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Fritchie Classic motorcycle race to return to fairgrounds July 4

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by Mary Grace Keller from https://www.fredericknewspost.com

The 100th Anniversary of Barbara Fritchie Classic

There’s a short list of factors that can prevent the country’s oldest continuous dirt track motorcycle race — the Great Depression, World War II, rain and most recently, COVID-19.

But not this year.

The Barbara Fritchie Classic will return to the Frederick Fairgrounds July 4 after the pandemic led to its cancellation in 2020. This year will mark 100 years of tradition at the location since the series started in 1922, according to race organizer Richard Riley.

“The race is on,” he said.

The event will look a little different from years past. The plan is to limit the grandstands to 1,500 spectators (half capacity), COVID-19 safety protocols will be in place, visitors will notice extra cleaning throughout the event, and hand sanitizer will abound.

Riley isn’t worried about reducing the capacity in the grandstands, since they usually see 1,500 to 1,800 spectators, and many of them stand around the racetrack’s fence.

“It’s just good dusty fun,” Riley said.

New this year, the event will offer a STACYC exhibition for youngsters competing on electric bikes. More details are to come, but Riley said the event will probably be geared toward kids ages 4 to 6.

“The kids got to get out,” he said. “They can’t stay in the house all day.”

He also hopes to display restored vintage racing bikes from the era of the first race.

Riley’s been involved in the race in some way since 1977 and first attended in 1968. For decades of his life, the Fritchie Classic has been synonymous with celebrating Independence Day.

Last Fourth of July, Riley found himself staring at the empty fairgrounds. He nearly cried when he had to cancel the event.

“I just looked in there. Everything was locked down,” he recalled. “It would have been strange for me not to go to the Frederick Fairgrounds on the Fourth of July.”

The decision did not come easily.

“I was forced to make a decision that I don’t regret,” Riley told the News-Post in June 2020. “But it’s not something I wanted to make. It was nothing that I would have told you I would have done six months or longer ago.”

One of the competitors looking forward to kicking the dust up at the fairgrounds is 2018 winner Cory Texter of Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

“[I’m] looking forward to going back,” Texter said.

He won the main event Expert/Pro Twins race at the 97th running of the Barbara Fritchie Classic. His sister, Shayna, is also a past winner but in the 450cc Pro Sport race in 2008.

“Because it’s so technical, I seem to do really well there,” Cory Texter said. “It’s one of the biggest non-national races we do.”

The history of the half-mile track itself is a draw to competitors. Riley said they’ve had racers from all over the U.S. as well as other countries.

“There’s a tremendous amount of tradition,” Riley said. “I promised I’d get it to 100.”

Richard Riley invites those interested in attending the Fritchie Classic to visit barbarafritchieclassic.com for more information and to buy tickets in the future.

Tickets will also be available at Fredericktown Yamaha, which can be reached at 301-663-8333.

 

A 17-year-old is taking the motorcycle racing world by storm

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by James Warren from https://www.theolivepress.es

SPAIN has often been called the mecca for motorcycle racing, with world champions being cultivated from the moment they can sit on a bike.

Household names like Marc Marquez, Aleix Espargaro and current champ Joan Mir all started riding and racing while they were at school, making use of Spain’s love of two wheels to develop their talents unhindered.

As these riders fight to earn their latest victories in 2021, they all have one eye on one name that is causing waves in the Moto3 World Championship.

And that name is Pedro Acosta, a young 17-year-old from Mazarron, Murcia.

So far in 2021, the young man has taken three victories and one podium in the first four races, shattering records for the 250cc class and leaving experts to hail him as a ‘future legend’.

But how has this teenager become one of the most exciting prospects since Marc Marquez arrived on the scene back in 2008.

The answer can be found at the Circuito de Cartagena, a race track six kilometres northwest of the popular resort.

The circuit is popular with trackday riders, people who own motorcycles who rent sessions on the track to hone their skills.

Acosta’s father, also Pedro, was one such rider, with a love for American legend Kevin Schwanz, and eager for his son to inherit his love for two wheels.

