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Springer Transformation – Custom Building Adventure

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Sturgis 2008. Rode this bike from Houston to Sturgis.

The Springer Transformation
My Education into Bike Customization for the Poor, Unskilled, Wanna-be Biker.
By Johnny White with photos by his lovely wife

I bought this Springer Classic in August 2005 – right after my inaugural trip to Sturgis on the 100th Anniversary – from Mancuso Harley-Davidson in Houston, Texas after seeing it on the showroom floor.

I had gotten a gift card for my recent birthday and decided to get a t-shirt. Well, the t-shirt cost me more than $25,000.

I rode the bike bone stock for an entire year. I had made the famous lying quote more than once to my better half, “I love it just the way she is, I won’t change a thing.”

For a whole year that rung true. Most of my trips were back and forth to work or the gym.

Most of my changes were like most people, limited by
1) my financial situation and
2) my ability.

I also had one other caveat, in that whatever change I made had to be completed in time for me to go to work as my bike was my main transport.

So, as I started, the bike remained stock until the ride to Sturgis in 2006.

CLICK HERE To Read this feature on Bikernet .com

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Sea-Level change experience from shore ramp expert

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Video from MTG – investigating 47 nations for claims about rising sea-levels.

The visible cause of Ocean Reclamation by Governments for revenues affecting the sea-level in their region.

Climate Change Or is it Temperature Change ? Sit outdoors for a few hours and find out.

See the Video to understand what people working at Sea-shores witness and experience over past 45 years.

BMW R 18 Going on Three-Nation Tour, including U.S.A.

By General Posts

The Great Getaway. That’s what German bike maker BMW Motorrad calls its first event dedicated to the moniker that marked its return to the cruiser segment, the insane R 18 motorcycles.

from https://www.autoevolution.com by Daniel Patrascu

The motorcycle was first shown back in 2020, and quickly expanded into an entire family that now comprises no less than four models, namely the standard cruiser and the Classic, and the more recent R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental.

Advertised as one of the most important two-wheeled BMWs in recent memory, the family makes use of the most “powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production,” the mighty Big Boxer – 1,802cc in displacement and rated at 91 hp at 4,750 rpm, and a maximum of 158 Nm of torque at 3,000 rpm.

Now, not enough time has passed since the model’s introduction for the world to have plenty of them on the roads, but that isn’t stopping the Germans from coming up with a series of mammoth ride events meant to advertise the bike to new customers.

The Great Getaway is in fact the first in what will be a series of travel events dedicated to R 18 riders. Next year, BMW promises “three inspiring destinations […] to provide riders with outstanding motorcycling pleasure in heritage style.”

The tour kicks off in March 2022 in Costa Rica, moves to Portugal in June, and ends in August in the U.S. Each of the tours in these countries will comprise eight days of riding “along rugged coasts, through dense forests and past mountains and waterfalls,” and benefit from “a tour guide, hotel accommodation and meals, support vehicle and an extensive social program.”

At the time of writing, BMW does not give any info on the cost for the rides, but says more info will be provided in due time on the dedicated webpage.

Visit The Great Getaway Website at: https://thegreatgetaway.net/

PRESS RELEASE: 15 NOVEMBER 2021

Experience the beauty of nature for eight days on the “Big Boxer” motorbikes of the R 18 family, enjoy the freedom of endless expanses, immerse yourself in the urban jungle, sometimes discover the unexpected and leave the stress of everyday life behind. In “The Great Getaway”, BMW Motorrad will be offering the perfectly organised travel format for a perfect time-out, arranged and carried out by BMW Motorrad partner Elephant Moto.

For the 2022 motorcycle season, three inspiring destinations have been planned to provide riders with outstanding motorcycling pleasure in heritage style: Costa Rica, Portugal and the USA. Each tour includes eight days of riding on motorcycles from the R18 family, a tour guide, hotel accommodation and meals, support vehicle and an extensive social programme. In short: everything has been thought of.

