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Motorcycle Live: Inside the UK’s biggest motorcycle show

By General Posts

from https://www.standard.co.uk/ by David Williams

It’s that time of year bikers dread – the days are shorter and the weather is colder and wetter, forcing fair-weather riders to leave their bikes parked at the roadside. Which means it’s time to head to Birmingham by train for Motorcycle Live, to see what they’ll be riding (and wearing) next year, when it all improves again.

The UK’s biggest bike show rolls Birmingham’s NEC from Saturday December 4 to Sunday December 12, revealing dozens of new motorcycles, even presenting show-goers with the chance to try some of them out.

More than 55 leading motorcycle manufacturers are showing off their latest machinery, and attendants are being encouraged to try them for size. New metal being revealed includes the Suzuki GSX-S1000 GT, the Triumph Tiger Sport 660, the Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak and the Husqvarna Norden 901.

Kawasaki will be showing off its new Z650RS, while other new bikes include the CFMoto 700CL-X and the Honda NT1100. Show-goers also get to see the British-built Langen Two Stroke, as well as the Norton V4SV, while BMW will have its futuristic-looking CE04 electric scooter on show.

Celebrating the future of motorcycling with electric technology is also high on the show’s agenda, with the brand-new Electric Test Ride Zone giving consumers an opportunity to try out a range of battery-powered models on a special indoor track.

This feature will give riders a feel for the instant power and responsiveness typical of an electric motorcycle – all without any emissions. Electrically-assisted bicycles – e-bikes – will also be available for show-goes to try out.

Elsewhere at Birmingham’s sprawling NEC there will be custom and classic bike zones, while race fans will be able to meet their track heroes, as stars from WorldSBK, British Superbike and road racing make guest appearances across the nine days.

Visitors can also watch Moto Trails, featuring the jaw-dropping skills of pro trail riders Jack Price, former World Trails 2 Champion and seven-time British Champion, and Michael Brown, European and multiple British Trials Champion, with show times throughout the day.

Honda will be paying homage to the original 1992 Fireblade by displaying a range of heritage models from across the years, while rival firm Suzuki is displaying all seven of its world championship-winning Grand Prix machines, including the GSX-RR of 2020 title-winner Joan Mir and Barry Sheene’s 1976 and 1977 500s.

Harley-Davidson will be showcasing its ‘Sportster Evolution Galley’, tracing the development of its 64-year-old Sportster range, while ‘bikers’ aged 1.5 to five years can try their skills at the Kiddimoto Balance Bike Experience, on an inflatable course.

Riders aged between four and twelve will be able to get kitted out in motocross clothing, gloves and a helmet – and be unleashed on a circuit designed to give a taste of the motocross experience, for novices and more experienced riders alike.

‘Experience Adventure’, supported by Honda, Royal Enfield and Triumph, will allow participants to enjoy a taste of off-road adventure riding, which will include tuition on bike set-up, body positioning and balance across an assortment of terrains.

For those wanting to break into motorcycling, meanwhile, every day during the show the Motorcycle Industry Association (MCIA) will be offering free 20-minute riding lessons with a professional instructor, all protective clothing provided. Participants will be introduced to the brakes, gears and slow speed handling, giving visitors the chance to see if a life on two wheels is for them.

Who knows; maybe next year they’ll be riding to the show at the NEC too.

More information at: www.motorcyclelive.co.uk/features/category/ride-bikes/

Wild Hurst Sportster

By General Posts

By Bandit, Sam Burns and Ryan

Sportster project in an old Amen sprung frame by a shop in Europe named Chopper Chrash.

Ryan Woods, the Chief of Chrash at Chopper Chrash shared info about this Hurst, Olds 442 theme project.

http://chopperchrash.bigcartel.com/

Ryan started with the old Amen, sprung frame and a random springer he found on eBay. Then he bought a ‘74 Ironhead basket case from a buddy.

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Spec Showdown: Harley-Davidson Sportster S Vs. Indian Scout

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

An American middleweight melee.