“Dad had a Suzuki like Schwantz’s and I grew up looking at the photos and videos of him.” said Acosta in an interview with Spanish publication Marca.

Acosta’s father, keen to see his son carry on the mantle, give him a €150 Chinese Motina bike at the age of five, and brought him to track days at the Cartagena circuit to watch his father ride.

“At first he was not interested, spending more time playing rather than watching, but he soon began to become intrigued to what I was doing.” said his father.

Acosta enrolled into a youth development program at the track ran by early mentor Francisco Marmol, a name that would become an integral part in Acosta’s rise to stardom.

“He would always be at the track with his father, and after a few years we enrolled him in our program, like an after-school club for riders.” said Marmol.

“He developed a taste for it very quickly, and grew a strong bond with me, he listened very intently and it became apparent that he had no fear.”

“He was open to experiment and try new things that I suggested. Some people say they can see a natural talent in children this age but it is not true, it is too early. But Acosta was always ready to learn, and enjoyed every moment, and that was the key.”

The son of a modest fisherman and a mother Mercedes, who didn’t care for racing, Acosta, with the help of Marmol and the KSB Federation, entered numerous national championships as soon as he was old enough, and won the Pre Moto3 championship in 2017.

As a result, Acosta entered the Spanish Junior Moto3 category (CEV), finishing 33rd after racing in just five races, but more importantly giving him his first proper taste of 250cc machinery.

His stint in the CEV gave him the confidence to apply for the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup, the official starter class for the MotoGP championship and a place where teams scalp for potential talents.

Acosta made the cut, and in 2019 he began his first foray into international racing.

He impressed, taking three victories and five podiums on the way to a second place finish after 12 races.

In 2020, Acosta remained in the Rookie’s Cup and claimed an unprecedented six straight victories and a further three podiums to take the championship n his second attempt.

His performance got teams talking, and for 2021 Acosta joined the Austrian Red Bull Ajo KTM team on the factory KTM RC250, colours that would propel him into the eyes of the world.

The current crop of riders are already heaping praise on the Spanish youngster, but are concerned that his rapid rise to stardom could be his downfall.

“It is clear that he can become a champion, he has the talent, but he has to surround himself with the right people.” said 2020 champion Joan Mir.

This is a sentiment that is echoed amongst the other riders, with Franco Morbidelli and Marquez all offering words of wisdom to the 17-year-old.

“He must be left alone to enjoy his time on the bike, to concentrate on his development and not be forced to advance to quickly.” said Marquez.

Marquez is referring to rumors that Acosta is already being touted for MotoGP ride, skipping the intermediate Moto2 category altogether, a move that has concerned many.

“Moto2 is a valuable stepping stone, you learn a lot from 675cc racing machinery that you can’t pick up from Moto3, or even training on larger bikes.” said Mir.

“As Pecco (Bagnaia, current Ducati rider) said, two years in each category is sensible, it is important not to rush. It is clear he is something special but he must do what is best for him not what is best for the teams or promotions.”

What Acosta does next year is uncertain, but from humble beginnings he has gained admiration from not only his childhood heroes, but also racing fans across the globe.

Epic Indian vs Harley-Davidson Bagger First Race of 2021

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

SEE VIDEO BELOW – It’s been an exciting weekend for motorcycle enthusiasts as the Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta hosted a number of MotoAmerica events. For us, by far the most spectacular was the first race of what is now the King of the Baggers series.

Born last year as a single run at the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, King of the Baggers morphed for 2021 into a small series of three races, and attracted significantly more involvement from both Indian and Harley-Davidson. The former went on the starting grid with no fewer than three factory-backed teams, while the latter enlisted its own factory team and backed four other Harley-Davidson riders.

Back in 2020, we had 11 Harleys going up against just two Indians. The outnumbered bike maker managed to end the race in first and third podium positions, with riders Tyler O’Hara and Frankie Garcia, respectively. Sandwiched between them was Harley rider Hayden Gillim.

