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The Taxing Bikernet Weekly News for April 15, 2021

By General Posts

News from Wheels Through Time Museum, Four Corners Motorcycle Rally, Goodyear buys Avon tires company, Fandango event coverage, Tucker Powersports offers over 200 new products for e-bikes to help dealers, David Uhl Art in Florida, CARB Certification Fees, major Motorcycle Events List for 2021 from Twisted Road, the ever-growing Cantina Bad Joke Library, Laconia Bike Week Charity Raffle, NMA readers comment on EV,

There’s way more coming to Bikernet. We need to keep riding free into the future.

–Bandit

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Electric Motorcycles to help in Wildlife Protection

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from https://thewestsidegazette.com

Two-Wheeled Hope: Kenya Embraces Electric Motorcycle Project, Ups E-Mobility Goals

One of the world’s largest urban forests sits just outside Nairobi, one of Africa’s busiest cities. Amid its tranquility, the setting is often pierced by ear-splitting gasoline motorbikes emitting fumes as rangers patrol for poachers, intruders and watch over visitors.

“Normally, we use gasoline motorbikes to patrol this forest, making it impossible to nab culprits because of the noise. In many instances, we have been fighting a losing battle,” John Chege, the infrastructure coordinator from Friends of Karura Forest, told Zenger News.

But now, thanks to an electric motorbikes pilot project recently launched in Nairobi, Friends of Karura Forest is getting a donation of electric motorbikes.

Implemented by the United Nations Environmental Program, it is part of a larger initiative: Integrating two and three-wheelers into existing urban transport modes in developing and transition countries. The effort is funded by the International Climate Initiative of the German Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature and Nuclear.

Thanks to an electric motorbikes pilot project recently launched in Nairobi, Friends of Karura Forest is getting a donation of electric motorbikes. (Courtesy United Nations Environment Program)

The goal is to curb greenhouse gas emissions by helping countries reduce their dependence on fossil fuels.

Chege also said the bikes will help rangers move swiftly and more quietly through the vast forest of 2,752 acres.

“Since they are fast and do not emit much noise and minimal air pollution, we are sure of providing forest security efficiently, while tackling environmental problems,” Chege told stakeholders at the launch.

Despite the Kenyan government hope to transition into a 100 percent green energy nation, with more than 80 percent of its energy coming from hydro, solar, geothermal and wind, it still imports more gasoline motorbikes than cars, doubling its fleet every seven-to-eight years. It’s estimated that the newly registered gasoline motorcycles, commonly used as taxis (boda-boda), which stood at 1.5 million in 2018, will likely hit 5 million by 2030.

With the two and three-wheelers accounting for the same amount of emissions as a passenger car, Africa could see a 50 percent increase in air pollution by 2050 in low- and middle-income countries by 2050, according to a study by the Global Environment Facility.

“Now is a critical moment in the transition to electric mobility. Although we are at relatively low levels, we are 2 percent of sales globally, the change is coming exponentially. The volume is doubling less than every two years,” said Nigel Topping, the UK Government High Level Climate Action Champion for the upcoming United Nations climate talks, known as COP26.

According to Topping, it is possible to end the use of combustion engines and their associated health and climate effects.

“The shift toward electric mobility is a much-needed technology in saving the environment from pollution, and this pilot project will help. We have to grasp this opportunity, which will change the way we move in our cities. We are committed to it,” said James Macharia, Kenya’s Cabinet Secretary for transport, infrastructure, housing, urban development and public works.

Joyce Musya, UNEP deputy executive director, says motorcycles being imported by Kenya are generally inefficient and poorly maintained. “Shifting to electric bikes in Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and elsewhere will reduce costs, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, as well as create jobs,” said Musya.

Environment Program in Nairobi. (Courtesy U.N. Environment Program)

The bikes, donated by Shenzhen Shenling Car Co. Ltd., will last six to 12 months and will be replicated in Uganda, Ethiopia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

“We are committed to set up charging ports across the country to support growing demand for electric-powered vehicles and motorbikes,” said Brian Ngugi, managing director at Kenya Power, the country’s electricity transmission company.

The motorcycle industry supports 5.2 million Kenyans directly or indirectly, which is about 10 percent of Kenya’s population. There are 1.4 million motorcycle riders in Kenya.

Keffa Mwendwa, a boda boda rider, has been using an electric bike for six months within Nairobi, courtesy of Ecobodaa, a Nairobi-based startup that operates on a rent-to-own model. He sees many plusses.

