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Hunter Sills Racing Earns Four World Records and One U.S. National Record at the AMA

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Hunter Sills Racing Earns Four World Records and One U.S. National Record at the AMA and FIM-Sanctioned Bonneville Motorcycle Speed Trials With Their BMW S 1000 RR Motorcycle

Associated Press | WENDOVER, Utah – September 10, 2019 – ( Newswire.com )

Hunter Sills Racing captured five records with its BMW S 1000 RR at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Wendover, Utah, during the Bonneville Motorcycle Speed Trials event held Aug. 24–29, 2019. The team also earned Top Time of the Meet and Fastest Naturally Aspirated Motorcycle and increased the speed of their world’s fastest BMW motorcycle to 238.398 mph. Both riders, Erin Sills and Trev Richter of Hunter Sills Racing, earned 1000cc FIM records aboard a nitrous-powered BMW bike affectionately known as “Snoopy.”

With improving track conditions over the week, the team was able to set records early, then progressively improve them over the event. Ultimately, Sills piloted the Alpine Performance Centre-built BMW S 1000 RR to 237.287 mph to earn the FIM kilometer record in the faired, naturally aspirated 1000cc class; a record that was previously set in 2014 by her late husband Andy Sills, also of Hunter Sills Racing, at 221.863 mph. Erin was later able to improve her own FIM mile record set in 2018 on the Uyuni Salt Flats in Bolivia at 229.265 mph, making the new mark 236.889 mph.

“After the poor track conditions presented by Mother Nature during Speedweek, we were looking forward to seeing how our bike would perform on a better course,” said Sills, rider and owner of Hunter Sills Racing. “Shane Kinderis of Alpine Performance Centre put together an incredible motor which performed beautifully with the Wizards of NoS nitrous system. I also found the AirTech fairing to be incredibly stable and grounded at speed.”

“Our senior race technician Curtice Thom worked alongside Shane Kinderis again, a pairing that has proven to be very successful over the years. They did an excellent job of keeping the bike in peak performance, and I’m very pleased with our results. As always, we owe a great amount of success with this project to our many technical partners,” added Gary Orr, owner of San Diego BMW Motorcycles and Hunter Sills Racing team member.

Richter, known previously for his “Race For Relief” charity effort World’s Fastest BMW GS (http://huntersillsracing.com/race-for-relief-2018/), also saw much success in his first event racing the BMW S 1000 RR, winning back a record the team lost in Bolivia in 2017 to Nick Genet. Richter increased the FIM and AMA 1000cc naturally aspirated un-faired (“naked”) mile record to 195.674 mph and the FIM kilometer record to 196.206 mph.

“Riding the over 275 horsepower motorcycle without a fairing presents a unique physical challenge, but the team gave me a bike and suspension set-up that enabled me to reach my goal of earning World and National records in my first event,” said Richter.

Hunter Sills Racing is also proud of its contributions to the Bonneville Motorcycle Speed Trials racing community during the week. With the express permission of the Bureau of Land Management, the team built and donated a mock “Bonneville Salt Flats” sign which was installed at the entrance of the Salt Flats for the week-long event. Following the event, HSR auctioned the sign, earning $4,000 to benefit a fallen rider who needed help with medical bills. Erin Sills also continued her Shemoto Scholarship, awarding $2,000 to the Buell Sisters team of Ashley Woodford.

The next event for Hunter Sills Racing will be in support of the Women Riders World Relay, a year-long around-the-world journey of over 10,000 female motorcyclists. Erin Sills will participate in the WRWR’s United States relay Oct. 2-12, 2019.

The team would like to thank their sponsors who make all of this possible: Top 1 Oil, San Diego BMW Motorcycles, Alpine Performance Centre, Colorado ADVmoto, WomenRidersNow.com, BMW Motorrad USA, Helite Airbags, JBA Speed Shop, Motochic, Moto-Skiveez, Ohlins USA, PitBull Motorcycle Stands, Racer Gloves USA, Remus Exhaust, Schuberth Helmets, Sprint Filter, Wizards of NoS, Worldwide Bearings, and Wunderlich.

