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Notice from the Federal Government

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from Jay Jackson, MRF, with images from Sam Burns

Establishment of the Motorcyclist Advisory Council (MAC)

NHTSA announces the establishment of MAC for a 2-year period. The MAC will coordinate with and advise the Secretary of Transportation, the NHTSA Administrator and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Administrator on transportation issues of concern to motorcyclists, including: motorcycle and motorcyclist safety; barrier and road design, construction, and maintenance practices; and the architecture and implementation of intelligent transportation system technologies.

NHTSA is also soliciting nominations for appointment to the MAC.

Applications for membership must be received by NHTSA on or before 5 p.m. EST, December 15, 2023.

Click and refer details in this article at Bikernet.com

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World War II Rider Beatrice Shilling, OBE

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by Jason Marker from https://www.rideapart.com

With a simple, thimble-shaped washer, this pioneering woman gearhead saved the lives of countless RAF pilots in WWII.

During the Battle of Britain, the Royal Air Force discovered a glaring problem with its Rolls-Royce Merlin-powered fighters—the Hawker Hurricane and the Supermarine Spitfire. See, that generation of Merlin was fitted with dual-choke, updraft carburetors built by the S.U. Carburettor Company Limited. These worked just like your regular updraft carb and were great in level flight. Problem was, you see, that fighter planes don’t spend a lot of time in level flight.

Any negative-G maneuvers, such as pitching the nose down sharply in a dive, would cause the carbs to flood and the engine to cut out. Not exactly what you want in your badass, high-po, Nazi-killing fighter. RAF pilots figured out pretty quickly that they could perform a quick half-roll before diving in an attempt to counteract the flooding, but this only worked so well. It also introduced a delay in the RAF boys’ maneuvers that provided ample opportunity for the fuel-injected Luftwaffe fighters—especially Willie Messerschmitt’s legendary BF109—to either blow up the RAF planes or run for it as the situation allowed.

The RAF needed a solution to this problem, and fast. Enter one Beatrice Shilling.

Humble Beginnings and Early Career
Beatrice Shilling was born on March 8, 1909, in Hampshire, and raised in Surrey. Her parents were butcher Henry Shilling and his wife Annie (née Dulake). She was, by all accounts, a peculiar young girl for her time. She was obsessed with Meccano, a model-building system similar to an Erector Set, and even won a prize in a national Meccano-building contest. She spent her pocket money on tools, knives, and pots of glue, and, the fact that most concerns us here at RideApart, bought her first motorcycle at age 14. From that instant, Shilling knew she wanted to be an engineer.

Shilling left secondary school at 17 and apprenticed under legendary electrical engineer, sister badass, and Women’s Engineering Society founder Margaret Partridge. Partridge, who knew quality when she saw it, encouraged Shilling to pursue further engineering education. Following her mentor’s suggestion, Shilling then enrolled at Victoria University of Manchester where she studied electrical engineering—one of only two women enrolled in the program. She graduated with her Bachelor’s in electrical engineering in 1932 and promptly pursued a Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering.

Unfortunately for her, Shilling graduated and entered the workforce in the midst of one of Britain’s worst recessions at that point. She kicked around from job to job, struggling to make ends meet, until she landed a spot as a research assistant at the University of Birmingham. There she worked with Professor GF Mucklow studying forced induction, especially supercharging.

In 1936, Shilling was recruited by the Royal Air Force’s research and development arm, the Royal Aircraft Establishment. Her first job at the RAE was as a technical writer working in the Air Ministry’s technical publications department. Her supervisors quickly realized her talents were wasted writing Spitfire owner’s manuals and pilot checklists, and she was transferred to another department where she did R&D on aircraft engines.

On November 1, 1939, she was promoted to Technical Officer in Charge of Carburetor Research and Development (a job I wouldn’t wish on anyone after years of tinkering with carbs myself) and, eventually, to Principal Technical Officer. It was in that role that Shilling developed the answer to the RAF’s stalling Merlin issue. Before we get to that, though, we have to talk about motorcycles.

Motorcycles and Motorsport
Now, all that airplane stuff is fascinating, but you all are here to read about motorcycles, right? Don’t worry, I got you covered. As I mentioned earlier, Shilling got her first motorcycle, an unnamed two-stroke job, at the tender age of 14. The first thing she did with it was teach herself how to tear down and rebuild the engine. From there she got into modifying her own bikes, and, like any good gearhead, trying to figure out how to make them go faster.