For decades, the Harley-Davidson Sportster dominated the American middleweight V-twin class, mostly by dint of being the only American middleweight V-twin. Without a top contender to challenge its reign, the Motor Company only issued modest upgrades since 1986. However, that all changed when the Indian Scout burst onto the scene in 2015.

Heavily based on the Victory Octane, the revived Scout paired Indian’s rich heritage with thoroughly modern equipment. The liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,133cc V-twin was the antithesis of Harley’s ancient air-cooled Evo engine. Compared to the Sportster’s signature teardrop tank and engine cooling fins, the Scout’s low-slung stance and neo-bobber aesthetic presented a viable alternative to Harley’s aging platform.

Facing a formidable foe and new emissions regulations, the Bar and Shield telegraphed its counterpunch when it revealed the Custom 1250 in July, 2018. Nearly three years later, that haymaker finally landed when Harley officially announced the 2021 Sportster S.

Complete with a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,252cc V-twin, the new Sportster’s spec sheet now stands toe-to-toe with the Scout. Of course, we won’t know who wins the battle in the showroom until the Sportster S arrives at dealerships. For now, however, the tale of the tape tells a fascinating story.

Overview
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S – Vs – 2021 Indian Scout

Middleweight Might
Featuring Harley’s shiny new Revolution Max 1250T, the 2021 Sportster now produces 121 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of torque. While the Scout previously set performance benchmarks for the category with 100 horsepower and 72 lb-ft of torque, Indian’s entry cruiser now looks outgunned. Of course, the Revolution Max V-twin touts a larger displacement, which helps the Sportster S steal that performance feather from Indian’s cap.

On top of that power deficit, the Scout lugs around 59 extra pounds, weighing in at 561 pounds compared to the Sportster’s 502-pound wet weight. Straightline acceleration and top speed define a motorcycle not, but agility goes to the Hog as well. With a 59.8-inch wheelbase, fully adjustable USD fork, and a linkage-equipped monoshock, the Sportster S outmaneuvers the Scout’s 62-inch wheelbase, conventional front end, and dual rear shocks.

Indian does outfit the Scout with a 16-inch wheelset shod in sticky Pirelli Night Dragon rubber while Harley opts for a 16-inch rear and 17-inch front. We could surmise that the smaller wheelset gives the Scout a handling edge if it weren’t for the Sportster’s specially-developed Dunlop GT503 tires. Thanks to an aggressive profile and sticky compound, the Dunlops compensate for the Sportster’s larger front wheel, helping to deliver a 34-degree lean angle compared to the Scout’s 29 degrees.

Novice-Friendly
Though Indian no longer holds the performance edge, the Scout still has a fighting chance. At 29.6 inches, the 2021 Sportster’s perch is a full four inches about the Scout’s 25.6-inch seat height. Most riders won’t have an issue with the Sporty’s seat height, which sags to 28.9-inches in the saddle, but even less will have problems with Indian’s low-slung seat. Of course, novice and inseam-challenged riders benefit most from a low seat height and the Scout is good option for that reason.

Conversely, Indian only offers optional ABS on the Scout while the Harley flaunts rider aids like traction control, cornering ABS, ride modes, and engine braking settings. On top of the full electronics suite, the Motor Company’s new round, four-inch TFT display also outshines the Scout’s analog speedometer and digital tachometer combo. Of course, you could reason the Scout’s spartan accommodations help beginners learn the ropes with a less cumbersome system, but it’s usually better to have rider aids and not need them as opposed to the other way around.

If we’re going to make any case for beginner-appropriate features, however, it should start with the brakes, and the Sportster delivers yet again. Championing a full Brembo braking system with a radially mounted four-piston front caliper, floating single-pot rear binder, and master cylinder, the Sportster S stops surprisingly well. On the other hand, the Scout’s single two-piston caliper up front and single-piston clamper in the rear don’t deliver as much stopping power as its counterpart.

The Final Decision:
Though the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S walks away with nearly every round in its pocket, we still have to consider one very important detail: price. At $14,999, the souped-up Sporty is $3,000 over the Scout’s MSRP. Coupled with a 121-horsepower V-twin, Harley’s asking price could easily put the Sportster S out of most beginner’s grasp. When price is taken into account, the two cruisers stack up much more evenly, and may even cater to different customers/budgets.