This year, O’Hara and Garcia repeated their performance from 2020, and ended the race in the exact same positions. This time, however, Gillim completed the race fourth, and his spot between the two Indian riders was taken by Harley’s own Kyle Wyman. The rest of the Harley pack, save for one that didn’t finish the race, came in after them.

Unlike last year however, Harley riders did seem to put on more of a fight. For most of the race, the lead switched from O’Hara to Wyman repeatedly in epic fights, but in the end the Indian rider managed to cross the finish line first, just under a second ahead of the runner-up. You can watch the video attached below for highlights from the race.

There are two more events left in this inaugural season of King of the Baggers, with the races scheduled in June at Road America, and, as a return to where it all started, one month after that at Laguna Seca.

SEE VIDEO:

Lowes fights back to third at the Spanish Grand Prix

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After a tough start, Sam Lowes saved his best for last to claim his third podium finish from the opening four races of 2021, while Augusto Fernandez suffered an unfortunate early crash from third.

The Moto2 field had to navigate 23 laps of the Circuit of Jerez Angel Nieto in ambient temperatures of 21 degrees for the fourth round of 2021.

There were mixed fortunes for the Elf Marc VDS Racing Team riders in an outing that broke the previous Moto2 race record. Sam Lowes scored 16 important points for his world championship challenge, while Augusto Fernandez failed to finish.

Augusto Fernandez – DNF
The 23-year old enjoyed a brilliant start from seventh on the grid, and climbed four places in the first half a lap to sit a very strong third.

But Augusto’s race came to a frustrating end when he tucked the front at turn six on the third lap, a result that brings his first non-score of the 2021 season.

It means the rider from the Balearic Islands slips to ninth in the championship with 23 points.

“The positive thing is we have the speed again”

“A big shame! I made a great start. I was there and in the lead group. My pace was podium pace and I felt good. I did a 1’41.7s with a full tank on the second lap. I was third and thought it was time to relax so I could be strong at the end of the race. But I made a little mistake, coming into turn six hot with the brakes. With the full tank, the front closed immediately. I couldn’t do anything. The positive thing is we have the speed again. Also, we are constant in every practice at different tracks – the second weekend in Qatar, Portimao and here. I struggled a lot last year and now we’ve been competitive. We just have to manage the races better and know how to be at the front. I want to say sorry to the team. It was completely my mistake and now I’m already thinking about Le Mans.”

Sam Lowes – 3rd, +2.229 s.

The Briton didn’t enjoy an ideal getaway off the line, dropping from fifth to eighth by the first corner. Despite joining the back of a four-rider fight for second, Lowes didn’t feel comfortable in the race’s first half.

But the 30-year old maintained his cool and produced a late rally. He passed Remy Gardner for fourth on lap 20 and then took third from Raul Fernandez at turn two on the penultimate lap.

The result sees Lowes climb to second in the world championship with 66 points, and sits just 3 behind leader Remy Gardner.

“It’s really positive to be back on the podium”

“It was really important to get the race distance today after what happened in Portugal. We didn’t just miss out on scoring points, but we didn’t get any information for the race distance. Today I didn’t have the grip I expected in the race. But the conditions were like that. I was happy to have the speed at the end. It’s really positive to be back on the podium after Portugal. It has been another solid weekend. I want to thank the team for their help. Now we can look forward to Le Mans in a couple of weeks, where I have great memories. It’s where I scored my first win with this team!”

American racing champion Dick Mann passes away

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from https://www.roadracingworld.com

Racing Legend Dick Mann passes away – from a press release issued By American Motorcyclist Association

AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer and Racing Legend Dick Mann Passes

Mann, a two-time AMA Grand National Champion, was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Dick “Bugsy” Mann, one of the most versatile racers to ever throw a leg over a motorcycle, passed away on April 26 at the age of 86.

Mr. Mann, born June 13, 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah, was a two-time AMA Grand National Champion (1963 and 1971), and became best known for being the first person to achieve a motorcycle racing Grand Slam, which involved winning across all five types of circuits included in the Grand National Championship: road racing, TT, short track, half-mile and mile. When he retired from racing in 1974, Mann had 24 national victories, which — at the time — placed him second in all-time wins within the AMA Grand National Series.