“As compared to the gasoline motorbikes, maintenance is cheaper,” Mwendwa said. “I don’t have to do engine services like changing oil or changing chains. I only have to change brake fluid and tire pressure.”

Europe’s Electric Motorcycle Market Surges

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2020 is an IDTechEx estimate based on Q1 – Q3 2020 data. Source: ACEM, IDTechEx

Press Release: IDTechEx from https://www.scoop.co.nz

IDTechEx expects electric motorcycle sales in Europe to grow at least 50% year-on-year in 2020, building on the momentum of recent years. This is driven by continued policy support from governments alongside start-ups and incumbent OEMs entering the market with new model releases, finds the recent report from IDTechEx.

Growth is also being boosted by consumer awareness and acceptance in Europe of the benefits of electric motorcycles. Besides the low cost of ownership, electric motorcycles improve the riding experience, taking away the noise, fumes, vibration, shifting, and clutching from the user experience, alongside the environmental benefits of low emissions. The result has been strong growth on par with the electric car market since 2017.

How are electric motorcycles different? Electric motorcycles are unique, serious machines with power and energy requirements orders of magnitude higher than other common types of electric two-wheelers such as electric scooters, both the standing kind – think Lime – and the sitting kind – think Vespa.

Indeed, electric motorcycles typically utilize electric motors beyond 40kWp, which is more comparable to those found in electric cars than electric scooters, in a much more restricted space. This high-power need, coupled with the limited space on the motorcycle, means manufacturers rarely use off-the-shelf parts and design motors in-house from scratch. The situation is the same for the battery packs, which actually take up the most space in boxy designs unconventional for the moto industry (even when utilizing high-energy automotive-grade Li-ion cells). In contrast, low energy, cheap LFP packs sourced from China can be used for the low energy needs of electric scooters.

Zero Motorcycles, the global market leader for electric motorcycles based out of California, USA, is a good example. It uses locally sourced NMC pouch cells in a custom pack and has an impressive custom-built permanent magnet AC motor (passively air-cooled). The motor has no transmission and is direct drive to the rear wheel, with instant torque.

The result is that electric motorcycles are expensive compared with equivalent combustion models, and start-ups often focus on developing competition or racing bikes, which are less price-sensitive markets. So, while the market is growing, the price remains the main hurdle: a motorcycle with a 14kWh battery pack sells for over $15,000 today. The issue is exacerbated by the fact that electric motorcycles have the most appeal to environmentally conscious millennials who tend to have less purchasing power than older generations preferring loud pipes. In fact, young people are less inclined to buy a motorcycle in general, which is an existential problem the overall industry is grappling with. The high price of electric motorcycles should naturally improve as battery costs continue to decline from the economies of scale of the automotive industry, which may be enough to entice a new, younger audience.

To learn more, the new IDTechEx report “Electric Two-wheelers 2021–2041” (www.IDTechEx.com/E2W) addresses and forecasts electric two-wheelers with pure electric modes under 4kW (‘electric scooters’) and over 4kW (‘electric motorcycles’) with historic data back to 2015 and forecasts to 2041, with insight into the drivers and uptake by region (China, India, Indonesia, Vietnam, EU + UK, US, RoW). The report further explores key technology trends, such as the transition away from lead-acid and the reliance on permanent magnet motors for all power classes. Market shares of companies are provided regionally, based on primary interviews with market leaders.

This research forms part of the broader electric vehicle and energy storage portfolio from IDTechEx, who track the adoption of electric vehicles, battery trends, and demand across land, sea, and air, helping you navigate whatever may be ahead. Find out more at www.IDTechEx.com/EV.

U.S. judge approves revised EPA Harley-Davidson emissions settlement

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by David Shepardson from https://www.reuters.com

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A U.S. judge late on Monday approved a revised settlement with Harley-Davidson Inc over excess emissions that dropped a requirement that it spend $3 million to reduce air pollution.

In August 2016, the Milwaukee-based motorcycle manufacturer agreed to pay a $12 million civil fine and stop selling illegal after-market devices that caused its vehicles to emit too much pollution.

It also agreed to spend about $3 million to retrofit or replace wood-burning appliances with cleaner stoves to offset excess emissions.

The Justice Department in July 2017 cited a new policy by then-U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and an ongoing review of the penalty by a government auditor in proposing to drop the $3 million mitigation project.

More than four years after the settlement was announced, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan approved the settlement over the objections of environmental groups and a group of 10 states, including New York, Illinois, Maryland, Vermont, Washington and Massachusetts.

