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Can you Ride with a Pet on your Motorcycle?

By General Posts

ASK A TROOPER: “Motorcycle Riding Dog”
by Ryan Janke from https://kfgo.com/

Question: Can someone with a motorcycle permit have their small dog riding on the motorcycle or would that be considered a passenger? We have already purchased a helmet and leather jacket for this lucky pup! Thank you for your response.

Answer: First of all, where will this dog be seated and how? I see less issues if you are talking about a motorcycle side car or a motorcycle trailer equipped with a kennel. But if you are talking about on the actual motorcycle with you, I don’t think this would be very safe for you or your pet.

If you are going to carry a passenger, there are a few key items to keep in mind:

Equip and Adjust Your Motorcycle:

  • A passenger seat and footrests are required by law.
  • Adjust tire pressure and suspension settings for the additional weight. (Do not exceed weight limitations specified in the owner’s manual.)
  • Readjust mirrors.

Passenger Preparation:

  • Provide protective riding gear: eye protection, a DOT-approved helmet, boots, gloves, long riding pants and a high-visibility motorcycle jacket.
  • Passengers under age 18 are required by law to wear a DOT-approved helmet.
  • Small children are required by law to be able to reach both footrests with their feet while sitting on the passenger seat.

Getting On and Off the Motorcycle:

  • Start the engine before the passenger gets on.
  • Squeeze the front brake while the passenger gets on or off the bike.
  • Passengers should get off the bike before the operator.

Passenger Safety Tips:

  • Hold operator’s waist or hips, or motorcycle’s passenger hand-holds.
  • Keep feet on footrests at all times, including while stopped.
  • Keep hands and feet away from hot or moving parts.
  • When turning, look over the operator’s shoulder in the direction of the turn.
  • Avoid turning around or making sudden moves that might affect operation.
  • If crossing an obstacle, rise off the seat keeping your feet on the foot pegs with knees slightly bent and allow legs to absorb the shock upon impact.

Operator Safety Tips:

  • A passenger will affect handling due to extra weight and independent motion.
  • Braking sooner with greater pressure may be necessary.
  • Use extra caution in a corner.
  • Allow more time and space for passing.
  • Be ready to counter the effects of wind.
  • Avoid extreme speeds and dramatic lean angles.

If you have any questions concerning traffic related laws or issues in Minnesota, send your questions to Trp. Jesse Grabow – Minnesota State Patrol at 1000 Highway 10 West, Detroit Lakes, MN 56501-2205. (You can follow him on Twitter @MSPPIO_NW).

Get ready for Adventures with unique design of Bandit’s Bedroll – Weekend Rides or a whole Week – easy reach essentials & separate section for must-carry tools. You won’t find such a riding product anywhere. Old school has its perks. CLICK For New 5-Ball Racing Shop!!!

Blue Collar Builder Giveaway

By General Posts

13 of 150 Spots Left To Go. Will 13 Of You Throw In?

@ Only $20 a spot

Yup, 13 more to go then we select a winner!

Nash Motorcycle Blue Collar Chopper Builders Special!! 1982’ HD XLH 1000 Ironhead Rigid Chopper Build Giveaway.

Pretty Darn Good Odds!

If you’re interested, please choose the “Friends & Family” option in payment. When we see your contact info in Venmo or PayPal, you’re in! Damon will DM you back to confirm.

Imagine a chance at getting this platform of pure potential for $20! That’s cheaper than a night’s worth of beer for many of you. There’s little reason not to go for it!

The specs:

  • Complete engine- 1982’ HD XLH 1000
  • Paughco frame
  • 19” high shoulder front rim, 16” stock rear
  • Narrow 39mm Sporty front end with very clean shaved lowers
  • New 12” chrome traditional Apes, Flanders style
  • Stock 4’ HD risers chrome
  • Mechanical rear brake, caliper style front brake
  • Old King Sporty tank (will need paint work on it) thrown in
  • NO TITLE, AND PICK UP LOCAL (will meet you) OR YOU PAY TO SHIP IF OUT OF STATE. (Bike is in Oceanside, CA)

Contact

Contact Damon George if you have any questions, want to pay with a Zelle QuickPay option, or just want to confirm your successful registration
…DM @Rocco123 on Instagram
…(or) Email damon@nashmotorcycle.com

Road Map

  • You will be given your unique spot #(’s) once you purchase
  • Once all spots are filled, Damon will announce the giveaway day and time to watch live on Instagram.
  • You will also be contacted before the giveaway goes live with the live event’s date and time to see if you have won!