While Mann got his racing start in scrambles, he soon got hooked on turning left on dirt ovals, and after some time learning his trade, headed to the professional racing circuit in 1954, turning expert in 1955. He achieved his first national win at the Peoria TT in 1959, quickly establishing himself as an elite racer in the series.

Mann also helped pioneer the sport of motocross in the U.S., competing in several of the early AMA professional motocross races in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Perhaps Mann’s most fulfilling national win was his victory in the 1970 Daytona 200 aboard the then-new Honda CB750. He’d been racing the Daytona 200 for 15 years and finished second three times, and in 1970 finally got to the top step of the podium, holding off rising stars and future Hall of Famers Gary Nixon and Gene Romero, as well as former world champion and Hall of Famer Mike Hailwood. That win wasn’t just Mann’s first victory at the 200, but the first time a Honda had won an AMA national.

Despite retiring from professional racing in 1974, Mann returned to his trail-riding roots in 1975, qualifying for the United States International Six Days Trial team, competed for the U.S. on the Isle of Man, and brought home a bronze medal.

Beyond being a legendary racer, Mann’s mentorship of the next generation of American racers and future Hall of Famers like Dave Aldana, Mert Lawwill and Kenny Roberts, was just as important.

In 1995, Mr. Mann was presented with the AMA Dud Perkins Lifetime Achievement Award, recognizing his significant contributions to the sport. He was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998.

Honoring Motorcycle Racing Legend Dick Mann – from a press release issued by American Flat Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (April 28, 2021) – AMA Pro Racing joins the motorcycle community in mourning the loss of the great Dick Mann. Mann passed Monday at 86 years of age.

The winner of two Grand National Championships, Mann was touted as one of the greatest to ever compete in various motorcycle racing disciplines. Mann is best known for being the first person to ever win all five types of circuit included in the AMA Grand National Championship: short track, TT, half-mile, mile and road race.

Mann continued to contribute to the legacy of motorcycle racing by influencing some of the greatest names in flat track including Gene Romero, Gary Nixon, Mert Lawwill, Kenny Roberts and Dave Aldana.

Mann was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993 and the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998.

Progressive American Flat Track will observe a moment of silence in Mann’s honor during its opening ceremonies at Saturday’s event at Atlanta Motor Speedway.

Statement of Condolence on Passing of Dick Mann – from a press release issued by American Honda

Hall of Famer earned Honda’s first big motorcycle-race win in the U.S.

April 28, 2021 — TORRANCE, Calif.

Following Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann at the age of 86, American Honda today honored the versatile racer.

A true Renaissance man, Mann was noted for his adaptability as a rider, and for the longevity of his professional motorcycle-racing career, which included charter membership in the exclusive Grand Slam Club (for riders who earned Grand National wins in road racing, short track, TT, half-mile and mile competition), two AMA Grand National Championships and a bronze medal for Team USA in the 1975 International Six Days Trial. According to Racer X Illustrated, Mann even scored a win at the first AMA-sanctioned professional motocross race. Those successes came with a variety of brands, but the Utah native’s primary tie with Honda centered on a single race—the 1970 Daytona 200.

It was Honda’s first factory effort in the legendary endurance event, with a four-rider project aboard CR750 machinery (the racing version of the now-iconic CB750 four-cylinder, which had started production just a year earlier). Conversely, Mann (then 35) had a long and relatively successful history at the race, though victory had eluded him to that point.

After launching from the front row of an all-star starting grid, Mann eventually secured the lead, then preserved the bike in the race’s latter stages to score a 10-second win over Gene Romero, with Don Castro third. In the process, Mann ran a record average race speed of 102.697 mph. It was Honda’s first AMA National Championship race win, and it established the CB750 at the top of the performance hierarchy. (Over four decades later, Motorcyclist magazine would name it the Bike of the Century.) As such, the victory was significant not only for Honda, but for its American subsidiary.