Throughout the 30s, Shilling raced motorcycles while pursuing her engineering degrees and working for the RAE. She and her all-woman—or nearly all-woman, the information is a little sketchy—team campaigned modified Nortons at various tracks throughout England. In 1934, she set a speed record at Brooklands by lapping the track on a Norton M30 with an average speed of 101.85 mph. She was one of the few riders who’d achieved this, and one of only two women—the other being the formidable racer and adventurer Florence Blenkiron.

For this feat, she was granted the British Motorcycle Racing Club’s prestigious Gold Star Award and bragging rights for the rest of her life. There’s also a story that comes up whenever discussing Shilling’s Brooklands lap that she refused to marry her future husband—fellow racer, rider, RAE employee, and RAF bomber pilot George Naylor—until he matched or beat her lap. Apparently, he eventually did, because the couple was married in 1938.

After The War, Shilling and her husband traded in their motorbikes for racing cars and spent some years tear-assing around the U.K. These cars were, of course, heavily modified by Shilling in her home workshop. Throughout the late-40s and early-50s, Shilling and Naylor raced a lightened 1934 Lagonda Rapier and an Austin-Healy Sebring Sprite. In the 60s, they upgraded to an Elva 200 Formula Junior car. They weren’t the best racers on the circuit, but to paraphrase Les Claypool, they never did win no checkered flags but they never did come in last.

Miss Shilling’s Orifice
So, back to Spitfires. The shortcomings of the Merlin’s carbs were well known, and much gnashing of teeth and rending of garments went on among RAF pilots, technicians, and engineers as they tried to fix the problem. As the RAE’s Chief Technical Officer for Carburetor R&D, Shilling was in the perfect position to do something about the flooding Merlin carbs.

She developed a small device—A brass thimble-like affair with a hole in it that eventually evolved into something like a small washer—that restricted fuel flow through the carburetor. This kept the carbs from flooding under negative g-force maneuvers and made sure the boys in the RAF had all the reliable power they needed constantly on tap. Sir Stanley Hooker, head of supercharger development at Rolls-Royce, called it “Miss Shilling’s Orifice” and the name stuck.

While it may sound odd to our ears here in TYooL 2023, Hooker’s name for Shilling’s restrictor plate is a lot more complimentary than other names people, primarily fellow engineers and RAF brass, had for the device. Most of those—Miss Tilly’s Diaphragm, for example—either referenced birth control or found ways to be derisive. The RAF pilots loved the device, however, especially since now they could keep up with the German fighters without the constant risk of falling out of the sky. Miss Shilling’s Orifice, officially called the RAE Restrictor Plate, stayed in use until Bendix developed the pressure carburetor—an early style of throttle body fuel injection—in 1943.

Denouement
For the rest of her life, Beatrice Shilling continued messing around with engines. She retired from the RAE in 1969 and died in 1990 at the age of 81. I could probably write another two or three thousand words about her here, but I’m already pushing it with as long as this story is. There’s so much more to tell about her, and I only scratched the surface.

For example, I glossed over the constant sexism, obstruction, and disrespect she received from colleagues throughout her career. I didn’t get to talk about her work on the Blue Streak Missile, her becoming an Officer of the British Empire (OBE), or a dozen other interesting things about her life. Another time, perhaps.

If you’d like to know more about Beatrice Shilling and her many shining parts (and why wouldn’t you?) you should dig through my sources and follow your nose. If you’re feeling really adventurous, you can try to find a copy of her biography Negative Gravity: A Life of Beatrice Shilling written in 2003 by Mathew Freudenberg. It seems to be long out of print and the only copy I found was offered on Amazon for the eye-watering price of $1,227 Yankee dollars. If you can find a cheaper copy of it anywhere, let me know.

Accident Scene Management : Save A Life

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by Rogue

As much as we do not like to talk about it there are an alarming amount of people being injured while riding their motorcycles. Things are being done around the country in hopes of reducing these incidents.

One of the things we can do is to become knowledgeable about what to do if we are present when this happens.

Read this Important Article on Bikernet.com

A ‘Crash Course’ in Accident Scene Management (bystander assistance program) is to be held on Sunday September 18, 2022.

Support Biker Lives Matter at https://bikerlivesmatter.com

Please do spread the word, even if you are unable to register for the program this time.

FREE Trauma kit included

The “Biker Lives Matter” Organization

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Rogue with his son Dale and grandson Reese – a family that rides together.

Click Here to Get Involved – http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

Article by Rogue – Founder of Biker Lives Matter, Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame

I have been asked a lot why I and some others started an organization named Biker Lives Matter and why it is important to me. My answer is simple, there is a need for an organization that calls attention to the tragic loss of lives and livelihoods from motorcycle crashes.

In the 1970s, I became involved in motorcycle rights and safety. At the time, motorcycle injury and death rate were high so the government and insurance companies began trying to pass laws that they hoped would help protect motorcyclists when crashes happened.

