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Electric dream: Horwin CR6 reviewed

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by Fraser Addecott from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Sales of electric two-wheelers are booming and with manufacturers producing bikes like this one, it’s easy to see why.

It seems difficult to keep up with the number of new electric two-wheelers coming on to the market these days.

The trend was already under way and has only been accelerated by the pandemic, with commuters and others looking for alternatives to public transport.

Figures from the Motorcycle Industry Association show sales of electrics for June up 155% compared to the same month last year.

Sales for the year up until last month are also up 210% compared to the same period in 2020.

That is impressive growth, with the majority of bikes sold falling in the 50cc and 125cc equivalent categories.

Artisan Electric is a British company established in 2016 with a “mission to change the face of electric motorcycles and scooters with industry-leading innovation and product quality”.

The company offers a range of seven electric bikes and scooters – and the one I am testing here is the CR6.

This is a 125cc-equivalent machine, with a pretty cool retro-meets-futuristic look.

The air-cooled electric motor is powered by a 3.96kWh Panasonic lithium-ion battery.

Careful riding will produce a range of around 60 miles.

Haring around flat out – top speed is about 55mph – will cut your range to around 30 miles.

That may not sound much, but the CR6 is aimed at commuters and for jaunts into town, so it’s perfectly adequate.

A full charge from zero takes around four hours, but bear in mind you’ll hardly ever be charging from completely flat, so shorter times are more realistic.

Charging is via a standard three-pin socket and a socket in the side of the bike.

The battery comes with a reassuring three-year warranty.

On board, the ride position is relaxed and comfortable with a long and well-padded cafe-racer type seat.

There’s a round retro/modern, backlit, colour clock with a rather unnecessary rev counter across the top and a LCD panel with speed, charge level etc.

As with all electrics, the acceleration is instantaneous and impressive.

At just 134kg, this bike is light and it feels agile, manageable and nippy – perfect for the urban jungle.

With low-down weight, a decent aluminium chassis and an excellent turning circle, the CR6 handles extremely well.

The non-adjustable USD forks and preload-adjustable rear monoshock do a perfectly reasonable job.

And braking via a front 265mm disc and three-piston caliper and rear 220mm is plenty powerful enough.

The headlight is a nice bright LED and the “tank” is actually a lockable storage compartment, ideal for the charge cable, gloves etc.

It also contains a USB port – handy for charging your phone.

At five grand, the CR6 is obviously a bigger initial outlay than a petrol 125, but running costs work out at just a penny a mile.

Overall then, the Horwin is a solid little city commuter, easy to ride, with good looks and decent performance.

Specs:
Horwin CR6
Motor: Air-cooled electric
Max power: 8bhp
Max torque: 30ft lb
Colours: White; blue; green; black
Price: £4,992

This Ducati EV Artwork Is So Good, Folks Even Believe It’s Real

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by Cristian Curmei from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati is the sort of name that tells you right away just about everything you need to know about a vehicle. It’s even grown to be the sort of brand that inspires designers of all kinds to take a whack at building the perfect Ducati.

While building the perfect Ducati may just be a dream, here’s a fine example of one designer’s inspiration derived from the famed brand. The vehicle rendering before you is known as the Ducati è rossa monoposto, and it’s from the mind of one Romain Gauvin.

No, Mr. Gauvin is not some artist that just graduated college and decided to test his drawing hand, but rather a very prolific designer. His resume currently shows that he is Senior Designer at Automobile Citroen. That should be more than enough to have you looking at this render a second time.

If it isn’t, here’s a fun little fact. Rumor has it that this design is the newest electric motorcycle from Ducati, according to an article by gomotoriders. However, upon a search that led me to Ducati themselves, there has been nothing to back up those claims. But I can see why some people want to believe so much that this is a real motorcycle; it’s definitely a one-of-a-kind piece of work, even as a render.

The idea behind the concept is a simple one, and Gauvin states on his Behance page that, “My goal was to blend cutting edge technology with pure emotional motoring fascination. I wanted to see an electric motorbike that was actually desirable.” Did he succeed? Well, you tell me. I’m just the messenger.

