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Harley-Davidson Is Google’s Most Searched Motorcycle Brand in 83 Countries

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

The above title is perhaps the obvious statement of the week. One really doesn’t need statistics to know that Harley-Davidson is an Internet phenomenon: if we don’t know it for sure, it’s something most us feel in our guts. But it’s nice to get some confirmation from time to time.

Born in 1903 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Harley has grown into the most successful motorcycle brand ever. And by successful we don’t necessarily mean the one that sells the most, but the one most people and custom shops on this planet think/dream of.

As of 2017, Harley makes around 240,000 motorcycles each year – most remain stock, but a great deal of them go down the aftermarket part as well. Many other Harleys come to be from unofficial garages, who make custom rides and try to gain some attention by using Harley parts and slapping the name on the builds.

And the Internet loves them all. According to research conducted by Australian insurance company Budget Direct, Harley-Davidson is the most-searched motorcycle manufacturer in many parts of the world.

How much so? Well, our world is divided into roughly 195 countries, and Harley is at the top of the search engine’s list in 83 of them. And we mean the bigger ones, not some forgotten island-state.

You can check out the map available in the photo gallery for details. All the regions you see there in orange are ruled by Harley searches, from the U.S. to the Far East, and from Northern Europe to the southernmost point of Australia.

There are other names on the list as well. In some places, people like Ducati or Honda more, so they use Google to search for those. Others go for Kawasaki or Royal Enfield, and there are even some that enjoying googling Bajaj.

But just a quick glance at the map shows who the true king of the realm really is.

My Harley Sounds Like a Sewing Machine, So Many Google Users Say

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by Bogdan Popa from https://www.autoevolution.com

If you use Google’s search engine or Microsoft’s Bing to look for information online, you probably know that both services provide you with suggestions (or predictions, as Google calls them) as you type, all in an attempt to make the whole process faster.

So technically, if you go to Google and type “Harley-Davidson,” you should then be provided with a series of suggestions that are based on data like popular keywords that other people used when searching the web and trending topics.

One of the top searches related to Harley-Davidson shows that way too many owners believe their motorcycles “sound like a sewing machine.”

The suggestions for “Harley sounds like a” are “my harley sounds like a sewing machine,” “harley 103 sounds like a sewing machine,” and “honda that sounds like a harley.” Also, Google users also tried to figure out “what motorcycle sounds like a harley.”

On the other hand, if you turn to Microsoft’s Bing for searching the web, the suggestions are a lot different.

If you use the same “my harley sounds like a” keyword, you’re not getting a sewing machine suggestion, but something totally different. “My truck sounds like a harley davidson,” is the suggestion this time, which is a little bit unexpected since Harley-Davidson motorcycles sound pretty cool in the first place anyway.

Bing also has a few other suggestions for the sounds generated by a Harley-Davidson engine. “Harley livewire sounds like jet coming,” one suggestion reads, while another one potentially indicates a problem with the motorcycle because “harley sounds like it grinds on a cold start.”

Google calls these suggestions “predictions” because the whole system tries to guess what you’re more likely to type in the search box.

“We look at the real searches that happen on Google and show common and trending ones relevant to the characters that are entered and also related to your location and previous searches,” Google says.

These predictions could thus be a little different depending on your location and should be provided regardless of the device you use to search the web.

Tesla among companies sued for complicity over child labor in Congo

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by Matthew Lavietes from https://www.autonews.com

NEW YORK — Five of the world’s largest tech companies, including electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc., have been accused of being complicit in the death of children in the Democratic Republic of Congo forced to mine cobalt, a metal used to make telephones and computers, in a landmark lawsuit.

The legal complaint on behalf of 14 families from Congo was filed on Sunday by International Rights Advocates, a U.S.-based human rights non-profit, against Tesla, Apple Inc., Google parent Alphabet Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Dell Technologies Inc..

The companies were part of a system of forced labor that the families claimed led to the death and serious injury of their children, it said.

It marked the first time the tech industry jointly has faced legal action over the source of its cobalt.

Images in the court documents, filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, showed children with disfigured or missing limbs.

Six of the 14 children in the case were killed in tunnel collapses, and the others suffered life-altering injuries, including paralysis, it said.

“These companies — the richest companies in the world, these fancy gadget-making companies — have allowed children to be maimed and killed to get their cheap cobalt,” Terrence Collingsworth, an attorney representing the families, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Cobalt is essential in making rechargeable lithium batteries used in millions of products sold by the tech industry.

More than half of the world’s cobalt is produced in Congo.

Global demand for the metal is expected to increase at 7 percent to 13 percent annually over the next decade, according to a 2018 study by the European Commission.

The lawsuit said the children, some as young as 6 years old, were forced by their families’ extreme poverty to leave school and work in cobalt mining owned by the British mining company Glencore. Glencore has previously been accused of using child labor.

Some children were paid as little as $1.50 per day, working 6 days a week, it said.

In response to a request for comment, Dell said in an email that it has “never knowingly sourced operations” using child labor and has launched an investigation into the allegations.

A spokesperson for Glencore said: “Glencore notes the allegations contained in a U.S. lawsuit filed on 15th December 2019.

“Glencore’s production of cobalt in the DRC is a by-product of our industrial copper production. Glencore’s operations in the DRC do not purchase or process any artisanally mined ore.

“Glencore does not tolerate any form of child, forced, or compulsory labor.”

Tesla, Apple, Google, Microsoft did not immediately respond for comment.

The legal complaint argued that the companies all have the ability to overhaul their cobalt supply chains to ensure safer conditions.

“I’ve never encountered or documented a more severe asymmetry in the allocation of income between the top of the supply chain and the bottom,” said Siddharth Kara, a researcher on modern slavery who is an expert witness in the case.

“It’s that disconnect that makes this perhaps the worst injustice of slavery and child exploitation that I’ve seen in my two decades research,” Kara said.

More than 40 million people have been estimated to be captive in modern slavery, which includes forced labor and forced marriage, according to Walk Free and the International Labour Organization.

Google Maps introduces a feature to make commute easy

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Google has reportedly introduced a new features in Google Maps which will offer preview of users’ commute with a map as soon as they get into the car.

Tech giant Google keep on introducing new features in its navigation app Google Maps in order to enhance the user experience. Recently, the company rolled out the speed camera and accident alert features. Now, Google has reportedly introduced a new features in Google Maps which will offer preview of users’ commute with a map as soon as they get into the car.

According to a report by Android Police, Google is working on a major improvement which will offer advance notification including a small preview of the route that the Maps suggest the user to take. This will offer a better idea to the driver as they will get to know about the traffic congestion in advance.

The company will be using the same colour codes to inform about the traffic condition. The blue area will suggest the clear route and the orange will highlight the slow traffic movement. The roads which will appear red indicate heavy traffic.

In order to access the preview users just will have to expand the notification which they will receive before their morning and afternoon commutes. The report also adds that the update consisting of the new feature has started rolling out as a server-side update and is yet to reach the Android users.

Recently, Google Maps were updated with features like report a Crash, Speed alert and traffic slowdown. While the first one lets the app know about a possible crash and show others a different route, the second one alerts them about upcoming Speed Traps on the way. However, the team is rolling out the third ‘Add a report’ option in the app – Slowdown.