WEBSITE: https://nashmotorcycle.com/

See A Video Walkaround Of The Build Here

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ProTaper Reveals its Industry First Aluminum and Carbon Fiber Handlebar

By General Posts

ProTaper Reveals its Industry First Aluminum and Carbon Fiber Handlebar Offering Greater Strength, Lower Weight for MX Riders

Fort Worth TX — January 19, 2022 — ProTaper, the industry leader in motorcycle handlebars and controls, today announced an industry first, a revolutionary carbon fiber-reinforced, aluminum handlebar designed specifically to meet the needs of motocross riders. The ProTaper ACF Handlebar uses a revolutionary Carbon Core system to maintain strength while creating the lightest 1 1/8-inch handlebar in the industry.

The use of unidirectional, unwoven carbon fiber creates a core for the bar with a maximum longitudinal tensile strength that is twice the strength of a traditional carbon fiber weave. This carbon fiber core allows ProTaper to reduce the thickness of the strong, 7000 series aluminum alloy walls in key areas, decreasing weight by up to 20% and producing unrivaled impact absorbing flex.

In addition, the ACF Handlebar uses ProTaper’s Control+ design, which creates 220 millimeters of space, an increase of up to 40 millimeters, for mounting controls such as hydraulic clutches, ignition mapping switches and electric starters. The Control+ design creates this additional space without ergonomic changes for the rider.

“The handlebar is the most critical element in a rider’s control of the bike,” said Randy Valade, brand director for ProTaper. “This innovation in design offers greater control, greater comfort, increased ability to mount crucial controls and reduces weight by up to 20%. Riders have been seeking this advantage for years and now ProTaper will deliver it to them.”

The ACF Handlebar is available in four bends to allow rider the fit that they prefer on their motocross bike. The CR High, Carmichael, Henry/Reed and SX Race bends are available in black and retails for $139.99.

About ProTaper
Since 1991, ProTaper has led the way in premium control components. The brand delivers an exciting, innovative, and complete product line that fulfills the needs of professional racers and weekend riders alike. Through revolutionary ideas like the oversized 1⅛” handlebar and the Micro Handlebar Kit—the only control system purpose-built for youth riders, ProTaper transforms how riders experience their motorcycles. It’s no wonder that ProTaper has long list of pro and amateur athletes relying on its products to help them win races.

What is Hub-center Steering Motorcycle & Why it is Better

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Hub-center steering is one of several different types of front-end suspension and steering mechanisms used in motorcycles and cargo bicycles. It is essentially a mechanism that uses steering pivot points inside the wheel hub rather than a geometry that places the wheel in a headstock like the traditional motorcycle layout.

Perhaps the most venerable example of the idea came in the form of the 1930 Majestic. This Georges Roy design used a novel pressed-steel monocoque chassis, and it incorporated an automotive-type chassis with hub-center steering. Other bikes had already used the configuration in such machines as the Ner-A-Car and the Zenith Auto-Bi, but the Majestic made it lovely to behold.

Another bike, the Vyrus 984 C3 2V Razzetto, was one such motorcycle that used hub-center geometry.

Vyrus is a small Italian motorcycle manufacturer based in Coriano, Italy, and their bikes such as the “Tesi” – Thesis in Italian – had their designs originate from a university engineering project linked to the motorcycle legend Massimo Tamburini. The Tesi, and the Vyrus 984, were instantly identifiable by their use of their hub-center steering front suspension and steering arrangement.

Those fabulously expensive bespoke motorcycles have been called “functional works of art,” and they look a bit like something you might see in a video game.

In hub-centered bikes, the front wheel is attached to a swingarm with a shock and an internal pivot point. Steering is achieved using those linkages to turn the wheel on a pivot point. Hub-center steering has been employed on motorcycles for more than a century, but the design, despite what some engineers say offers a distinct advantage, never took hold.

But the founder of Vyrus, Ascanio Rodorigo, once worked for Bimota as a race mechanic and engineer during the 1970s and his tenure there lasted until 1985. When Rodorigo finally left Bimota, he started his own company but partnered with Bimota on the hub-center-steered Tesi. He then went on to take the steering concept deeper and refined it for his own company’s motorcycles.

A Ducati dual spark bored out to 1,079cc and making 100hp L-twin provides the power for the 319 lbs (145 kg) Vyrus 984 bike, and it’s delivered to the road for via a six-speed transmission.

Now builders like Bryan Fuller of Fuller Moto, Revival Cycles, and others have built beautiful machines which harken back to the hub-centered glory days of the Majestic. Builders such as Stellan Egeland used a hopped-up 1200 boxer engine from a BMW HP2 Sport. He also added his own hub-center steering setup from ISR to a frame he made from a 2391 steel tube. The ISR kit is a thing to behold.