About Hunter Sills Racing:

Hunter Sills Racing is a female-owned professional land speed racing team including motor builder Shane Kinderis of Alpine Performance Centre, Gary Orr of San Diego BMW Motorcycles, race technician Curtice Thom, and riders Erin Sills and Trev Richter. The team races in memory of the late Andy Sills. Together, the team has earned over 40 World and National records, two Guinness World Book records, Mojave Mile 200 MPH Club membership, Mojave Magnum 200 MPH Club membership, BUB 201 MPH Club membership, Bonneville SCTA 200 MPH Club membership, El Mirage SCTA 200 MPH Club membership, top average mile speed to-date of 238 MPH, and title of World’s Fastest BMW. When not racing the Salt Flats, Richter and Sills both serve as off-road adventure motorcycle riding coaches. Erin Sills has been named 2013 Advertising Age Woman To Watch, 2014 American Motorcyclist Association Female Athlete of the Year, 2014 University of Cincinnati Lindner College of Business Distinguished Alumni and is a retired executive with Facebook, Inc. A frequent speaker on behalf of the sport of motorcycling, Sills also serves on the board of directors for the American Motorcyclist Association Hall of Fame Foundation, the FIM Women’s Commission, WomenRidersNow.com and is the founder of the Shemoto Scholarship for females in the sport.

Cross Country Chase Stage 2

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A glorious sunrise kicked off a day of cruising country roads and enjoying warm hospitality as Chase riders boarded the S.S. Badger for a 60-mile cruise across Lake Michigan before enjoying lunch during a visit at the gracious Harbor Town Harley-Davidson dealership. The day was topped off by dinner, fellowship and a bike show at the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee.

Riders loaded up the belly of the S.S.Badger with their antique motorcycles and spent the 4-hour cruise on the old ferry by napping, eating or playing bingo with the very animated staff of the coal-burning ship. Lucky rider, Evan Riggle, #11, would later show off the cool ship cap he won during bingo aboard the transport ferry during his first-time visit to the H-D Museum.

Luck also followed third place rider #72, into the museum. Larry Luce managed to roll onto the campus before the tire on his 1938 Velocette KSS went completely flat, so instead of visiting the museum exhibits as he had planned, the first-time visitor barely had time to get the flat fixed before the museum closed, though he did have time to enjoy a plateful of the great dinner the museum had prepared for the riders. Luce will start Stage 3 alongside the other riders, though James Malone, #05 and Don Gilmore, #22 have left the race completely. Good news is that rider #51, Shane Masters, has rejoined the group and is ready to make up for lost time. Be sure to check out the scores tomorrow and see where your favorite rider stands!

Cross Country Chase Stage 1

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A dark and dreary start for the Chase did nothing to dampen spirits as 68 riders set off for their 267-mile day. By the time the first antique bikes started crossing southbound on the wet and foggy Mackinac Bridge, a group of 1,500 antique tractors had already begun their trek north. It’s an annual parade that just happened to coincide with the Cross Country Chase ride and seemed quite appropriate as the antiques met midway.

Drizzle kept riders occupied through out the day, but the rain stopped long enough for the group to enjoy a nice lunch hosted by Hagerty Insurance in Traverse City, Michigan, which was followed closely by a short stop to take the daily quiz. Brainy bikers stood with clipboards and quickly answered 10 multiple-choice questions before hopping on their bikes and booking on to the final stop in Ludington. From there they will board the Badger Ferry for Stage 2 tomorrow morning.

The top three positions are still held by the same Class I riders from yesterday’s Prologue, and last place is still Shane Masters, who we hope will rejoin the group for Stage 2. As it is, the sweep trailer was loaded to the max with broken bikes for Stage 1. Let’s wish them all an overnight recovery.

The Cross Country Chase Scores

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The first official day of the inaugural Cross Country Chase consisted of a scant 13-miles as a shakedown ride called the Prologue. Riders gathered on the shores of the Saint Mary’s River across the banks of the Canada border to sit for a group photo taken by none other than the world-famous photographer, Michael Lichter. Aune Osborne Park in Sault Saint Marie, Michigan was the staging area as well as the Official Green Flag start.

Rider #51, Shane Masters, was the only rider unable to start and trucked his 1948 Indian Chief some 5 hours away to have his bike worked on with the hopes of meeting the group at the Ludington stop tomorrow evening. He received a DNS (Did Not Start) for the day.