With the idea of creating a “desirable” EV branded Ducati, the monoposto was underway. Gauvin states that he started with the frame of the bike. Here, carbon fiber was the chosen material. From there, he just kept adding more and more elements until the bike was complete.

After the frame, an electric motor, rear suspension system, and rear hub are designed and set in their according position. One thing you can see is that this bike is a chain driven EV. I recently rode a chain driven EV, and I got to say, those things can be beasts.

Even though Gauvin doesn’t state what cues from the motorsport’s world are being used in the overall design, one feature is very clear; the panel work that wraps the motor housing looks a lot like the air intake to an F1 vehicle. That segment then blends beautifully into a leather seat that’ll have the rider leaning forward quite a bit. Those pits on the sides of the would-be “intake” also look like a perfect place for the rider’s arms to become one with the frame, resulting in some nice aerodynamics.

Speaking of aerodynamics, the carbon fiber fork flares out and looks like it, too, is made to manipulate oncoming air around the bike and rider. Even though the fork looks solid, it also seems like there may be some suspension properties hidden beneath the flares.

One thing is for sure, this motorcycle does not look like it’s one meant for just plain cruising on Sundays. Instead, the rims, massive front brakes, and slick tires tell you that the only place you will ever feel this EV’s true potential is on a track. Even the riders position tells you all you need to know about where this EV belongs.

Even though the designer makes no mention of this motorcycle’s range, he does include a visual as to where the recharge port would be, right underneath the seat and fed directly to the battery system.

Now, take a minute and have a nice long look at this design. If you do so, you too, may begin to believe the rumors about this possibly being the next Ducati motorcycle. Even though those rumors aren’t true, not currently anyway. If Ducati was to ever make an EV that looks like this, I would be out there in line waiting for the test ride.

Davinci DC100 Is a Two-Wheeled Robot Disguised as an Electric Motorcycle

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

  • 0 to 60 mph (100 kph) in 3 seconds
  • top speed of 124 mph (200 km)
  • peak power 135 hp and peak torque 627 ft-lb (850 Nm)
  • ride range of 222 miles (357.51 km)
  • fast-charging to full charge in 30 minutes

The motorcycle of tomorrow is, according to makers Davinci Dynamics, the DC100, or its fancier, more expensive version, the limited-edition, hand-crafted masterpiece DC Classic. Introduced this week in Beijing (hat tip to New Atlas), it is said to be the culmination of seven years of hard work, the first step toward the electric two-wheel revolution that the world has been hoping for but is yet to fully witness.

Big words for an equally big moment, but you don’t get the chance to stand out from everyone else if you don’t show cojones, figuratively speaking. Hopefully, Davinci Dynamics can back up the impressive claims with a futuristic cafe racer to match, because, on paper, the DC100 sounds like a dream. It’s more than just an electric motorcycle, the company says: it’s a two-wheeled robot disguised as an elegant, futuristic, electric cafe racer.

The DC100 rides on a monocoque aluminum alloy chassis. It has a single-sided swingarm and a cover for the giant lithium 17.7kWh battery pack that gives it a boxy but still streamlined appearance. It rides on Pirelli Diablo Rosso III tires, and it’s painted in muted gray or bright orange, making it feel as if it belongs in a video game of some sorts.

On paper, the DC100 delivers solid performance, meant to “rival the performance of their 1000cc gas-powered counterparts:” you get 0 to 60 mph (100kph) acceleration time of 3 seconds, peak torque of 627 ft-lb (850 Nm), and a top speed of 124 mph (200 kph). The hub motor delivers a peak power of 135 hp, while the battery is good for an estimated WLTP range of 222 miles (357.51 km). Fast-charging ensures a full charge in just 30 minutes.

The DC100 is also very smart, using technology for smoother and more intuitive, longer, and safer rides. It’s packed with sensors that collect and track information, says Davinci, with the ultimate goal of maximized efficiency and comfort, so you can truly enjoy your ride.

Features include Hill-start Assist Control (HAC), regen braking and improved balancing on descent, reverse assist (which allows you to back out of a spot on torque, even on an incline), traction control, and combined braking for maximized stopping power. In Drive mode, if you release the brake, the motorcycle “creeps forward slowly” at 3 mph (5 kph) to ensure a “smooth” start.