“For a Japanese company with its first, completely unproven big bike, it was hard to top that,” Bob Hansen, then American Honda’s National Service Manager, is quoted as saying in Aaron P. Frank’s book Honda Motorcycles.

“Hansen prepared the machine, and I rode it as best I could, just as I was contracted to do. That was it,” said the humble Mann in the same book.

Mann, who would back up the Daytona 200 win the following year aboard a BSA, was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America in 1993, and he is a charter member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

“Everyone at American Honda sends their heartfelt condolences to Dick Mann’s family, friends and fans,” said Bill Savino, Senior Manager of Customer Engagement at American Honda. “Dick tallied a number of accomplishments over the course of his long career, but he’ll always hold a special spot in our hearts for the role he played in proving that Honda motorcycles could perform with the very best.”

Dick Mann at Daytona in 1971 on his BSA road racer.

Mourning the first Honda US champion / MotoAmerica Superbike
by Eileen Curry from https://www.thewestonforum.com

The American motorsport world lost one of its first great champions. American Dick Mann died on Monday at the age of 86; He was an iconic character in the early Honda years.

Dick Mann was seen as a versatile racing driver who was quick to adapt to new conditions. His long career contained countless seasons in various categories of motorsport, all of which were easy to handle. Mann was a founding member of the exclusive “Grand Slam Club” in the USA, an organization that welcomed national winners in the fields of road, short track, tourist prize and drag races over the half-mile plus the full mile.

In 1975 he won a bronze medal with Team USA in a six-day international trial, and Mann won the AMA National Championship twice. Especially impressive: In AMA’s first-ever motocross race, the race driver emerged from Salt Lake City victorious.

The American competed for Honda at the Daytona 200 at the Daytona International Speedway in 1970 on the four-cylinder CB750. The 35-year-old surprisingly won his first Japanese factory outing in Daytona. Day to day, it made Honda a legend in American motorbike racing, and the manufacturer had never before been represented at an AMA event. Because he defeated GP star Mike Hailwood in that race, this success had an important place in his resume.

In 1971 he repeated the victory of Daytona over the Bosnian Serb Army. In total, Mann handled 240 AMA races, of which he won 24. At the age of 40, he ended his road racing career and returned to his trial roots. Until the 1990s, Mann regularly competed in races, and in 2006 he opened an exhibition in his honor entitled “Superman” in the American MotoGP Hall of Fame. During his career as a racing driver, he built motorcycle tires and other parts for off-road motorcycles.

Mann passed away on April 26, 2021 at the age of 86.

The weekend’s Spanish Grand Prix

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Lowes and Fernandez chasing big gains in Spain

The Elf Marc VDS Racing Team remains on the Iberian Peninsula to make the short trip across the border from Portimao to Jerez for this weekend’s Spanish Grand Prix.

The famous Circuito de Jerez-Angel Nieto hosted the Spanish and Andalusian rounds as part of a double-header that kicked off a heavily revamped European schedule last July.

Sam Lowes and Augusto Fernandez enjoyed a successful pre-season test in Jerez just a few weeks ago and both are confident they can play a prominent role in the 23-lap battle, which is scheduled to commence at 1220pm local time on Sunday.

Successive top six finishes, including a gritty ride to an outstanding fifth last time out in Portimao, have given Fernandez a huge injection of confidence heading into his home Grand Prix.

Fernandez finished 13th in both Jerez battles last season but the 4.4km track has special memories for the 23-year-old after he started on the front row and finished on the podium for the first time in his World Championship career in 2019.

“We are getting closer to where we need to be”

“I’m really excited to start the weekend in Jerez after the strong race in Portimao. I finished really close to the podium and I was in the front group for the whole race and that’s where I want to stay now. It seems like we are getting closer and closer to where we need to be, so hopefully we can continue to improve and fight for a top position again.”

Lowes is determined to reassert his authority on the 2021 title chase after a first corner crash meant the Briton left round three in Portugal empty-handed.

The Jerez track is the perfect place for Lowes to rediscover his winning touch after he took the chequered flag in first place back in 2016 and the 30-year-old was less than a second away from the podium in both races last summer.