Revival’s ‘The Six,’ which features a ballsy Honda CBX motor, is another take on the hub-steer geometry. It was commissioned by museum owner and bike collector Bobby Haas for his Haas Moto Museum in Dallas and made by Revival’s Alan Stulberg and his crew.

Stulberg said the commission was aimed at paying homage to the Art Deco classic Majestic and added that he and the team became “obsessed with its design language and flow” since they first saw the bike at the Barber Museum.

Hub steering systems don’t dive as much under braking and hard cornering as do conventional telescopic fork setups. They push braking forces back into the chassis more efficiently rather than transferring immense bending forces to a pair of upright forks. The ride experience is exceptional as braking performance throughout corners is greatly enhanced.

It works like this: A wheel hub pitches back and forth on a central pivot and is supported by two large steering arms actuated by handlebars. The handlebars connect to the front steering and swingarm using complex linkages. A fixed arm connects a pull-and-push rod on either side of the hub-center to help steer the bike. The geometry also includes a second pair of static rods to ensure the axle stays level with the bike’s mass.

While hub steering has a number of clear advantages, its downfall is that it is considerably more expensive to manufacture and maintain and requires exceptionally experienced mechanics to tune and repair.

But it does look good, works more efficiently from an engineering standpoint, and directly addresses the most important factor in the motorcycling experience: braking.

The Majestic – Artistic Design from the 1920s
from https://www.odd-bike.com

While the engineering of the Majestic might have been relatively conventional, what was unprecedented was the styling, the hallmark of the Majestic to this day.

All the oily bits were fully enclosed under louvered panels, with partially enclosed fenders covering the wheels at both ends. The rider was completely isolated from the grime and muck of the running gear and powertrain, perched upon a sprung saddle and controlling the machine via levers and bars that poke through the all-encompassing body.

Presented in 1929, the prototype Majestic (which was reported as Roy’s personal machine) featured an air-cooled 1000cc longitudinal four-cylinder engine from a 1927-28 Cleveland 4-61. This would not remain for production, however.

While at least two Majestics were built with a 750cc JAP V-twin (arranged, like a much later Moto-Guzzi , with the Vee transverse and the heads poking through the bodywork) and records note that JAP singles, a Chaise Four, and at least one Gnome et Rhone flat twin were also employed, the majority of production machines coming out of Chartenay featured air-cooled Chaise engines.

These were overhead valve singles featuring unit two or three-speed gearboxes operated by hand-shift, available in 350cc and 500cc displacements. Distinctive for their single pushrod tube that resembles a bevel tower (but contains a pair of tightly-spaced parallel pushrods) and external bacon-slicer flywheel, these powerplants were a favourite of French manufacturers during the interwar period and were used by a variety of marques in lieu of producing their own engines.

The base price of the Majestic was 5200 Francs for a 350 with chain final drive; an extra 500 Francs netted you optional shaft drive.

An additional option that is rarely seen on surviving examples was a fine “craquelure” paint option that was applied by skilled artisans. It involves a process of deliberately screwing up the paint job in the most controlled and flawless way possible, applying a contrasting top coat over a base using incompatible paints that will cause the top coat to crack in a uniform fashion, something like a well-aged oil painting or antique piece of furniture.

The result is spectacular – and perhaps a bit tacky, giving the machine the appearance of a lizard skin handbag. (Maybe a later Rock Star would have loved to ride it as the “The Lizard King” ? )

The Majestic was impeccably stable at higher speeds compared to the other motorcycles of that era.

It was also agile and light footed in a way that similar machines, like the Ner-A-Car, were not.

The relatively low weight, around 350 pounds, carried with a very low centre of gravity made for tidy handling that was more than up to the meagre output offered by the powerplants.

Majestic was targeting a clientele that didn’t really exist: the gentlemanly rider who might desire a superior (read: expensive) machine as a stablemate to their elegant automobiles.

Georges Roy’s previous design produced under the name “New Motorcycle”

Georges Roy’s earlier 1927 brand called New Motorcycle was a far better barometer of things to come, predicting the style and design of machines that would emerge during the 1930s and beyond. The Majestic has far less impact and was more of a curiosity than predictor of trends to come.

Georges Roy’s brilliance as a designer is unquestionable, and deserves more praise than he ever earned during his lifetime.

Majestic is a little bit of elegance floating on the sea of staid machines that clutter up the history books.

Georges Roy was a French industrialist and engineer born in 1888 who achieved success in the textile business – specifically in knitting and sewing equipment. He was, however, an early adopter of motorcycling at the turn of the 20th Century – reportedly his first machine was a Werner, a Parisian machine that introduced the term “Motocyclette” in 1897.