But the most intriguing features are listed as “to come:” self-balancing capabilities, target recognition, and remote control. Davinci promises that the DC100 “will be able to balance itself” and “to automatically follow a target,” hence the promise that it could become your “jogging companion.” The idea, one assumes, is that it won’t ever go any faster than in the creep mode mentioned above, at 3 mph (5 kph). Not that you should ever go out jogging with your bike, as if you’d have your dog tag along.

Remote control will also be offered as an OTA update, through the Davinci App. Though the press materials released so far show the bike with a display, the Davinci website and the press release that went out this week note that, even in this stage, your “phone is the key, and your display.” This means that riders have to use the Davinci App for settings and stats, and their phone to visualize them, including speed. They would also use this method for remote control, when and if it becomes available – maybe even to summon their bike to them in the way drivers do their Teslas today.

As noted above, Davinci is offering two models of this two-wheeled robot that poses as an electric motorcycle: the DC100 and the DC Classic. Spec-wise, the only difference between the two is that the latter will be limited to just 50 units worldwide and will come with a hand-crafted, hand-assembled and custom-tailored body that stands out for the “striking minimalist aesthetics,” each carrying an ID number.

The other, more significant difference is in pricing: the DC100 costs $27,500 / €26,000, while the DC Classic is $90,000/ €78,000. Assuming you picked yourself up from the floor, here’s the good news: the pre-order books are open, and all you need is a $150 / €150 deposit to secure your bike of tomorrow right now. That’s not a figure of speech, because the wait for either is long: the Classic ships in April 2022, and the DC100 in July 2022.

 

NCOM Biker Newsbytes for July 2021

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Highway Bill passes House, Right to Repair moves ahead, Motorcycle Industry Council program, Emission free motorcycles in UK and more nations to phase out new gas engine motorcycles, EU & US truce on Trade Tariffs, Mandatory Motorcycle Inspections for Europe, Easyriders magazine to come back.

E-news service from National Coalition of Motorcyclists

Click Here to Read the NCOM motorcycle industry news on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Harley-Davidson Reports Global Bike Sales Up 24 Percent In 2021 Q2

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You can read the Company Announcement at their Official Website by Clicking Here.

Second Quarter 2021 Highlights and Results, and Recent Announcements

  • Delivered Q2 GAAP diluted EPS of $1.33, up $1.93 over Q2 2020
  • Q2 H-D, Inc. total revenue up 77 percent over Q2 2020
  • North America Q2 retail sales up 43% over Q2 2020 and up 5% over Q2 2019
  • Delivered strong Motorcycles and Related Products (Motorcycles) segment gross margin and operating margin driven by the Rewire product portfolio adjustments
  • Delivered Financial Services segment Q2 2021 operating income growth of $90 million over Q2 2020 driven by a lower provision for credit losses
  • Launched LiveWire as a standalone brand and introduced LiveWire ONE™ – the electric motorcycle built for the urban experience, with the power and range to take you beyond
  • Revealed Sportster® S, the all-new Sportster motorcycle built on the Revolution Max platform
  • Launched H-D1™ Marketplace today, the ultimate online destination for pre-owned Harley-Davidson motorcycles in North America

Rolling in the right direction.
by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

On July 21, 2021, Harley-Davidson reported its 2021 Q2 results. The numbers are definitely moving in the right direction, especially when compared to the same time period in 2020. Worldwide Harley motorcycle sales are up 24 percent, due entirely to an impressive sales rebound in North America.

North American sales are up 43 percent year-on-year in Q2, which is the only positive number when broken down by sales region. Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (commonly referred to among some OEMs as “EMEA”) are down by 7 percent for the same time period. Asia Pacific sales are down 13 percent, and Latin America sales are down 31 percent.

Taking the entirety of the first six months of 2021 into consideration, worldwide Harley-Davidson bike sales are up 18 percent—which is still good news for the embattled OEM. North American sales are up 38 percent, EMEA sales are down 19 percent, Asia Pacific sales are down 7 percent, and Latin America sales are down 47 percent.