“I’ve great memories of two strong races last season”

“Last year in Jerez, it was really nice for me because it felt like my first proper chance to work with the team after my shoulder injury meant I had to withdraw in Qatar. I’ve great memories of two strong races last season and I’m really looking forward to this weekend. We have tested in Jerez already this year and I felt strong. I’m disappointed with the mistake in Portugal but we are still in a very good situation in terms of the Championship. I’ve been very fast at the first three races and I feel relaxed coming into Jerez and I can’t wait to see what we can achieve this weekend.”

Vance & Hines and Hayden Gillim to Enter MotoAmerica’s 2021 King of the Baggers Series

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Santa Fe Springs CA – April 26, 2021 – The Vance & Hines Racing Team will return to the road courses for MotoAmerica’s three-race King of the Bagger series, leveraging the staff at the company’s new Racing Development Center (RDC) to build this year’s entry. Fielding one of the highest performance Harley-Davidson touring bikes ever assembled, the team is building off of their successful podium finish in the inaugural King of the Baggers race at Laguna Seca in 2020.

The Vance & Hines entry is a Harley-Davidson Electra Glide, one of the most popular motorcycles sold today. It features a 131-cubic-inch v-twin motor, managed by a Vance & Hines Fuelpak FP3 custom tuned map. Intake is through a Vance & Hines VO2 Cage Fighter and exhaust is a Vance & Hines Stainless Hi-Output 2-into 1 designed for the Harley-Davidson 131 cubic-inch motor.

The bagger rocket ship will be piloted once again by Hayden Gillim, whose got racing credentials in MotoAmerica, MotoGP, WERA and American Flat Track and has wins or championships in almost every class he’s ever raced. Gillim has a winning pedigree, too. He’s a cousin of Nicky, Roger and Tommy Hayden and hails from racing hotspot, Owensboro, Kentucky.

“America’s favorite motorcycle, great performance products and a top notch rider, racing doesn’t get better than that!” said company President Mike Kennedy. “Vance & Hines was born at a race track, so it’s natural that we’d be in the series demonstrating the talent we have at our RDC and the great performance products we create.”

The MotoAmerica’s Mission Foods King of the Baggers kicks off with a weekend event at Road Atlanta, April 30 through May 2, followed by events at Road America in Wisconsin in June and Laguna Seca in California in July.

Website: https://vanceandhines.com/king-of-the-baggers

Watch the Preview Video:

 

AHDRA Racing Opens at the Closing of Atlanta Dragway

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The AHDRA All-American motorcycle drag racing series gave Atlanta Dragway a flaming, thundering, nitro Harley send-off, as the AHDRA opened its 2021 campaign at the soon-to-be-razed Commerce, Georgia speed facility on April 17-18.

Click Here to Read all the action that happened and the results on Bikernet.

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Pirelli Unveils 2021 RYAO Program at Upcoming CCS/ASRA Events

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The program, which will kick off at New Jersey Motorsports Park on April 24-25, will consist of 11 events and encourages Pirelli-equipped riders to compete in multiple classes.

Pirelli Tire North America has unveiled its 2021 RYAO program that will take place at upcoming Championship Cup Series (CCS) and American Sportbike Racing (ASRA) events throughout the nation. The program, which will kick off at New Jersey Motorsports Park on April 24-25, will consist of 11 events and encourages Pirelli-equipped riders to compete in multiple classes. Riders on Pirelli race compound tires who register to compete in one class will be eligible to race in as many additional classes as they wish with no extra registration fees.

“The RYAO program was really positive for us last year and a challenge that was well received by riders across North America,” said Oscar Solis, road racing manager, Pirelli. “We’ve been able to expand the program in 2021, which is something we’re excited about. We look forward to seeing more riders and their DIABLO™ Superbike slicks join us in the challenge. Every racer wants to get in as many laps as possible on the weekend and this allows them do that by entering as many races they are eligible for while only paying a low fixed entry fee.”

