind all drivers that motorcyclists are back on the road.

BUFFALO, N.Y. — May is Motorcycle Awareness Month, and on Saturday, 75 motorcyclists took part in the 31st annual American Bikers Aimed Toward Education safety ride.

The event is aimed at reminding all drivers that motorcyclists are back on the road. There are plenty of safety tips for motorcyclists, including the obvious.

“On a motorcycle, you want to make yourself visible,” Lee Argen of ABATE Buffalo said. “You always want as visible as possible. Daytime ride with your high beam lights on. A lot of times, I think people are not visible because their lights are either off or on low beam in the daytime.”

Drivers should never try to share a lane with a motorcycle. Always give a motorcycle the full lane width.

The one-hour event began Saturday afternoon at the Rath Building in downtown Buffalo.

Free Safety Course Included with Motorcycle Purchases

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by Annie Lindgren from https://northfortynews.com

Fort Collins Motorsports (FCMS), in partnership with Indian® Motorcycle of Fort Collins (IMOFC), has announced it will offer a free safety course to riders (valued at $250) with the purchase of any new make or model motorcycle from its dealership.

“Safe riding should always be a priority, and we’re excited to have an opportunity to tap into our IMRG network so that we can offer this course for free to customers,” said Jeff Sroufe, general manager of Fort Collins Motorsports. “With May being Motorcycle Safety Month, we want to ensure all of our fellow riders are equipped with knowledge of important skills to help them ‘live to ride and ride to live’ while on the open roads.”

With two dates to choose from, on May 8 and August 14, 2021, the safety course event will take place on-site at the IMOFC dealership (1800 SE Frontage Rd., Fort Collins, Colorado 80525). During the four-hour safety course, expert training will be provided by a local police officer and certified motorcycle instructor, who also acts as VP and safety director of the Northern Colorado Indian® Motorcycle Riders Group (NOCO IMRG).

Designed for every level of motorcycle rider experience, the course will cover key safety topics in a real-world style setting. Safety topics include threshold braking, obstacle avoidance, slow speed precision, and more. Each course has been organized into a three-part format, starting with an educational ‘Listen & Learn’ segment, followed by a live demonstration to ‘Watch & Learn,’ and ending with a supervised ‘Ride & Learn’ practice session.

Upon making a qualifying motorcycle purchase, riders will receive access to register for the course through an exclusive direct link. FCMS is also offering the educational (Listen & Learn) segment as a complimentary video download for those pending or without a purchase to ‘Ride Fear Free’ at www.indianmotorcycleoffortcollins.com/ridefreeRSVP.

DISCLAIMER: A completed liability waiver and valid Motorcycle Endorsement will be required for course admittance. The ‘Road Survival Training’ course is supplementary to other training courses and is not MSF Approved (completion of the ‘Road Survival Training’ course does not earn a Motorcycle Endorsement). Participants will need to come prepared with individual helmets and safety gear to use during the ‘Ride & Learn’ portion of the course.

Learn more about Indian® Motorcycle of Fort Collins at www.indianmotorcycleoffortcollins.com. To learn more about Fort Collins Motorsports, visit www.fortcollinsmotorsports.com.

Annual Motorcycle Awareness Parade in Wyoming

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by Tom Morton from https://kgab.com

Hundreds of bikers at noon Saturday will join the annual parade through Casper to mark the beginning of motorcycle awareness month.

Casper Police will provide an escort for the bikers for the 10.5-mile route, and the parade will significantly affect traffic.

The parade begins at the eastside Walmart, heads west on Second Street then through the Old Yellowstone District, goes north over the Poplar Street bridge, turns east and back to East First Street, then east on the Old Yellowstone Highway to Hat Six Road and ending at the Hat Six Travel Plaza.

To keep bikers and motorists safe, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration offers these tips:

  • If you are turning at an intersection and your view of oncoming traffic is partially obstructed, wait until you can see around the obstruction, sufficiently scan for all roadway users — pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorcyclists — and proceed with caution.
  • Slow down your decision-making at intersections.
  • Reaction time and ability to assess and respond to a potential collision, such as a lane change, is significantly hindered if there are large differences in speed among vehicles in traffic.
  • Be diligent in modifying your speed to match other vehicles when approaching a congested roadway.
  • Allow a motorcyclist a full lane width. Though it may seem as if there is enough room in a single lane for a motor vehicle and a motorcycle, looks can be deceiving. Share the road, but not the lane: A motorcyclist needs room to maneuver safely.
  • Because motorcycles are smaller than most vehicles, they can be difficult to see. Their size can also cause other drivers to misjudge their speed and distance.
  • Size also counts against motorcycles when it comes to blind spots. Motorcyclists can be easily hidden in a vehicle’s blind spot. Always look for motorcycles by checking your mirrors and blind spots before switching to another lane of traffic.
  • Always signal your intentions before changing lanes or merging with traffic. This allows motorcyclists to anticipate your movement and find a safe lane position.
  • Do not be fooled by a flashing turn signal on a motorcycle — it may not be self-canceling and the motorcyclist may have forgotten to turn it off. Wait to be sure the rider is going to turn before you proceed.
  • Allow more follow distance — three or four seconds — when following a motorcycle; this gives the motorcycle rider more time to maneuver or stop in an emergency. Motorcycle riders may suddenly need to change speed or adjust their lane position to avoid hazards such as potholes, gravel, wet or slippery surfaces, pavement seams, railroad crossings, and grooved pavement.

Lane Filtering awareness on Motorcycle Awareness Month

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by Mercy Owusu from https://www.abc4.com

Expect to see motorcycles lane filtering, it’s legal under certain circumstances

Lane Filtering is NOT the same as Lane Splitting. Legal for roads with speed limit NOT LEGAL on Freeways.