Harley had some explanations for some of the negative numbers, stressing that they’re all part of its overall strategy. EMEA Q2 retail sales, the Motor Company said, went down because Harley stopped sales of the Street and legacy Sportster models in the region. Meanwhile, Latin America sales were negatively impacted by a dealer reduction across the region, as well as “pricing actions across the portfolio, which were executed as part of the Rewire strategy.”

Revenues for Q2 of 2021 are up 99 percent over the same period in 2020. That likely comes as particularly good news, since that contributes to a revenue increase of 45 percent over 2020 for the first six months of the year. While most of these numbers are still below those achieved in 2019, this is clearly the strongest showing since the pandemic became a factor. North American Q2 retail sales stand out as an exception, as those are actually up 5 percent over Q2 2019.

Parts and Accessories sales are likewise up 32 percent for Q2 of 2021, and General Merchandise sales are up 47 percent. Overall, Harley says, it forecasts full-year 2021 motorcycle segment revenue growth to end up between 30 and 35 percent, year-on-year. Since that is just a forecast, we’ll have to see how that prediction pans out over the coming months.

Zero FXE launched: Review and Details

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by Andrew Cherney from https://www.cycleworld.com

The brand’s sleekest and most fun ebike yet. The lightweight, agile FXE is a new addition to Zero’s 2022 lineup.

  • In a segment full of either high-priced, tech-heavy options or cheap flimsy junk, the FXE is a step in the right direction, especially for commuters not too concerned with range. It’s also a ton of fun.
  • The design adds a minimal, supermoto style onto the existing FX platform for a more modern, updated feel.
  • Steel frame holds the tried-and-true ZF 75-5 air-cooled motor in the FXE, rated at 46 hp. The 7.2kWh battery is not removable.
  • Certain design elements like the front headlight design (an LED) and “beak” got carried over directly from the Huge Design concept bike.
  • The bike’s light weight and short wheelbase make it easy to work turns, with good lean angle and sticky Pirelli tires aiding in your attack. You can drag the kickstand if you’re super aggressive though.
  • The relaxed, commuter-friendly riding position is even more upright than the SR/F’s but it makes for a comfy perch (except at higher speeds).
  • You’ll find the Cypher II operating system on the FXE displayed on a new 5-inch TFT screen, giving various ride modes and bike data. Pair your phone with the app to tailor them and get more detailed info.
  • Stylish cast wheels hold grippy Pirelli Diablo Rosso II tires, which upped our confidence in deeper high-speed turns.
  • The rear Showa monoshock delivers nearly 8 inches of travel for an impressively stable ride.
  • Inverted Showa fork is adjustable. J.Juan brakes offer excellent feel and good stopping power, and ABS can be turned off.

2022 Zero FXE Specifications
MSRP: $11,795
Motor: ZF 75-5 air-cooled IPM motor
Battery: 7.2kWh (max capacity) lithium-ion integrated battery
Charger type: 650W integrated
Charge time: 9.7 hours to 100% w/ standard 110V or 220V input
Claimed Range: 60 miles highway, 100 miles city, 75 miles combined
Claimed Peak power: 46 hp @ 3,500 rpm
Claimed Peak torque: 78 lb.-ft.
Top speed: 85 mph
Transmission: Clutchless direct drive
Final Drive: Carbon belt
Frame: Steel trellis
Front Suspension: 41mm inverted Showa fork, spring preload, compression and rebound damping adjustable; 7.0 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Showa 40mm piston monoshock, spring preload, compression and rebound damping adjustable; 8.9 in. travel
Front Brake: 1-piston J.Juan floating caliper, 320mm disc w/ Bosch Gen 9 ABS
Rear Brake: 1-piston J.Juan floating caliper, 240mm disc w/ Bosch Gen 9 ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast alloy; 17 x 3 in. / 17 x 3.5 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: Pirelli Diablo Rosso II; 110/70-17 / 140/70-17
Rake/Trail: 24.4°/2.8 in.
Wheelbase: 56.0 in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Claimed Curb Weight: 299 lb.
Standard warranty: 2 years
Contact: zeromotorcycles.com

Conventional wisdom says there will be more EVs on the street within the next five to 10 years, and our urban roadscape will look a lot different than it does now. But conventional wisdom usually skips over the equally important notion that attracting riders means you have to innovate while also being sensitive to price, particularly in the electric space. Zero seems to be tackling those talking points, at least partially, with the reveal of the new 2022 FXE, a compact and affordable supermoto-styled commuter machine it’s billing as “the motorcycle of tomorrow, available today.”

