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Ducati to Make Electric Motorcycle for MotoE World Cup

By General Posts

From Ducati Racing Museum – Troy Bayliss

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati to Make Electric Motorcycle for MotoE World Cup, Road Machines to Follow.

To date, despite the advances electric mobility is making in the world of motorcycles, there is only one major bike maker that has embraced electric drivetrains: Harley-Davidson, with its LiveWire. But soon, there will be more, and Ducati seems to be keen on becoming the next one.

The Italian company announced this week it is officially entering the electric motorcycle segment, but it will not be doing so with a bike that can be sold to the general public. Instead, the Borgo Panigale manufacturer will become the sole official supplier of motorcycles for the electric class of the MotoGP World Championship, the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup.

The deal between Ducati and the organizers of the competition, Dorna Sports, will come into effect in 2023 and will run through 2026. That means we’ll probably have to wait some more before we get to see official details and images of the electric bike, but Ducati tried to give us a glimpse of that by releasing a teaser rendering of the two-wheeler (main pic of this piece).

What’s more important is that Ducati promises the MotoE bike will influence “the evolution of the product range,” hinting the electric drive is something now under consideration for the general public.

“The goal is to study how to produce, as soon as the technology allows, a Ducati electric vehicle that is sporty, light, thrilling and able to satisfy all enthusiasts,” the Italians promised.

MotoE came into existence in 2019 and is presently using Energica Ego Corsa motorcycles. Sadly, the series became famous not for the achievements of these electric machines, but on account of a fire back in 2019 that destroyed all the motorcycles before racing could get going at Jerez.

Ducati promises to share the story of this new bike’s development throughout 2022, through means that are yet to be announced.

PRESS RELEASE FROM DUCATI

21 OCTOBER 2021
Ducati is thrilled to announce the beginning of its electric era: starting from the 2023 season it will be the sole official supplier of motorcycles for the FIM Enel MotoE™ World Cup, the electric class of the MotoGP™ World Championship.

The agreement signed with Dorna Sports, organizer and promoter of the most important international two-wheel racing championships, lasts until 2026 and will therefore cover four editions of the MotoE World Cup.

This is a historic step for the Borgo Panigale motorcycle manufacturer which, following its custom of using racing competition as a laboratory for technologies and solutions that then become reality for all motorcyclists, enters the world of electric bikes starting from the sportiest sector, that of the electric class of the MotoGP World Championship.

The goal is to develop expertise and technologies in a constantly evolving world such as the electric one, through an experience familiar to the company like that of racing competition. This has been a consolidated tradition for the Borgo Panigale company starting from the Ducati 851, which inaugurated the trend of Ducati road sports bikes by revolutionizing the concept with its innovative two-cylinder water-cooled engine, electronic fuel injection and the new twin-shaft, four-valve heads, deriving from the Ducati 748 IE bike that made its debut in endurance races at Le Castellet in 1986.

Since then, this endless transfer of expertise has always taken place from the Superbike World Championships, in which Ducati has participated since the first edition in 1988, and from MotoGP, in which Ducati is the only non-Japanese motorcycle manufacturer to have won a World Championship.

The crossover is also evident in the most recent and prestigious products of the Borgo Panigale manufacturer: the V4 engine of the Panigale is in fact strictly derived in its entire construction philosophy – from the bore and stroke measurements to the counter-rotating crankshaft – from the engine that debuted on the Desmosedici GP in 2015. The V4 Granturismo that equips the new Multistrada V4 was then derived from the Panigale engine. All the vehicle control software is also directly derived from those developed in the racing world. Not to mention the field of aerodynamics.

The technological solutions developed in the world of racing, transferred to the products that make up the range, allow Ducati to offer its enthusiasts extremely high-performance and fun-to-ride motorcycles. The FIM Enel MotoE Championship will also be no exception in this regard and will allow the Company to develop the best technologies and test methodologies applied to sporty, light and powerful electric motorcycles.

At the same time, the fact that Ducati forms part of the Volkswagen Group, which has made electric mobility an essential element of its 2030 “New Auto” strategy, represents the best prerequisite for an extraordinary exchange of expertise in the field of electric powertrains.

The announcement of the agreement was made during a joint press conference in the press room of the Misano World Circuit ‘Marco Simoncelli’ on the eve of the Made in Italy and Emilia-Romagna Grand Prix, the third to last round of the 2021 MotoGP World Championship. Carmelo Ezpeleta, CEO Dorna Sports, and Claudio Domenicali, CEO Ducati Motor Holding, were both present.

Claudio Domenicali, CEO of Ducati Motor Holding: “We are proud of this agreement because, like all the first times, it represents a historic moment for our company. Ducati is always projected towards the future and every time it enters a new world, it does so to create the best performing product possible. This agreement comes at the right time for Ducati, which has been studying the situation of electric powertrains for years, because it will allow us to experiment in a well-known and controlled field like that of racing competition. We will work to make available to all participants of the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup electric bikes that are high-performance and characterized by lightness. It is precisely on weight, a fundamental element of sports bikes, that the greatest challenge will be played out. Lightness has always been in Ducati’s DNA and thanks to the technology and chemistry of the batteries that are evolving rapidly we are convinced that we can obtain an excellent result. We test our innovations and our futuristic technological solutions on circuits all over the world and then make exciting and desirable products available to Ducatisti. I am convinced that once again we will build on the experiences we have had in the world of racing competition to transfer them and apply them also on production bikes.”

Carmelo Ezpeleta, CEO Dorna Sports: “We are very proud to announce Ducati as the new, single manufacturer for the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup. With their incredible racing history, it is an honour to welcome this commitment from one of the best-known manufacturers in the paddock and to take on this new challenge together. We are eager to see what the future has in store and continue to watch this technology develop and grow, with the MotoGP paddock and MotoE continuing to drive innovation and evolution in the motorcycling industry – at the same time as creating an incredible on-track spectacle.”