Rider # 62, Scott Funk, is one of only two Class I riders on 250cc machines and, despite his missing 2 of the required miles, his handicap favored him and his 1946 BSA-C11 afforded him a finishing score of 22.0 points.

Rider #5 in Class II, James Maloney, managed only 1 mile and finished with 11 points, leaving him in 68th place. Number 99, Todd Cameron on his 1930 BSA Sloper with a 493cc engine, finished the day in first place with 30 points. Stay tuned folks, it’s sure to be an exciting race as 69 riders on every imaginable motorcycle marque works their way across America. Riders are preparing for the wet forecast tomorrow as they head toward Ludington, Michigan after an arduous 267-mile ride.

Women Bikers Converge On Harley Davidson Dealership In World Record Attempt

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FREDERICK, Colo. (CBS4) – Women bikers in Colorado attempted to set a world record on Saturday. More than 430 women showed up to the Harley Davidson dealership in Frederick on motorcycles, hoping to set the record for most women riding in one place at one time.

“In Colorado, women bikers are growing like a weed,” said Susan Udero, organizer of Colorado Women’s World Record Ride. “There are 88,000 bikers registered (in Colorado). How many are women? (The DMV) said 4,000 or 5,000.”

The world record is held by the United Kingdom, where more than 1,100 riders showed up. While the riders in Frederick were unable to set the record, they were able to raise a lot of money for children with Autism.

“It brings me great joy,” Udero said.

“All the proceeds from this incredible event come directly to Firefly Autism,” said Jesse Ogas, Executive Director of Firefly Autism.

Firefly Autism, based in Denver, provides support to children and families who are impacted by autism.

“We work with children from 18 months to 21 years of age, who are impacted with autism,” Ogas said. “(Money raised by the event) go to scholarship families who might not be able to pay their deductibles, who might not be able to pay their premiums. These women are having a huge impact for the children and families at Firefly Autism.”

Some said they were hoping to attract more women at a future ride in another attempt to set the world record. In the meantime, organizers joked they did set one record at the event.

“I can get the record for the most women bikers with records,” Udero said.

News Source: https://denver.cbslocal.com

Young, Hot Motorcycle App – Now With Video

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Tonit Announces Slick New Video Feature
Video Feature Enhances User Experience & Makes Tonit a True Social Media Platform

Kelowna, BC – August 9, 2019 – Tonit, the motorcycle community app built by riders for riders, today announced the release of their new Video Feature, which makes sharing motorcycle content more versatile and engaging. Members will now be able to snap and feature up to 60 seconds worth of video on their profiles, and view the latest clips posted on their feeds.

The Tonit app was developed to be a social hub for motorcycle riders to connect with one another and foster a strong community. On the app, riders can meet, post photos and videos, share tips and tricks, track and share riding experiences, and stay safer on the road.

“Our members asked for it, and we listened,” said Jason Lotoski, Founder and CEO, Tonit. “Tonit is 100% developed from the community’s voice. The new video feature is cementing Tonit’s place as a must have social-media platform for riders across North America. We will continue to roll out new app features and improvements quickly to keep meeting member requests that help build a better experience for the community.”

Tonit can be downloaded for free on Google Play or the App Store

Motorcycle social media app Tonit has devoted itself to uniting and growing a global network of motorcycle riders. With over 200k users in less than 8 months, the app allows people to create profiles, connect with other motorcyclists, join group rides, and attend motorbike-centric events.

A near fatal accident didn’t stop Natalie from getting back on the open road.

When she was young, Natalie yearned to one day have her own motorcycle. She made her dream a reality when she purchased her own Yamaha, and could finally experience the thrill of riding solo and getting involved in the local motorcycle community.

Things took a turn for the worse and she was involved in a near fatal accident that left her dreams – and bones – broken. Natalie was told that she wouldn’t be able to walk for up to a year. Five surgeries, organs removed, and one titanium pelvis later, Natalie’s passion for riding drove her to get back up again. Three months after her accident, she was back on wheels– and not the wheelchair kind.

One of the things that helped Natalie stay positive throughout her traumatic ordeal was the Tonit community that would be there to welcome her return to the road.