Building the bike of tomorrow is a tall order, even for an electric motorcycle manufacturer, but when Zero took the wraps off its new machine last month near the firm’s HQ in Santa Cruz, California, our group of assorted moto scribes nodded. Here indeed was a very different looking electric bike—especially for the sometimes dowdy two-wheel electric space. And yet a mind-blowing revelation it was not, especially if you’re looking at the spec sheet alone. From a design standpoint, the slim, starkly modern supermoto-styled machine felt instantly appealing—even if it looked an awful lot like a deconstructed riff on the WR450, or more accurately, a close cousin of the brand’s already supermoto-y FXS model. But how would it hold up on the street?

n the FXE’s case, form did not have to follow function—or not as rigorously as previous models, which adopted more familiar shapes to make them appealing to the general public, according to Zero. But now, says VP of Product Development Brian Wismann, the consumer is ready for updated designs, which explains why the FXE, a model based on a concept collaboration with Huge Design back in 2019, is here. Although it’s built on the brand’s existing FX platform, the partnership with Huge introduced a completely new design language, informed mainly by stripped-down panels of bodywork. (The concept bike was in fact built on an FXS model, and you can see the similarities.) On the FXE, the so-called essential surfaces—seats, body panels, touch points—are intended to look like they’re floating over the chassis. The distinctive styling radiates modern industrial design aesthetics, while “celebrating the electric drivetrain” says Wismann.

When we sidled up to the FXE at a secret staging location outside of town—Zero shrewdly had us ride older SR/Fs and SR/Ss to where the new bikes were stashed—we were struck by just how approachable the profile was. A sane seat height welcomed even the shorties in the bunch, with the 32.9-inch perch making for easy access and a riding position similar to that of a dirt bike, not super aggressive but sitting atop the slightly dished, mostly flat seat, with a fairly short reach to the tallish bars. Mid-mounted pegs were ideally located, not too far forward or rearward, providing an upright stance in the saddle—even more than the SR/F I had just gotten off of. The compact body panels make for a clean look, though they did splay outward from below the faux fuel tank, pushing my knees out into the wind. They basically made it impossible to grip the tank as you normally might, but it was more minor inconvenience than any real annoyance.

With the ergonomics checking out, I put the FXE into Sport mode and let ‘er rip. Even though I sort of knew what to expect, the instant torque pop of an electric motor never fails to put a big grin on your face. Yes, 46 horses might not sound like much, but the eerily silent power pulse from the air-cooled ZF 75-5 motor is more than enough to turn your head, especially in its immediacy; the throttle felt far more responsive than the SR/F we had just ridden, possibly because the FXE’s substantially smaller mass and less unsprung weight made for quicker power transfer. With its narrow waist and short wheelbase, I found I could easily push the FXE into and through even the harshest decreasing-radius turns we tackled among the Santa Cruz redwoods. The bike did not fight me on quick transitions as much as expected, with the sticky Pirellis giving me all kinds of confidence throughout a half-day stint in mountain twisties. And with no need to worry about shifting, you’re free to focus on the next apex. Or to just blast to the 85-mph top speed, which I did whenever we hit a straight stretch of road. Why not, right?

Zero also outfitted the FXE with its now-familiar J.Juan brakes and bolstered by a Bosch ABS system, so stops were also a stress-free affair, with easy lever pull giving a strong bite and solid stopping power and almost no fade. (ABS can be turned off as well.) With 7 inches of travel, the inverted, adjustable Showa fork soaked up almost every road deformity we came across (except for one unexpected curb hop) staying composed even in truly harsh divots. Holding the line out back is an equally resilient—and adjustable—Showa monoshock that tracked solidly throughout our short ride.

