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Riding Experiences on Harley-Davidson Sportster S

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

In mid-July, American bike maker Harley-Davidson pulled the wraps off the Sportster S, one of the new Milwaukee models we’ve been waiting for for so long we kind of lost hope of actually seeing it. Yet, here it is, so fresh that it is only now beginning to be properly tested by users, and so promising it’d better not disappoint.

Described by Harley as an “all-new sport custom motorcycle designed to deliver a thrilling riding experience,” the two-wheeler makes use of the most modern technologies brewed recently in Milwaukee, and, for a rather balanced price of $14,999, promises entirely new thrills for its riders.

Massive in design, the bike holds in its frame the Revolution Max 1250 engine, an application of which some people are already enjoying in the Pan America. On this here beast, the V-Twin is officially titled Revolution Max 1250T, and comes with impressive performance figures: 121 horsepower and “tremendous torque at low RPM” as per Harley. That’s fewer hp than the 150 claimed for the Pan America, but more than enough for the lightweight bike: the thing tips the scale, after all, at only 502 pounds (227 kg).

All that power is put to the ground by means of cast-aluminum wheels with a staggered design, 19-inch front and 17-inch rear, linked to the rest of the build by fully adjustable front and rear suspension – SHOWA 43 mm inverted cartridge forks and a SHOWA Piggyback reservoir rear shock.

Stopping power comes from Brembo, forward foot controls are there together with a low handlebar to give the rider an aggressive posture while riding, and thanks to these the entire experience of moving on the back of the Sportster S should be one to remember.

Harley threw into the Sportster mix the entire might of its technological advancements, some of them already deployed on the Pan America. We get things like three pre-programmed, selectable ride modes (Sport, Road and Rain) and two custom modes, a 4.0-inch-diameter TFT screen showing all the instrumentation and infotainment features, and all-LED lighting.

By now, almost three weeks past the unveiling point, there is number of test ride videos with this motorcycle already out there for us all to get a sense of how the thing feels on the actual road. The latest comes from a German custom and Harley-junkie shop that goes by the name Thunderbike.

Knowing the way these guys treat the American wheeled wonders, we tend to trust what they’re saying. And for the Sportster S, the verdict is simple and blunt: fantastic.

The rider sent by the Germans for the test ride spent about 200 km (124 miles) on the back on the motorcycle, and the crew managed to get some incredible images of the thing while on the move, as you can see in the short video below. And, even if we don’t get to see the Sportster S reach its top speed, we’re still treated to some incredible shots – but possibly not enough talk about it.

The new Harley should arrive at dealerships in mid-September, and that’s probably when the real flood of test ride videos will hit us. Kind of a close call, given how fall will move in to put an end to motorcycle riding in most parts of the world, but one never knows with this global warming and all.

Being less pretentious than the Pan America when it comes to its target customers, the Sportster S, the only bike offered presently by Harley in a family it calls Sport, could become one of the heavy-hitters in its segment in no time. And judging by how good two of them look on the road at the same time, we wouldn’t mind seeing larger packs of such machines roaming the continents at once.

Electric dream: Horwin CR6 reviewed

By General Posts

by Fraser Addecott from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Sales of electric two-wheelers are booming and with manufacturers producing bikes like this one, it’s easy to see why.

It seems difficult to keep up with the number of new electric two-wheelers coming on to the market these days.

The trend was already under way and has only been accelerated by the pandemic, with commuters and others looking for alternatives to public transport.

Figures from the Motorcycle Industry Association show sales of electrics for June up 155% compared to the same month last year.

Sales for the year up until last month are also up 210% compared to the same period in 2020.

That is impressive growth, with the majority of bikes sold falling in the 50cc and 125cc equivalent categories.

Artisan Electric is a British company established in 2016 with a “mission to change the face of electric motorcycles and scooters with industry-leading innovation and product quality”.

The company offers a range of seven electric bikes and scooters – and the one I am testing here is the CR6.

This is a 125cc-equivalent machine, with a pretty cool retro-meets-futuristic look.

The air-cooled electric motor is powered by a 3.96kWh Panasonic lithium-ion battery.

