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Harley-Davidson Archives — Page 12 of 31 — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

Rumors Of Harley-Challenger Honda Rebel 1100 Getting Louder

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by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

Honda has been keeping busy for the past few weeks. The manufacturer recently unveiled the latest addition to its family, the Super Cub-based CT125 during the company’s virtual bike show. The CB-F Concept was also showcased on the digital stage, hinting at a new vintage aesthetic for the brand.

New motorcycles and designs aren’t the only reason Team Red has been creating a buzz: rumors of new models being developed have also been abounding. A few weeks ago, talks of a mid-sized Africa Twin resurfaced after a few months of hiatus, suggesting that there could soon be a proper midweight ADV coming to the lineup. Another rumor suggest that the CBR1000RR-R could be getting a midsize variant. However, the story that seems to be keeping everyone on the edge of their seat is the one regarding a 1100 twin-based, big-displacement Rebel.

That rumor first surfaced at the beginning of March 2020, following Young Machine’s report on the matter in its April 2020 issue. The Japanese publication seems to have the right connections since its predictions have been pretty accurate until now (think about its early reports about the upgraded Africa Twin and the Kawasaki ZX-25R in 2019).

Interestingly, our colleagues at Motorcycle News have now boarded the Rebel 1100 boat as well, reporting on the model with conviction rather than supposition. The team seems adamant that the 1,082cc twin unveiled in the 2020 Africa Twin in September 2019, will undoubtedly underline a new, bigger Rebel charged with the mission of stepping on Indian and Harley’s toes.

According to MCN, the new model will not only feature the new twin but also high-end components which will allow it to compete with the other premium cruisers currently on the market. It even goes as far as to suggest that the model will be unveiled at EICMA this upcoming November.

Considering we have yet to hear from Honda about this particular story, for now, the Rebel 1100 remains nothing more than a rumor, albeit a very loud and noisy one.

CAC Racer Is the Bike Harley-Davidson Didn’t Want, But Joe Petrali Built Anyway

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It sold earlier this year for $181,500 during the Mecum motorcycle auction in Las Vegas. It managed to do so thanks to the fact that it is one of only 12 such motorcycles known to have been made and, more importantly, it was built in person by the legendary Joe Petrali.

We’re talking about a 1934 Harley-Davidson CAC, a motorcycle designed specially not to race on the makeshift cinder tracks of that era, but on actual, purpose made speedways. And its arrival was made possible by the resilience of Class A racing champion Joe Petrali.

The Italian-American agreed to race for Harley for the first time in 1925, after proving his worth on bikes made by the competition. He quickly managed to do the same for the new employer by winning two national titles the following year riding H-D machines, just as the company decided to end its involvement in racing.

Harley returned to the starting grid in 1931, and quickly re-signed Petrali, only this time the man had bigger plans than ever before. Eyeing an entry in speedway racing, he needed a dedicated machine for the task, and tried to sell his idea to Harley-Davidson.

Word is the time’s higher-ups apparently weren’t impressed, and were reluctant to back the idea, so Petrali convinced several engineers to help him build the motorcycle over the weekends over at Harley. That bike is the CAC, a motorcycle powered by a 500cc engine with a single cylinder and no transmission and clutch.

The official story goes that there were a total of 20 CAC bikes built, and an additional 5 spare engines, but that number is likely lower than that, at about 12. One of them is this one here, which sold earlier this year in pretty much the same condition as it was back in the day.

More precisely, that means the bike has no modern replacement parts fitted on it, and it is not legal for someone to ride it on any public road. For collectors though, or for those planning to make an extra buck by reselling it at a later date, is a must have.

Harley-Davidson lays off staff, cuts salaries, amid coronavirus outbreak

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from https://www.reuters.com

April 15 (Reuters) – Harley-Davidson Inc said on Wednesday it had temporarily laid off most of its global production employees and implemented salary cuts in a bid to lower costs as the coronavirus pandemic has hurt its business.

The announcement comes weeks after the motorcycle maker withdrew its earnings forecast for this year, saying pandemic-induced disruptions could dent its ability to supply and sell motorcycles.

Harley’s shares were down 6.9% at $18.02 in afternoon trading.

As part of the cost cuts, its chief executive officer and board of directors will forgo their salaries, the company said, though it didn’t say for how long.

Salaries of the executive leadership would be cut by 30%, while most other salaried employees would see a reduction of between 10%-20% in their paychecks.

Outside the United States, it will take similar actions.

Harley said salary reductions will be reassessed at the end of the second quarter.