While the earlier agreement “containing the mitigation project might have been the ‘best’ resolution of

Harley-Davidson’s alleged violations, the court cannot say that the decree lodged before the Court is not within ‘the reaches of the public interest,’” Sullivan wrote in approving the consent decree.

Harley-Davidson and the EPA did not immediately comment Tuesday.

The settlement resolved allegations that Harley sold about 340,000 “super tuners” enabling motorcycles since 2008 to pollute the air at levels greater than what the company certified.

Harley-Davidson did not admit liability and has said it disagreed with the government, arguing that the tuners were designed and sold to be used in “competition only.”

Even though the settlement had not yet taken effect, Harley-Davidson has said that since August 2016, it sold only tuners certified by the California Air Resources Board and halted sale of the tuners in question and destroyed tuners returned by dealers.

Electric motorcycles made and designed in Singapore set to rev up Southeast Asia

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by Zhaki Abdullah from https://www.channelnewsasia.com

SINGAPORE: Although the COVID-19 pandemic had affected their initial plans, two Singapore-based start-ups are still set on revving up efforts to produce their own electric motorbikes.

This comes as Singapore relaxed its rules on electric motorcycles in April, allowing high-powered motorbikes with power ratings of more than 10kW to be on the roads as part of efforts to encourage the adoption of cleaner vehicles.

The coronavirus outbreak has caused “little hiccups” in its supply chain, said Scorpio Electric’s acting head of operations Muhammad Taureza.

But the brand remains on track to roll out its zero-emission, fully electric smart motorcycles, with no “appreciable delay”, he said, adding that it aims to do so by the middle of this year, or as soon as the COVID-19 situation stabilises.

Scorpio Electric is a brand under Singapore-based EuroSports Technologies, which is backed by SGX-listed EuroSports Global.

Since March, Scorpio Electric has expanded its premises at Teban Gardens to 7,000 sq m. The space includes offices and showrooms, as well as 4,000 sq m dedicated to a factory and warehouse.

This facility is expected to produce about 8,000 electric motorcycles a year, said Dr Taureza.

Although the components will be manufactured elsewhere, Scorpio Electric’s bikes will be assembled at its Singapore location, he added.

Scorpio Electric chief technology officer Tham Kwang Sheun noted that making its motorcycles “smart”, with the use of artificial intelligence and data analytics, will allow them to be even more energy efficient.

“That means that when you get on, the bike will actually have the intelligence to tell you how can you better plan your trips, and how much fuel consumption you’re going to use, accounting for operating conditions,” he explained.

The aim is also for Scorpio Electric to extend this environmental sustainability to its production line, said Mr Tham, noting some of the materials used in the making of motorcycles can be substituted by “bio-derived” materials with “some recyclability”.

The switch to electric motorcycles is “very promising” in terms of reducing carbon emissions in the region, said Mr Tham, who was previously with the Land Transport Authority as the head of its autonomous vehicle programme office.

Motorcycles in Southeast Asia are “typically lagging behind the curve in emissions standards”, said James Chan, co-founder and chief executive of Ion Mobility, which is headquartered in Singapore.

The firm’s other co-founder, Joel Chang, was previously with Scorpio Electric as its chief operating officer before he formed Ion Mobility last year.

“In Singapore, ICE (internal combustion engine) motorcycles are on Euro 4 standards, while Indonesia is still on Euro 3,” noted Mr Chan, referring to the emissions standard introduced by the European Union. The latest standard for motorcycles in Europe is Euro 5, which came into effect this year.

Motorcycles may seem to have better fuel efficiency, but on average, they produce twice as much carbon dioxide per passenger-kilometre over their life cycles when compared to cars, said Mr Chan.

In addition, particulate matter (PM2.5) from motorcycle emissions is taken into consideration due to the sheer number of motorcycles on the roads in the region, he explained, noting that PM2.5 is one of the largest “air pollution culprits” to health costs and premature deaths in Southeast Asia.

Ion Mobility’s electric motorcycles would produce zero tailpipe emissions and play “a big part” in reducing PM2.5 and greenhouse gas emissions produced, added Mr Chan.

Southeast Asia is the world’s third largest market for motorcycles after India and China, he noted, adding that there are currently more than 200 million ICE motorcycles across Southeast Asia.

The company had originally aimed to offer test rides and launch pre-orders for its Model 1 electric motorcycles in Jakarta by the third quarter of 2020, although it had to go back to the drawing board because of COVID-19.