This first step of Ducati in the world of electric bikes will also have an influence on the evolution of the product range. Now, the most important challenges in this field remain those of the size, weight, autonomy of the batteries and the availability of charging networks. Ducati’s experience in the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup will be a fundamental support for product R&D, together with the physiological evolution of technology and chemistry. The goal is to study how to produce, as soon as the technology allows, a Ducati electric vehicle that is sporty, light, thrilling and able to satisfy all enthusiasts.

A new chapter of the FIM Enel MotoE Word Cup is closer than ever. And that of Ducati too.

During 2022, various events and collective moments will allow all fans to discover the development of the project step by step.

Sons of Speed 2021 Event Report with Photos

By General Posts

Billy Lane at Finish Line – Chris Callen Flagman

Sons of Speed – Biketoberfest 2021 by Dmac

Billy Lane Rocks the Vintage Banked Motorcycle Racing World Once More

2021 has turned out to be the year of the “Covid Hangover!”

Many lives have been permanently changed, but Sons of Speed has not skipped a beat and has returned to the New Smyrna Speedway breathing life into the asphalt, 23 degree banked, ½ mile track.

Originally started in 2017 by Billy Lane of Choppers, inc., the race has been held at both New Smyrna Speedway and at the Pappy Hoel Campground Racetrack, in Sturgis, South Dakota.

Click Here To Read the Race Report and Photos only on Bikernet.com

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Launch of Honda CB750 & Dick Mann at AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race

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by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

On Twitter by Honda Powersports: Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann, American Honda sends its heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and fans. Mann’s 1970 Daytona 200 win aboard the CR750 (the racing version of the CB750 four-cylinder) was momentous in Honda’s history Thank you, Dick, and godspeed.

The Honda CB750 Changed the Way Motorcycles Were Made, Raced and Sold

Though now highly prized for their potential as re-imagined cafe racer machines, the venerable Honda CB750 was – back in its infancy – the bike that changed the game.

So how did it happen that the Japanese took over the worldwide motorcycle manufacturing industry? To a large extent, it came down to the creation of a single model.

With five consecutive championship titles under their belts, Honda decided to withdraw from the World GP circuit in 1967 with a plan to develop high-performance consumer motorcycles at the forefront of their vision.

While Honda exported more than half of their output back in the mid-’60s, they didn’t make a large-displacement sport bike model which would appeal to the hardcore rider in the U.S.

And it’s not like the honchos at Honda failed to notice that glaring deficiency. Sales of Honda motorcycles in America were flagging in 1966, and the company knew a brand-new worldview was in order. While the company had created the Dream CB450 in 1965, they were still being outgunned by big bikes from other makers. The CB450 sold well, but for the vast majority of American riders, it just didn’t have the requisite zing and bottom-end torque they craved.

What really drove Yoshiro Harada, the head of Honda product development at the time, was hearing the news that Britain’s Triumph was deep in the development process of a high-performance, 3-cylinder 750 cc engine. With the ante thus upped, Honda laid out plans to compete by creating their own 750 cc engine, which would lay down 67 horsepower to overtake the juice you could get from the 66-horsepower Harley-Davidson’s 1300 and the proposed Triumph Triple.

Though Honda was already the industry’s leading maker of motorcycles (due in no small part to the success of the most popular motorcycle in history, the Super Cub), the introduction of the CB750 sought to become the world’s top manufacturer of quality motorcycles as well. They were up against some formidable competition as comparable models from Triumph, BMW, and Harley were already on the road.

So what were the targets? Honda wanted to make a long-range, high-speed touring machine, so they turned to science for answers in the form of a newly-minted paradigm dubbed “ergonomics.”

Those targets included: Stability at highway cruising speeds, a reliable and cooled braking system that would handle frequent rapid decelerations from high speed, minimal vibration, and noise to fight rider fatigue on long hauls with a rider position which complimented the smoother power plant, lights and instruments which were large, gauges which were easy to read, easy maintenance and servicing for all the various modules of the bike and the use of top-quality materials and production techniques.

Perhaps the most significant innovation for Honda’s showpiece bike? The adoption of disc brakes. While that design decision proved costly and time-consuming, it was also a stroke of brilliance and one which made the CB750 a favorite of the serious riding set.

Released to the U.S. public in January 1969, the announcement of the new bike’s retail price, $1,495, was met with stunned silence at a dealer meeting in Nevada. The other shoe had officially dropped. Large-displacement bikes were selling at that time for between $2,800 and $4,000, and the 2,000 dealers on hand for the announcement exploded into applause when they recovered their wits.

And they had good cause for their optimism. The CB750 immediately commanded a premium sales price in dealer showrooms of between $1,800 and $2,000 to get one out the door.

Featuring an integrated crankshaft and metal bearing to replace the split-type, press-fit crankshaft with a needle bearing used in previous Honda motors, the CB750 was a great leap forward in design as well as price.

As great as this new machine was, the company initially had a serious problem. They could only manage to make something like five bikes a day, and that was clearly not enough to meet the demand for what had become a major hit with the market. Production was pushed to 25 units per day and then to 100 units, but that still left an enormous pile of backorders building up under and an entirely expected sales landslide.

It became clear that the production of the original sand-molded crankcases would never meet the rate requirements of mass production, so the factory switched over to producing crankcases of a metal, die-cast construction. The bikes were such a hit with the riding public that the production of engines and chassis was moved to a Suzuki factory in mid-1971. The “sandcast” CB750 models are now fetching enormous prices from collectors of up to ten and fifteen times higher than their new-off-the-line premium price back in the day.

But what really made the bikes a smash hit with the public?

Performance. Pure and dependable performance.

The factory racing team at Honda R&D took the new machines to compete at a 10-Hour Endurance Race in August 1969 to coincide with the commercial launch of the big bike, and Honda dominated, notching one-two finishes with the teams of Morio Sumiya and Tetsuya Hishiki taking first place and Yoichi Oguma and Minoru Sato pulling in a close second.

The deal was done when rider Dick Mann blew away the field on his CR750 during the AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race run during March 1970. The field was now wide open for large-displacement Japanese bikes, and in 1972, Kawasaki launched the 900cc ZI to compete on the big-bike stage…and the rest is, as they say, history.