For motorcyclists riding in groups or flying solo, no resource offers a more authentic way to connect with other passionate riders than the Tonit app.

About Tonit https://www.tonit.com/

Tonit, the motorcycle app built for riders by riders was developed to bring motorcyclists together both online and on-the-road through an interactive and inclusive social community. Motorcyclists across the globe use Tonit to connect with other riders, share bike-related content, map and track riding experiences, and stay safer on the road. Riders can find new people to hit the road with based on location and riding style, and, once in touch, easily plan group rides. Routes and stats can be shared with the Tonit community so that riders can discover new locations, share intel about best routes, provide maintenance tips and tricks and post photos and experiences. Launched late November 2018, Tonit has over 60,000 downloads and 50,000 active users and four months later was the #1 trending lifestyle app on Google Play. Tonit is a free download on both the Google Play and App Store. Visit tonit.com to learn more.

Shared e-scooters aren’t as environmentally friendly as other transport options

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A new study has found that e-scooters may be greener than most cars, but they can be less green than several other options.

Washington DC: People who think electric scooters or e-scooters are environmentally friendly, take note!

A new study has found that e-scooters may be greener than most cars, but they can be less green than several other options.

“E-scooter companies tout themselves as having little or no carbon footprint, which is a bold statement,” said Jeremiah Johnson, the corresponding author of the study

“We wanted to look broadly at the environmental impacts of shared e-scooters – and how that compares to other local transportation options.”

To capture the impact of e-scooters, researchers looked at emissions associated with four aspects of each scooter’s life cycle: the production of the materials and components that go into each scooter; the manufacturing process; shipping the scooter from the manufacturer to its city of use; and collecting, charging and redistributing the scooters.

The researchers also conducted a small-scale survey of e-scooter riders to see what modes of transportation they would have used if they hadn’t used an e-scooter.

The researchers found that 49 per cent of riders would have biked or walked; 34 per cent would have used a car; 11 per cent would have taken a bus; and 7 per cent wouldn’t have taken the trip at all.

In order to compare the impact of e-scooters to that of other transport options, the researchers looked at previously published life cycle analyses of cars, buses, electric mopeds, and bicycles.

Researchers looked at four types of pollution and environmental impact: climate change impact; nutrient loading in water; respiratory health impacts related to air pollution; and acidification.

The performance results were similar for all four types of pollution.

“A lot of what we found is pretty complicated, but a few things were clear,” said Johnson.

“Biking – even with an electric bike – is almost always more environmentally friendly than using a shared e-scooter. The sole possible exception is for people who use pay-to-ride bike-share programs. Those companies use cars and trucks to redistribute the bicycles in their service area, which can sometimes make them less environmentally friendly than using an e-scooter.”

By the same token, the study found that driving a car is almost always less environmentally friendly than using an e-scooter.

But some results may surprise you. For example, taking the bus on a route with high ridership is usually more environmentally friendly than an e-scooter.

“We found that the environmental impact from the electricity used to charge the e-scooters is fairly small – about 5 per cent of its overall impact,” said Johnson. “The real impact comes largely from two areas: using other vehicles to collect and redistribute the scooters; and emissions related to producing the materials and components that go into each scooter.”

That means that there are two major factors that contribute to each scooter’s environmental footprint. First is that the less driving that is done to collect and redistribute the scooters, the smaller the impact. The second factor is the scooters’ lifetime: the longer the scooter is in service, the more time it has to offset the impact caused by making all of its constituent parts.

Motorcycle Makers Are Getting Hip to Women-Only Rallies

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Anxious to find new audiences after a decade of declining sales, the giants like Harley-Davidson and BMW Motorrad are finally taking notice of a self-made community.

On Valentine’s Day, Sharry Billings posted a photograph on Instagram. Below the image of herself, her hair a red caramel and her smile open, she wrote: “I love you so much I wanna squeeze you!”

The object of her affection? “All the motorcycles I have owned and will own in the future,” she explained. Alongside the photo of her astride a Harley-Davidson, she wrote that bikes “have changed my life, healed my soul, and brought me more love and friendships than I could have ever imagined.”