With that said, we can’t wait to see how the Sportster and Scout duke it out in the future. Will Indian fight back with an even punchier V-twin? Will Harley offer a cheaper Sportster option without diluting too much performance? The middleweight cruiser class is a much more competitive environment these days, and we can’t wait to see Sportster and Scout continue to battle it out in the future.

Moto Nisto Custom Motorcycles Make the Humble Harley Sportster a Thing to Behold

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Marcel Nistor and his cohort at Moto Nisto build something special out of bikes that are decidedly not special as they come off the showroom floor. He takes the base metal, often the Harley-Davidson Sportster, and then turns it into a showstopping custom machine.

Nistor does his work with style and pays a bit of homage to the early days of motorcycling when bikes looked tough, were stripped down to emphasize performance, and offered no-nonsense whatever in the way of plastic.

He and his team begin using modern powertrains, strip away what he calls “ugly factory body panels, useless gizmos and under-performing components,” and then sets to work adapting their own parts to create “machines envisioned by past racers.”

For Nistor, it’s all about melding the functionality and reliability found in the motorcycles of today with the class and style of past decades.

“We like to start off with a Harley-Davidson Sportster as a blank canvas and strip off everything it stands for. What do we like about it? Mostly the air-cooled, unit engine in a cradle frame,” Nistor says. “Time-proven, simple, reliable, honest performance, no-maintenance valvetrain, ground clearance, parts availability, inexpensive. What don’t we like about it? Everything else.”

It’s a take-no-prisoners approach to building custom motorcycles, and Michigan resident Nistor, it appears, is that kind of guy. He once received a Citizen Award from the Ferndale City Council for his help that led to the arrest of a home invasion suspect.

Ferndale Police Chief Tim Collins presented Nistor with the award, which was given for his “actions and quick response which led to the arrest of a very dangerous criminal” who later confessed to an October home invasion.

Nistor helped police locate the suspect who was wanted in for an attack on a homeowner’s property where the homeowner was forced to fire his handgun at the suspect. A couple of days later, Nistor was riding his motorcycle in Redford when he saw a Ford Ranger which matched the description from a news story he had seen. Nistor rode his bike toward the truck in question, confirmed the license plate and put in a call to 911. The suspect was arrested and later confessed to the home invasion and two other crimes. Collins said the man is suspected of many other crimes as well including home invasions and various larcenies.

But as for his customs, they tell a similar no-baloney tale. They’re identified simply with names such as Nr. 14, Nr. 13 and Revision B. Nr. 13 is 1997 Harley Davidson Sportster 1200 which was completely reimagined in 2017, and needless to say, it is both simple and stylish.

For instance, his latest project, Nr. 15 is, was recently completed and what was once a straightforward 1996 Heritage Softail has become an all-purpose hooligan he says is “ready to do some exploring off the pavement.” The bike was built with the help of some invaluable parts from Michael Selman of Bella Corse.

The artists and beasts who make up Moto Nisto are Internet Virtuoso and critic Valerie Souto, Creator-Designer-Mechanic-Electrician-Fabricator-and Head of Housekeeping Marcel Nistor, Welder-Fabricator-Cocktail Mixer Len Puch (of Speedcult), Machinist Ry Seidler (of RAS Moto Detroit) and Painter Chuck Miller.

As for getting your hands on a Moto Nisto custom, you’ll have to contact the Majordomo about this one. His answers on the website are revealing indeed. So how much does one cost and does it come with a warranty?

“Hmm, good question,” he says. “It depends – if you’re paying us $100K to build you one, we’ll provide you with a lifetime warranty on anything that breaks. If we only charge you $10K to modify your own bike, we only guarantee our own parts or the pre-existing ones affected by the installation of ours, for 24 (metric or U.S.) months or 60K (U.S) miles, whichever occurs first.”