UTAH – As the weather continues to get warmer, Utahans can expect to see more motorcycles on the road — and more motorcycles means more lane filtering.

The Department of Public Safety wants to remind drivers they can expect to see motorcycles lane filtering, as well as remind motorcyclists of the conditions under which lane filtering is legal.

What is Lane filtering?
Lane filtering is when motorcyclists move between two lanes to the front of traffic that is stopped at an intersection.

Motorcycle lane filtering was made legal under certain circumstances in Utah in May of 2019. The decision came after the Utah legislature’s passage of HB 149 during the 2019 legislative session.

Officials say the law for lane filtering was designed to prevent or reduce rear-end collisions between approaching vehicles and motorcycles stopped in traffic.

They added, unlike lane “splitting,” lane “filtering” is intended to provide a “safety pocket” for motorcycles when encountering stopped traffic.

Since motorcycle riding is seasonal in Utah, some drivers may be surprised when they see motorcyclists who are lane filtering.

Officials emphasized that lane filtering between stopped vehicles on roadways with at least two lanes in the same direction and speeds of 45 mph and lower is legal in Utah.

Having a motorcycle pass closely to your stopped vehicle can be startling. However, officials say if you’re aware that lane filtering is legal and know to expect it, you can maintain an awareness of your surroundings and reduce the element of surprise.

Motorcycles can lane filter in Utah when the following conditions are met, according to officials:

  • The individual is on a roadway divided into two or more adjacent traffic lanes in the same direction of travel
  • The individual is on a roadway with a speed limit of 45 miles per hour or less; this means it is never legal on the freeway
  • The vehicle being overtaken in the same lane is stopped
  • The motorcycle is traveling at a speed of 15 miles per hour or less
  • The movement may be made safely

Ghost Bike motorcycle statue for awareness

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by Dan Soul from https://www.mylloydminsternow.com

Ghost bike stands again as reminder of motorcycle safety, tribute to fallen riders

The Lloydminster Sport Riders are putting up a ghost bike for another year, to serve as an important reminder for drivers and motorcyclists to share the road and keep each other safe.

The motorcycle statue was first put up last year, not only as a reminder to be road aware of bikes but as a sobering reminder of and a way to honour fallen riders as well. With this month marking Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month in Alberta, it will stand at the 59 Avenue-25 Street intersection.

The administrator of the LSR, Philip Cummine, says the bike’s key message is being cognizant of the riders people share the road with.

” We want to make sure everyone gets home safe. So we want to help bring the awareness to make sure that people realize that there are motorcycles out there, and a lot of motorcyclists are putting their life on the line when they get out on the road because, for them, a simple accident can be life-threatening.”

Riders are out on the road much more in the summer, and both they and drivers can take steps to be protected. For people on their bikes, this means wearing protective gear, making a plan for their ride, and not going out alone so that someone is there to help.

Drivers should keep an eye out for riders, be extra diligent in checking blind spots and mirrors, and slow it down when coming up on someone on a motorcycle.

Lloydminster RCMP Sargeant Brad Mouland says every year they respond to accidents between motorcycles and cars and they want people on both sides to be aware.

“Within Lloydminster, unfortunately, we have seen injury-related collisions and fatalities. Those are things we definitely want to make sure we don’t have anymore. We want to just help the rest of the agencies, emergency services and the City of Lloydminster get that awareness out to the public.”

Cummine adds that given what the ghost bike symbolizes, he hopes to only see it out during Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, and the right steps are just taken so they don’t have to commemorate another fallen rider.

“Even if [the rider] isn’t a member of LSR and there’s something that happens, we want to take that onus and make sure we provide that service to the city. That way, people can see maybe if it’s a high impact area or there’s high traffic intersection like this one south of us. It’s high traffic, there’s been accidents, so let’s get some awareness.”

The ghost bike will be standing at the 59 Ave-29 St intersection for all of May.

Free motorcycle safety courses around Virginia

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from https://www.wfxrtv.com

Virginia State Police to offer free motorcycle safety courses in Salem, Lynchburg in May

Seeing as May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, Virginia State Police will start offering their “Ride 2 Save Lives” motorcycle self-assessment courses around Virginia — including Salem and Lynchburg — in the next few weeks.

According to police, these free motorcycle self-assessment courses allow people to learn and practice rider safety.

In addition, the courses — which are conducted by Virginia State Police Motor Troopers — teach riders how to handle hazards, special situations, interstate highways, curve negotiation, and more.

“The sun is out and the beautiful weather is calling Virginia’s motorcycling community to our highways,” said Col. Gary T. Settle, Superintendent of Virginia State Police. “Rider safety is of the utmost importance, as riding a motorcycle is a unique experience with its own unique safety concerns. I encourage all Virginia riders to take advantage of this opportunity to learn from our professional motors troopers.”

Virginia State Police say the courses will be held in four locations across the Commonwealth during the month of May.

However, participants are required to have a valid operator’s license with a Class ‘M’ endorsement, appropriate riding attire, a DOT-approved helmet, eye protection, and a street legal motorcycle.

Salem: 8 a.m. on May 15 at the Salem Red Sox Stadium
Lynchburg: 8:30 a.m. on May 15 at Central Virginia Community College
Yorktown: 8:30 a.m. on May 22 at Waters Edge Church
Midlothian: 9 a.m. on May 22 at Steel Horse Harley Davidson

In addition to the four courses being held in May, police say courses will held throughout the summer and into the fall. However, advanced registration is required for these free courses, so follow this link to sign up for one of those limited spots at one of the upcoming Ride 2 Save Lives courses.

Click Here to Register for this course.