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Ultra Carbon Looks Like a Motorcycle But Is Really an Electric Bike

By | General Posts

by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com/

We know, electric bikes are a dime a dozen these days, as are fat-tire bicycles. With the ongoing conversation on the climate crisis and the need for urgent action to reduce exhaust emissions, various alternative, greener mobility solutions have sprung. E-bikes are among the most popular, and the offer is so varied anyone can find something to like, depending on budget and preferences.

Italian maker Moto Parilla knows that too: with e-bikes, you really have to think outside the box in order to get people to notice you. So, it’s trying to carve a separate niche of the market for itself, offering a pedal-assist bicycle that works just as well in the city as it does on the most difficult trail, but which was designed with the latter in mind.

Ultra Carbon represents an improvement over the Carbon range from Moto Parilla: it’s powerful and reliable, designed to be taken out on the bumpiest road, but it’s also fully customizable. Moto Parilla even goes as far as to call it a work of art because it will be hand-building each bike according to its new owner’s specifications, with every detail hand-finished.

Based on photos alone, you have to admit: the Ultra Carbon packs a punch. It’s sturdy enough to fool the untrained eye into mistaking it for a motorcycle, but it’s elegant at the same time.

“Starting from the Carbon line, the Ultra goes beyond to highlight the concept of uniqueness,” the maker says. “Every Ultra is designed around the biometrics of the rider. The aluminum frame is obtained by a single aluminum block. As a sculptor, the numerical control machine removes the aluminum excess to find aggressive shapes and lines, to indulge the engine power, the speediness and the personality as well.”

What this actually means is that there are no two Ultra Carbons alike and each design is patented before it’s shipped to the new owner. The base model features a carbon and CNC aluminum frame, front fork and rear suspension, shock absorbers, LED light package and Bluetooth connectivity. The leather seat is handmade and, much like the color of the bike, can be made to the owner’s liking.

The extra-large handlebar is fitted with Velo grips for maximum control and stability. The 8-caliper Alligator disk brakes are custom-made and can be found on this bike only, Moto Parilla says. The tires are Vee Tyre Apache and will easily help you conquer even the most difficult terrain, no matter how bumpy or steep.

Each Ultra Carbon bike weighs around 112 pounds and comes with a 3000W brushless engine powered by a 72V lithium-ion battery churning out 148 ft-lb of torque and a maximum speed of more than 50 mph. Moto Parilla doesn’t say anything about range for a single charge.

The Ultra Carbon is a limited-edition product, with prices starting at $7,300 and going up to $10,000+. With so much focus on how it’s a “work of art” that will do what few other mountain bikes are able to do, it couldn’t have been cheap. For this kind of money (which is nothing to scoff at, we agree), Moto Parilla promises an unparalleled biking experience, thanks to a product whose design combines attention to detail and performance in equal measure.

“Dream it. Bike it. Love it,” Moto Parilla says of its new, limited-edition electric bike. “The Ultra Carbon is a totally customized e-bike working in synergy with his rider. Every detail has been studied to find the rider uniqueness in order to merge the souls.”

Whether said merger and / or the promise of an electric bike that truly stands out is worth so much money, well, that’s entirely up to you.

BMW E-Power Roadster Electric Bike Shows Its Face

By | General Posts

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com/

BMW is one of the mainstream manufacturers that’s most involved in the electrification of transportation. It didn’t come as a big surprise when the manufacturer showed the Vision DC Roadster back in June. In fact, we were surprised it hadn’t come earlier. BMW has since been pretty quiet about what could become its first electric motorcycle. Until now.

number of European media headed to France to check out the E-Power Roadster which we guess is BMW’s working name for its electric motorcycle prototype. The bike the European journalists got to test is actually an assembly of bits and pieces of existing BMW models, including the front end of an S 1000 R and the back-end of the R 1200 RS. Obviously, at this stage of development, the priority is to put the electric powertrain through its paces rather than gives the model a finished look.

Though even just a Frankenbike, the E-Power showcases a number of really interesting features. First, contrarily to most electric motorcycles that use a belt or a chain final drive, this one sends power to the back wheel via a shaft.

While the bike itself is an amalgam of BMW bikes, the electric powertrain combines bits borrowed from hybrid cars. The 13 kW battery at the core of the bike was grafted from a hybrid 2 Series while the electric motor comes from a long-wheelbase 7 Series (a Chinese exclusivity). This allows the E-Power to produce a respectable 136 horsepower and an exciting 147 lb-ft of torque (that’s 7 lb-ft more than the Zero SR/F and trust me, that’s a lot of pull).