Champions Strut at the XDA Season Finale

By General Posts

Champions Strut at the XDA Season Finale

XDA’s fourth season has been another success with the 29th annual DME Racing Fall Nationals, crowning twelve champions at Maryland International Raceway (MDIR). 

The season featured top-tier motorcycle drag racing action that can’t be seen anywhere else. And while the on-track action was hot, the racers’ payouts were hotter, with over $560,000 for the year and $131,000 in contingency offerings.

The 2021 season also saw records broken and performance barriers pushed to new levels. And because of the loyal XDA racers and fans, the series continued to grow and thrive during a time that is unpredictable month to month. XDA is looking forward to another successful season next year with their racing family.

The 2022 XDA season will begin where 2021 ended, at the world-renown Maryland International Raceway on April 22-24 for the Platinum Fleet Repair Spring Nationals. Mark your 2022 calendars now to race with the quickest and fastest sanction in the country!

April 22-24 / PFR Spring Nationals / MDIR
May 20-22 / MTC Engineering Summer Nationals / VMP
June 17-19 / FuelTech Superbike Showdown / MDIR
July 22-24 / WPGC Bike Fest / MDIR
August 26-28 / Bike Bash / VMP
September 23-25 / DME Racing Fall Nationals / MDIR

Orient Express Racing Pro Street
Winner – Rodney Williford / Runner-up – Jordan Haase
Champion – Rodney Williford

The Orient Express Pro Street class is the most exciting class to watch in all of motorcycle drag racing. With no wheelie bars, these 6-second, 230+mph motorcycles are launching like missiles as their riders fight to keep them straight through the quarter mile. This past weekend delivered numerous personal improvements among the class.

Rodney Williford came into the DME Racing Fall Nationals with the championship title already locked down. He went right to work taking the number one qualifying spot with a 6.482, followed by Greg Wallace’s personal best ET of 6.484. This makes Wallace the eleventh rider to enter the forties in Pro Street.

Curtis Brown, who is in his rookie season, ran a 6.760 in qualifying to make a big move down the Pro Street GOAT list. Midwest racer Jamie Hendricks also improved to a 7.136. And Jason Dunigan ran the top speed of the event in qualifying at 230.29 mph.

Rudy Sanzoterra with Quicktime Motorsports has been making big moves this season in his program and made the trip to his first XDA race of the season. Despite losing in round one, he ran his personal best of 6.688 to make him the twenty-fifth rider ever to enter the sixties in Pro Street. The XDA looks forward to seeing his team back next season.

In round one, Caleb Holt ran the quickest of the session at 6.499 to take a win over Curtis Brown. Like Sanzoterra, Brown also ran his personal best on a losing round at 6.735.

James Waugh would also improve his personal best in round one, winning against Ryan Bonitatis with a 6.562 making him the eighteenth rider to enter the fifties.

Problems for Greg Wallace in round one caused an upset as the fifteenth qualifier, Brad Christian, took the win over him, running a 7.202.

Also taking wins in the round were Williford 6.638, Ryan Hable 6.704, Justin Shakir 6.583, Jordan Haase 6.643, and Jason Dunigan 6.617.

In round two, the performance continued as Williford 6.503, Holt 6.542, Haase 7.103, and Dunigan 6.587 all took wins.

In the semi-final, Jordan Haase made a solo pass when Dunigan’s cam sensor broke, and he could not get the bike to fire in the water box. This sent Haase to his first final round appearance this season. Williford also took a win with a 6.488 over Holt’s 6.582.

If Jordan Haase is in the final, Williford is always in the other lane. With John Gover tuning, Haase was ready to lay down his best number of the weekend and finally get a win over Williford. Haase got the starting line advantage with a .032 reaction time to Williford’s .079. Haase gave his best effort with a 6.644, but it was no match for the run that everyone had been waiting for Williford to run all season, a 6.383 at 229.66 mph. With this pass, Williford won the race and became the third rider to enter the thirties, and the first person to ever run thirties on a Hayabusa.

With the XDA season complete, the top ten XDA Pro Street racers will focus on their $5,000 bonus race. The 25th annual Haltech World Cup Finals presented by Wiseco on November 3-7 will host the fourth annual Pro Street Shootout sponsored by Platinum General Services.

This will be the largest event that Pro Street has ever raced at, competing in front of 40,000+ fans. Ten racers will show up, but only eight will make it to the show on Sunday! The ten racers that will strive to qualify for the eight-bike field are Rodney Williford, Justin Shakir, Jason Dunigan, Greg Wallace, Jordan Haase, Ryan Hable, Kenny Brewer, Curtis Brown, Ryan Bonitatis, and Darion Payne.

DME Racing Real Street
Winner – Trevor Schnitz / Runner-up – Mark Hylton
Champion – Mark Hylton

On Friday, you could feel the steam from the DME Racing Real Street pressure cooker as both David Stewart and Mark Hylton waited to start qualifying. With only a round of points separating them from a championship, the pressure was written all over their faces.

In qualifying Spencer Claycomb took the top spot with a 7.572, followed by Hylton’s 7.591. Stewart qualified seventh with a 7.693 at the bottom half of the field, putting him at a disadvantage for round one.

In round one, Ralphie Navarro would run a 7.613 to take out David Stewart’s 7.770 pass and end his hopes of a championship. Mark Hylton would win over Bud Harrod to cement his 2021 title. You could see the relief on Hylton’s team as they were able to switch gears and happily focus on an event win. Rickey Gadson won over Chad Sosnowski 7.751 to 7.724, and Trevor Schnitz won over Jovi Barnes.

In round two, Navarro and Schnitz gave us some action with a side-by-side nail biter. Schnitz had the starting line advantage with a.042 reaction time to Navarro’s .108. Schnitz was quickly in front of Navarro, but Navarro kept gaining, and by the eighth mile, they were side-by-side. Even from the top of the grandstands, you could not tell who was crossing the finish line first; they were that close. When the boards lit up, it was a 7.668 to a 7.669 in favor of Schnitz. Gadson and Hylton also took wins that round on solo passes.

Schnitz’s round two win earned him a bye to the final. The new champ, Mark Hylton, took an easy victory against Gadson, who broke on the starting line.