The company said it will also not hand out merit increases for 2020 and will freeze hiring. (Reporting by Rajesh Kumar Singh; Editing by Bernadette Baum)

1948 Harley-Davidson EL Panhead Is Why Motorcycles Should Only Come in Black

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Back in 1948, soon after proving its worth on the world’s battlefields, Harley-Davidson began the hard work of making motorcycles for the peacetime years everyone was anticipating. And that meant both coming up with new models, and remaking all of the company’s most successful engineering.

Several years before, in 1936, Harley had introduced the knucklehead engine as first overhead-valve, top of the line powerplant. The moment is still considered a turning point in motorcycle manufacturing and despite lasting for about a decade, the engine inspired all that came afterward.

The panhead, named so because the chrome rocker covers kind of looked like cooking pans, replaced the knucklehead in the lineup in 1948, and it too proved to be a revolutionary piece of engineering. Fitted in two displacements on the EL, FL and FLH bikes, it stayed in production until the Shovelhead took its place in 1965.

Right from the first year of production some incredible machines based on this engine were built. The EL such as this one here, for instance, equipped with the smaller displacement 61ci engine, is still one of the most coveted Harley products in the eyes of collectors and fans.

The bike pictured in the gallery above, part of the Eddie Vannoy collection of vehicles that will go under the hammer this summer at the hands of Mecum, is one of the first-year ELs that probably looks even better than it did when new.

Pitch black, shiny chrome and vivid red combine on the motorcycle to create a visual treat we don’t get to enjoy very often. The bike is, of course, the result of some restoration work, but that doesn’t diminish its appeal in any way.

The restoration work was done while trying to keep as close to the original as possible. The springer forks and rigid frame for instance were retained, but the bike received a Police Special speedometer that goes as high as 100 mph (162 kph).

Black and Red 1947 Harley-Davidson WL Police Bike Is What Bad Guys Feared

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Police departments were never slow in adopting emerging technologies. Given the nature of their work, these organizations had to adapt and use hardware that, if not more advanced than the one used by bad guys, and least on par with it. And motorcycles are no exception.

In the U.S. one of the preferred suppliers of motorcycles for the police force is Harley-Davidson. The company has been providing bikes for the force since the first years of the 20th century, when the Detroit PD was the first to commission and use the Harleys of that time. As you might imagine, at the time there were no police packages for bikes and not even cars for that matter, so these early police bikes were nothing more than civilian models with PD logos here and there.

That would change starting with the 1920s, when the fight against the villains of the era intensifies. Things like sirens and lights start being fitted on Harleys as they chase down bad guys, but it was not until the end of World War II that police Harleys would become norm.

That is all owed to the Army-specced WLA model, a no-nonsense machine based on the civilian version that was known at the time as the WL. The way in which the WLA handled itself during the war made police departments look to the WL with new interest.

The motorcycle you see in the gallery above is one of post-war police WLs, and is currently on the list of vehicles on sale during the Mecum Eddie Vannoy Collection sale in June. We’re not being told what police department it served back in its glory days, but we do know it comes with the customary siren and lights.

The bike as seen above is of course a restoration, one draped in black and red hues that are not the customary police colors but suit it beautifully, and powered by a restored 45ci engine linked to a 3-speed manual transmission.

Harley-Davidson to hold virtual annual meeting, acting CEO says More Roads plan is working

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by Margaret Naczek from https://www.bizjournals.com

Amid the instability of the COVID-19 pandemic, Harley-Davidson Inc.’s acting president and CEO Jochen Zeitz reflected back on the advancements made in the More Roads to Harley-Davidson strategy in 2019.

2020 already was a pivotal year in the company’s strategic plan to grow more riders and expand dealership reach, but the year became a lot more crucial as the Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) looks to also overcome the difficulties during a pandemic.

With concerns over public health and travel restrictions, Harley-Davidson organized its 2020 annual shareholders meeting to be conducted virtually via a live audio webcast on May 21, 2020. The annual meeting will elect nine directors to the board, approve the compensation of the company’s executive officers, approve amendments to the company’s restated articles of incorporation, approve the company’s 2020 incentive stock plan and ratify the selection of Ernst & Young LLP as Harley-Davidson’s independent registered public accounting firm.

“As we embark on our next chapter and seek new leadership, we are steadfast in our belief that we have both much to be proud of and much to look forward to,” Zeitz said in his letter to shareholders.

On Feb. 28, Harley-Davidson announced former CEO Matt Levatich had stepped down and Zeitz would assume the role of acting president and CEO. The company is currently engaged in a search for new CEO.

In his letter to shareholders, Zeitz shared some of the company’s accomplishments in 2019. While U.S. motorcycle sales continue to decline over consecutive quarters, Zeitz noted that in 2019 the rate of decline significantly tempered.