For each of the events, Pirelli’s local trackside vendor will have certificates for Pirelli riders when they register. There will be 50 certificates available per event that can be used for either pre-entry or post-entry and they will be good for regular sprint and twin sprint classes. Certificates will not be eligible for the team challenge or practice day.

As an additional incentive, Pirelli will be keeping track of all Pirelli-equipped riders and the points that they accumulate each race weekend. The rider who earns the most points at the end of each weekend will receive a set of Pirelli racing slicks at no charge.

2021 Pirelli RYAO Events in Conjunction with CCS/ASRA

April 24-25: New Jersey Motorsports Park (vendor – Metric Devil Moto)
June 12-13: Summit Point Raceway (vendor – Metric Devil Moto)
Round TBD
July 31-August 1: Blackhawk Farms Raceway (vendor – Farrell Performance)
July 31-August 1: North Carolina Bike (vendor – Podium Motorsports)
August 21-22: Roebling Road Raceway (vendor – Podium Motorsports)
August 21-22: Autobahn Speedway (vendor – Farrell Performance)
September 4-5: New Jersey Motorsports Park (vendor – Metric Devil Moto)
September 17-19: Blackhawk Farms Raceway (vendor – Farrell Performance)
Round TBD
December 4-5: Homestead International Speedway (vendor – Mark Tenn Motorsports)

To learn more about how to get your RYAO registration certificate, contact your Pirelli local trackside vendor listed above.

For more information about the complete line of Pirelli motorcycle tires, please visit Pirelli.com

RiMS: A New Bike Racing Simulation Game

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Become more than just a rider in RiMS Racing!

RiMS sounds like a really exciting project for all fans of motorcycling sports, boasting a new addition to the simulation genre. RaceWard and Nacon partnering together to deliver a brand new Bike Racing Sim coming out on all gaming platforms this summer.

NACON and RaceWard Studio are pleased to unveil a new video for RiMS Racing, a motorcycling video game with a unique concept of combining mechanics and riding. Because the race is not won purely on the track! NACON who has become a key player in racing games publishing over the last few years will make one more announcement in the upcoming days.

By making mechanics a central part of the game, RiMS Racing provides a unique simulation experience requiring players to combine both engineering and riding skills. Using an innovative mechanics management system, you can optimize every part of your motorbike down to the smallest component. With RiMS Racing, the Italian studio RaceWard sets a new standard for realism and customization options.

Over 500 official spare parts available and more than 200 official items of equipment for the rider are perfectly recreated in the game and realistically simulated even down to how each can wear down, Just like a real rider, you can analyze the status of your motorbike in real time to perfect your set-up. From brake disc temperature and tyre pressure to suspension behaviour and electronics, the ultra-realistic and precise physics of RiMS Racing recreates every hazard of the race.

You start your adventure by choosing a motorbike from eight of the most powerful European and Japanese models, recreated with unparalleled accuracy thanks to tight collaboration with each manufacturer. The video features the MV Agusta F4 RC and its precision mechanics. This four-cylinder bike with over 200 horsepower is MV Agusta’s flagship model and is fitted with an Ohlins TTX 36 shock absorber, Brembo radial braking system and fairing made primarily of carbon. All these components are reproduced in the finest detail in RiMS Racing.

Another iconic motorcycle that players will love riding is the Ducati Panigale V4 R. With this masterpiece from Ducati, the Italian manufacturer of sport-inspired motorcycles characterized by high-performance engines, innovative design and cutting-edge technology, every detail has been designed specifically for racing: aerodynamics, the chassis, performance, even the mesmerizing sound of its engine.

Silverstone, Laguna Seca, Suzuka, Nürburgring, Paul Ricard… Travel the world and enjoy thrilling races on 10 faithfully recreated official circuits. For those who prefer roads, five routes in the stunning landscapes of the United States, Norway, Australia, Spain and Italy have been recreated for a different racing experience on two wheels!

RiMS Racing will be available on August 19, 2021 on PlayStation®4, PlayStation®5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X|S, and PC.

A Nintendo Switch™ version of the game will be released at a later date.

Watch the new Video Trailer for RiMS Racing: