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China-made Brixton 1200 cleared for production

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by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com

China-made Brixton 1200 cleared for production: 1200cc modern classic has Bonneville T120 in its sights!

About the new 1200cc model, Brixton says that it “shows the way of Brixton Motorcycles into even higher capacity classes and proves the development competence of our brand.”

Brixton 1200 – a 1200cc modern classic has been cleared to enter production as per a report on Bennetts. The modern classic will lock horns against the likes of the Triumph Bonneville T120 in the segment. Showcased as a concept at 2019 EICMA motorcycle show, the said model will be made in China. However, Brixton comes under the KSR Group from Austria that is responsible for importing motorcycles from multiple Chinese manufacturers. The design and engineering part for the Brixton 1200 has been taken care of at KSR’s design center that is located in Krups, Austria. The Brixton will most likely draw power from a 1200cc, parallel-twin engine that will put itself very much in the Bonneville T120 territory. In terms of aesthetics, the Brixton 1200 looks like a proper modern classic with an all-LED rounded headlamp upfront, wired wheels, all-black theme and touches of chrome just at the right places.

About the new 1200cc model, Brixton says that it “shows the way of Brixton Motorcycles into even higher capacity classes and proves the development competence of our brand.” As of now, the exact timeline for the production of Brixton 1200 isn’t clear and the company says that it wants to create a technically mature vehicle without time pressure, a vehicle that meets more than just the high-quality requirements in these cubic capacity classes.

Apart from showcasing the Brixton 1200, the company launched Crossfire 500 and Crossfire 500X last year. The two get power from a 486 cc, parallel-twin motor good for churning out 47 bhp of power. The said models entered production soon after they were showcased as concepts and the same can be expected from the Brixton 1200 as well. More details on the Brixton 1200 expected soon, so stay tuned for all the updates!

Also, will the Brixton 1200 be able to give a tough fight to the Triumph Bonneville 120?

New Flat Out Leather Vest from 5-Ball Racing

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We’ve developed this from a notion by Jeremiah Soto. After awhile, we discovered several improvements and went to work on manufacturing a new model.

This puppy is too cool with comfortable invisible hand pockets in the front, traditional western leather chest pockets with snaps. Two deep gun, phone or camera pockets on the inside and out official, exclusive media pocket in the back. And the price is right.

–Bandit

CLICK HERE TO SHOP LEATHERS AND GEAR NOW

https://shop.bikernet.com/

2021 BMW G310R, G310GS spotted testing

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by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com

2021 BMW G310R, G310GS spotted testing: Most affordable German bikes to get these changes!
2021 BMW G310R and G310GS have been snapped testing recently. Here’s what all updates the baby Beemers will come up with!

BMW Motorrad is yet to roll out its BS6 compliant G310R and the G310GS for the Indian market. Our recent report revealed that the BS6 compliant versions of these two bikes are ready at TVS’ Hosur facility and the launch has been delayed due to the Covid-19 lockdown. We also told you that the BS6 BMW G310R and G310GS should be launched in India sometime during June-July 2020. Now, meanwhile, folks at RideApart managed to get some spy shots of the 2021 BMW 310 GS range. Take a look at the images and you will notice that there is no drastic change in terms of the appearance and styling of both these bikes. However, upfront, the 310 twins will get an all-LED headlamp that should offer better illumination compared to the regular halogens on the BS4 models.

The headlamp cluster also appears to have been slightly redesigned and the same looks a bit sharper than before. Apart from the all-LED headlamp, you can also see LED turn indicators on the new models. Now coming to the powertrain, the upcoming 2021 BMW G310R and the G310GS will get the same 313cc, single-cylinder engine and the same will be Euro-5 compliant and hence, you can expect a slight revision in power and torque figures. The engine on the BS4 model used to churn out respective power and torque outputs of 34hp and 28Nm.

With the Coronavirus outbreak, BMW had announced that it will be skipping the 2020 EICMA motorcycle show that is slated to happen towards the end of this year. That said, if the situation doesn’t stabilizes till that time, expect the company to launch these bikes via the online route only. BMW is expected to launch the new G310 models by 2020 end or during the initial months of 2021. Expect a considerable price hike over the outgoing model with the new updates on offer.

2020 KTM 390 Adventure Arriving at U.S. Dealers in May, Priced from $6,199

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Austrian motorcycle KTM is one of the leaders of the adventure motorcycle segment. For years the group has been making a wide range of two-wheeled machines, and the offering is about to get even more convincing.

As it eyes an increase of the customer base in key markets, KTM will introduce a new version of its entry-level bike for adventure riders, targeted at the ones who are new to this type of motoring. Called 390 Adventure, it should become available at dealers across the U.S. starting May.

The Adventure is based on the 390 Duke, and according to KTM has been built using lessons learned with the 790 Adventure and the bikes it usually fields in the famous Dakar Rally – at the core of the new bike sits a four-stroke 373.2 cc engine linked to an oversized radiator and a 6-speed sequential gearbox.

The movement of the bike over even or uneven terrain is handled by WP APEX suspension that comes with 170 mm of travel at the front and 177 mm at the rear. Bosch software runs the two-channel ABS system (for on-road and off-road use) fitted on the bike, and is backed by lean-angle-sensitive traction control.

“As an introduction to the world of light offroading and wider adventure touring, this motorcycle is a pure class-leader, combining the most powerful single in the segment with unmatched technology,” said KTM in a statement.

“A light, agile and confidence-inspiring entry model for riders looking to discover the world of adventure riding, this motorcycle offers added versatility for touring and light offroading.”

As said, the motorcycle will arrive at dealers across the U.S. starting next month. Prices start at $6,199, and the bikes matches all the A2 driver´s license requirements.

The entire list of features available the 390 Adventure can be found in the press release section below or at this link.

2020 Suzuki Burgman 200 unveiled

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by Abhinand Venugopal from https://www.rushlane.com

Suzuki’s new Burgman 200 churns out 17.7bhp and 18Nm of torque from a 200cc liquid-cooled engine

Suzuki Motorcycle has unveiled its new Burgman 200 for global markets. The 2020MY max-scooter might not make it to our market (in the foreseeable future) unlike its lesser 125cc sibling, Burgman Street. The Suzuki Burgman Street (now in BS6 format), although not exactly a Burgman sibling but an Access 125 in a different avatar, introduced a new genre of scooters to the wider Indian mass. This was something which the old, large and expensive Kinetic Blaze could not do.

The 2020 Suzuki Burgman 200 is mechanically identical to its previous version. A 200cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder generates 17.7bhp and 18Nm torque while mated to a CVT. It gets 13-inch and 12-inch alloy wheels at the front and rear, respectively. The scooter boasts of dual-channel ABS thanks to twin 240mm discs at the front and a 240mm rotor at the rear. Suspension duties are carried out by conventional telescopic forks and a monoshock.

In its global spec, the maxi-scooter is available in three colour choices: White, Black and Silver. As mentioned before, the chances of it coming to our market are slim especially when considering the current state of affairs. Global automotive industries have been badly affected by COVID-19 and many brands are trying their best to minimise losses. In India, automakers are collectively losing about Rs 1000 crore each day. On the other hand, several dealerships are on the verge of shutting shops forever.

Thanks to BS6 emission norms, the Indian scooter market has witnessed a rapid evolution. Besides offering new features and styling, almost all the new BS6 scooters come with FI. Some scooters have a lost a bhp or two but let’s face it, most of the mainstream scooters feel exactly the same to ride.

Still, there are certain ‘sporty’ choices to appeal to a smaller group of buyers. Examples include the Aprilia SR 160, TVS NTorq 125 Race Edition and to an extent, Yamaha Ray ZR Street Rally. Meanwhile, Piaggio’s Vespa range is a premium and elegant choice. Sales of these scooters are relatively less but just enough to remain on the market. Hence, there is a small potential for premium scooters in India.

However, the shift towards high-displacement CVT scooters should be gradual for them to be sensible alternatives to motorcycles coming at a similar price range. At the moment, 125cc scooters are the best performers on the sales chart and it would take some time for the market to see the same demand for 200cc scooters.

Aprilia Terra 250 adventure motorcycle spied in China

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by Abhinand Venugopal from https://www.rushlane.com

Aprilia’s new Terra 250 adventure motorcycle is powered by the same power plant in CFMoto’s 250NK

Italian two-wheeler brand, Aprilia is apparently working on a new adventure (or dual-sport) motorcycle in the 250cc category, for the Chinese market. It was recently spied at Zongshen Aprilia’s manufacturing facility in a market-ready format. Zongshen Aprilia is the Italian automaker’s Chinese counterpart.

Aprilia already sells the Terra 150 in China. The 150cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder motorcycle (which originally made its debut in a 125cc avatar) is relatively expensive and has not been able to perform well on monthly sales charts. Zongshen Aprilia aims to change this story with its new Terra 250. The motorcycle could be introduced in other Asian markets in phases but it is too early to make any conclusions.

The Aprilia Terra 250 is based on a split-cradle chassis frame with a box-section swingarm and a tubular handlebar. To aid off-roading characteristics, it gets 18-inch front and 17-inch rear spoke wheels with knobby tyres. Reports state that this is the standard version and a more capable ‘Adventure’ variant could be introduced alongside (with longer suspension travel and 21-inch wheels at the front).

At the moment, a lot of details about the motorcycle remain unknown. However, it shares its power plant with the CFMoto 250NK which could be launched in India soon. The 249.2cc liquid-cooled DOHC single-cylinder engine makes around 26bhp @ 9,000rpm and 22Nm @ 7,500rpm. This is mated to a 6-speed gearbox via a slipper clutch. The CFMoto 250NK can hit a top speed of 140km/h.

The Aprilia GPR 250, which was introduced in China last year, is also powered by the same engine. In the Aprilia Terra 250, the output characteristics could be slightly tuned to suit its touring or off-roading trait. The Terra 250 is a potential product for Aprilia India considering the country’s growing interest in adventure-tourers and low-capacity off-roaders. If launched, it will directly lock horns with KTM India’s upcoming 250 Adventure while also being an interesting alternative to Royal Enfield’s Himalayan and Hero MotoCorp’s Xpulse 200.

However, Aprilia India had previously disappointed Indian motorcycle enthusiasts by stepping away from introducing the RS 150 and Tuono 150. The motorcycles were first showcased in India back at Auto Expo 2018. At the time, the Aprilia RS 150 seemed to be a compelling alternative to Yamaha Motor India’s YZF-R15 V2.0 (now YZF-R15 V3.0). If the Aprilia Tuono 150 was introduced by now, it could have been a strong rival to the Yamaha MT-15.

Vyrus Alyen Powered By Ducati – Motorcycle From The Future

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by Satya Singh from https://www.rushlane.com/

A bike that appears to utilize advanced alien engineering, Vyrus Alyen easily qualifies as a formidable competitor to the likes of batpod

Vyrus is an Italy based innovation workshop that has been producing absolute masterpieces for more than thirty years. The workshop’s latest creation Alyen is a seamless blend of art, passion, performance and hi-tech innovation. The awe-inspiring motorcycle seems like a product from the future, with the idea probably being brought home by a time traveller.

While Vyrus Alyen appears to be quite heavy by its looks, its weight may be well below your expectations. That’s because the motorcycle utilizes lightweight carbon fibre for its wheels and bodywork. The forged carbon fibre wheels have been sourced from Rotobox, a firm that specializes in producing lightweight yet extra strong wheels. The uniquely shaped wheels also enhance the bike’s visual appeal and overall aesthetics.

As of now, Vyrus has released only some basic information about Alyen. The motorcycle is powered by a 1285 cc, water-cooled, Ducati L shaped 90° Desmo drive engine that produces max power of 205 hp at 10,500 rpm. Max torque is 144.6 Nm at 8,750 rpm. However, this also makes it a fuel guzzler. With its small fuel tank, Vyrus Alyen would be most appropriate for short rides. Engine is mated to a 6-speed gearbox and comes with wet clutch.

Vyrus Alyen sits on Magnesium double omega frame that is integrated with a self-supporting composite body. Suspension system comprises push rod twin pivot units at both front and rear. The hub-centre steering system works independently and does not interact with suspension functions.

Also known as hydraulic wired steering system, it was designed in 2004 by Vyrus project leader Ascanio Rodorigo. It was used for the first time in Bimota Tesi 2D superbike. As braking forces do not impact suspension movements, it makes Alyen a lot more agile when negotiating corners. Braking duties are performed by Brembo GP4 series.

To get an idea about Vyrus Alyen’s performance, we can look at the 1285 cc Ducati engine that can reach 0-60 kmph in just around 4 seconds. Top speed is 300 kmph.

Vyrus has not revealed how many of Alyen motorcycles will be produced. Vyrus motorcycles are usually manufactured in limited numbers and are meant for collectors and enthusiasts. You would be lucky to spot a Vyrus Alyen on the streets. Motorcycles created by Vyrus are also known to be priced astronomically. To know the price, you need to contact the Vyrus team.

Riding Triumph’s Rocket 3

By | General Posts

by Dries Van der Walt from https://www.wheels24.co.za

As promised during the local launch of the new Triumph Rocket 3, Triumph South Africa allowed me to ride the beast on Wednesday, March 25, beating the national coronavirus lockdown by just two days.

It was a bitter-sweet experience because while riding the open (and already noticeably quieter) roads in the Hekpoort area of Gauteng, I was keenly aware of the fact that this would be my last leisure ride on a bike for quite a while.

I was joined on the trip by Triumph South Africa CEO Bruce Allen and a colleague from another publication, and the conversation over brunch was predictably dominated by our shared concern about the effects that the looming lockdown, as undeniably necessary as it was, would have on the country’s already brittle economy.

But all of that did nothing to distract from the experience of riding the world’s biggest-capacity production bike. At 2500cm³, the Rocket 3’s engine capacity exceeds that of most cars – almost double that of the popular B-segment hatchbacks that are ubiquitous on South African roads. Housing an engine of that size dictates the design approach, and the Rocket 3 presents a squat motorcycle that is not likely to be mistaken for anything else.

Intimidating at first

Despite being not very tall, the sheer bulk of the bike is somewhat intimidating at first sight. This feeling is not dispelled once you swing a leg over, because that’s when you realise how wide the frame actually is. That said, as soon as the wheels start rolling and your feet are on the pegs, the intimidation factor dissipates with the realisation that, despite its bulk, the Rocket is really well-balanced.

It carries its weight low in the frame, and the size seems to melt away as speed picks up, so that by the time you reach the first traffic light, you’ve forgotten that you are sitting astride a machine of decidedly unusual proportions.

Sandton’s streets are not the place to explore the limits of the Rocket’s prodigious torque, but it did allow me to develop an appreciation for the remarkably smooth quick-shifter. Working both up and down, shifts are immediate and jerk-free, even at lower revs. With a bike that can be ridden in top gear most of the time, a quick-shifter may seem unnecessary, but this one worked so well that I found myself running up and down through the ratios for the sheer fun of it.

We soon hit the highway, and with the relative lack of traffic, I could start playing with the throttle. The torque was everything I expected, and then some. Twist the throttle wide open in any gear, and the Rocket takes off like the proverbial scalded cat leaving your body caught between the twin sensations of your arms being wrenched from their sockets and your hands strained to their utmost to maintain a grip on the handlebar.

Zooming past

On the other hand, if you give the twist grip the respect it demands, the torque is exhilarating but manageable. Overtaking becomes a non-event – you edge up to whatever is in front of you, wait for a brief gap in the oncoming traffic, twist the throttle and zoom past it in the blink of an eye.

Highway gave way to some twisty backroads, and I found that the Rocket is not averse to brisk cornering. At this point on the route, I was on the Rocket 3 R, the “sporty” naked version with footpegs almost directly underneath your hips. This gave me the opportunity to adopt the usual weight-forward riding position, and I could attack the curves with confidence.

While no sportbike, the Rocket remains stable through the twisties, making it once again easy to forget how big and heavy it actually is.

After brunch, I switched to the GT. On this version, you get a welcome windscreen, and footpegs set more forward for a relaxed riding position. I’m not a cruiser person, but to my great surprise I found that I preferred the GT to the R. The small screen was remarkably helpful in preventing my body from acting as a drag chute, and the footpegs weren’t so far forward that I was forced into the dreaded C-shaped riding position.

Ideal for long distance

Although these slight changes to the identical frame shared by the two variants made the GT feel like a different bike altogether, it retained the sure-footed handling of the R, leaving me to enjoy the twisties on the way back as much as on its sibling.

The new Rocket 3, aimed mostly at the US market where long, straight roads and low-speed limits are at the order of the day, is without a doubt a niche bike. As such it is unlikely to appeal to a broad audience locally, but one thing is for sure: if I were offered one for a trip down to Cape Town, I would grab it with nary a second thought.

SPECIFICATIONS:

ENGINE & TRANSMISSION 
Type: In-line three-cylinder, water-cooled, DOHC
Capacity: 2458 cm³
Max Power: 123kW @ 6000r/min
Max Torque: 221Nm @ 4000r/min
Final Drive: Shaft, bevel box
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate hydraulically operated, torque assist
Gearbox: six-speed

CHASSIS 

Frame: Full aluminium frame
Swingarm: Single-sided, cast aluminium
Front Wheel: 17 x 3.5in cast aluminium
Rear Wheel: 16 x 7.5in cast aluminium
Front Tyre: 150/80 R17 VRear Tyre: 240/50 R16 V
Front Suspension: Showa 47mm upside-down 1 1 cartridge front forks, compression and rebound adjuster. 120mm travel
Rear Suspension: Fully adjustable Showa piggyback reservoir RSU with remote hydraulic preload adjuster, 107mm rear wheel travel
Front Brakes: Dual 320mm discs, Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial monobloc callipers, Cornering ABS
Rear Brakes: Single 300mm disc, Brembo M4.32 4-piston monobloc calliper, Cornering ABS
Instrument Display: TFT multi-functional

DIMENSIONS & WEIGHTS 

Width (handlebars): 889mm
(w/out mirror): 1065mm
Seat Height: 773mm
Wheelbase: 1677mm
Dry Weight: 291kg
Tank Capacity: 18L
Fuel Consumption: 6.82-l/100km (claimed)

DORF Reviewed

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A Book about Two Brothers Riding from Los Angeles To Sturgis

Book by Bob Bitchin, Review by Rogue

I was thinking about all of you on Quarantine and how much I think you would enjoy reading this book by my friend Bob Bitchin. I will tell you ahead of time, it is an ADULT PUBLICATION and if you are offended by Sex, Drugs, or Rock and Roll it is probably not for you.

READ THE BOOK REVIEW ON BIKERNET – CLICK HERE

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BMW’s prewar-inspired R18 boxer motorcycle makes its production debut

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by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com/

We loved the concept at Villa d’Este, and now the production version will haunt our dreams until it’s released.

I’ve been looking forward to a production version of BMW’s R18 concept since it debuted last year at Villa d’Este, and now it’s finally here. How close does the production model get to the utterly gorgeous prewar-inspired concept?

Well, pretty close, actually. Sure, there will be plenty who argue that it should be closer, that the production bike’s front wheel is too small or that BMW should have retained the concept’s fork covers, but I’m not one of those people. This thing is a handsome-as-hell cruiser-bobber style motorcycle, and I badly want to ride it already.

The R18’s headline feature is its massive 1.8-liter horizontally opposed twin-cylinder engine. This is the biggest boxer that BMW has ever offered — by over half a liter — and it’s still air-cooled. This lump outputs a 91 horsepower and a whopping 116 pound-feet of torque. It’s got four valves per cylinder with dual overhead camshafts on each cylinder, and it promises to be a characterful old thing, in the best traditions of the brand.

The bike also features the classic BMW boxer large single-disc dry clutch and a six-speed gearbox. Unusual for the BMW though (these days, at least) is the decision to leave the bike’s driveshaft exposed. This was done in homage to the prewar Beemers like the R5 and R51 from which the R18 takes much of its inspiration. A reverse gear ala Honda’s Goldwing is available as an option.

The R18 is probably closest in spirit to the R NineT, at least as far as current production motorcycles go, and like that bike, it’s been designed with easy customization in mind. To that end, BMW has partnered with the likes of Roland Sands Design and Mustang Seats to offer factory-approved accessories to help make the R18 more your own.

Unlike the R NineT, the R18 features multiple ride modes which include Rock, Roll and Rain. The former being the most aggressive ride mode, with access to the bike’s full power and torque. Roll mode is analogous to most motorcycles’ Road mode, while Rain offers softer throttle response and more limited power and torque.

The bike’s suspension is pretty neat in that it looks very much like a hardtail (aka no rear suspension) but, in fact, is merely hiding its rear suspension bits. The bike’s front fork legs are each a whopping 49 millimeters in diameter and look suitably old-timey — though I’d have loved to see a modern BMW interpretation of the classic Earles fork design that it used in the 1920s and 30s.

The R18 will be available in two flavors at launch: the standard version and the First Edition, and it’s the latter one that really gets my attention. The First Edition pays the closest homage to the classic Beemers with all kinds of pinstriping and chrome. It also comes with some neat extras like historically accurate tank emblems, slotted screws (to look period correct while also annoying your mechanic), a leather belt, a screwdriver, gloves and a book celebrating the BMW motorcycles’ 97-year history.

The standard R18 will set you back a surprisingly reasonable $17,495, while the First Edition will go for $19,870. Bikes are currently slated to hit dealers later on in 2020, but given the dramatic effect that the coronavirus outbreak has had on the industry, that could be pushed back.