Careful riding will produce a range of around 60 miles.

Haring around flat out – top speed is about 55mph – will cut your range to around 30 miles.

That may not sound much, but the CR6 is aimed at commuters and for jaunts into town, so it’s perfectly adequate.

A full charge from zero takes around four hours, but bear in mind you’ll hardly ever be charging from completely flat, so shorter times are more realistic.

Charging is via a standard three-pin socket and a socket in the side of the bike.

The battery comes with a reassuring three-year warranty.

On board, the ride position is relaxed and comfortable with a long and well-padded cafe-racer type seat.

There’s a round retro/modern, backlit, colour clock with a rather unnecessary rev counter across the top and a LCD panel with speed, charge level etc.

As with all electrics, the acceleration is instantaneous and impressive.

At just 134kg, this bike is light and it feels agile, manageable and nippy – perfect for the urban jungle.

With low-down weight, a decent aluminium chassis and an excellent turning circle, the CR6 handles extremely well.

The non-adjustable USD forks and preload-adjustable rear monoshock do a perfectly reasonable job.

And braking via a front 265mm disc and three-piston caliper and rear 220mm is plenty powerful enough.

The headlight is a nice bright LED and the “tank” is actually a lockable storage compartment, ideal for the charge cable, gloves etc.

It also contains a USB port – handy for charging your phone.

At five grand, the CR6 is obviously a bigger initial outlay than a petrol 125, but running costs work out at just a penny a mile.

Overall then, the Horwin is a solid little city commuter, easy to ride, with good looks and decent performance.

Specs:
Horwin CR6
Motor: Air-cooled electric
Max power: 8bhp
Max torque: 30ft lb
Colours: White; blue; green; black
Price: £4,992

BMW Debuts R 18 Transcontinental and R 18 B ‘Bagger’ touring motorcycles

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by Florina Spînu from https://www.autoevolution.com

According to BMW, the new R 18 Transcontinental and R 18 B will be available worldwide as special R 18 Transcontinental First Edition and R 18 B First Edition models when they hit the market in September. The two new R 18 family members will be unveiled to the public for the first time on August 6th in Sturgis, South Dakota.

BMW is expanding the R 18 family with the new R 18 Transcontinental and the R 18 B “Bagger,” one ideal for long-distance rides and one perfect for touring and cruising. You can watch some high-octane scenes with the new models in The Cadillac Three’s new music video, “Get After It.”

The collaboration between the American Southern rock group and BMW only came naturally as the new models are built to appeal to those looking for a sportier ride and those going for a more touring-oriented machine. The southern country music is a perfect addition for these bad boys that star in the clip, riding just outside Nashville.

The new R 18 Transcontinental is a luxurious tourer that comes with a high windshield, wind deflector, and flaps. Compared to the standard R 18, it has additional lights, a top case, and four analog round instruments. The ride has seat heating as standard to ensure long-distance riding comfort even when two people get on it.

On the other hand, the R 18 B has no top case and a lower windscreen that adds to the style of a bagger. Among other features, it sports a smaller seat, wider and more comfortable footrests, and a matt black metallic engine.

Like the previous R 18 models, both rides combine the power of the 2-cylinder “Big Boxer” engine with a classic chassis design based on BMW’s historical motorcycle models. The engine generates an output of 67 kW (91 hp) at 4,750 RPM, and between the 2,000 to 4,000 RPM range, it produces more than 150 Nm of torque.

Tech-wise, they feature a 10.25 inch TFT color display that provides all the information the rider needs. The motorcycles come with three riding modes, Rain, Roll, and Rock, and a Hill Start Control function that turn one’s journeys into a memorable experience.

What can make that experience even better is the new Marshall sound system. Developed in collaboration with the British manufacturer Marshall (yes, the same brand that makes the renowned guitar amplifiers), the audio system uses 4 loudspeakers and 2 subwoofers to produce great sound quality and “good vibrations.”

Pre-Rally Week Bikernet Weekly News for July 29, 2021

By General Posts

Hey,

The rally is starting next week and at the last minute we are buying a Bikernet Billboard in Sturgis. It’s another project, but what the fuck.