Billings goes by @sistermother13 on Instagram, but the main account she oversees is @thelitaslosangeles. The Litas is a group she joined three years ago as a way to connect with other women riders in her city. She’s co-led the L.A. branch for two years. When she joined, it provided her with much-needed healing and camaraderie after her kids grew up and she got divorced. Billings had ridden as a teenager and into her 20s but took a hiatus later. “It was always in my heart,” she says. But when she was married with young children, “I thought it was a little too dangerous.”

After the breakup in 2015, she found herself longing for escape. And adventure. “My prayer at the time was, ‘God, I don’t want to date.’ These men are not happening,” Billings says, laughing. “The first thing that came to my heart was the motorcycle I wanted. It was a Harley.”

She bought the bike, took the ride. Then she joined the Litas. “I’m very grateful to have found my heart again,” Billings says.

Founded in Utah by Jessica Haggett half a decade ago, the Litas have expanded to include hundreds of branches around the world (Litas Denver, Litas Lisbon, Litas Rome), with members ranging from twentysomething singles to 60- and 70-year-old retirees with grandkids. They take regular rides, often along wild back roads, including the Pine Mountain Ridge route near Ojai, Calif., that Billings took with 32 other riders one Saturday in July. It’s about riding with your own style and pace but surrounded by like-minded friends.

“If you’re learning to ride, you’re going to kill yourself riding with men—they ride like bats out of hell!” Billings says. “And women—I’m generalizing here—tend to be more careful. We are mothers, we are sisters, we feel obligated to stay alive.”

The Litas are singular but not uncommon. All across California, Oregon, and Utah, from Texas to New York, women-only motorcycle groups and riding events are springing up like wildflowers. They go by names such as the Miss-Fires (Brooklyn, N.Y.), the Chrome Divas (Austin), and Leather and Lace (Daytona Beach, Fla.). They do regular rides: Tuesday night pizza runs, say, or weekend coffee meetups—and they take periodic excursions to women-only destination events such as the Wild Gypsy Tour, which is organizing a festival in Sturgis, S.D., in August, and the Dream Roll in Ashland, Ore.; it’s early June event near Denver was photographed for this article.

The biggest crowd follows Babes Ride Out, a series of events founded by Anya Violet and Ashmore Ellis in 2013. It started with 50 women riders who gathered to camp out in Borrego Springs, Calif. They built fires, pitched tents, drank beer, and played games on Harleys, Husqvarnas, and Hondas while soaking in nature and one another’s company.

These groups are tapping into an undercurrent of the motorcycle industry. As sales have faltered, dropping more than 40% from 2008 to 2010, then recovering somewhat by 2014 but never to previous levels, manufacturers including Harley-Davidson Inc. and BMW Motorrad have struggled to create appeal beyond their core demographic of older white men. Their efforts include offering electric and less-expensive motorbikes and introducing exciting conceptual prototypes. Female riders offer enthusiasm and youth, and, yes, they’re spending money that brands crave.

The number of women who own motorcycles has almost doubled since 2010, according to a 2018 study by the Motorcycle Industry Council. Today, 19% of owners are women, up from 10% in 2009 and 8% in the late 1990s. And the number of female riders gets higher as you go younger: 22% of Generation X riders are women, and 26% of millennial riders are women. What’s more, the average woman who owns a motorcycle spends $574 annually on maintenance, parts, service, and accessories, while the average man who rides spends $497.

While the industry on the whole dropped 40% from 2008 to 2010, the amount of women who own motorcycles has almost doubled

“We are riding a ton,” says Joy Lewis, who started when she was 12. “I have a friend who put 20,000 miles on her bike in one year.” Lewis’s father, an Alaskan crab fisherman who owned a Harley, got her hooked. “We spend a lot of money on our gear and our bikes, and a lot of things to go with them. I think that’s starting to be appreciated.”

Andy Jefferson, a spokesman for Husqvarna, says one of the brand’s priorities must be to provide support for women’s motorcycling. “We were like everyone else—going after a piece of the pie,” he says. “But everyone was looking at men, and there are all these other people—women—that nobody even really talks about in conversations about how to sell more bikes.” The brand lacks figures for how many of its owners are women but is “working to change that,” Jefferson says. “That’s part of the problem.”