Headed to the final, this would be Schnitz’s second final round appearance this season and the second time facing Hylton. Schnitz once again took a slight starting line advantage with a .042 to Hylton’s .046. Both riders took off side-by-side until about the eighth mile when Hylton’s Hayabusa lost power, and Schnitz pulled away from him. When Schnitz’s win light came on, it made the sixteen-year-old the youngest winner in XDA history. It must be in the genes.

Real Street will return for the 2022 motorcycle drag racing season. If you are looking to enter the Pro ranks, now is the time to start preparing for next year.

MaxxECU Pro Xtreme
Winner – John Collins / Runner-up – Chris Garner-Jones
Champion – Chris Garner-Jones

Chris Garner-Jones clinched the 2021 MaxxECU Pro Xtreme championship with a 159 point lead over the class. Jones also set the ET record earlier this season to an astounding 3.897.

Garner-Jones qualified number one with a 3.949 followed by his rival John Collins with a 3.95. At the DME Racing Fall Nationals, these two riders would find themselves in the opposing lanes for the fourth final this season. Collins is the only rider Garner-Jones has lost to all season.

In round one, Bobby Lovingood was broke, giving Garner-Jones an easy pass to the next round. Collins bested Chris Cutsinger with a 4.011 to a 4.103. And Rob Garcia ran the only three-second pass of eliminations with a 3.984 to win over Travis Davis.

Garner-Jones broke the beams in the semi-final with an earned bye, and Garcia went red with a -.024 against Collins.

Garner-Jones’ bike jumped out of gear during qualifying, slamming him into the tank hard, giving him some pain around his ribs. This happened again during round one of eliminations. Also, during a pass, he went to push down on the left foot peg when his foot slipped, slamming it to the pavement at about 170mph. The team later found the reason the bike was being so difficult; the wheelie bars had broken.

When the final round came around, he was still in pain and was concerned about safely riding the bike. And add to that, the PDRA race this weekend was coming up, and he would need to heal up if he wanted a shot at their championship. He ultimately decided to forfeit the round, giving Collins his second win this season.

MaxxECU Pro Xtreme is presented by Ace Mechanical, Billy Vose Racing, Dallas Flat Glass, Dunigan Racing, DME Racing, Grothus Dragbikes, Harley Haul, Rob Bush Motorsports, Robinson Industries, Schnitz Racing, Timblin Chassis, and Worldwide Bearings.

HTP Performance Super Stock
Winner – David Fondon / Runner-up – Mike Davis
2021 Champion – David Fondon

The HTP Performance Super Stock season finished just as it started. David Fondon clinched the championship mid-season and finished with a staggering 591 point lead over the class. Fondon won every event this season except for the WPGC Bike Fest that Jeremey Teasley claimed.

Insert image: 2021_1014_xda_ss_david_fondon.jpg

This past weekend Fondon took the number one qualifying position with an 8.808, followed by rival Mike Davis with an 8.861. Fondon and Davis found each other in the finals at the season opening PFR Spring Nationals, where Fondon took a win over Davis.

This past weekend their Kawasaki ZX-14’s found each other in opposing lanes for the final round once again. Fondon had the starting line advantage with a .098 reaction to Davis’ .132. Davis gave Fondon a fight to the finish line, but he didn’t have enough to overpower the quicker 8.833 of Fondon to his 8.946.

This makes two championships in a row for David Fondon. For 2022, will he be back in Super Stock again, or will he move up to Real Street or Pro Street to compete with the Big Dogs?

Vance & Hines 4.60
Winner – Michael Thyen / Runner-up – Tyler Cammock
2021 Champion – Ronald Procopio

The 2020 Vance & Hines 4.60 Champion continues his reign with back-to-back championships. Without taking a win this season, Ronald Procopio accumulated enough points from rounds won over the seven-race series to be the first consecutive champion in the class. This is also Procopio’s third Vance & Hines 4.60 career championship.

Procopio qualified number one at the DME Racing Fall Nationals with a perfect 4.600 over thirty-five competitors. He was taken out in round two by the two-time class champion Tyler Cammock. Cammock then went on to win two more rounds against Mac McAdams and Wes Hawkins before reaching the final round.

The competition was on point in Vance & Hines 4.60 that in all five rounds of competition, there was only one red light. Michael Thyen has only entered the class three times this season, but three times was the charm as he took wins against Curtis Griggs, Eran Pielert, Michael Stewart, and Chase Van Sant on his way to the final round against Cammock.

Thyen cut his best light of the day in the final with a .004 for the starting line advantage over Cammock’s .031. The light would earn him a hole shot win as Cammock ran a 4.611 to Thyen’s 4.622 pass.

The Vance & Hines 4.60 class continues to grow each year; mark your 2022 calendars now and race with the best competitors in the country.

HTP Performance Grudge
HTP Performance Grudge racers filled the lanes Saturday night with an impressive ninety-six ‘No Time’ motorcycles. Chris Moore returned with Melania looking for action in Boosted Bulls against the latest DME Racing entry piloted by multi-time record holder Frankie Stotz. The DME team had their money on the table, and they were ready to play. But once again, when it came time to do the deed, Melania was unable to make the call.

APE Nitrous Bulls
Winner – Ray Lee / Lil Ugly
Runner-up – Russell Dennison / Jimmy Hendricks
2021 Champion – Russell Dennison / Jimmy Hendricks

The APE Nitrous Bulls championship was locked in before the DME Racing Fall Nationals, with Russell Dennison on ‘Jimmy Hendricks’ claiming his first Bulls title.

In round one, Ray Lee on ‘Lil Ugly’ couldn’t be touched by Matt Dozier on ‘Kill shot’ as he flew past him. While fast, Alex Williams on ‘Master Blaster’ didn’t need to be, as Billy Vose on ‘Red Bull’ lost his wings right off the starting line. The Champ, Dennison, had an earned bye.

In the semi-final, Dennison executed another flawless pass as Williams struggled to keep his power on the track as it attempted to take flight off the starting line. And Lee had an earned bye to the final.

It got a little ugly in the final round when ‘Jimmy Hendricks’ lost his tune and let Ray Lee on ‘Lil Ugly’ get his first XDA win.