I have been riding motorcycles for 69 years and both my life and that of the others who ride has always been important to me.

I have seen many people injured and I know too many that have died.

I consider myself one of the lucky ones to still be riding at the age of 83 years old.

CLICK HERE To Read this insightful feature article on Bikernet.com

SUPPORT Biker Lives Matter – Visit website to know more: http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

Red Cross Philippines vows faster, more effective response with motorcycles

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from https://mb.com.ph by Dhel Nazario

The Philippine Red Cross vowed on Saturday, Dec. 11, to provide a more effective humanitarian response now that it is more equipped after receiving motorcycles donated by Honda Philippines Inc.

PRC Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Sen. Richard Gordon gave this assurance to the public during the ceremonial distribution of Honda motorcycle units to local Red Cross chapters in North Luzon, Central Luzon, South Luzon, Bicol, Visayas, and Mindanao clusters.

Gordon expressed his gratitude to Honda Philippines Inc. President Susumu Mitsuishi for the carmaker’s turnover of 104 motorcycles, complete with insulated top box.

“These motorcycles will level-up the capacity of PRC’s fleet for responding to emergencies. The PRC is now more equipped to provide speedy and effective responses during disasters, public health crises, and other situations that require humanitarian aid,” Gordon said.

Gordon also thanked respected automotive industry parts supplier Eddie Jose as he assured the group of the PRC’s commitment to use the assets to protect the public’s well-being, health, and to save lives.

“Each PRC chapter will use these new motorcycles to ensure faster and easier access to blood, saliva RT-PCR testing, and soon, even first aid assistance. These motorcycles will enable PRC volunteers and staff to quickly reach areas that would be inaccessible to larger vehicles.” Gordon said.

He also reiterated that PRC personnel assigned to use the motorcycles will undergo a series of safety trainings that will enable them to properly handle and operate the units safely especially during high-stress, high-pressure situations.

“The humanitarian situations faced by PRC riders will range from the routine to the extreme. This makes it a priority for us to train volunteers and staff on the safe and proper handling of these vehicles especially during high-stress incidents. We are a staunch advocate of road safety and I want our volunteers and staff to achieve a high level of skill and safety in their use of these motorcycles,” he said.

The initial phase of the training is composed of three hours of classroom lectures and three hours of practical motorcycle handling. Further training will be given as needed to the PRC staff and volunteers.

Last call to register for the DAV 5K!

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Honor our Disabled American Veterans

This weekend thousands of members and supporters of the DAV (Disabled American Veterans) community will come together to honor America’s ill and injured veterans at the DAV 5K presented by Humana. Although online registration ended for our in-person event, you can still register TOMORROW at The Banks at 7:00 AM.

If you cannot make the in-person event, you still have time to register for the virtual event! Register for the virtual race today and walk, roll, run or ride to support America’s ill and injured veterans November 6-11.

Whether you’re on the West Coast, the East Coast or near us in Cincinnati, you can still support America’s veterans and participate with us.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER TODAY

DAV keep the lifesaving programs and services to our nation’s injured veterans free of charge and participate in the DAV 5K, in-person or virtually. Thank you for helping keep the promise to America’s veterans.

Sincerely,
The DAV 5K Team

P.S. Not able to join the DAV 5K, but want to help veterans? Make a special gift to DAV instead. Your donation will help America’s veterans get the benefits they’ve earned.

DAV is a tax-exempt organization, and all contributions are tax-deductible according to IRS regulation.

Annual Motorcycle Ride for Toys for Tots to Begin October 24

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by Allison Keys from https://www.krqe.com

On Sunday, Oct. 24, the 17th Annual Ride for Toys for Tots will kick off the season.

Toys for Tots begins collections for holiday season during motorcycle run.

As a child, there is nothing quite as exciting as waking up on Christmas morning with presents under the tree. However, not every child gets to experience that feeling.

The Toys for Tots campaign works to change that. Assistant Program Coordinator Paul Caputo and Maj. Mike Schroeder discuss the campaign and how it’s making a difference in the lives of local children.

A program by the US Marine Corps Reserve, Toys for Tots strives to collect new, unwrapped toys during October, November, and December every year and to distribute them as Christmas gifts to children in need within the community.

On Sunday, Oct. 24, the 17th Annual Ride for Toys for Tots will kick off the season at the Super Walmart located on 528 and Enchanted Hills. Registration for the motorcycle ride starts at 9 a.m. with a ride to Thunderbird Harley-Davidson at 5000 Alameda Blvd. for an afterparty. The entry fee to the event is an unwrapped gift.