Motorcycle Vibrations Can Damage iPhone cameras as per Apple

By General Posts

by Kim Lyons from https://www.theverge.com

by Edward Moyer from https://www.cnet.com

From Apple: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803

Motorcycle vibrations can degrade iPhone camera performance, Apple says

High amplitude vibrations can cause problems for the cameras’ gyroscopes

A new post on Apple’s Support forum https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803 says exposing iPhones to high-amplitude vibrations, “specifically those generated by high-power motorcycle engines” could degrade the devices’ camera system. The company recommends against mounting an iPhone on a motorcycle, as the vibrations may be transmitted via the bike’s handlebars and chassis.

Here’s the technical explanation from Apple:

If you accidentally move a camera when you take a picture, the resulting image can be blurry. To prevent this, some iPhone models have optical image stabilization (OIS).1 OIS lets you take sharp photos even if you accidentally move the camera. With OIS, a gyroscope senses that the camera moved. To reduce image motion, and the resulting blur, the lens moves according to the angle of the gyroscope.

Additionally, some iPhone models have closed-loop autofocus (AF).2 Closed-loop AF resists the effects of gravity and vibration to preserve sharp focus in stills, videos, and panoramas. With closed-loop AF, on-board magnetic sensors measure gravity and vibration effects and determine the lens position so that the compensating motion can be set accurately.

The OIS and closed-loop AF systems in iPhone are designed for durability. However, as is the case with many consumer electronics that include systems like OIS, long-term direct exposure to high-amplitude vibrations within certain frequency ranges may degrade the performance of these systems and lead to reduced image quality for photos and videos. It is recommended to avoid exposing your iPhone to extended high-amplitude vibrations.

The iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and all iPhones since the iPhone 7 have both optical image stabilization and closed-loop autofocus (as noted by MacRumors, the first outlet to spot the Apple support post). Both features are also vulnerable to magnetic interference from some iPhone accessories, Apple warned earlier this year, but removing the accessories should take care of that issue.

Additionally in the new post, Apple says if you’re planning to mount your iPhone to a scooter or a moped, it recommends using a vibration-dampening mount to lessen the risk to the phone and its camera system. And avoiding prolonged regular use of an iPhone mounted to a vehicle that produces lower-amplitude vibrations is also a good idea.

Apple says iPhone cameras can be hurt by motorcycle vibrations

High-power or high-volume motorcycle engines produce potentially damaging high-amplitude vibrations, so the company says don’t attach your phone to your hawg.

If you’ve been rockin’ down the highway with an iPhone mounted on your motorcycle, you might want to think again. On Friday, Apple said certain motorcycle engines can give your iPhone’s camera bad vibes.

“Exposing your iPhone to high amplitude vibrations within certain frequency ranges, specifically those generated by high-power motorcycle engines, can degrade the performance of the camera system,” the company said in a post on its support site.

The vibes are channeled through the chassis and handlebars, so you shouldn’t attach your phone to motorcycles with high-power or high-volume engines, the company said. It said mopeds and scooters, which tend to have small-volume or electric engines, are less of a concern but that you should use a vibration dampening mount and “avoid regular use for prolonged periods.”

The problem has to do with high-tech gyroscope- and magnet-based camera systems designed to compensate for shaky shots. Such systems, like optical image stabilization and closed-loop autofocus, make automatic adjustments if you accidentally move while taking a picture.

“The OIS and closed-loop AF systems in iPhone are designed for durability,” Apple said. But “long-term direct exposure to high-amplitude vibrations … may degrade the performance of these systems and lead to reduced image quality for photos and videos.”

For details on which iPhone models feature these camera systems, you can check out Apple’s post.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803

 

BMW R1250RS conversion / handlebar risers F900R/XR

By General Posts

BMW R1250RS conversion by Hornig – Sports tourer on a new level

What do you expect from a sports tourer like the BMW R1250RS? Overall, a coherent and perfect combination of tour comfort and sporty influences. Due to our conversion, the motorcycle reaches a new level when travelling as well as during race track training.

BMW R1250RS conversion by Hornig
(press release and printable pictures)
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=432

Handlebar Risers with Offset for BMW F900R & F900XR

Raising the handlebar by 30mm results in a more upright, much more relaxed seating position. Moreover, the handlebar is brought 25mm closer to the rider which additionally improves driving comfort. The handlebar riser also makes riding while standing less tiring, which is of tremendous benefit to taller riders in particular. The overall result is a noticeable increase in stamina and concentration. Long stretches on the motorway are less nerve-racking, and even fast, difficult off-road sections are easier to handle.
Easy to fit in minutes. No need for long cables or brake cables! Fits on original handlebar.