“We aim to launch our Model 1 in Indonesia by early 2021 or sooner, COVID-19 permitting,” said Mr Chan.

Apart from its headquarters here – which will serve as a regional centre for design as well as research and development – Ion Mobility also has offices in Jakarta and Guangzhou. Mr Chan said the company is focused on becoming the top electric motorcycle company in Southeast Asia.

It aims to begin with Indonesia, where 6.5 million new ICE motorcycles were sold in 2019, aiming to claim 1 per cent of the Indonesian market within its first two years of sales.

Scorpio Electric, meanwhile, aims to be a “global brand”, said Dr Taureza.

“We want to be in the same ranks as Apple and Tesla,” he said, although he noted that this needs to be done one step at a time.

As a “homegrown Singapore brand”, Scorpio Electric’s first priority is the Southeast Asian market, primarily Vietnam, Indonesia and Singapore, he said.

Although sales of electric vehicles (EVs) have been increasing in recent years, they are still in the minority, making up just 2 per cent of the total vehicle population worldwide.

“The reason why the uptake of EVs generally, whether cars or motorcycles, is low is because the price is expensive, let’s not beat around the bush,” said Dr Taureza, noting that the main reason for this has been battery prices.

However, with battery prices declining in recent years, it is only a matter of time before price parity is reached, he added.

To attract consumers, Mr Chan said the onus is on companies like Ion Mobility to “up our game and offer a compelling product that provides price- and performance-superiority over ICE equivalents without relying on subsidies”.

While both firms welcomed Singapore’s recent measures to accept electric motorcycles here, Mr Chan believes more can be done.

“Certain categories of electric motorcycles should be permitted to charge from normal wall sockets provided they are UL2272-certified,” he said, referring to the fire-safety standard used in Singapore for personal mobility devices such as e-scooters.

“Singapore’s touted network of EV charging stations are also all zoned for EV cars, not EV motorcycles. There is a need to consider the zoning and charging sockets for EV motorcycles too,” he added.

More refinement is also needed in the categorising of electric motorcycles, which do not neatly fit in with existing categories of conventional motorbikes, he said.

“Horsepower and kilowatt power output is not a one-is-to-one relationship,” he explained, adding a more “engineer-centric approach” is needed.

In 2018, Scorpio Electric secured S$2 million from its parent firm EuroSports Global, which promised another S$3 million if certain milestones were met.

Mr Tham said the firm aims to close another round of funding in the coming months, although he declined to provide figures.

“We started our fund-raise in January this year, and in spite of COVID-19, have been able to secure healthy investor demand amidst these tumultuous times,” said Ion Mobility’s Mr Chan.

He declined to provide figures at this time, but Mr Chan noted that it would be able to launch its motorcycle without raising more funds.

When asked how Ion Mobility would fare against other players in the electric motorcycle market, he said such discussions were “premature”.

“There is plenty of room for all of us to coexist, with each player going after different market segments,” he said.

“The real competition, the elephant in the room if you must, is consumer preferences, which have been honed by what Japanese incumbents have offered to them in terms of design, price and performance over the years,” he added.

Scorpio Electric welcomed competition, said Dr Taureza, adding that competition helps the company to “grow and continue to improve”.

He noted that apart from the two new players, established traditional motorcycle manufacturers have also entered the market.

“I think there will be tremendous growth in the EV motorcycle segment next year,” he said.

Paris e-scooters under pressure to prove green credentials

By General Posts

Hadjali and Gompo are part of the “urban patrols” carried out by the US start-up Lime, which says the recovered units are recycled as much as possible — though the lithium-ion batteries are usually shot.

Paris – Pulling on makeshift roped hooks along a sun-drenched bank of the Seine River in Paris, Youva Hadjali and Edison Gompo fish out two electric scooters — not the most ecological fate for devices billed as a carbon-free fix for strained urban transport systems.

As city officials vow to rein in the use of wildly popular e-scooters, their short lifespans, along with the energy consumed to build and service them, have many wondering if they are as good for the environment as operators say.

Hadjali and Gompo are part of the “urban patrols” carried out by the US start-up Lime, which says the recovered units are recycled as much as possible — though the lithium-ion batteries are usually shot.

“Overall in Paris, Lime scooters have saved the equivalent of two days without any cars at all” since they arrived 16 months ago, Arthur-Louis Jacquier, head of French operations, told AFP.

Critics say such claims fail to take into account the carbon emitted in constructing the scooters and the daily collections for recharging the so-called “dockless” vehicles.