“After four years of accelerating declines, such improvement was supported by our More Roads actions, notably in how we’re Amplifying our Brand and delivering on our New Products catalysts for growth,” Zeitz said in the letter.
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Some other company milestones included the launch of the first Harley-Davidson electric motorcycle, the LiveWire, the introduction of Reflex Defensive Rider System, the acquisition of StaCyc and the launch of the company’s IRONe two-wheelers for children.

In its efforts to continue to grow new riders, Zeitz noted that in 2019, 75% of people who purchased Harley-Davidson products on Amazon were new to the company. Harley-Davidson dealerships that participated in company consulting engagements also saw a nearly 6% increase in motorcycle retail sales compared with dealers not in the program, Zeitz said. Internationally, Harley-Davidson also added 27 new dealerships.

“In 2019, we also continued to manage our business to address current market conditions across the globe. We expanded our Thailand plant to serve the ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) markets and increase customer access with more competitive prices, and we continued our work to mitigate the bulk of the impact of recent EU and China tariffs,” Zeitz said.

Zeitz said the company now expects the impact of tariffs to be significantly less in 2020 compared with 2019. According to its annual report filed in February, Harley-Davidson expects the impact of recent EU and China tariffs to be approximately $35 million, which is down significantly from the 2019 impact of $97.9 million.

Zeitz also stated that in 2019, Harley-Davidson finished with 3.1 million riders in the U.S., 55,000 more total riders than 2018. Throughout 2019, the company saw 527,000 new people join the brand.

“The number of people who continue to join Harley-Davidson each year is a testament to the power of our brand and our strengthened capabilities. We are becoming a company that excels at and exists to not only build great bikes, but to build riders,” Zeitz said in the letter.

Zeitz said that in 2020, the company will expand its focus from heavyweight motorcycle shipments to revenue from motorcycles and related products.

“This measure best reflects our comprehensive efforts to expand into new product segments and foster a customer-creation culture,” he said, “one that is laser-focused on our riders and fans who are passionate about our great brand.”

With Harley-Davidson Production, Sales Frozen, Argus Downshifts On Stock

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by Priya Nigam , Benzinga Staff Writer from https://www.benzinga.com

Although shares of Harley-Davidson Inc HOG 11.31% have significantly underperformed the S&P 500, the company has suspended production at most of its U.S. manufacturing facilities and shut its retail stores due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to Argus.

The Harley-Davidson Analyst David Coleman downgraded Harley-Davidson from Buy to Hold.

The Harley-Davidson Thesis

While Harley-Davidson’s stock has lost around 59% over the past three months versus a 24% decline for the S&P 500, recent developments have been particularly disappointing, Coleman said in the Monday downgrade note. (See his track record here.)

The motorcycle manufacturer has withdrawn its 2020 guidance.

Argus lowered its adjusted earnings estimates for 2020 and 2021 from $3.52 per share to $3.07 per share and from $3.68 per share to $3.41 per share, respectively.

Harley-Davidson had witnessed a marginal improvement in sales in the fourth quarter, raising expectations of its strategic growth plan leading to a turnaround by the end of 2020, Coleman said. The company instead stopped production and closed its retail stores.

Although Harley-Davidson’s shares are trading near the bottom of their 52-week range, they are not attractively priced given the company’s substantial challenges, including the loss of production and sales due to the coronavirus, the analyst said.

HOG Price Action

Harley-Davidson shares were trading 5.47% higher at $15.82 at the time of publication Monday.

BMW Goes After Harley-Davidson with Stunning R 18 Big Boxer Cruiser

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Despite being at the top of sales charts in the motorcycle industry, BMW hasn’t had an entry in the cruiser segment since the R1200 RC . That changed with the introduction of the brand new R 18 this week.

Featuring the Big Boxer engine, the “most powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production,” the R18 is described as a bike that blends the classic lines of older BMW bikes with modern day technology.

The design of the motorcycle, and parts of its construction, like the rear swingarm, are reminiscent of the R 5, a bike designed way back in the 1930s as the first BMW motorcycle to use a foot-operated four-speed gearbox. Cues to that resemblance are also the double-loop frame, the pear-drop tank, the open-running driveshaft, the pinstriped paintwork, and of course the exposed drive-shaft.

At the center of the motorcycle lies the Big Boxer BMW has been teasing for more than a year now. The 2-cylinder engine is 1,802 cc in displacement, develops 91 hp at 4,750 rpm, and provides a maximum of 158 Nm of torque at 3,000 rpm.