As with the FX, the FXE also leverages Zero’s Cypher II operating system, which here is married to a new 5-inch optically bonded TFT display that proved bright and easy to read. You can access ride modes—it comes preprogrammed with Eco and Sport—and tailor torque, speed, and brake regeneration from the free Zero app, which also gives you insight to battery status. We can’t speak to range, given our short ride day—Zero claims 100 miles of city riding from the 7.2kWh (peak) battery, with 60 miles of range claimed on the highway, at 55 mph. The display screen showed less than 20 percent of charge remaining after our 50-mile stint, which was a mix of high- and low-speed scenarios, and that feels fairly close to the claim. According to Zero, the onboard 650W charger will top off the battery in 9.7 hours off a standard household socket; a rapid charger available for additional cost will do the job in a little more than 3 hours.

In sum, we’re not entirely buying the “bike of tomorrow” tagline, but the FXE does manage to serve up a grin-inducing blend of instant acceleration, flickability, and easy steering. Perhaps even more tantalizing is the sub-$10K price tag; yes, you’re getting a somewhat short range bike, but at least that obstacle is being somewhat addressed. Of course that sub-10K number rings true only once you tally in the federal and California EV tax credits, but hey, $10K is $10K.

Considering H-D’s lowest priced electric offering, the just-released LiveWire One, runs upward of $20K, and any bike called Lightning, Energica, Tarform, or Damon is well north of there, you’ve gotta hand it to Zero for compiling a portfolio of four models priced under $12K, all coming with a warranty and dealer support.

The dual sport FX sits at $11,595, the entry-level FXS is at $11,295, the naked S is priced at $10,995, and now the FXE at $11,795. All four either are or can be configured with the ZF 7.2 powertrain, which, granted, is not the fastest or most top-of-the-line offering, but it does help make the FXE one of the most affordable models in the Zero line.

You can check it out yourself at some of the upcoming stops of the IMS tour (starting with Sonoma Raceway on July 16) and bikes should be in dealers later this month as well.

Honda CB200 Modified Into An Electric Motorcycle

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

The electric powertrain of the modified Honda CB200 has fitted onto a stylish aluminum enclosure

Manufacturing EVs from scratch is an uphill task in itself but it is a whole new level of challenge when one has to convert a vehicle already fitted with an IC engine. We have earlier witnessed such projects being undertaken in four-wheelers such as Land Rovers and VW Beetles but this time an electric powertrain has been fitted into a motorcycle.

An aftermarket workshop named Omega Motors, based out of San Francisco in USA, has converted a 1975 Honda CB200 into an electric motorcycle. The donor model back in 1970s and 80s was a hot-selling retro-style motorcycle with a cafe racer design. The makers of this modified prototype haven’t tried to alter the design of the motorcycle in any way.

Updated Styling
Rechristened as Omega EV200, it still retains a part-scrambler and part-cafe racer design with round headlamps, single-piece ripped seat and wire-spoke wheels lending it a retro appeal. The electric CB200 gets refurbished front forks, wheels and brakes while retaining the cable-actuated front brake and rear drum brake.

Subtle modifications have been made to the chassis in order to incorporate a battery and electric motor setup. The frame has been shortened and the welded-in rear fender has been chopped off.

The pillion footpegs have also been removed while a small part of its spine has also been cut in order to weld a mounting plate for the controller. Interestingly, the motor mounts from the original bike have been left intact while the new battery pack and electric motor are attached via a set of custom mounting plates.

Specs & Features
Speaking of specifications, the motorcycle has been fitted with an electric motor sourced from Golden Motor and raed to produce 5kW (6.7 bhp) of continuous supply and peak power of 10kW (13.4 bhp). This motor feeds energy of a 1.6 kWh battery pack specifically designed and built for Omega EV200. Omega has also added a Kelly Controls controller which has been packaged neatly under the modified fuel tank and seat.

Coming to its performance, numbers are fairly modest with a top speed of 60mph (96.5 kmph). However, the electric bike weighs only 111 kilos which is 22 percent lighter than the stock CB200. The motorcycle offers a riding range of only 48 km on a single charge while charging the battery takes five to eight hours.