Moto Nisto Custom Motorcycles Website is at https://www.motonisto.com/

Three Amazing Motorcycles You Can Buy Brand New for Less Than $10K

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

If you’re in the market for a new motorcycle, you could do worse than these three versatile, cruiser-style rides, and the best news is that you can have any of them showroom-new for under $10,000.

And in yet more interesting news, two of the three are American.

The 2021 Kawasaki Vulcan S ABS comes in at a wallet-friendly $7,599 and it represents a middleweight hybrid with somewhat brawny underpinnings. While it’s big and powerful enough to appeal to riders who require sporty performance, it also offers cushy ergonomics designed to suit nearly any rider size, no matter their skill level.

The Vulcan S is powered by a 649cc liquid-cooled parallel-twin taken from the Ninja 650 line, and it also boasts a wide range of available adjustments for the seat, the footpegs, and handlebar positions. The 2022 models offer a base-model Vulcan S (sorry, no ABS included), and that’s what makes the 2021 model such an excellent value.

For 2021, the Harley-Davidson Iron 883 comes in at the top of the range, and at $9,749, it offers an opportunity to join the HD fraternity at a price that won’t cause hiccups in a tight budget.

The Iron 883 does have the Sportster lineage American riders often prefer, and it’s a bit of a throwback with some stripped-down street cred. Featuring a low solo seat height, nearly naked bike bodywork and the venerable 883cc, air-cooled V-Twin, there’s no doubt it’s an HD. And in a departure, it also happens to be the lightest, lowest, and most new-rider-friendly bike in the HD lineup. For your cash, you get low down bars, a low seat height, and a lowered suspension.

Unfortunately, should you want ABS braking, you’ll find yourself over the target as that feature puts another $795 on the final sticker price.

But the real standout here is the 2022 Indian Scout Bobber Sixty and Scout Sixty, and they tip the cash register at $8,999 and $9,499, respectively.

The Scout Sixty, offering a fantastic 1,000cc motor, is by far the most impressive of the three mentioned here. With a 25.8-inch seat height and weighing in at a substantial 542 pounds, it’s hardly an entry-level cruiser. Sporting a 60ci (819 cc) liquid-cooled 78 hp mill, this good-looking and powerful engine helps the Scout blow the pegs off the other two bikes listed here.

But once again, if you want to stay inside the target price, you’re out of luck with the Scout Sixty as the ABS model will ding you an additional $800.

Whichever way you go, all three of these bikes will provide a ton of value and some needed thrills for under $10K.

Riding Experiences on Harley-Davidson Sportster S

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

In mid-July, American bike maker Harley-Davidson pulled the wraps off the Sportster S, one of the new Milwaukee models we’ve been waiting for for so long we kind of lost hope of actually seeing it. Yet, here it is, so fresh that it is only now beginning to be properly tested by users, and so promising it’d better not disappoint.

Described by Harley as an “all-new sport custom motorcycle designed to deliver a thrilling riding experience,” the two-wheeler makes use of the most modern technologies brewed recently in Milwaukee, and, for a rather balanced price of $14,999, promises entirely new thrills for its riders.

Massive in design, the bike holds in its frame the Revolution Max 1250 engine, an application of which some people are already enjoying in the Pan America. On this here beast, the V-Twin is officially titled Revolution Max 1250T, and comes with impressive performance figures: 121 horsepower and “tremendous torque at low RPM” as per Harley. That’s fewer hp than the 150 claimed for the Pan America, but more than enough for the lightweight bike: the thing tips the scale, after all, at only 502 pounds (227 kg).

All that power is put to the ground by means of cast-aluminum wheels with a staggered design, 19-inch front and 17-inch rear, linked to the rest of the build by fully adjustable front and rear suspension – SHOWA 43 mm inverted cartridge forks and a SHOWA Piggyback reservoir rear shock.

Stopping power comes from Brembo, forward foot controls are there together with a low handlebar to give the rider an aggressive posture while riding, and thanks to these the entire experience of moving on the back of the Sportster S should be one to remember.

Harley threw into the Sportster mix the entire might of its technological advancements, some of them already deployed on the Pan America. We get things like three pre-programmed, selectable ride modes (Sport, Road and Rain) and two custom modes, a 4.0-inch-diameter TFT screen showing all the instrumentation and infotainment features, and all-LED lighting.