We are working with Markus Cuff on a Petersen Museum motorcycle exhibit featuring long distance motorcycles. Some wild bikes.

I’ll sign books for donations to Kid’s Ride at the Builder’s Breakfast coming up next weekend.

Never stop or slow down and always fight for the freedom to ride fast and free.

–Bandit

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Harley-Davidson Sportster S 2021 First Ride Review

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Teaching an old dog new tricks.

Harley-Davidson has produced the Sportster for over six continuous decades. Despite the nameplate dating back to the Eisenhower administration, the Sportster canon only contains two periods: the Ironhead years and the Evo era. Since 1957, a pushrod-actuated, 45-degree V-Twin always thrummed at the model’s core. Along with the vibey powerplant, a cradle frame, conservative styling, and spartan accommodations defined the platform. That all changes with the 2021 Sportster S, however.

For the first time in the model’s history, the brakes read Brembo, the gearbox touts six speeds, and the lighting is LED. Boasting a feature-rich electronic suite, the historically entry-level Hog gains premium status overnight. A daring new design encompasses the brand’s acclaimed Revolution Max engine and aligns with the model’s performance ambitions. Of course, the 1,252cc, 60-degree V-twin doesn’t deliver the cruiser’s customary vibes. Instead, it delivers 121 horsepower. The Sportster may be a sexagenarian, but it’s spryer than ever in 2021.

To prove the new model’s mettle, the Motor Company invited us to a day-long ride through the picturesque canyons of the Angeles National Forest and the man-made canyons of Downtown L.A. With such a dramatic makeover, questions naturally arose. Will the 2021 interpretation appeal to the customer base? Will it retain its David vs. Goliath attitude? Is it still a Sportster? Like all Harleys, the answers center around the V-twin mill.

Engine
Since 1986, the Sportster harnessed the MoCo’s Evolution engine. Long after the Big Twin class moved on to the brand’s Twin Cam V-twin, and subsequently, the Milwaukee-Eight, the Sportster continued championing the bulletproof Evo. Undersquare, air-cooled, and rumbly, the engine’s charisma overshadowed its crudeness. Instead of refining the platform over the years, H-D didn’t fix what wasn’t broke.

Instead, it reinvented the model 35 long years later with the aptly named Revolution Max engine. Fresh off its debut in the Pan America, the liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,252 V-twin earns a cruiser-appropriate retune in the Sportster S. The Revolution Max 1250T may concede 29 ponies to its adventurous cousin, but it’s hard to notice the difference in the saddle.

Unlike the Pan America, which spools up to its powerband, the Sportster S is all teeth all the time. Well, in Sport mode, at least. Predictably, Road is more mannerly and Rain is downright pleasant. Two additional custom ride modes allow users to adjust power delivery, traction control/ABS parameters, and engine braking settings to their liking. Whether you prefer a chill ride or a thrill ride, the Sportster switches identity with the tap of a button.

In Sport mode, performance reigns supreme. From the initial throttle crack, the torque piles on, peaking at 94 lb-ft at 6,000 rpm. The 1250T really shines in the mid-range, but power is accessible throughout the 9,500-rpm rev range. On the other hand, the throttle-by-wire system exhibited an abrupt, on/off quality in Sport mode.

Snappy roll-ons frequently pushed me to the edge of the plank-like seat and the front end dove under quick throttle cuts. What Sport mode lacks in finesse, it makes up with enthusiasm, so I reserved it for highway and canyon duty. In the city, Road mode smoothed out the V-twin’s power pulses without sacrificing too much raw acceleration. However, the Revolution Max and high-mount exhaust system threw off significant heat when confined to surface streets.

While the Sportster S does feature rear cylinder deactivation at a stop, the tracker-style pipes not only contribute to the engine heat, it traps it under the seat. Unsurprisingly, the rider’s right leg receives the first heatwave, but the engine’s port side follows suit in short order. In motion, the warmth goes unnoticed, but from light to light, the heat forced me to rest my right foot on the peg at a stop. Otherwise, the exhaust was liable to broil my inner thigh to a medium-well shank.

Despite those drawbacks, the Revolution Max remains the star of the show. Of course, to optimize that star performance, Harley had to surround it with a complimentary cast of components.

Chassis
Composed of three separate frame sections, the Sportster S chassis is like nothing in the company’s current cruiser lineup. The front, middle, and tail trellis frame units bolt directly to the 1250T engine, reducing weight while increasing rigidity. In turn, the handling improves markedly over the Evo era models, jumping from a 28-degree maximum lean angle to 34-degrees of lean. Tip-in and steering rate are predictable and stable.

Despite the 160/70 Dunlop GT503 tire wrapped around the 17-inch front wheel and the 180/70 rubber shod onto the 16-inch rear, the Sportster is surprisingly agile. Similarly, the 320mm single-disc front braking system seems lacking for a 121-horsepower machine, but the Brembo master cylinder delivers excellent bite along with nuanced feedback and feel. Needless to say, we would love to see how the Sportster S performs with slimmer tires and a dual-disc setup, but the stock equipment exceeds expectations.

The rear suspension suffers the same fate. With just 1.5-inches of travel, I anticipated the Showa monoshock to be one step removed from a hardtail. Thankfully, the linkage system helps the unit outperform the spec sheet, but the setup still has its limitation. The shock happily soaked up slow-speed bump, but fast-bump compliance was another story. Several large hits bucked me out of the seat or sent a shock directly through my back.

Of course, the model’s aggressive, low stance may look sporty, but it also restricts the suspension travel. Again, we would love to see a taller monoshock on the sportiest of Sportsters, but the piggyback unit performed admirably considering its handicaps. Luckily, the fully adjustable USD fork isn’t hindered by the same issues.

The front end only boasts 3.6 inches of travel, but the appropriately damped fork never bottoms under hard braking or big bumps. In a corner, the Sportster S holds its line in a smooth and predictable manner. The Dunlop GT503 tires suit the model well, with enough feedback and grip to inspire confidence. Of course, dragging the single-piston rear caliper on the 260mm disc helps stabilize the 500-pound rig upon corner entry.

The Sportster S was in its natural element in the canyons. The model holds its own in the city, but it reveals its naughty side on a curvy road. The high-spec componentry and adjustability certainly contributed to that nature, but the rider posture also factors into the Sportster’s performance.

Cockpit
At 29.6 inches, the S model’s seat height should fit a broad range of inseams. Despite the large exhaust heat shields pressing into the rider’s right leg, flat-footing the Sportster is effortless. Reach to the bars is a slight stretch, with the rider’s upper half leaned forward and a small bend at the elbows. The forward controls position the legs at a 90-degree angle, but feet point slightly upward on the pegs.

While the forwards increase long-distance comfort, they also place more weight on the rider’s hindquarters and off the pegs. As a result, I preferred the mid control-equipped Sportster S despite the acute leg bend. The sense of control provided by the mids would make it an instant upgrade for me. Unfortunately, the Motor Company doesn’t offer an option for mid control, but customers can purchase a conversion kit for $660.

The Sportster doesn’t perform poorly with the forwards, as both setups yield a 34-degree lean angle, but the mids allow the model to reach its full performance potential. Not to mention, after several hours with forward controls, my rear end started to ache due to so much of my weight bearing down on the thinly padded seat.

Harley also outfits the forwards with an extended shift lever (compared to the mid controls). The lever’s long throw also resulted in numerous unintentional shifts into neutral when kicking from first to second gear. I didn’t encounter the same problem once on the mid controls. I should note that the mids may prove too cramped for taller riders. At five-foot, 10-inches, I fit comfortably into the new rider triangle but the user’s purposes and preference will determine what’s best for them.

Last but certainly not least, the all-new round, four-inch TFT display is a first for the Sportster family. While the switchgear gains a host of new buttons and switches, the interface is intuitive and easy to navigate. From ambient temperature to engine temperature, from tire pressure to battery voltage, the rider can check every metric impacting the bike’s performance.

Bluetooth connectivity unlocks navigation, incoming call identification, and music-playing features. However, the Sportster S doesn’t include a GPS receiver, so the system relies on the rider’s smartphone network for those services. Also, without speakers included, the user will need to link their helmet communication system to the motorcycle.

The breadth and technology of the new infotainment system may be a giant leap forward, but the limited screen real estate can be restricting in navigation and diagnostic modes. With so much information crammed in such a small area, fonts quickly become illegible, especially at speed. For that reason, I stuck with the standard setup, pairing a large mph readout, needle-style tachometer, gear position indicator, and trip meters.

Conclusion
The 2021 Sportster S marks a watershed moment for the longest production motorcycle in history. From side valves to overhead valves to four valves per cylinder, the Sportster has come a long way, but its latest form is a major departure from the previous iterations. The Sportster S should appeal to existing, performance-oriented Harley customers but also draw new blood into the brand.

At 500 pounds and 121 horsepower, the historically entry-level model is lighter and more powerful than any other cruiser in the Motor Company’s portfolio, making it more of a giant killer than ever. By Sportster standards, the 2021 S model is a marvel, warts and all. While the Sportster S is a seminal entry in the Harley history books, the potential it presents is even more intriguing.

We can’t wait to see what the Bar and Shield does with the platform as it fills the slots under the flagship trim. No, this isn’t your grandad’s Sportster, it’s something entirely new, and Harley-Davidson plans to build on the model’s possibilities for the next 64 years.

Harley-Davidson Announces “Let’s Ride Challenge” Sweepstakes

By General Posts

Celebrating the Open Road with a Sweepstakes that Unlocks Prizes as Miles are Ridden and Tracked Via H-D.com App

  • 0-999,999 mi: $2,500 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card
  • 1M mi: $5,000 USD cash and a $2,500 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card
  • 3M mi: Riding trip with 3 friends
  • 5M mi: Custom Harley-Davidson® Motorcycle†

You’ll also be automatically entered for a chance to win a $1,000 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card.
*Miles update daily. When more miles are tracked and a bigger prize is unlocked, the previous prize will no longer be available.

MILWAUKEE (JULY 26, 2021) – Harley-Davidson is celebrating the summer riding season and the open road with the “Let’s Ride Challenge”. This sweepstakes encourages riders to rack up miles via the H-D.com app in order to unlock bigger prizes, as each milestone is reached. In addition, the sweepstakes also features personal riding challenges, including instant win games that provide riders a chance to win.

“We want to acknowledge and reward our Harley-Davidson riders, in the United States and Canada, for all the miles they’re putting in this summer,” said Theo Keetell, VP Marketing. “The ‘Lets Ride Challenge’ sweepstakes will encourage our riders to seek out new adventures, unlock new prizes via the H-D.com app and experience instant win games, as part of the Harley-Davidson community.”

From July 23 through September 30, riders in the U.S. and Canada who enter by registering on www.Harley-Davidson.com/ride or the H-D App. Through riding-related milestones and activities, by visiting their local Harley-Davidson dealer, and by alternative methods of entry, participants can earn entries for a chance to win prizes at increasing thresholds. Depending on the threshold number of miles entered via the H-D.com app, prizes would include H-D gift cards, cash rewards, a riding trip, or a custom 2021 Harley-Davidson® touring motorcycle.

For sweepstakes Official Rules, program and prize details and more information visit this page.

https://harleydavidson.promo.eprize.com/letsridechallenge/public/COMPILED/en/fulfillment/rules.649d0b8ca0016d712e194aaf1794b981.pdf

For full information on 2021 Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Genuine Motor Parts and Accessories, and general merchandise visit: www.h-d.com.

Women-only motorcycle club rides across 48 states in 8 days

By General Posts

by Madeleine Hagen from https://www.yaktrinews.com

Forty-eight states in 10 days, from Kittery, Maine to Kennewick, Washington was the adventure 28 women took to honor a motorcycle legend.

“I didn’t know anyway to come out to Washington to put an event on so we came up with the 48 in 10,” Tameka Singleton of Bessie’s Belles said.

The group of ladies is from all over the United States.

They met up in Maine in early July to start their ride in honor of Bessie Stringfield.

“She kind of gives us an inspiration and we use that everyday you know just ride motorcycles,” Singleton said.

In the mid-1900’s, Bessie was a female motorcycle pioneer. She was the first African-American woman to ride the continuous United States all by herself.

She eventually founded a motorcycle club, became president and was inducted into the American Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

Tameka Singleton said Bessie is the reason they completed the cross country journey.

“The logistics are crazy, being resourceful. These ladies have made this ride what it is,” she said.

The ride started on July 5th, Tameka said they covered 15 states and hundreds of miles in the first day.

On their journey, they had to get proof that they stopped in all 48 states. So, they would stop quickly, get gas and carry on.

“Texarkana is in Texas and Arkansas – so it counts,” Tameka laughed.

The women rode with minimal sleep.

“Two to four hours of rest a night,” she said.

As they reached the west, the ladies dealt with extreme conditions.

“Now we have to go through that desert, and we have to go across New Mexico and it was hot, and that’s when somebody turned hell on,” Tameka said by the time they reached Idaho, the historic heatwave had started.

Eventually they ended their journey in Kennewick, beating their goal of 10 days.

“48 in eight, all women, what more can you say? Just watching my sisters like, they were having hard times but they never stopped and that is really the biggest reward to see people standing in this state that probably never would have been here otherwise, and for that Bessie Stringfield has really inspired all of us,” Tameka said.

The ladies spent their Tuesday at the Harley Davidson in Kennewick, to get their bikes serviced and tuned up before hitting the road again. Tameka said next up is a ride to Miami, Florida.

Red River Harley Davidson hosts 33rd annual Poker Run and Ride

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by Markeshia Jackson from https://www.texomashomepage.com

WICHITA FALLS — It was April Fools’ in July for those over at Red River Harley Davidson who hosted their 33rd annual April Fools’ Poker Run and Ride.

All the proceeds benefit The Friendly Door and its Meals On Wheels program. Dozens participated to support the cause.

For company service writer Bobbie Gilmore, the Red River Harley Davidson poker run ride has been something she’s been doing for as long as she can remember. At this year’s 33rd annual ride, she and others said it felt good to be out riding together again.

“Everyone that knows Red River knows this is a nostalgic ride for us,” Gilmore said. “Everyone wants to be a part of it and get in on it, and you just tie in just by being here and we’re all a family together riding.”

The event started with an 80 mile motorcycle ride, followed by lunch and raffles. The ride has only gotten cancelled three times in the past, one being last year due to the pandemic.

“COVID killed it earlier, and they just got cleared,” Gilmore said. “So they got cleared, we’re ready to go, let’s do it.”

“It really has a big turnout,” Tom Venhaus, a chairman for The Friendly Door, said. “For them to give up their time on a Sunday to do the ride and then to come here and we do lunch.”

This year, the proceeds from the poker run will go to The Friendly Door Senior Center of Iowa Park.

Gilmore said, “It benefits The Friendly Door in Iowa Park. They’re a great facility that helps the seniors and also does meals on wheels.”

Officials with The Friendly Door said they will continue to cherish their relationship with Red River Harley Davidson and that they value their support.

“And to say ‘Hi, we appreciate you coming, we appreciate you supporting the center,’” Venhaus said. “Without their support, we wouldn’t be able to do what we do for the senior citizens here.”

Venhaus said each event like this one helps the center stay open to serve those seniors in the community. “Anything that we do we try to better the conditions for the senior citizens here.”

Red River Harley Davidson said they are looking forward to next year’s April Fools’ run, and they hope it will be another year of fun on two and three wheels, all to help a great cause.

Although today’s ride was a hot one, it did not stop the community from showing up. Employees at Red River said they look forward to actually having next years April Fools’ run in April.

You can find out more information about The Friendly Door by clicking here.

Traveling but can’t bring your motorcycle? Here are a few solutions

By General Posts

from https://www.traveldailynews.com

One of the primary reasons why people travel is to get away from their day-to-day hard-knock lives and relax on an island away from all the noise. Although leaving the noisy city to a remote location brings a high level of calmness and serenity, many people still like to be very active while on vacation. One major group of people in this category are bikers.