Those emissions are compounded by lifespans of barely a year, due to wear and tear but also vandalism.

They were a specific target of activists at the Extinction Rebellion protest in Paris last month, who gathered up a huge pile of the devices to denounce what they labelled “pointless pollution.”

“Scooters don’t replace cars, they motorise walking trips,” one sign said.

Studies indeed show that most scooter trips are replacing walking or biking, with just a third displacing car use, said Jeremiah Johnson of North Carolina State University.

He and his colleagues analysed use in North Carolina’s capital, Raleigh, and found the electricity for charging was actually a pretty small contributor to scooters’ environmental impact.

But in terms of pollution, scooters most often end up causing a net increase in terms of global warming impacts.

“Forty percent of the CO2 emissions are from driving around to pick these things up (for charging), and about half of the CO2 emissions are from the materials and the manufacturing of the scooter,” Johnson told AFP.

– ‘Mass transport’ – In the coming weeks, Paris will pick just three operators allowed to keep their scooters on the streets, down from around a dozen which began flooding the city last year.

Lime, which says its charging depots run on so-called clean electricity and plans to use only electric vans for pick-ups, hopes to be one of them.

It also vows to get over some embarrassing growing pains: A few months ago videos emerged showing “juicers,” as Lime calls the freelance workers who gather scooters for charging the batteries, using gas-powered electric generators.

“In just a year and a half, we went from being a firm with innovative ideas to a mass transport company,” Jacquier said of the early decision to outsource charging, something it has since ruled out.

Even so, operators must also meet the challenge of keeping scooters rolling longer.

“If you are able to achieve a two-year lifetime, which would be a really rugged scooter and with really good anti-vandalism policies… that makes a big difference,” Johnson said.

But since September, when Lime launched its Seine searches, some 200 scooters have been pulled out, said Sonthay Detsaboun, who manages the urban patrols.

It’s a similar story in Lyon, where in September an environment group pulled out 109 scooters on just one 800-metre (half a mile) stretch along the Rhone, one of two rivers that weave through the city.

– Building a better machine – At Lime’s depot at Arcueil, just south of Paris, the din of clanking metal and power tools suggests vandalism will remain a challenge to profitability — just as it has been for the city’s pioneering Velib bike-sharing system.

Some 200 mechanics keep the place running around the clock, seven days a week, so the fleet can keep rolling.

Every day 1,000 to 1,500 scooters are put back in working order — common problems include snipped brake cables or spray-painted QR codes, meaning they can’t be unlocked.

Lime is upgrading its fleet to put bigger batteries under the floorboard, hopefully extending the life of the most costly — and environmentally damaging — component.

Those scooters can go 50 kilometres (30 miles) on a single charge, and have an improved lifespan of 16 to 18 months, Jacquier said.

“We’re aiming for a net environmental impact of zero, and therefore 100 percent positive for the planet,” he said.

U.S. moving to block California vehicle emissions rules

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Two U.S. agencies are preparing to submit for final White House regulatory review a plan to revoke California’s authority to set its own vehicle greenhouse gas standards and declare that states are pre-empted from setting their own vehicle rules, two people briefed on the matter said on Thursday.

WASHINGTON: Two U.S. agencies are preparing to submit for final White House regulatory review a plan to revoke California’s authority to set its own vehicle greenhouse gas standards and declare that states are pre-empted from setting their own vehicle rules, two people briefed on the matter said on Thursday.

The Environmental Protection Agency in August 2018 proposed revoking a waiver granted to California in 2013 under the Clean Air Act as part of the Trump administration’s plan to roll back Obama-era fuel economy standards through 2025.

The EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) are expected to seek approval to finalize the first portion of the rule dealing with California and other states before completing action on setting yearly fuel efficiency requirements. The plan would not revoke California’s ability to set low-emission vehicle standards that has been in place since 1990, the sources said.

The move comes as President Donald Trump has expressed anger with automakers over the issue. In July, four major automakers, including Ford Motor Co and Volkswagen AG, said they had reached a voluntary agreement with California on fuel efficiency rules.

California and other states had vowed to enforce stricter Obama-era emissions standards, after Trump proposed rolling back the federal rules. Automakers had worried that court battles between state and federal governments could create years of uncertainty for manufacturers.

The plan, also backed by BMW AG and Honda Motor Co Ltd, is more stringent than Trump’s proposal but looser than the Obama-era rule. California, the most populous U.S. state, accounts for about 12% of American vehicle sales, and if the administration recognizes the deal, it would allow automakers to operate under one set of rules.