There isn’t much to offer in terms of features but Omega has got the stock analogue speedometer and switches working. Most importantly the clutch lever has been repurposed to work as an analogue regenerative braking control. The most attractive addition is a small digital display to reveal battery-related information which has been covered with the same piece of leather as the custom seat.

BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100

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from https://www.bmwmotorcycles.com

The Great Escape – VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
Concept Vehicle. Not available for sale.

Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100.

“When we develop a motorcycle, we are usually thinking around five to ten years in the future. Looking further ahead is particularly exciting for us and very appealing.” – Edgar Heinrich, Head of BMW Motorcycle Design

The frame follows the wheel.
The black triangular frame is visually reminiscent of the R 32 from 1923 – the first BMW motorcycle. However, the frame has functionally little to do with the original. The Flexframe is flexible and allows steering manoeuvres without the joints we are familiar with today. If the handlebars are moved, the entire frame changes shape and facilitates the change in direction. Depending on the traffic situation, the forces required for this vary: steering manoeuvres are especially easy at a standstill, while the frame firms up at high speeds. The surfaces are attached so that they offer the wind and weather protection of a fully enclosed motorcycle. The surface of the frame is made of matt black textile.

Self-balancing: no chance of tilting over.
A motorcycle doesn’t need a stand. Not when assistance systems ensure perfect balance. Self-balancing enables the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100 to remain stable both during the ride and at a standstill. This enhances safety for the driver. It also makes it easier for beginners, because they are led safely through every riding situation and cannot fall over. But experienced bikers can also profit from self-balancing. Because the motorcycle becomes even more agile, making the riding experience even more dynamic. The assistance systems also expand the rider’s capabilities. Regardless of ability and practice, riders are able to constantly expand their boundaries and positively intensify the riding experiences. Making every ride an experience of pure freedom from start to finish.

SEE DETAILS at BMW Motorrad Website by Clicking Here.

BMW futuristic 75 mph electric scooter

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by Micah Toll from https://electrek.co

Definition CE 04 is not a production series model and not available for sale. The scooter won’t be available until 2022, and will carry a price of USD $11,795 in the US.

SEE BMW CE 04 at Motorrad Website by Clicking Here.

BMW has brought its futuristic concept electric scooter to life as the BMW CE 04. No longer just a lofty design study, the new electric scooter is prepared for production as the first in a new succession of electric urban mobility solutions from BMW Motorrad.

The BMW CE 04 follows very closely with the original concept bike unveiled last year, while offering minor concessions to ease production of the new electric two-wheeler.

But the inclusion of realistic fenders and practical mirrors hasn’t dulled the sharp, progressive design. It features no shortage of bright colors, floating panels, storage compartments, and angular edges. Even that single-sided rear swingarm puts a new twist on classic engineering.

The electric scooter includes a peak-rated 31 kW (42 hp) frame-mounted electric motor designed to offer zippy urban acceleration. BMW claims it can reach a speed of 50 km/h (31 mph) in 2.6 seconds, meaning riders should have no problem pulling away quickly from traffic lights.

Even considering the continuous motor rating of 15 kW (20 hp), the CE 04 is still much more powerful than other full-size urban electric scooters on the market.

With a full twist of the wrist, the scooter tops out at 120 km/h (75 mph).

There’s also a reduced power model with a 23 kW (31 hp) motor, though it still reaches the same top speed.

The internal battery in the higher spec model provides 8.9 kWh of capacity and is rated for up to 130 km (81 miles) of range. The reduced power model has a maximum range of 100 km (62 miles).

Based on the rather thin and flat profile of the saddle, perhaps it is best that this isn’t an ultra-long range touring scooter.

The CE 04 instead focuses on the urban commuter role, where features like an enclosed helmet storage compartment are likely to score points in the market.

The BMW CE 04 electric scooter can be recharged from a simple home wall outlet, a wall-mounted charger or a public charging station.

An internal 2.3 kW charger provides a recharge time of four hours. An optional 6.9 kW quick charger upgrade is available that reduces recharge time to one hour and 40 minutes.