The “Big Boxers” will be cruisng along rugged coasts, through dense forests and past mountains and waterfalls. The participants will get to know hidden places and exciting people, indulge in local and international cuisine and recharge their batteries for the next day in accommodation specially tailored to the tours.

With a maximum of twelve participants per tour, the 150 to 200 kilometre daily stages guarantee speedy progress on the road, great fun together in the evening and an intensive shared experience on the “Urban Day”, where the participants get to immerse themselves in the melting pot of famous cities: San José in Costa Rica, Lisbon in Portugal and Portland/Oregon in the USA.

New, intense impressions await the participants at every turn: pulsating life, foreign scents, spectacular architecture, even the soundscape is never the same. After all, every city has its own rhythm. And you meet the people who make the city’s heartbeat. For example, when visiting a handcrafter or a local market.

After dinner, the day ends in a variety of ways. For example, with a whiskey tasting, cocktails “on the roof” or live music, before everyone is back in the saddle the next morning: “The Great Getaway – start your R 18, please!” Eight days of unforgettable riding pleasure combined with impressive experiences await the participants.

The time slots for “The Great Getaway” are:

1. Costa Rica, March 2022

2. Portugal, April to June 2022

3. USA, August to October 2022

Further information and bookings via www.thegreatgetaway.net

Riveters Chapter of AMCA and Chix on 66 Ride

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Riveter Chapter of the AMCA Presents Chix on 66

Newest AMCA Chapter Announces First Event

September 30, 2021—Today, the Riveter Chapter became the first woman-focused, nationwide chapter of the Antique Motorcycle Club of America.

The purpose of this chapter is to bring female AMCA members together in a single chapter to concentrate their talents, give women motorcyclists an increased awareness of their own history, and raise visibility of women in the sport. By doing so, we will increase women’s awareness of each other, and improve connections between women in the sport through visibility and networking. A chapter containing powerful, talented, dynamic women will give all women riders inspiring role models.

The Riveter Chapter’s first AMCA-sponsored event will be the “Chix on 66” ride scheduled to take place June 11-June 26, 2022. Up to 40 women motorcyclists will meet in Chicago, Illinois, to ride Route 66, the “Mother Road,” to Santa Monica, California. This is the classic American journey on classic machines, with some women riding vintage motorcycles, and others making the trip on modern mounts.

Each day the group will begin and end together, but each woman will make the journey what she wants it to be. Instead of riding in a single pack, a turn-by-turn app will allow each rider to follow the route at her own pace. There will be a list of suggested hotel accommodations for each stop. If some opt for a camping experience, they can arrange that for themselves.

This ride will span the entirety of Route 66, covering anywhere from 100 to 300 miles per day. Most days will be around 200 miles, allowing for an easy pace, and ample time to stop for photos and exploration of the iconic points of interest along the Mother Road.

Anyone who is interested in participating in the ride can email chix@chixon66.com. You can also find information at www.chixon66.com, and on facebook.com/chixon66 or Instagram @chixon66.

We are also still accepting charter members of the Riveter Chapter through December 31, 2021. While this chapter is women-focused, meaning our activities, events and newsletters will feature and promote women riders, both contemporary and historic, we welcome anyone with an AMCA membership who would like to become a member. If you would like to join, please send your name, AMCA member number and email address to joann@riveterchapter.com.

If you are not an AMCA member, it’s easy to join online at www.antiquemotorcycle.org. You do not have to own an antique motorcycle to join the AMCA, or the Riveter Chapter. For more information, go to www.riveterchapter.com or Instagram @riveterchapteramca.

What is Hub-center Steering Motorcycle & Why it is Better

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by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Hub-center steering is one of several different types of front-end suspension and steering mechanisms used in motorcycles and cargo bicycles. It is essentially a mechanism that uses steering pivot points inside the wheel hub rather than a geometry that places the wheel in a headstock like the traditional motorcycle layout.