Husqvarna honed in on women riders five years ago when it started sponsoring Babes in the Dirt, an offshoot of Babes Ride Out that’s more focused on off-road and dirt-bike riding. Last year the company spent $50,000 to $60,000 in support of the three-day rally, lending 27 motorcycles and nine staffers to service the bikes and teach.

“We counted between 80 and 100 girls out there [trying out] Husqvarnas,” he says. “The number is not huge by any means, but those are 100 people we didn’t have before. It also jumps down to their brothers and sisters and kids. We never would have got these people without doing this.”

But more important, “we want to get you to ride a motorcycle,” Jefferson adds. “If you ride with Babes and have fun and go buy another brand, great. We just want people riding.”

At BMW Motorrad, which on July 1 named Trudy Hardy vice president for the Americas, the company is sponsoring women-only events including the Sisters’ Centennial Motorcycle Ride. It’s also covering travel expenses and appearance fees for brand reps such as Elspeth Beard, an architect who was the first British woman to ride her motorcycle around the world. The brand also sends pro racer Jocelin Snow and Erin Sills, who holds a 242 mph land speed record, to attend events at local dealerships.

Harley-Davidson has expanded its retail line in recent years to include a host of riding jackets, helmets, boots, and gloves sized and styled for women. It’s perhaps the most critical field of growth for the 116-year-old Wisconsin brand, which has seen sales steadily decline since 2014. The average age of a Harley owner is 50. The average price of one is $15,800—more than many millennials will spend on a car, let alone a motorcycle.

“Even just in the last five years the conversation has shifted,” says motorcycle aficionado Lewis. “I’m sitting here in leather Kevlar pants as we speak, about to go into a meeting. Not only are companies making cute technical stuff that you could wear to work—rather than some weird leather pants with pink embroidery all over the butt that you’d never wear—they’re making things we can actually use.”

Attendees at events for Babes Ride Out (or BRO, the ironic abbreviation they’ve adopted) come to America from as far away as Sweden and South America. Some have ridden since they could walk; some can’t operate a bike at all, preferring always to be a passenger and imbibe the inspirational atmosphere. There’s always plenty of denim and leather on-site—but the hipster kind, not the leather-daddy look. Local shops give classes on basic bike maintenance. Some women get tattoos to commemorate the experience.

“People camp, and there are trailers, too,” Lewis says. “The idea is that you grab coffee and breakfast, and then during the day everyone is out riding. And then all the stuff happens in the evenings with bands or karaoke and slow races”—feats of throttle control.

Earlier this year, a 96-year-old woman joined them at camp; she’d first ridden cross-country on her motorcycle 75 years ago. Last summer the annual California desert meetup saw 1,700 women ride in Yucca Valley; 500 attended an East Coast campout in the Catskill Mountains in New York; 700 attended the most recent Babes in the Dirt in Lebec, Calif.

“Maybe people think that women who ride are pretty tough and badass, which is probably true, but all in all, women riders come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and lifestyles, so any label that you want to give them does not really work,” co-founder Violet says. “I can honestly say that there is no ‘type’ … and we like it that way!”

Be Here Next for Motor-Loving Ladies

The Dream Roll
Set at New Frontier Ranch in the southern wilds of Oregon, the Dream Roll offers camping, tattoos, dirt trails, an on-site bar, and water activities near stunningly picturesque Crater Lake. Aug. 23–25; Ashland, Ore.

Wild Gypsy Tour – Sturgis Buffalo Chip
The biggest and baddest Gypsy festival of the year, the five-day South Dakota event will appeal to the truly unbridled spirit with Super Hooligan races, minibike showdowns, the Wall of Death—and multiple concerts including Keith Urban, Toby Keith, Snoop Dogg, and Styx. Aug. 3–7; Sturgis, S.D.

Babes in the Dirt East
A mix of flat-track and motocross riding gives dirt-loving ladies a place to experience and perfect their off-roading skills. Where Babes Ride Out focuses on asphalt routes, here you’ll be on trails. Sept. 20–22; Greenville, Tenn.

Babes Ride Out 7 – Central Coast
BRO 7 will include the jewels of years past: karaoke, free beer, performances from local bands, route maps for area rides, and hands-on classes for working on your bike. B.Y.O. tent. Oct. 11–13; Santa Margarita, Calif.