The quick charger can also bring the battery from 20% to 80% in just 45 minutes, representing a more real-world quick-charging scenario.

The scooter includes advanced rider aides such as Automatic Stability Control (ASC) and Dynamic Traction Control (DTC), though the latter is an upgradeable option. There’s also a reverse gear, which is quite helpful for a heavy 230 kg (507 lb) scooter like this.

A large 10.25″ color TFT screen serves as the bike’s massive display and control center. The screen also includes navigation features, allowing riders to keep their phone in their pocket instead of using it as an added GPS device. Or riders could choose to store their phones in the bike’s charging compartment that includes a USB-C port. The scooter’s internal 8.9 kWh battery should be enough for several… hundred phone charges.

The scooter won’t be available until 2022, and will carry a price of USD $11,795 in the US. That may put it a bit above some competitors, but the new electric scooter certainly stands apart.

And perhaps most importantly, the CE 04 marks a fundamental electric shift for BMW Motorrad.

As BMW AG’s CEO Oliver Zipse explained:
“The BMW CE 04 is our new electric star for the city. It combines an e-drive with emotion and motorcycling fun. The latest technology, and the best battery cells, which also provide power in the BMW iX. Just like the CE 04, all future new BMW Motorrad models for urban mobility will be pure electric.”

With the unveiling of such a futuristic design for the company’s latest electric scooter, we have to wonder if that BMW Vision DC Roadster electric motorcycle concept will one day become a reality as well.

Check out the scooter in action in the video below, and let us know what you think of BMW’s new direction in the urban mobility space.

Harley-Davidson’s Livewire One electric motorcycle debuts at $21,995

By General Posts

  • Up to 146 Miles on a Single Charge
  • Customizable Riding Experience
  • Connected Communication
  • 105 HP
  • 30″ Seat Height
  • All-Electric
  • DC Fast Charge Compatible
  • Charging time is 0-100% charge in 11 hours using the included charging cord
  • $19,799 *Price includes tax credit of $2,200
  • ADDITIONAL ACCESSORIES: Radius Carbon Fiber Kit $1,299.95* and Rizoma® Precision Billet Kit $1,299.95*
  • CHECK FOR Federal Government Electric Vehicle Tax Credit by Clicking Here

by Gary Gastelu from https://www.foxnews.com

Reboot of H-D’s original electric motorcycle. Harley-Davidson’s rebooted electric motorcycle has been revealed.

The LiveWire One is an updated version of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire that was introduced in 2019 and will be sold under the newly established LiveWire electric motorcycle brand.

The LiveWire One has a claimed range of 146 miles per charge in urban driving and can be recharged to 100% in an hour at a public DC fast charging station.

The starting price has been reduced from $29,799 to $21,999, which will make it more competitive against similar offerings from Zero Motorcycles.

Twelve dedicated LiveWire showrooms located in California, Texas and New York are scheduled to be open this fall with additional locations to be added by the end of the year.

International sales will begin in 2022 and the LiveWire brand will be expanded with additional models in the coming years.

Harley-Davidson Launches LiveWire One Electric Motorcycle
from https://www.rttnews.com

Harley-Davidson (HOG) on Thursday launched its first electric motorcycle under LiveWire brand, LiveWire One, as the iconic motorcycle company re-attempts to make a mark in the electric motorcycle segment.

LiveWire ONE is priced at $21,999 and available to order at LiveWire.com, in addition to select LiveWire dealers. The price could go below $20,000 for most customers after federal tax credit for electric motorcycles.

The city range of the LiveWire One is listed as 146 miles, which is the exact same range as the original LiveWire. The bike also sports DC fast charging that can recharge from 0-100% in 60 minutes or 0-80% in 45 minutes.

CEO Jochen Zeitz said, “As part of The Hardwire Strategy, we made a commitment that Harley-Davidson would lead in electric. We recognized the pioneering spirit and brand value in LiveWire for our community and took the decision to evolve the original LiveWire motorcycle into a dedicated EV brand.”

SEE MORE AT https://www.livewire.com