Perhaps the most venerable example of the idea came in the form of the 1930 Majestic. This Georges Roy design used a novel pressed-steel monocoque chassis, and it incorporated an automotive-type chassis with hub-center steering. Other bikes had already used the configuration in such machines as the Ner-A-Car and the Zenith Auto-Bi, but the Majestic made it lovely to behold.

Another bike, the Vyrus 984 C3 2V Razzetto, was one such motorcycle that used hub-center geometry.

Vyrus is a small Italian motorcycle manufacturer based in Coriano, Italy, and their bikes such as the “Tesi” – Thesis in Italian – had their designs originate from a university engineering project linked to the motorcycle legend Massimo Tamburini. The Tesi, and the Vyrus 984, were instantly identifiable by their use of their hub-center steering front suspension and steering arrangement.

Those fabulously expensive bespoke motorcycles have been called “functional works of art,” and they look a bit like something you might see in a video game.

In hub-centered bikes, the front wheel is attached to a swingarm with a shock and an internal pivot point. Steering is achieved using those linkages to turn the wheel on a pivot point. Hub-center steering has been employed on motorcycles for more than a century, but the design, despite what some engineers say offers a distinct advantage, never took hold.

But the founder of Vyrus, Ascanio Rodorigo, once worked for Bimota as a race mechanic and engineer during the 1970s and his tenure there lasted until 1985. When Rodorigo finally left Bimota, he started his own company but partnered with Bimota on the hub-center-steered Tesi. He then went on to take the steering concept deeper and refined it for his own company’s motorcycles.

A Ducati dual spark bored out to 1,079cc and making 100hp L-twin provides the power for the 319 lbs (145 kg) Vyrus 984 bike, and it’s delivered to the road for via a six-speed transmission.

Now builders like Bryan Fuller of Fuller Moto, Revival Cycles, and others have built beautiful machines which harken back to the hub-centered glory days of the Majestic. Builders such as Stellan Egeland used a hopped-up 1200 boxer engine from a BMW HP2 Sport. He also added his own hub-center steering setup from ISR to a frame he made from a 2391 steel tube. The ISR kit is a thing to behold.

Revival’s ‘The Six,’ which features a ballsy Honda CBX motor, is another take on the hub-steer geometry. It was commissioned by museum owner and bike collector Bobby Haas for his Haas Moto Museum in Dallas and made by Revival’s Alan Stulberg and his crew.

Stulberg said the commission was aimed at paying homage to the Art Deco classic Majestic and added that he and the team became “obsessed with its design language and flow” since they first saw the bike at the Barber Museum.

Hub steering systems don’t dive as much under braking and hard cornering as do conventional telescopic fork setups. They push braking forces back into the chassis more efficiently rather than transferring immense bending forces to a pair of upright forks. The ride experience is exceptional as braking performance throughout corners is greatly enhanced.

It works like this: A wheel hub pitches back and forth on a central pivot and is supported by two large steering arms actuated by handlebars. The handlebars connect to the front steering and swingarm using complex linkages. A fixed arm connects a pull-and-push rod on either side of the hub-center to help steer the bike. The geometry also includes a second pair of static rods to ensure the axle stays level with the bike’s mass.

While hub steering has a number of clear advantages, its downfall is that it is considerably more expensive to manufacture and maintain and requires exceptionally experienced mechanics to tune and repair.

But it does look good, works more efficiently from an engineering standpoint, and directly addresses the most important factor in the motorcycling experience: braking.

The Majestic – Artistic Design from the 1920s
from https://www.odd-bike.com

While the engineering of the Majestic might have been relatively conventional, what was unprecedented was the styling, the hallmark of the Majestic to this day.

All the oily bits were fully enclosed under louvered panels, with partially enclosed fenders covering the wheels at both ends. The rider was completely isolated from the grime and muck of the running gear and powertrain, perched upon a sprung saddle and controlling the machine via levers and bars that poke through the all-encompassing body.