According to Motorcycle News, the E-Power is able to go from 0 to 60 in a minuscule 2.9 seconds, barely 0.2 seconds more than the S 1000 RR. And that’s despite the bike weighing a massive 639 lb.

The prototype is fast charger-compatible and can recharge three miles of range a minute which means that within 30 minutes, it could regain 90-percent of its total range.

According to the Head of BMW Motorrad Christoph Lischka, the company will further the development of the motorcycle and send it to production only if the team can figure out how to increase the range to reach between 125 to 185 miles. So an electric BMW bike isn’t a sure thing just yet. The bets are open.

Royal Enfield electric motorcycle planned for launch – CEO confirms

By | General Posts

This is the first time Royal Enfield has confirmed the development of an electric motorcycle. Launch is expected in the coming years.

A Royal Enfield electric motorcycle (yes, you have read that right) has been confirmed to be in the works by the company’s CEO. With the push towards electric mobility reshaping the automotive industry worldwide, manufacturers with little-to-no previous association with EV powertrains have also started to ready themselves for a supposedly inevitable future; Royal Enfield being just one of many others.

Vinod Dasari, CEO of Royal Enfield, shares that the Chennai-based motorcycle brand is actively developing an electric motorcycle. Despite the lower sales volume in the year, the company has invested enough capital to make new products for the coming years; electric and regular.

Earlier this year, the company had announced an investment of Rs 700 crores towards the development of newer and better platforms. Now, we can be certain that a part of it will go into the making of a Royal Enfield electric motorcycle.

It is a known fact that almost all major automotive manufacturers are working on an EV portfolio despite having a strong heritage with fossil-fuel-powered products. Loyal fans and enthusiasts of such brands may not be happy with this and we completely understand that. However, in order to ensure sustainability and reduce the chances of business failure in the future, manufacturers are bound to accept necessary changes.

Perhaps the biggest example of this was the introduction of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire. The American motorcycle company — praised for its big, loud and intimidating V-Twins — shocked everyone with the introduction of the LiveWire electric motorcycle. However, from a business point of view, the move made sense and the LiveWire will definitely be a popular option in the electric cruiser market of the future.

Whilst the argument between EV fanatics and ICE purists will go on for ages, there is no denying that electric vehicles will become an integral part of global automotive industries. In India, the idea of electric mobility has not developed as much as in developed countries such as the USA. For starters, we do not have enough supporting infrastructure for EVs to logically replace every petrol/diesel-powered vehicle.

Royal Enfield motorcycles have a huge fan following in the country. The heritage of the British-origin brand is so strong that its classic and original models fetch quite a good amount in the used market. For the same reason, there might some initial shock and confusion regarding an electric Royal Enfield. After all, for the “RE addicts”, Royal Enfield motorcycles have always been about the “thump”.

Savic Electric Motorcycle Is Thor’s Hammer in the Hands of Mad Max

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Because there are so many startups now in the business of making – or at least planning to make – electric motorcycles, it’s impossible to know them all. Yet, from time to time, one stands out, like it’s the case with Melbourne-based Savic Motorcycles.

Led by a man who at some point in his career worked for Ford Australia, Dennis Savic, the company set out to create an electric bike even Mad Max would be proud of riding on Fury Road.

Designed as a c-series cafe racer, the bike is officially Australia’s first locally-made electric two-wheeler that should offer decent performance levels for an incredibly affordable price.

Sometime in the near future, there will be three variants of the Savic bike available, namely Omega, Delta and Alpha, each with a differently-sized battery and increasing range: 120, 150 and 200 km, respectively (74, 93, 124 miles). Zero to 80 percent charging time ranges from 2 to four hours.

The electric motor fitted on it, of unspecified power, allows for 0 to 62 mph acceleration of between 3.5 and 5.5 seconds, depending on the version.

Built as all motorcycles in its class for speed and handling, the Savic does not look particularly comfortable, but it does look.. familiar.

The seat for the rider and the part that in conventional bikes is the fuel tank come together to become what looks like half of Thor’s hammer mounted on two wheels.

Just by looking at it, one could say this cafe racer will be prohibitively priced, but it truly isn’t. The Australians plan to sell the entry-level Omega for $12,990, while the top of the range Alpha would retail for $23,990.