Handlebar Risers with Offset for BMW F900R & F900XR
99,90 Euro up (incl. VAT) plus shipping
(press release and printable pictures)
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=433

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Motorcycleparts.Hornig

YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrHornig

Instagram: hornig.motorcycle.parts
https://www.instagram.com/hornig.motorcycle.parts/

Your readers could also be interested in:

BMW R1250R conversion by Hornig – amazingly different
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=430

GPS Mount for BMW F900XR
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=429

Side stand foot enlargement for BMW F900R & F900XR
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=428

Lithium battery and battery charger for BMW motorcycles
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=427

Kind regards,

Motorcycle Accessory Hornig GmbH
Gewerbepark Chammünster Nord C 5
D93413 Cham

Germany

http://www.motorcycleparts-hornig.com

CEO: Hornig Helmut
Regensburg HRB 10330
Ust.Id.Nr. DE251397246
Fon: 0049 9971 99 66 10
Fax: 0049 9971 99 66 110

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Motorcycleparts.Hornig
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/MrHornig

Father’s Day Special: Buy A Split, Get 45% Off Bars & Rock Your Cockpit

By General Posts

Totally get 45% off your handlebar order when you buy a Split Bag. Just use code:

rockthecockpit45

Make your entire life better with the one-handed, quick-draw, US-made Split Bag!

The worlds greatest chopper riders in the universe the world over mount them to their handlebars or to all over the place!!! Now they can quickly, one-handedly pull stuff in and out of use, on the fly. Think: phone, toll money, sunglasses, snacks, Glocks, eye drops, bath salts and more!!!!

Click here to buy

Yamaha announce MSRP for Ténéré

By General Posts

The Ténéré 700 could be the most important new adventure bike of 2019. It isn’t as advanced, powerful, sexy or sophisticated as the many Japanese super bikes, but it is capable more accessible to the masses. It is desirable and affordable.

Yamaha Ténéré 700 has a launch date for the online ordering system. The first bikes will be delivered to customers in Europe on July 2019 at a special introductory price of €9,299 / £8399 – the normal price will be £8699. The online only price will be available between March 27 and July 31, when the ordering system closes.

No information about an early ordering system has been given for the U.S.A. at this time. Due to differing government regulatory standards and factory production line schedules, the Tenere 700 is scheduled to arrive at U.S. dealerships a year later in the second half of 2020. Europe receives three color options, so far, but Ceramic Ice will be the only color available for the U.S.A. market.

The T7 concept bikes and two years of Ténéré 700 waiting might suggested it started as an MT-07 ‘soft-roader’.

The power in the package comes from the MT-07’s CP2 689cc parallel-twin, wrapped in an all-new chassis, and rolling on proper off-road rim sizes (21-in. front, 18-in. rear). The engine guarantees off-road success with dedicated fuel maps for its new dual-purpose life which means a broad spread of torque, and plenty of power for the road. There’s also gearbox tweaks to suit the new purpose.

Yamaha claims that the combination of good fuel economy and a 16-litre tank capacity will give a real-world 215-mile+ range between fuel stops.

The all-new frame is a tubular steel double cradle, designed just for the Ténéré offers flexibility and finds traction in the rough stuff.

Quad-LED headlamps nestling behind the tall screen presents a new aesthetic face protecting the new all-LCD dash tower  that shows speed, rpm, fuel level and range, trips and more. Above this sits a very useful bar for bolting all your navigational needs.

There’s a 43mm inverted fork up front which offers complete damping adjustment and 210mm of travel. The rear has a remote preload-adjustable link-type monoshock providing 200mm of travel for its aluminium swingarm. Brembo brakes with 282mm discs up front, and a 245mm one at the rear is equipped with switchable ABS  that can be disabled for off-roading adventures.

• High-torque 689cc four-stroke CP2 parallel twin-cylinder engine

• 72.4 HP (54 kW) @ 9000 rpm

• Adjustable 43mm upside down coil-spring forks with long-travel (210mm)

• Remotely adjustable link-type rear suspension with 200mm of travel

• Compact rally-style cockpit with tapered handlebars

• 452 lbs (205 kg) wet weight

• 21-inch/18-inch lightweight spoked wheels with adventure tires

• Average 358+km (217 mile) fuel range

• Switchable ABS option

• 880mm seat height

Yamaha will release a wide range of Genuine Accessories for the Tenere 700. The line-up will include luggage options and several other items to enable riders to travel further in comfort and convenience. Yamaha will also offer several Rally-oriented items to further sharpen the bike’s off-road capability.