For more information on how to get involved with the program, visit https://toysfortots.org/.

If you’d like to put a donation box for toys at your business, call Paul Caputo at 505-975-2033.

WATCH: Full interview with Toys for Tots Asst. Program Coordinator Paul Caputo and Maj. Mike Schroeder

New York City’s motorcycle community is riding to save lives

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from https://www.wmay.com/

The orders were straightforward and immediate: pick up the supplies, ride through the streets of New York City and make the deliveries.

There would be no detours, no diversions. The clock was ticking.

On March 21, Ryan Snelson and three other motorcycle riders geared up, divided up the supplies and took off from Montauk, New York, to meet their receivers in Tribeca and Queens. The supplies strapped to their bikes would help protect the doctors, nurses and other health care professionals battling the deadly novel coronavirus pandemic. New York City hospitals were running out of personal protective equipment (PPE) as the number of sick grew each day. The masks, gloves and gowns Snelson and his crew were in possession of could save patients’ — and doctors’ — lives.

Snelson, a longtime biker, took action against the virus the only way he knew how: by calling on his fellow bikers to join him in the cause.

“We’re just regular people who have bikes and have regular jobs in the city,” he told ABC News. “The motorcycle community is very active in New York.”

Snelson was intrigued after learning about Masks for Docs, a grassroots campaign that was started two weeks ago by Chad Loder, a computer security researcher and entrepreneur in the Los Angeles area. Masks for Docs, which is in the process of being recognized as a 501 (c) charity organization, connects people who have PPE with hospitals and health clinics around the country. Donors and receivers fill out an online questionnaire and Masks for Docs then shares the info with its local volunteer chapters to verify the applicants and distribute the supplies quickly to the requisite facilities.

“We’re getting photos from doctors and nurses who are wearing trash bags and bandanas [for protection],” Loder told ABC News. “We’ve had hospitals say they cannot accept donations but doctors are privately reaching out to us. We have to move faster than the virus.”

Individuals can donate surgical, construction and N95 masks, hand sanitizers, hazmat suits, disposable scrubs, face shields and gowns on the Masks for Docs site. Loder said local chapters are given guidance on acceptable donations as well as safety precautions when picking up and dropping off the PPE.

More than 60 riders have joined the New York “moto squad,” according to Snelson, and supplies have been delivered to all five New York City boroughs as well as northern New Jersey.

“It all happened so fast,” Snelson noted. “We’re figuring it out as we go … and we can start and stop based on our schedules.”

Meredith Balkus, who joined Snelson on the group’s first mission, recalled how eerie and still the city’s streets were that Saturday night, a “surreal” experience for the riders involved, she said.

“When this opportunity came up I was so excited,” she told ABC News. “We all understand the gravity of the situation and it’s really rewarding to help doctors who are on the front lines. It’s really dire in New York and there’s a lot of hunger out there to help.”

At least 776 New Yorkers have died from COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, and more than half of New York state’s cases, or 33,768, are in the city. Nearly 8,500 state residents are currently hospitalized. In New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio warned Sunday in an interview on CNN that hospitals have only one week’s worth of medical supplies.

Snelson said his team is cognizant of the infection risks and closely adheres to the safety guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We are so smart every step of the way,” added Balkus. “We’re wearing a full face helmet and a mask underneath. We always stay six feet apart from each other.”

Moto squad’s riders will do whatever it takes to stop the outbreak and slow down the rate of transmission, Snelson said.

“The motorcycle community will help — always,” he said.

New Motorcycle Rights Organization

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Biker Lives Matter Florida USA
Great News…. John Rogue has once again stepped up and will be leading the upcoming Board of Directors for Biker Lives Matter – Florida USA… as “President”

for those that don’t know Rogue ” I am a well known Photo-Journalist in the Motorcycle Field and have had my work continually published in national magazines since the late 60s. I also do work for select individuals.” *source bikerrogue.com

He has been involved in Biker Rights almost as long as I have been alive (a long dang time)… was one of the founders of the “original” A.B.A.T.E. ….

We couldn’t ask for a better or more experienced person to take the controls… Thank You Rogue….

Rogue is the Senior Editor at Bikernet.com

ROGUE SAYS: To many brothers and sisters are being killed by stupid drivers ( I almost had a lady hit me today by coming into my lane)

I believe we can put together a new organization to get legislation passed that will seriously penalize any one that hits and injures or kills a motorcyclist.

I do not think it is going to be easy or quick But like other Motorcycle Rights we have fought for in the past and won I think we can with this one as well.

There is NO FEE TO JOIN THIS ORGANIZATION

GET INVOLVED NOW!