By now, almost three weeks past the unveiling point, there is number of test ride videos with this motorcycle already out there for us all to get a sense of how the thing feels on the actual road. The latest comes from a German custom and Harley-junkie shop that goes by the name Thunderbike.

Knowing the way these guys treat the American wheeled wonders, we tend to trust what they’re saying. And for the Sportster S, the verdict is simple and blunt: fantastic.

The rider sent by the Germans for the test ride spent about 200 km (124 miles) on the back on the motorcycle, and the crew managed to get some incredible images of the thing while on the move, as you can see in the short video below. And, even if we don’t get to see the Sportster S reach its top speed, we’re still treated to some incredible shots – but possibly not enough talk about it.

The new Harley should arrive at dealerships in mid-September, and that’s probably when the real flood of test ride videos will hit us. Kind of a close call, given how fall will move in to put an end to motorcycle riding in most parts of the world, but one never knows with this global warming and all.

Being less pretentious than the Pan America when it comes to its target customers, the Sportster S, the only bike offered presently by Harley in a family it calls Sport, could become one of the heavy-hitters in its segment in no time. And judging by how good two of them look on the road at the same time, we wouldn’t mind seeing larger packs of such machines roaming the continents at once.

Harley-Davidson Sportster S 2021 First Ride Review

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Teaching an old dog new tricks.

Harley-Davidson has produced the Sportster for over six continuous decades. Despite the nameplate dating back to the Eisenhower administration, the Sportster canon only contains two periods: the Ironhead years and the Evo era. Since 1957, a pushrod-actuated, 45-degree V-Twin always thrummed at the model’s core. Along with the vibey powerplant, a cradle frame, conservative styling, and spartan accommodations defined the platform. That all changes with the 2021 Sportster S, however.

For the first time in the model’s history, the brakes read Brembo, the gearbox touts six speeds, and the lighting is LED. Boasting a feature-rich electronic suite, the historically entry-level Hog gains premium status overnight. A daring new design encompasses the brand’s acclaimed Revolution Max engine and aligns with the model’s performance ambitions. Of course, the 1,252cc, 60-degree V-twin doesn’t deliver the cruiser’s customary vibes. Instead, it delivers 121 horsepower. The Sportster may be a sexagenarian, but it’s spryer than ever in 2021.

To prove the new model’s mettle, the Motor Company invited us to a day-long ride through the picturesque canyons of the Angeles National Forest and the man-made canyons of Downtown L.A. With such a dramatic makeover, questions naturally arose. Will the 2021 interpretation appeal to the customer base? Will it retain its David vs. Goliath attitude? Is it still a Sportster? Like all Harleys, the answers center around the V-twin mill.

Engine
Since 1986, the Sportster harnessed the MoCo’s Evolution engine. Long after the Big Twin class moved on to the brand’s Twin Cam V-twin, and subsequently, the Milwaukee-Eight, the Sportster continued championing the bulletproof Evo. Undersquare, air-cooled, and rumbly, the engine’s charisma overshadowed its crudeness. Instead of refining the platform over the years, H-D didn’t fix what wasn’t broke.

Instead, it reinvented the model 35 long years later with the aptly named Revolution Max engine. Fresh off its debut in the Pan America, the liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,252 V-twin earns a cruiser-appropriate retune in the Sportster S. The Revolution Max 1250T may concede 29 ponies to its adventurous cousin, but it’s hard to notice the difference in the saddle.

Unlike the Pan America, which spools up to its powerband, the Sportster S is all teeth all the time. Well, in Sport mode, at least. Predictably, Road is more mannerly and Rain is downright pleasant. Two additional custom ride modes allow users to adjust power delivery, traction control/ABS parameters, and engine braking settings to their liking. Whether you prefer a chill ride or a thrill ride, the Sportster switches identity with the tap of a button.

In Sport mode, performance reigns supreme. From the initial throttle crack, the torque piles on, peaking at 94 lb-ft at 6,000 rpm. The 1250T really shines in the mid-range, but power is accessible throughout the 9,500-rpm rev range. On the other hand, the throttle-by-wire system exhibited an abrupt, on/off quality in Sport mode.