Presented in 1929, the prototype Majestic (which was reported as Roy’s personal machine) featured an air-cooled 1000cc longitudinal four-cylinder engine from a 1927-28 Cleveland 4-61. This would not remain for production, however.

While at least two Majestics were built with a 750cc JAP V-twin (arranged, like a much later Moto-Guzzi , with the Vee transverse and the heads poking through the bodywork) and records note that JAP singles, a Chaise Four, and at least one Gnome et Rhone flat twin were also employed, the majority of production machines coming out of Chartenay featured air-cooled Chaise engines.

These were overhead valve singles featuring unit two or three-speed gearboxes operated by hand-shift, available in 350cc and 500cc displacements. Distinctive for their single pushrod tube that resembles a bevel tower (but contains a pair of tightly-spaced parallel pushrods) and external bacon-slicer flywheel, these powerplants were a favourite of French manufacturers during the interwar period and were used by a variety of marques in lieu of producing their own engines.

The base price of the Majestic was 5200 Francs for a 350 with chain final drive; an extra 500 Francs netted you optional shaft drive.

An additional option that is rarely seen on surviving examples was a fine “craquelure” paint option that was applied by skilled artisans. It involves a process of deliberately screwing up the paint job in the most controlled and flawless way possible, applying a contrasting top coat over a base using incompatible paints that will cause the top coat to crack in a uniform fashion, something like a well-aged oil painting or antique piece of furniture.

The result is spectacular – and perhaps a bit tacky, giving the machine the appearance of a lizard skin handbag. (Maybe a later Rock Star would have loved to ride it as the “The Lizard King” ? )

The Majestic was impeccably stable at higher speeds compared to the other motorcycles of that era.

It was also agile and light footed in a way that similar machines, like the Ner-A-Car, were not.

The relatively low weight, around 350 pounds, carried with a very low centre of gravity made for tidy handling that was more than up to the meagre output offered by the powerplants.

Majestic was targeting a clientele that didn’t really exist: the gentlemanly rider who might desire a superior (read: expensive) machine as a stablemate to their elegant automobiles.

Georges Roy’s previous design produced under the name “New Motorcycle”

Georges Roy’s earlier 1927 brand called New Motorcycle was a far better barometer of things to come, predicting the style and design of machines that would emerge during the 1930s and beyond. The Majestic has far less impact and was more of a curiosity than predictor of trends to come.

Georges Roy’s brilliance as a designer is unquestionable, and deserves more praise than he ever earned during his lifetime.

Majestic is a little bit of elegance floating on the sea of staid machines that clutter up the history books.

Georges Roy was a French industrialist and engineer born in 1888 who achieved success in the textile business – specifically in knitting and sewing equipment. He was, however, an early adopter of motorcycling at the turn of the 20th Century – reportedly his first machine was a Werner, a Parisian machine that introduced the term “Motocyclette” in 1897.

Check out the treats found at the Harley-Davidson Museum this October

By General Posts

Skulloween Bike Night returns and a first-ever outdoor Movie Night premieres.

MILWAUKEE, USA (Sept. 30, 2021) – The Harley-Davidson Museum has been an anchor of the Menomonee Valley neighborhood since opening back in 2008. The H-D Museum is also a proud sponsor of Valley Week, which aims to showcase some of the fantastic ways to experience the nature, destinations and the Menomonee River Valley’s fascinating history in the heart of Milwaukee. As a part of the festivities, the Harley-Davidson Museum is thrilled to present an outdoor movie night on Friday, Oct. 1.

Bring the whole family down to the H-D Museum for a screening of Trolls World Tour for the Valley Week finale. Pack a blanket or chairs to get cozy under the night sky. Come early to have the kids take a spin on an H-D® IRONe™ electric balance bike, nab a (temporary) tattoo or grab a bite from MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant.

But the family-friendly fun doesn’t stop there. Beginning Saturday, Oct. 16, the ever-popular engineering merit badge program returns for in-person, hands-on experiences. And don’t fret, the virtual program remains a popular option for scouts from around the country on Saturday mornings and Tuesday evenings.

And just in time for Halloween, Milwaukee’s favorite haunt, MOTOR, brings back Skulloween on Oct. 28. The night will feature live music, raffles for Harley-Davidson® gear and more shenanigans for ghouls who just want to have fun! Dress up to win the costume contest and go home with a $250 Harley-Davidson Museum Campus gift card! Don’t miss out!

PROGRAMMING / EVENTS
Valley Week Outdoor Movie Night
Friday, Oct. 1, 6 – 8:30 p.m.
Bring the whole family down to the Harley-Davidson Museum in the Valley for an outdoor screening of Trolls World Tour and more fun activities as we celebrate another successful Valley Week!
Grab some dinner, drinks, or snacks from MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant for dine-in or carry-out to pair with the movie or check out the refreshments available outside. Enjoy kids activities prior to the film, including H-D® IRONe™ ebike demos and airbrush tattoos.

Skulloween
Thursday, Oct. 28, 5 – 9 p.m.
Head to one of Milwaukee’s most popular haunts, MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant, for a celebration of all things black and orange! In addition to food and drink specials from MOTOR, Skulloween Bike Night will feature live music and raffles for Harley-Davidson® gear. Those who dress to impress will have a chance to win bragging rights in our costume contest. The costume with the most votes at the end of the night will win a $250 Harley-Davidson Museum Campus gift card!

Annual Pass
Looking for interesting things to do and ways to fully enjoy our programs and exhibits? The Harley-Davidson Museum’s new Annual Pass offers individual, family and VIP levels to fit your lifestyle. Just some of the perks of the new Annual Pass include: admission discounts, free admission for children under age 18, merchandise discounts at The Shop, dining discounts at MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant and more.
Plus, if you purchase an Annual Pass in 2021, those passholder perks can be enjoyed all of 2021 and 2022. Visit H-D Museum.com to see complete ticket details for exclusions and other terms and conditions.

Engineering Merit Badge (Saturdays at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.)
All scouts are welcome to come earn their Engineering Merit Badge at the Harley-Davidson Museum! This experience will be partially facilitated as scouts explore the history of Harley-Davidson as well as the engineering of motorcycles as they complete the nine merit badge requirements. Advance registration is required. Program registration closes one week prior to the scheduled program date. Ticket includes: Downloadable activity booklet used for the program, partially facilitated program, blue card signed by the facilitator (one blue card per scout registration) and an exclusive H-D Museum® patch.

Scout Virtual Engineering Merit Badge (Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. and Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m.)
This new 90-minute online program is open to scouts from all over the country. Our program facilitator will guide the troops and explore the role an engineer plays while creating a Harley-Davidson® Motorcycle. Nine requirements for the Engineering Merit Badge will be discussed during this virtual, interactive program. Advance registration is required. Program Fee: $20 per Scout, which includes an activity booklet used during the program and a special H-D® patch upon completion of the program.

MUST-SEE EXHIBITS AND INSTALLATIONS
Revolution Max Engine
(on display now)
The brand-new Revolution® Max 1250cc engine powers a new generation of Harley-Davidson motorcycles. See the liquid-cooled, 60-degree V-Twin that delivers for the Pan America™ adventure touring model and the performance cruiser Sportster® S motorcycle. On view in the Museum lobby.

Clubs & Competition (on display now)
In the early part of the 20th century, motorcycle culture was a homegrown phenomenon. It grew out of the passion of riders for their evolving sport. The camaraderie that developed around riding and attending competitive events led to the formation of motorcycle clubs that hosted destination rides, family picnics with motorcycle games and other riding competitions.

The newly reinstalled display case in the Clubs & Competition gallery highlights clothing from club members from primarily the 1930s and 1940s. The clothing selections on view include full dress uniforms, shirts, sweaters, jackets and caps, customized by the owners with their club name and logo, and pins or patches indicating membership in the American Motorcyclist Association. The H-D Archives™ collection includes Motorclothes® apparel sold in H-D® product catalogs but also non-H-D produced clothing items that have been proudly customized by riders.

Experience Gallery: Model Year 2021 Harley-Davidson motorcycles (on display now)
Always a favorite photo opportunity for riders and non-riders alike, the H-D Museum’s Experience Gallery has been refreshed with five 2021 Harley-Davidson motorcycles –including the all-new Pan America™ and the Sportster S!

Harley Fox (on display now)
Gail Anderson’s 1986 Softail® Custom motorcycle, “Harley Fox,” built by her partner Bob Burrows, took top prize at the first Ladies of Harley® (LOH) ride-in show during Daytona Beach Bike Week in 1987. With her custom bike and themed riding gear, Anderson presented a striking image that fit the growing visibility and exciting new options for women riders in the 1980s.

Alfonso Sotomayor’s 1957 Model FL (on display now)
The Harley-Davidson Museum is proud to announce its collection has recently grown with the addition of a 1957 Model FL that was ridden by famed Mexican stunt rider and racer Alfonso Sotomayor Canales.
Harley-Davidson’s history in Mexico dates back to at least 1913. In the 1920s, the brand was more frequently spotted throughout Mexico City as the motorcycles proved popular with the local traffic police who would also perform stunts with their Harley-Davidson® bikes. After racing from the 1930s into the 1960s, Sotomayor launched his own stunt riding career by performing the famed “Salto de la Muerte” or Jump of Death. Learn more about Sotomayor’s feats of derring-do and Harley-Davidson’s early entry into Mexico with this new display located in the Custom Culture area.

“Off-Road Harley-Davidson” (on display now)
In the decades before America paved its highways, early riders had to be prepared for all sorts of terrain: sand, clay or dirt – and wandering those makeshift byways were Harley-Davidson® motorcycles. Today, it’s called off-road or adventure touring; back then it was just called riding. Since 1903, Harley-Davidson motorcycles proved their toughness by riding over wooded hills, through stone-choked creek beds and up mountain sides. “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” tells the history of motorcycles designed for rough roads, the people who rode them and the adventures they shared.

“Building a Milwaukee Icon: Harley-Davidson’s Juneau Avenue Factory” (on display now)
A recently recovered cache of architectural drawings includes plans for the original Juneau Avenue facility. The pencil drawings, along with archival photographs, demonstrate the whirlwind pace of the company’s early growth. While building an international business—going from producing just over 1,000 motorcycles in 1909 to manufacturing 27,000 motorcycles in 1920—the company’s Milwaukee factory experienced near-constant expansion. Construction through this relatively brief period created the buildings that today, a century later, are still the proud home of Harley-Davidson.
“Building a Milwaukee Icon” provides a snapshot of Harley-Davidson’s formative years and illustrates a chapter of Milwaukee history when the city was known as the “Machine Shop to the World.”

Google Arts & Culture, “An Amphibious Sidecar Tour of the Salton Sea” (on display now)
100 years ago, John Edwin Hogg and Phillip Johnston visited the Salton Sea. Their exploits earned detailed coverage in the September 1921 issue of “The Harley-Davidson Enthusiast™” magazine due to the unexpected role their Harley-Davidson® motorcycles played in the adventure.

MOTOR® BAR & RESTAURANT
MOTOR® Bar and Restaurant is now open seven days a week – including dinner service on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays! Whether you’re hankering for an authentic all-you-can-eat Wisconsin Friday fish fry or just want to reconnect with your “virtual” colleagues, MOTOR provides the perfect backdrop to toast great food and good times. Plus, October’s bands for Saturday’s BBQ & Blues are scorchers.

10/2/2021 No BBQ & Blues (private event)
10/9/2021 Steve Cohen

10/16/2021 Craig Baumann

10/23/2021 Robert Allen Jr. Band

10/30/2021 Blue Highway Duo

1903 EVENTS
Book your holiday party now! After months of missing out on events and gatherings, it’s time to reconnect with friends, family and colleagues. Intimate or grand, the team at MOTOR Bar & Restaurant and 1903 Events are ready to take care of all the details so all you have to worry about is where you left your dancing shoes.

About the Harley-Davidson Museum
Discover culture and history through stories and interactive exhibits that celebrate expression, camaraderie, and love for the sport at the Harley-Davidson Museum. A visit to the H-D Museum is an experience that will stay with you for a lifetime. With an unrivaled collection of Harley-Davidson® motorcycles and memorabilia, a 20-acre, park-like campus, and a calendar full of activities, the H-D Museum is one of Milwaukee’s top tourist destinations for visitors from around the globe. Make your plans to visit the Harley-Davidson Museum at H-DMuseum.com.

Spec Showdown: Harley-Davidson Sportster S Vs. Indian Scout

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

An American middleweight melee.

For decades, the Harley-Davidson Sportster dominated the American middleweight V-twin class, mostly by dint of being the only American middleweight V-twin. Without a top contender to challenge its reign, the Motor Company only issued modest upgrades since 1986. However, that all changed when the Indian Scout burst onto the scene in 2015.

Heavily based on the Victory Octane, the revived Scout paired Indian’s rich heritage with thoroughly modern equipment. The liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,133cc V-twin was the antithesis of Harley’s ancient air-cooled Evo engine. Compared to the Sportster’s signature teardrop tank and engine cooling fins, the Scout’s low-slung stance and neo-bobber aesthetic presented a viable alternative to Harley’s aging platform.

Facing a formidable foe and new emissions regulations, the Bar and Shield telegraphed its counterpunch when it revealed the Custom 1250 in July, 2018. Nearly three years later, that haymaker finally landed when Harley officially announced the 2021 Sportster S.

Complete with a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,252cc V-twin, the new Sportster’s spec sheet now stands toe-to-toe with the Scout. Of course, we won’t know who wins the battle in the showroom until the Sportster S arrives at dealerships. For now, however, the tale of the tape tells a fascinating story.

Overview
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S – Vs – 2021 Indian Scout

Middleweight Might
Featuring Harley’s shiny new Revolution Max 1250T, the 2021 Sportster now produces 121 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of torque. While the Scout previously set performance benchmarks for the category with 100 horsepower and 72 lb-ft of torque, Indian’s entry cruiser now looks outgunned. Of course, the Revolution Max V-twin touts a larger displacement, which helps the Sportster S steal that performance feather from Indian’s cap.

On top of that power deficit, the Scout lugs around 59 extra pounds, weighing in at 561 pounds compared to the Sportster’s 502-pound wet weight. Straightline acceleration and top speed define a motorcycle not, but agility goes to the Hog as well. With a 59.8-inch wheelbase, fully adjustable USD fork, and a linkage-equipped monoshock, the Sportster S outmaneuvers the Scout’s 62-inch wheelbase, conventional front end, and dual rear shocks.

Indian does outfit the Scout with a 16-inch wheelset shod in sticky Pirelli Night Dragon rubber while Harley opts for a 16-inch rear and 17-inch front. We could surmise that the smaller wheelset gives the Scout a handling edge if it weren’t for the Sportster’s specially-developed Dunlop GT503 tires. Thanks to an aggressive profile and sticky compound, the Dunlops compensate for the Sportster’s larger front wheel, helping to deliver a 34-degree lean angle compared to the Scout’s 29 degrees.

Novice-Friendly
Though Indian no longer holds the performance edge, the Scout still has a fighting chance. At 29.6 inches, the 2021 Sportster’s perch is a full four inches about the Scout’s 25.6-inch seat height. Most riders won’t have an issue with the Sporty’s seat height, which sags to 28.9-inches in the saddle, but even less will have problems with Indian’s low-slung seat. Of course, novice and inseam-challenged riders benefit most from a low seat height and the Scout is good option for that reason.

Conversely, Indian only offers optional ABS on the Scout while the Harley flaunts rider aids like traction control, cornering ABS, ride modes, and engine braking settings. On top of the full electronics suite, the Motor Company’s new round, four-inch TFT display also outshines the Scout’s analog speedometer and digital tachometer combo. Of course, you could reason the Scout’s spartan accommodations help beginners learn the ropes with a less cumbersome system, but it’s usually better to have rider aids and not need them as opposed to the other way around.

If we’re going to make any case for beginner-appropriate features, however, it should start with the brakes, and the Sportster delivers yet again. Championing a full Brembo braking system with a radially mounted four-piston front caliper, floating single-pot rear binder, and master cylinder, the Sportster S stops surprisingly well. On the other hand, the Scout’s single two-piston caliper up front and single-piston clamper in the rear don’t deliver as much stopping power as its counterpart.

The Final Decision:
Though the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S walks away with nearly every round in its pocket, we still have to consider one very important detail: price. At $14,999, the souped-up Sporty is $3,000 over the Scout’s MSRP. Coupled with a 121-horsepower V-twin, Harley’s asking price could easily put the Sportster S out of most beginner’s grasp. When price is taken into account, the two cruisers stack up much more evenly, and may even cater to different customers/budgets.

With that said, we can’t wait to see how the Sportster and Scout duke it out in the future. Will Indian fight back with an even punchier V-twin? Will Harley offer a cheaper Sportster option without diluting too much performance? The middleweight cruiser class is a much more competitive environment these days, and we can’t wait to see Sportster and Scout continue to battle it out in the future.

Kirk Taylor’s 2018 Strider Custom is back

By General Posts

by Marilyn Stemp

Kirk Taylor’s L’il Cha Cha was among the very first class of Tiny Strider Customs, a program of the Flying Piston Benefit that supports All Kids Bike – an organization that’s on a mission to teach every kid how to ride a bike as part of kindergarten PE class.

Custom creations are unveiled at the Flying Piston breakfast in August at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip then auctioned at the Mecum motorcycle event in Las Vegas the following January. Proceeds fund bike-riding programs for elementary schools.

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BMW Motorrad & legendary music brand Marshall enter strategic partnership

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from Press Release at BMWgroup.com and from http://www.tradearabia.com/

BMW Motorrad has agreed a long-term partnership with world-renowned British company Marshall Amplification, to raise the innovation and quality of BMW Motorrad sound systems.

The legendary Marshall spirit and the development power of BMW Motorrad will in future be reflected in new innovative products for motorcycles and music, especially in the BMW Motorrad Heritage segment.

For 60 years, Marshall, originally from Hanwell, London, now based in Bletchley, Milton Keynes (UK), have produced legendary guitar amplifiers used by the world’s best musicians. Since 2012 it has expanded their audio quality into award winning headphones and active speakers designed for music lovers.

PRESS RELEASE:
Innovation and premium quality for future BMW Motorrad sound systems.

Munich. Riding a motorcycle while listening to music – both fit well together, as they promise deep emotional experiences and intense pleasure on two wheels. It is not for nothing that generations of artists have dedicated their songs to the experience of motorcycling. “Born to be Wild” is a notable example.

To ensure that beats and basses perfectly complement the ear while riding, BMW Motorrad has long been engaged in intensive development work on its sound systems. With its now agreed long-term partnership with world-renowned British company Marshall Amplification, the innovation and quality of BMW Motorrad sound systems are set to reach new heights.

For 60 years, Marshall, originally from Hanwell, London, now based in Bletchley, Milton Keynes (UK), have produced legendary guitar amplifiers used by the world’s best musicians. Since 2012 they have expanded their audio quality into award winning headphones and active speakers designed for music lovers.

The legendary Marshall spirit and the development power of BMW Motorrad will in future be reflected in new innovative products for motorcycles and music, especially in the BMW Motorrad Heritage segment.

BMW Motorrad will present the first new products resulting from this strategic partnership very soon. Stay tuned to find out more about this on 29 July 2021.