The motorcycle comes with three driving modes – Rain, Roll and Rock – and is equipped with automatic stability control (can be disengaged) and drag torque control as standard. Optionally, reverse assist and hill start control can be specified.

BMW did not announce yet when the motorcycle will become available and how much it will charge for it. When it hits the market though, it will be available in First Edition guise, adding a few unique extras like a classic black finish with white pinstriped paintwork, chrome highlights and First Edition badges.

Additionally, for the U.S. market BMW partnered with several companies to give the bike a local flavor. The customization program there includes parts from Roland Sands Design, Mustang Seat, or Vance & Hines.

Full details on the BMW R 18 can be found in the press release section below.

 

Harley-Davidson might have two all-new bikes coming, leaked documents suggest

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by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com/

These bikes would likely share powerplants with the Pan America and Bronx.

When you’ve been in business for as long as Harley-Davidson has, it’s really easy to let things get a bit stale and boring. We’ve seen that from H-D for a while, but over the past year or so, it’s been working to shake things up with bikes like the Livewire and the Pan-America, as well as the middleweight Bronx.

It would seem, based on some leaked documents from an investor presentation, that it’s not entirely done shaking yet. Specifically, this document suggests that there are at least two more motorcycles in the works — non-traditional Harleys, all — and I couldn’t be more excited.

The first (and the one for which I’m most excited) appears to be a reimagining of the XR1200 flat-track racer homage that H-D released in the mid-aughts. The would seem to be an answer to Indian’s excellent FTR1200, and if we can get some of that competitive spirit to move from the flat track to the showroom, then I’m all for it.

The second bike is a more 1980s sport-bike-meets-cafe-racer thing, but it’s not especially original or exciting looking, at least compared to the Pan America or the Bronx. That said, unoriginal doesn’t mean bad. It’s packaged well, with the big Revolution Max V-Twin engine sporting a cool bronze hue. It’s like Harley went back to the Buell days and then stripped off all the weird stuff so non-nerds would buy them.

Seeing as these are just leaked mentions of bikes, we don’t have a ton of information about them. Based on the images, we see that they will share the Revolution Max engine with the Pan America and Bronx, though in what displacements, we don’t know.

We also don’t know when we’d expect to see these bruisers make their official debuts, let alone be released for sale, though with the current state of global affairs, we’d bet it’s at least a year or two off, if ever.

Harley-Davidson declined to comment on future product.

Harley-Davidson Motor Co. chief operating officer Michelle Kumbier leaving company

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by David Schuyler from https://www.bizjournals.com/

Harley-Davidson Motor Co. senior vice president and chief operating officer Michelle Kumbier is leaving the company April 3, Milwaukee-based parent Harley-Davidson Inc. said in a regulatory filing Tuesday.

As chief operating officer since October 2017, Kumbier oversaw the Milwaukee-based motorcycle manufacturer’s U.S. and international markets in addition to responsibilities leading product and operations.

In the filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) did not disclose a reason for her departure. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the filing.

Kumbier is the latest high-ranking executive to leave the company in recent months. Those departures include former president and CEO Matt Levatich, a permanent replacement for whom has yet to be hired.

Before adding chief operating officer to her responsibilities, Kumbier was senior vice president, Motor Company product and operations. In that role, she led a team of more than 4,500 employees worldwide to bring Harley-Davidson motorcycles, parts and accessories and general merchandise to market.

Kumbier joined Harley-Davidson in 1997 in operations purchasing, and has since taken on roles with increasing responsibility in purchasing, strategic planning, new business development, and parts and accessories.

Kumbier’s former product and operations responsibilities will be assumed by Bryan Niketh, vice president of product development of the Harley-Davidson Motor Co., who has been promoted to senior vice president of product and operations. Kumbier’s global sales responsibilities as chief operating officer will be assumed by acting president and CEO Jochen Zeitz.

In another move, Harley-Davidson Inc. assistant general counsel Paul Krause, who has been serving as interim chief legal officer, has been hired for the role permanently. He’s also been promoted to chief compliance officer and secretary of Harley-Davidson Inc.

A number of high-ranking executives have left the company in the span of a half-year as the company struggles to turn around a years-long slide in sales. Levatich stepped down Feb. 28. Paul Jones left his role as vice president, chief legal officer, chief compliance officer and secretary of Harley-Davidson Inc. near the end of November 2019. In October 2019, the company removed Neil Grimmer from his post as president of global brand development following an investigation that the company said showed violations of the company’s code of conduct.

The same month Heather Malenshek, who was chief marketing officer and senior vice president, marketing and brand for Harley-Davidson Motor Co., left the company, according to her LinkedIn page.