3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls
Winner – Michael Thyen / The Prisoner
Runner-up – David Page / Pickin’ Pockets
2021 Champion – David Page / Pickin’ Pockets

3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls was an action-packed night as it came down to the wire to determine the championship. 2020 class champion David Page had a three-point lead, but those three points would not be a lot of help when it comes to round wins. David Martin was on his heels and wanted the title just as much as Page.

In round one, both riders dominated their competition for wins. Page won against ‘Tick Toc’ to earn a bye to the final. In the semi-final Martin on ‘Unknown’ faced Michael Thyen on ‘The Prisoner.’ Martin left the starting line with ample power but was fighting to keep the front wheel down as ‘The Prisoner’ crept past him for the win.

With Martin out and Page going to the final, he would officially secure the 2021 3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls championship despite the outcome of the final round.

The final was a slugfest between these two monsters, but Thyen got the drop on the pocket picker to secure a win and spot in the top five in the championship points. Page was still smiling with a 2x Monster Bulls Champion title to his name despite taking an event loss.

Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls
2021 Champion – Cody Lowe / Codeine

Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls was cut short on Saturday night when rain moved in before the final round at Midnight. Despite not crowning a winner, the Bulls still put on action-packed show with thirteen grudge racers vying for a win.

Duane Jackson was leading the points coming in the finals with Geoff Godfrey and Cody Lowe on his tail as they were both in contention for the title as well. Godfrey lost to Kyron Drake on ‘Drive By,’ taking him out of the running in round one. Lowe on ‘Codeine’ snatched a win light from Jordan McDougald’s ‘Quick Money’ to stay alive for another round.

In round two, Lowe would face Jackson on ‘Miss Behavin’ for a race that would determine Jackson’s championship fate. The two literbikes rolled into the beams, and when the yellow bulbs flashed, both bikes shot out like rockets side-by-side. Lowe was on a nonstop flight to the finish line while Jackson’s bike wouldn’t behave, forcing him to abort the pass as it quickly headed toward the wall. When Lowe’s win light came on, he was officially declared the Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls champion.

Lowe would take out Drake in the semi-final while Deshon Jones on ‘Mae Jean’ drove past Matt Dozier on ‘Tucci’ for a win. After the semi-round, the rain came, and the pot was split with no winner declared.

1 Stop Speed 5.60
Winner – Rico Brown / Runner-up – Jeff Stahl
2021 Champion – Dustin Lee

Dustin Lee secured the 1 Stop Speed 5.60 Championship title for a second time before he even rolled into MDIR last week. With the championship on lock, Lee was able to focus on win lights all weekend.

Kenny Webster earned the top qualifying spot on Saturday with a 5.603. Webster earned a first-round bye. However, he lost in the second round after breaking out with a 5.587 against Dustin Davis.

Jeff Stahl qualified with a 5.682 and turned on five win lights before getting to the final. Stahl’s average light of the weekend in 1 Stop Speed 5.60 was .330, making him a contender in the final.

On the other side of the ladder Rico Brown, who took a runner-up finish at the Bike Brawl, was on a mission to get to the winner’s circle. He was running consistently and turning on win lights every round.

As he turned the win light on against Duane Jackson in round four, Brown’s bike washed out from underneath him, sending him to the asphalt as his 2008 Hayabusa slid down the track. Brown was right up and walking around like it was just another tackle on the football field. His bike did not suffer any significant damage, and he was right back in the lanes for the semi-final, where another win light would send him to face Stahl.

In the final, Brown cut his best light of day with a .015 to Stahl’s .098, Brown had the starting line advantage, but Stahl would be too eager for the finish line and break out with a 5.553; sending Brown to his first 1 Stop Speed 5.60 win! And that’s what we call a comeback.

Mickey Thompson Tires Top Sportsman
Winner – John James / Runner-up – Pablo Gonzalez
2021 Champion – Bobby Holland

In Mickey Thompson Top Tires Sportsman, only thirty-two riders would qualify for the quickest bracket class in XDA. Bill Maturo Jr. would take the top qualifying spot with a 7.531, while Ohio racer Kevin Adams would round out the field in the thirty-second position with an 8.190 ET.

In round one of competition, points leader Jeffrey Santin lost with a -.001 red light to Michael Daddio, thus taking him out of championship contention. The top points leaders in contention also took first-round losses, except for the number two in points, Bobby Holland. Holland’s first-round win was enough to earn the 2021 Championship.

Philadelphia racer John James would win four rounds to face Pablo Gonzalez in the final. James had the better reaction time average than Gonzalez in the previous four rounds of competition. In the final, James would cut a .057 light to Gonzalez’s .073. The two racers barreled down the MDIR quarter-mile with eyes on each other as they approached the finish line side-by-side. Gonzalez misjudged his speed by a margin of two inches and broke out with a 7.547 on a 7.55 dial. James, with the win, ran an 8.014 on an 8.00 dial; this run is the definition of a photo finish.

MPS Racing Pro ET
Winner – Pablo Gonzalez
2021 Champion – Jeffrey Santin

The XDA staging lanes were brimming with MPS Racing Pro ET bikes as 189 of the best bracket racers on the east coast were looking for green lights. It took nine rounds of competition to get down to the final race of the weekend.

Jeffrey Santin came into the event with a slim lead on the class, and when he took a fourth-round loss, the potential of losing the championship became real. Dustin Lee, who was number two in points, went on to win the next two rounds. And with each win light, the drama ramped up; you could feel the seriousness of the situation in the air.

In round seven, Lee faced Pablo Gonzalez, and the winner of that round would have a bye to the final. And if Dustin Lee made it into the final and won, it would be Game Over for Santin. But Gonzalez put an end to the drama taking out Lee to secure Santin’s first XDA championship.

The season’s final race featured a stout $10K payout to the winner with the allowance of double entries, thus giving racers with multiple bikes two chances to win. And with this, for the first time in XDA’s history, one rider would have to face himself in the final. Gonzalez took his pair of Hayabusa’s to a ninth-round final and chose his 2005 Hayabusa to make the final lap down the track for the 2021 XDA season.

Brock’s Performance Street ET
Winner – Bubba Driscoll / Runner-up – Barry Purnell
2021 Champion – Derrick Milbourne

Going into the DME Racing Fall Nationals, 2020 class champion Derrick Milbourne had a healthy points lead in Brock’s Performance Street ET. His most significant threat to the championship, Mark Blake, took a first-round loss; and that sealed it for Milbourne to secure back-to-back championships.

Bubba Driscoll and Barry Purnell both won six rounds of competition to make it to the final. However, both racers opted not to race each other. With a rain delay holding up action on the track, Driscoll and Purnell decided they didn’t want to wait and flipped a coin in the lanes to determine a winner. Driscoll got the right side of the coin.

VooDoo Components Bracket Bash
Winner – Dustin Lee / Runner-up – Chris Sulkowski

On Saturday, 137 racers entered the VooDoo Components Bracket Bash for a chance at the $4,500 class payout. XDA multi-champion Dustin Lee made it look easy as he chopped the tree round after round. Lee not only had a perfect reaction time one round, his average reaction time over eight rounds was .024. In the final, Lee met Chris Sulkowski. Sulkowski took a first-round loss and bought back in, winning six more rounds to earn a lane in the final against Lee. However, luck would not go his way as a mechanical problem would make him a no-show for the final, sending Lee to another winner circle.

Hard Times Parts & Service Gambler’s Race
Winner – Boyd Mathis / Runner-up – Mike Schulz

The Friday night Hard Times Parts & Service Gambler’s race was at capacity with sixty-four sportsman competitors looking to start the weekend with a $4,000 payout. Boyd Mathias on his 2008 Suzuki Hayabusa was an intimidating competitor as four of his six competitors went red against him. He faced Mike Schulz, who cut a better light for a starting line advantage in the final. But Schulz would lose power as Mathis powered by him for his sixth win light of the night and first payout of the weekend.

Once again, congratulations to all our race winners, record breakers, champions, and every single racer as well as all the family and friends that came out to support this season’s events. We look forward to your support in 2022 as the series continues to evolve.

Don’t miss a weekend of racing with the quickest and fastest motorcycle drag racing sanction in the country; put XDA on your 2022 calendar now!

Visit www.xdaracing.com for event information, class rules, schedule, and more.

About XDA Racing
The Xtreme Dragbike Association (XDA) is an east coast motorcycle drag racing series with 700+ motorcycle racers competing at each event. Every XDA event hosts professional classes, sportsman classes, grudge racing and a vendor midway. Lifestyle activities such as bike shows, bikini contests, DJ and live bands are also held at select events.

For more information on the XDA, please visit www.xdaracing.com or connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube @xdaracing

Bonhams announces its first motorcycle auction in Italy

By General Posts

Bonhams Motorcycles Says Buongiorno Italia with Debut Sale at Moto Dei Miti

FIRST MOTORCYCLE SALE IN ITALY 1-3 APRIL 2022 AT WORLD-RENOWNED MUSEUM OF GENESIO BEVILACQUA

2011 ALTHEA WORLD SUPERBIKE AND SUPERSTOCK CHAMPIONSHIP WINNING MOTORCYCLES ARE EARLY HIGHLIGHTS

Bonhams is proud to announce its first motorcycle sale in Italy – in the world-renowned Moto dei Miti museum, created by paddock great Genesio Bevilacqua, founder of the Althea Racing team, which will be staged on 1-3 April 2022.

The weekend sale is the result of a new partnership with Genesio, which will see his museum, located in Civita Castellana (on the outskirts of Rome) provide a fitting venue for the 100-plus collectors’ motorcycles to be offered.

Telling the story of the evolution of motorcycle racing over the past 50 years, the museum represents Genesio’s own racing experience – as amateur rider and professional team manager – and his passion for two-wheeled sport and culture, featuring some of the most important sports and competition motorcycles of the modern era.

Genesio became General Manager in 2007 of the start-up Althea Racing Team, which picked up trophies in the World Superbike and Supersport series, winning both world championship titles in 2011, with Carlos Checa and Davide Giugliano respectively riding to victory. In 2016, with BMW as partner, Althea again won the World Superstock Championship, with Raffaele Da Rosa in the saddle.

The ex-Carlos Checa, 2011 World Superbike Championship-winning Ducati 1198 F11 estimate for sale is €110,000 – 130,000

Genesio will offer 27 machines from his collection for sale in the debut auction, including the two 2011 World Champion motorcycles: Carlos Checa’s Ducati 1198 RS and Davide Giugliano’s Ducati 1198 F12 and one of Raffaele De Rosa’s victorious BMW S 1000 RRs from 2016.

All motorcycles in the collection are ‘on the button’ and ready to race, having been maintained in the museum’s dedicated workshop, by technicians with years of experience in the paddock, and have recently ridden by Genesio and other riders.

Ben Walker, Global Head of Bonhams Motorcycles, said: “We are really excited to be hosting our debut sale in Italy – arguably THE land of motorcycles – and to have the ‘man who defeated giants’ as our new partner.

“”Genesio’s spectacular private museum will provide a stunning backdrop for the sale, and we are delighted that it will be open to the public for the preview and the auction itself.”

Genesio Bevilacqua, General Manager Althea Racing Team, said: “I am happy and proud to partner with Bonhams to bring to Italy their first auction dedicated to motorcycles and to the history of motorcycles, in which Italy has always played a vital role.

“Moto dei Miti is, without a doubt, the best location to hold this great event. Bonhams’ heritage and professionalism will attract the attention of international collectors and will play an important part in growing the collectors’ market for the motorcycles of the last 50 years”.

Further important collectors’ motorcycles and collections are currently being invited for consignment to this new sale.

Contact: ukmotorcycles@bonhams.com for further details.