An administration official said it was close to submitting a rule internally dubbed the “One National Program rule” aimed at ensuring a single national level for fuel economy standards.

But other automakers, including General Motors Co and Toyota Motor Corp, have declined to back the deal. Mary Nichols, who chairs the California Air Resources Board, told Reuters in July that the four automakers had agreed not to legally challenge California’s vehicle regulatory authority.

Under Trump, federal regulators backed freezing emissions requirements for new cars and trucks at 2020 levels through 2026. Administration officials say its final regulation will include a modest boost in annual efficiency requirements but far less than what the Obama administration had set in 2012.

News Source: Reuters

Jawa and Jawa Forty Two deliveries to begin fourth week of March

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Classic Legends reintroduced Jawa Motorcycles in India on November 15, 2018, with three new models — Jawa, Jawa Forty Two and Jawa Perak.

  • Both Jawa and Jawa Forty Two get the same 293 cc, liquid cooled, single cylinder, DOHC engine.
  • The two models have been designed and developed from scratch.
  • Jawa Perak is powered by a 334 cc, liquid cooled, single cylinder, DOHC engine.

Jawa Motorcycles will begin the deliveries of its two new models — Jawa and Jawa Forty Two — from the fourth week of March. While Jawa is priced at Rs 1.64 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi), Jawa Forty Two is available for Rs 1.55 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi).

Mahindra & Mahindra’s subsidiary Classic Legends reintroduced Jawa Motorcycles in India on November 15, 2018, with three new models — Jawa, Jawa Forty Two and Jawa Perak. The online bookings for Jawa and Jawa Forty Two had commenced on the same day and closed on the midnight of December 25, 2018. With regard to Jawa Perak, which is priced at Rs 1.89 lakh (ex-showroom, Delhi), it was announced that the bookings will open at a subsequent date.

Now, Classic Legends’ co-founder Anupam Thareja has said that the deliveries for Jawa and Jawa Forty Two across the country will start from fourth week of March as per the booking queue. By third week of the month, there will also be 100 Jawa Motorcycles showrooms in the country.

The moment of truth is here for #JawaMotorcycles. We were audacious and planned a 100 showrooms nationwide before starting delivery – that’s being done in record time by March 3rd week. Fourth week onwards, we will start delivery across the country as per the booking queue!
– Anupam Thareja (@reach_anupam) March 12, 2019

Both Jawa and Jawa Forty Two get the same 293 cc, liquid cooled, single cylinder, DOHC engine. It churns out 27 bhp and 28 Nm of torque. The motor complies with BS-VI norms. The two models have been designed and developed from scratch keeping in mind the distinctive character, unique sound, styling and riding experience. Jawa and Jawa Forty Two are tuned as retro and modern classics, respectively.

Jawa Perak is powered by a 334 cc, liquid cooled, single cylinder, DOHC engine. The powertrain develops 30 bhp and 31 Nm of torque.

S&S Cycle’s Shadow Pipe for the Sidewinder 2 into 1 Exhaust!

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Love the performance of a two into one, but need the aesthetic of dual exhaust on your touring bike?

The folks at S&S Cycle completely get it.

The big power of their stepped header Sidewinder 2:1 system is the ultimate addition to any performance bagger and to keeps things balanced, they just launched their Shadow pipe.

Perfectly matched to the 4.5” Sidewinder system, the Shadow pipe fills the left side gap under your saddlebag for a well sorted symmetrical look. Check out both the Sidewinder and Shadow pipe for 1995-2019 HD touring models

https://www.sscycle.com/sidewinder-2-into-1

S&S has successfully developed its own emissions testing laboratory. It is a recognized testing facility by the US Environmental Protection Agency and is listed on the California Air Resources Board’s list of approved independent test laboratories for testing of aftermarket products on motorcycles.

The S&S Emissions Certification Laboratory (ECL) is capable of performing both exhaust emissions and evaporative emissions testing. The ECL is set up specifically for testing vehicles in the power sports industry. Motorcycles, ATVs, UTVs, scooters, and trikes are all welcome candidates for testing at S&S.

S&S Cycle, Inc. exhaust systems and slip-on mufflers are legal for sale and use on U.S. EPA and California pollution controlled motorcycles not originally equipped with a catalyst in the exhaust system. In addition S&S slip-on mufflers are legal for sale and use on U.S. EPA and California pollution controlled motorcycles that have the catalyst located in the header pipes upstream of the muffler.