Snappy roll-ons frequently pushed me to the edge of the plank-like seat and the front end dove under quick throttle cuts. What Sport mode lacks in finesse, it makes up with enthusiasm, so I reserved it for highway and canyon duty. In the city, Road mode smoothed out the V-twin’s power pulses without sacrificing too much raw acceleration. However, the Revolution Max and high-mount exhaust system threw off significant heat when confined to surface streets.

While the Sportster S does feature rear cylinder deactivation at a stop, the tracker-style pipes not only contribute to the engine heat, it traps it under the seat. Unsurprisingly, the rider’s right leg receives the first heatwave, but the engine’s port side follows suit in short order. In motion, the warmth goes unnoticed, but from light to light, the heat forced me to rest my right foot on the peg at a stop. Otherwise, the exhaust was liable to broil my inner thigh to a medium-well shank.

Despite those drawbacks, the Revolution Max remains the star of the show. Of course, to optimize that star performance, Harley had to surround it with a complimentary cast of components.

Chassis
Composed of three separate frame sections, the Sportster S chassis is like nothing in the company’s current cruiser lineup. The front, middle, and tail trellis frame units bolt directly to the 1250T engine, reducing weight while increasing rigidity. In turn, the handling improves markedly over the Evo era models, jumping from a 28-degree maximum lean angle to 34-degrees of lean. Tip-in and steering rate are predictable and stable.

Despite the 160/70 Dunlop GT503 tire wrapped around the 17-inch front wheel and the 180/70 rubber shod onto the 16-inch rear, the Sportster is surprisingly agile. Similarly, the 320mm single-disc front braking system seems lacking for a 121-horsepower machine, but the Brembo master cylinder delivers excellent bite along with nuanced feedback and feel. Needless to say, we would love to see how the Sportster S performs with slimmer tires and a dual-disc setup, but the stock equipment exceeds expectations.

The rear suspension suffers the same fate. With just 1.5-inches of travel, I anticipated the Showa monoshock to be one step removed from a hardtail. Thankfully, the linkage system helps the unit outperform the spec sheet, but the setup still has its limitation. The shock happily soaked up slow-speed bump, but fast-bump compliance was another story. Several large hits bucked me out of the seat or sent a shock directly through my back.

Of course, the model’s aggressive, low stance may look sporty, but it also restricts the suspension travel. Again, we would love to see a taller monoshock on the sportiest of Sportsters, but the piggyback unit performed admirably considering its handicaps. Luckily, the fully adjustable USD fork isn’t hindered by the same issues.

The front end only boasts 3.6 inches of travel, but the appropriately damped fork never bottoms under hard braking or big bumps. In a corner, the Sportster S holds its line in a smooth and predictable manner. The Dunlop GT503 tires suit the model well, with enough feedback and grip to inspire confidence. Of course, dragging the single-piston rear caliper on the 260mm disc helps stabilize the 500-pound rig upon corner entry.

The Sportster S was in its natural element in the canyons. The model holds its own in the city, but it reveals its naughty side on a curvy road. The high-spec componentry and adjustability certainly contributed to that nature, but the rider posture also factors into the Sportster’s performance.

Cockpit
At 29.6 inches, the S model’s seat height should fit a broad range of inseams. Despite the large exhaust heat shields pressing into the rider’s right leg, flat-footing the Sportster is effortless. Reach to the bars is a slight stretch, with the rider’s upper half leaned forward and a small bend at the elbows. The forward controls position the legs at a 90-degree angle, but feet point slightly upward on the pegs.

While the forwards increase long-distance comfort, they also place more weight on the rider’s hindquarters and off the pegs. As a result, I preferred the mid control-equipped Sportster S despite the acute leg bend. The sense of control provided by the mids would make it an instant upgrade for me. Unfortunately, the Motor Company doesn’t offer an option for mid control, but customers can purchase a conversion kit for $660.