Dave Currier, aged 68, on Winning Cannonball riding his 1911 Harley-Davidson

By General Posts

by Kevin Wallevand from https://www.inforum.com

Fargo man wins Motorcycle Cannonball with 1911 Harley Davidson

  • Dave Currier turned 68 years of age on the road while racing in the Motorcycle Cannonball
  • Earlier, Dave Currier had been a runner-up in 2018 Motorcycle Cannonball riding a 1915 Harley-Davidson
  • His father sold Indian and Harley motorcycles in the 1940s and 50s in Fargo and also raced them
  • Dave Currier credits John Rouland of Northern Crankshaft in Thief River Falls for doing a lot of the technical and engine work on his 1911 H-D

“To start it, you have to pedal to start it, it is a belt drive. To move it forward, you have a lever which tensions the belt and the bike moves forward.” – Dave Currier

Fargo man wins Motorcycle Cannonball with 1911 Harley Davidson

A Fargo man has just won a cross country motorcycle run called The Motorcycle Cannonball.

Dave Currier is finally getting some feeling back in his rear-end. He is back in Fargo after competing in the most difficult, antique endurance race in the world: The Motorcycle Cannonball.

“I think this has been the toughest ride of my life,” Currier said. “It is a real grind, I had about eight hours in the saddle every day.”

Riding his 1911 belt-driven Harley Davidson, Currier and 88 competitors crossed 11 states over 16-days straight. From Michigan to South Padre Island, Texas, they racked up just over 3,700 miles.

“The bike is tall. I have short legs, so my feet don’t touch the ground,” Currier said. “To start it, you have to pedal to start it, it is a belt drive. To move it forward, you have a lever which tensions the belt and the bike moves forward.”

But Currier, who had a team planning and tweaking this bike, not only competed; he won.

“I had a police escort, it was an absolute incredible deal,” Currier said. “They closed the roads off.”

He crossed the finish line with this checkered flag, bringing home the trophy.

“Before the finish, they handed me the checkered flag, and I rode in with the checkered flag,” Currier said. “It was incredible. (It’s) still hard to talk about it.”

Currier credits John Rouland of Northern Crankshaft in Thief River Falls for doing a lot of the technical and engine work on the 1911 Harley.

He said his local sponsors; Milwaukee Tool, Acme Tools, Dakota Fence, and TechLine Coatings all played a role in the win.

Currier, who turned 68 during the race, thinks he had a little help from angels above. His dad, Dick Currier, sold Indian and Harley motorcycles in the 1940s and 50s in Fargo. He raced them as well, and Currier believes his dad would be pretty proud.

“He was a big part of my life,” Currier said. “That’s why I called it, ‘The Last Ride.'”

For more info on the Motorcycle Cannonball visit their website by clicking here.

Earlier Dave Currier had been a runner-up in 2018 Motorcycle Cannonball riding a 1915 Harley-Davidson

From September 2018.

“I’ve already been doing a lot of thinking,” Currier said, chuckling. “I have done the twin cylinder. The next challenge for me would be to take a single cylinder and make it across the U.S. But this was a trip of a lifetime. Going over the mountain in Kalispell, Montana, that’s when I turned 65.”

‘Trip of a lifetime’: Fargo resident named runner-up in world’s hardest antique motorcycle run

Currier says his bike, a 1915 Harley-Davidson twin-cylinder boasting an 11-horsepower engine, took him two years to restore.

by Emma Vatnsdal from https://bismarcktribune.com

PORTLAND, Ore. — Enjoying a sunny 48-degree morning in The Dalles, Ore., Dave Currier and his entourage were getting ready late last week to point themselves east and head back home to Fargo.

While many go west to escape the cold of winter or spend time with family and friends, Currier had a different motivation — and to end up in Portland, he had to start in Portland, Maine.

In 2010, one man set out to become the first person to take a group of 45 like-minded antique motorcycle riders across the U.S. from Kitty Hawk, N.C., to Santa Monica, Calif. Sixteen days later, 10 of the original 45 riders rolled their roughly century-old bikes onto the Santa Monica Pier, completing the inaugural Motorcycle Cannonball Endurance Run.

Now in its fifth running, the 2018 installment of the run saw more than 100 people ride from Maine to Oregon, giving participants a chance to see much of the U.S. in a whole new way.

Three classes of motorcycles — single cylinder, twin cylinders with two-speed rear ends and bikes with three-speed transmissions — set out, racing to navigate the roads to each day’s checkpoint before 5 p.m. Taking only the “back roads” across the whole country, Currier and the rest of the crew averaged around six hours of riding per day beginning at 7:30 a.m.

In true-to-history fashion, modern navigation systems like a GPS device were not allowed. Instead, riders were given maps each morning 30 minutes before they set out with directions consisting instructions like “drive north 3.2 miles, turn left at the blue house and head west.”

Currier said it was a voyage to remember.

“It was incredible,” Currier said. “It was a fantastic trip kind of re-enacting what the old-time people did when they had the opportunity to go across the U.S. What was really kind of special was I had my birthday (during the trip). Going over the mountain in Kalispell, Montana, that’s when I turned 65. It was kind of a monumental trip in many ways for me.”

Lifelong passion
There are few requirements about which motorcycles qualify for this cross-country road trip, but there are standards that must be met. For the 2018 run, all motorcycles had to be manufactured in 1928 or earlier, and must still appear original in nature.

While period-correct modifications were accepted, no modern replica bikes could be entered.

Electrical charging systems, auxiliary fuel tanks and modern wheels were OK, though GPS systems were specifically banned.

Currier says his bike, a 1915 Harley-Davidson twin-cylinder boasting an 11-horsepower engine, took him two years to restore.

“I started with the basic frame and completely refurbished it from the ground up,” he said. “I’ve always enjoyed the motorcycles since I was 7 years old when I first rode one. Restoring this was pretty special.”

Safety is the No. 1 concern during this race, especially because the bikes are sometimes older than riders’ grandparents. Upon arriving in Portland, Maine, riders completed a half-day of safety classes consisting of rules of the road and safety features.

Each Cannonball rider is also allowed a support team to help them along the way. Currier chose his wife, Kay, two friends from Alaska and a co-worker to assist him with any repairs after each day was done.

“When you get done with the day and you check out, you can do any service work you want on your bike,” he said. “You can change motors, you can overhaul it, whatever you can between 5 at night and 7 in the morning. The support team can’t have anything to do with you during the day.”