Whether they are in Cancun or Fiji Islands, bikers love to have their motorcycles with them and don’t like to go too long without riding. If you are in this category of vacationers, then not being able to travel with your motorcycle must be such a bummer. The good news is that there are many solutions that bikers can try to ensure they can ride when they travel. Ranging from shipping your motorcycle to your location to renting a different motorcycle, these tips will surely help you do what you love, even in a different location. So, here are a few solutions that will keep you active when you cannot take your motorcycle along on trips.

1. Renting a motorcycle
Renting service has been the most thought-after solution when going on traveling. Since you can’t travel with your motorcycle in tow, being able to rent it at your destination should be the next solution in mind. You might be worried about whether or not you will find a motorcycle rental service in your destination country, especially if you are going to a remote island. You should note that some brands allow tourists to rent a motorcycle from any part of the globe, and they can see the available countries in this URL or BRANDED website. This way, you can be sure a motorcycle will be waiting for you when you arrive. Also, ensure you have an idea of the type of motorcycle the rental company provides if it is durable for your activities.

When renting, try to check the details like the insurance, breakdown maintenance, and other required services covering the motorcycle. Most significantly, insurance is a focal point in renting a motorcycle. Due to unexpected events that can occur anytime with the bike, try and know the insurance policy. For instance, you rent a motorcycle for your trip, you got robbed, and it was taken away from you. With a good insurance policy, there will be some coverage for such an event.

Lastly, safety is always the primary concern for anyone when using a motorcycle. So it is always essential for you to make inquiries about the safety and maintenance carried out on the motorcycles. If it is from a trusted maintenance company that keeps to high standards, then feel less disturbed about your safety. It is vital to know how long such a motorcycle has been in function. Also, if possible, get to keep a snapshot of the bike before using it as a means of evidence in case any matter arises.

2. Purchase and sell
This type of solution is often hardly considered because of the cost and loss experienced when selling the motorcycle. In a situation where you will stay for a long time while on your trip, considering this solution will be a brilliant idea. However, if you can afford it, it will be the best for you. For instance, you can either purchase a new motorcycle that might be less expensive or a used one placed for sale. After traveling has lapsed, you can decide to sell it off and make back some of your money spent on getting the motorcycle. The recorded loss might be a little different between the purchasing price and the selling price.

3. Get the necessary document
Every intending destination you want to go to might request some document before anything can be used on their road or cross its border. First of all, making inquiries about a particular place you want to travel so can save you some expenses for your motorcycle. Second, if you are going to a place where documentation will be required for a motorcycle, try and ensure you get those necessary documents available. Some of these documents can be a valid passport, travel document, international driving permit, and visa.

For instance, you are traveling to a country where an international driving permit is required before taking a motorcycle into such country. Upon presenting the required document, you will be allowed to bring in and use your bike in that country without been stopped. After you are over with the duration of your stay, you can take your motorcycle along with you.

4. Ship your motorcycle
You can also consider shipping it when you cannot bring your motorcycle while traveling to the exact destination, either through local services or international services. It may seem to be quite expensive and takes a lot of work to process, but the safe delivery of your motorcycle is highly guaranteed. To avoid delaying your bike at the checkpoint, you must ensure all paperwork, physical and online registration is complete.

Lastly, due to the increasing shipping services globally, it is highly advisable to use a well-known company with good significant reviews in delivering goods and cargos to that specific destination. You can do your research about brands that suit you well.

With these few tips, you can easily travel to any location and not worry about not having your motorcycle. You can still do what you love in a new and exciting location!

Klock Werks Vent Screen Install

By General Posts

Klock Werks has created a simple yet effective part to accent the vent in the Harley-Davidson 2014-2020 FLH “batwing” style fairing. And on top of not only looking good it will keep some love bugs from flying through the vent.

Klock Werks offer a whole line of accessories for your motorcycle, not limited to just Harleys. Check them out. They are a great company with great support and that it is hard to find.

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