The Sportster doesn’t perform poorly with the forwards, as both setups yield a 34-degree lean angle, but the mids allow the model to reach its full performance potential. Not to mention, after several hours with forward controls, my rear end started to ache due to so much of my weight bearing down on the thinly padded seat.

Harley also outfits the forwards with an extended shift lever (compared to the mid controls). The lever’s long throw also resulted in numerous unintentional shifts into neutral when kicking from first to second gear. I didn’t encounter the same problem once on the mid controls. I should note that the mids may prove too cramped for taller riders. At five-foot, 10-inches, I fit comfortably into the new rider triangle but the user’s purposes and preference will determine what’s best for them.

Last but certainly not least, the all-new round, four-inch TFT display is a first for the Sportster family. While the switchgear gains a host of new buttons and switches, the interface is intuitive and easy to navigate. From ambient temperature to engine temperature, from tire pressure to battery voltage, the rider can check every metric impacting the bike’s performance.

Bluetooth connectivity unlocks navigation, incoming call identification, and music-playing features. However, the Sportster S doesn’t include a GPS receiver, so the system relies on the rider’s smartphone network for those services. Also, without speakers included, the user will need to link their helmet communication system to the motorcycle.

The breadth and technology of the new infotainment system may be a giant leap forward, but the limited screen real estate can be restricting in navigation and diagnostic modes. With so much information crammed in such a small area, fonts quickly become illegible, especially at speed. For that reason, I stuck with the standard setup, pairing a large mph readout, needle-style tachometer, gear position indicator, and trip meters.

Conclusion
The 2021 Sportster S marks a watershed moment for the longest production motorcycle in history. From side valves to overhead valves to four valves per cylinder, the Sportster has come a long way, but its latest form is a major departure from the previous iterations. The Sportster S should appeal to existing, performance-oriented Harley customers but also draw new blood into the brand.

At 500 pounds and 121 horsepower, the historically entry-level model is lighter and more powerful than any other cruiser in the Motor Company’s portfolio, making it more of a giant killer than ever. By Sportster standards, the 2021 S model is a marvel, warts and all. While the Sportster S is a seminal entry in the Harley history books, the potential it presents is even more intriguing.

We can’t wait to see what the Bar and Shield does with the platform as it fills the slots under the flagship trim. No, this isn’t your grandad’s Sportster, it’s something entirely new, and Harley-Davidson plans to build on the model’s possibilities for the next 64 years.

Dunlop Motorcycle Tires Launches the All-New GT503 Tire for H-D Sportster

By General Posts

With the announcement of Harley-Davidson’s new Sportster S, Dunlop is releasing the all-new GT503.

With the announcement of Harley-Davidson’s new Sportster S, Dunlop is releasing the all-new GT503. The GT503 was designed specifically for the aggressive look and high performance of H-D’s new motorcycle. Developed to meet the high standards of Harley-Davidson, the GT503 combines construction, compound, and tread design to provide the ultimate in tire performance for the new H-D Sportster S. Riders will experience the kind of performance only Dunlop delivers.

Features and Benefits
• Aggressive tread pattern maximizes the land-to-sea ratio to offer superior dry-grip while also utilizing tread grooves that are long in length to enhance wet-weather performance
• Radial construction featuring Steel Jointless Belt (JLB) technology delivers more responsive and consistent handling while also providing a more compliant ride
• New compound has been formulated to provide excellent grip and mileage
• Sidewall design proudly features the Harley-Davidson name and updated styling
• New “wide” front tire size (160/70R17) provides a custom fat tire look, while still offering light and responsive handling
• Available exclusively through Harley-Davidson dealers

All-New GT503 Tire
Front
• Size – 160/70R17
• Load/Speed – 73V
• TL/TT – TL
• Sidewall – BL
• Part Number – 45244727

Rear
• Size – 180/70R16
• Load/Speed – 77V
• TL/TT – TL
• Sidewall – BL
• Part Number – 45244726

About Dunlop Motorcycle Tires
Dunlop is the largest supplier of original equipment and replacement motorcycle tires in the U.S.A.

For more information, visit https://www.dunlopmotorcycletires.com/