Even with the small issues he faced — losing bolts, tough winds and unsoldered ground wires — Currier says he wouldn’t have placed runner-up in his class without the support of his wife and family.

“They’ve always been incredibly good,” he said. “I couldn’t have done this without them.”

The Motorcycle Cannonball Endurance Run happens every two years, and Currier said he’s started planning for 2020.

“I’ve already been doing a lot of thinking. Six to seven hours a day, you got plenty of time to think about a lot of stuff,” Currier said, chuckling. “I have done the twin cylinder. The next challenge for me would be to take a single cylinder and make it across the U.S. But this was a trip of a lifetime.”

World’s Fastest Female Motorcycle Racer

By General Posts

Valerie on 5-Ball Racing Panhead built by Keith Ball

Valerie Thompson is the World’s Fastest Female Motorcycle Racer and a 10x land speed record holder with membership in the Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame as well as eight 200 MPH Clubs and one 300 MPH Club.

She is consistently ranked as one of the World’s Top 10 Fastest Motorcycle Racers.

“The first time I raced at Bonneville, there were only 3 other female competitors, so we really stood out. A lot of people didn’t take me seriously until I established myself as a serious competitor capable of breaking records.” – Valerie Thompson

“I collected my first two records with team owner Keith Ball, who had a lot of faith in me and provided my first two record rides at Bonneville. Now I have Denis Manning, designer of the BUB 7 streamliner and AMA Hall of Fame member, as a mentor and team director.” – Valerie Thompson

Racing the BUB 7 during the 2018 Dry Lake Racers Australia (DLRA) Speed Week competition at Lake Gairdner, she set a new speed record of 328.467 mph (528.616 km/h) to become Australia’s fastest female streamliner motorcycle racer.

2022 Will Be a Busy Year on the Salt for Valerie.

Click Here to Read a Feature Article on Valerie on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

Click To See the book on Building the Salt Shaker – a Panhead on which Valerie set her First Speed Record. “The Worlds Fastest Panhead ” by 5-Ball Racing Team.

BMW Motorrad International GS Trophy 2022

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from https://www.bmw-motorrad.com/en/experience/stories/adventure/gs-trophy-2022.html

The unknown beauty of Albania
Rugged mountains, vast valleys, wild rivers, dense forests and a fantastic coastline: BMW Motorrad will bring the International GS Trophy to Albania in late summer 2022. The country, which is considered an insider tip for off-road touring, is incredibly rich in flora, fauna and culture. The best Enduro riders in the world can look forward to discovering this as yet quite unknown beauty on their GS bikes, in numerous special stages, and experience the #SpiritOfGS up close.

Once in a Lifetime
Seven days of pure adventure. Seven days that took two years of preparation. Seven days that change lives. Each rider only has one opportunity to take part in the International GS Trophy. But it is not a classic race – these intense challenges, in which participants demonstrate their knowledge and riding prowess, are all about team spirit and skill. And the journey is made memorable by nights in the tent under the stars, unique landscapes and cultures, as well as new friends from all over the world – the #SpiritOfGS doesn’t get much better than this.

National qualifiers – The chance for the adventure

A foretaste of the International GS Trophy will be provided by the national qualifiers, where there will be a separate ranking for men and women for the first time. The riders who best master rough terrain, navigation exercises with the GPS and knowledge questions about the GS can secure one of the coveted places in the national team and thus a ticket to Albania. However, who are the most team-minded and skilled endurists in the world will be decided in Albania. You can find more information about qualifying on the respective country page.

CLCIK HERE TO VISIT YOUR NATION’S QUALIFIER PAGE:
https://www.bmw-motorrad.com/en/experience/stories/adventure/gs-trophy-2022.html

Check Out the Location Reveal Video on YouTube:

Documentary
Behind the scenes in New Zealand

Eight days, 22 teams, 2,500 kilometres: These are the hard facts of the 2020 International GS Trophy in New Zealand. To find out how big the organisation effort and support team was, how many spare parts travelled to the other end of the world, and how the navigation devices were charged on the go, see our three-part documentary on Amazon Prime (available in Germany, Great Britain and the USA).

WATCH ON AMAZON PRIME: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08J8F2M65

Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports Act of 2021

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This week Senators Richard Burr (R-NC), Jon Tester (D-MT), Mark Kelly (D-AZ), Joni Ernst (R-IA), Thom Tillis (R-NC), and Joe Manchin (D-WV) reintroduced the Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports (RPM) Act of 2021. The bill, S. 2736, ensures that racing enthusiasts continue to have the ability to convert motor vehicles into vehicles used solely for competition. This bill also clarifies that it is legal under federal law to manufacture, sell, distribute, and install race parts that modify the emissions system of a motor vehicle that is used solely for racing.

The bill is in response to actions taken by the EPA in 2015. At that time, the EPA issued a proposed regulation that would prohibit the conversion of emissions-certified motor vehicles into vehicles used in motorsports competitions. The 2015 proposed regulation also prevented the sale or use of emissions-related race parts for those modified vehicles.

An important component of S. 2736 is that it helps protect the aftermarket parts industry. A robust and thriving aftermarket parts industry is vital to the motorcyclist community. The Motorcycle Riders Foundation is part of a broad collaboration of groups working together in D.C. on this topic.

As you may remember, earlier this year the House of Representatives introduced a similar bill, H.R. 3281, that now has 101 cosponsors. To see if your member of the House is a cosponsor of the RPM Act, click here.

If you’d like to read more about the Senate bill, click here.

Look for further updates and calls to actions on this issue before the end of the year!

See you in Atlanta!

Next week is shaping up to be another great Meeting of the Minds! If you make it down to Atlanta, be sure to introduce yourself to our D.C. lobbyist, Rocky Fox. Rocky is always looking to learn about what you are working on back home.

An important part of Meeting of the Minds is making connections between our members around the country and back in D.C. If you have relationships with your hometown Senators or Congressman, make sure Rocky knows!

Let’s have a great few days down South!

https://mrf.org/

About Motorcycle Riders Foundation
The Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) provides leadership at the federal level for states’ motorcyclists’ rights organizations as well as motorcycle clubs and individual riders.