There is no word yet on when production is expected to start, but Savic is already accepting submissions from those interested and promises test rides in early 2020. All you have to do is head over to the official website and fill in a few boxes.

BMW’s naked all-electric bike inching towards reality: Here’s how the LiveWire rival might look!

By | General Posts

by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com

BMW must be eyeing the Harley-Davidson LiveWire and the Zero SR/F territory with its upcoming all-electric offering. Considering the fact that these two generate power output in the 100hp region, BMW must also be eyeing a similar output on its electric bike.

The buzz around high-performance electric motorcycles is just refusing to die. Harley-Davidson revealed the LiveWire a few days back followed by which Kawasaki dropped a major hint on how its upcoming electric bike would be like. Now, very recently, patent images of a BMW naked bike have been leaked on the web and this one points towards a pure electric motorcycle. However, this is not the first time that the company has attempted at making an electric motorcycle.

Back in the year 2015, the company created an eco-friendly version of the S1000RR, naming it the eRR. However, the e-bike in the patent images that have been revealed recently seems to be based on the F800. The patent images suggest that the battery pack and the electric motor will be a structural member of the frame and this approach was earlier seen on the company’s C Evolution electric scooter.

The patent images also show that the wheels, monoshock, brakes and the inverted forks up front seem to have been borrowed from the F800R. The swingarm and the rear wheel on the electric bike have been taken from the BMW F800GT. The engine on the aforementioned two bikes churn out 90hp and BMW would not want to compromise on this aspect on its electric offering. Looking at these elements, it can be safely assumed that the German automaker is working on a naked electric motorcycle that will be based on the company’s F800 range.

All said and done, BMW must be eyeing the Harley-Davidson LiveWire and the Zero SR/F territory with its upcoming all-electric offering. Keeping in mind the fact that these two generate power output in the 100hp region, BMW must also be eyeing a similar output on its electric bike. We expect the company to reveal the electric bike sometime towards the end of 2020.

Electric vehicles won’t be mainstream, says Honda CEO

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from https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com

Commenting about Honda’s electrification strategy, Honda CEO said the brand will focus on petrol-electric hybrids, not BEVs, through 2030.

Electric vehicles won’t be mainstream, despite the push from the governments and the auto manufacturers across the world towards e-mobility, claims a media report quoting Honda CEO Takahiro Hachigo.

The report further quotes Hachigo saying, “The hurdles to battery electric vehicles and complete autonomous driving are still quite high.”

Commenting about Honda’s electrification strategy, he said the brand will focus on petrol-electric hybrids, not BEVs, through 2030. Also, he said Honda will prioritize incremental advances that offer real-world safety at affordable prices, instead of fancy functions and pricy lidar systems, claims the report.

Honda aims to be more realistic instead of competing with rivals brands when it comes to electric vehicles and autonomous driving technology.

Hachigo further said, “I do not believe there will be a dramatic increase in demand for battery vehicles, and I believe this situation is true globally. There are issues with infrastructure and hardware.”

He also added, “There are different regulations in different countries, and we have to abide by them. So, it’s a must to continue R&D. But I don’t believe it will become mainstream anytime soon.”

Blackstone HyperTek electric motorcycle smashes all molds

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A venture between Blackstone Tek carbon fiber wheels and moto designer Pierre Terblanche, the HyperTek makes science fiction real.

by Jonathon Ramsey from https://www.engadget.com

Better than the Tron Lightcycle and Akira bike because it’s real.

Here we have a motorcycle that takes advantage of what can be done with an electric powertrain and looks like one of the possibilities in the sci-fi futures we’ve dreamed of. South African company Blackstone Tek, better known by the initials BST, is known for its carbon fiber motorcycle and car wheels. When Founder Gary Turner decided he wanted to build an electric bike, he enlisted fellow South African designer Pierre Terblanche, who’s designed two-wheelers like the Ducati 749, 888, 999 and Hypermotard, and the Confederate X132 Hellcat Speedster. The result of the collaboration is this, the HyperTek. It will be hand-built, limited-edition, and expensive.

The HyperTek’s mechanicals hang from a one-piece carbon fiber monocoque and billet subframe. The water-cooled, DHX Hawk motor produces 105 hp and 88.5 pound-feet of torque, powered by a 4.75-kWh battery. BST claims the battery can be fully recharged in 30 minutes on a fast charger, with a range of 186 miles on a charge. That’s almost certainly on the more generous European standard, and we suspect the range claim includes the supplemental battery pack; a Zero S motorcycle, for instance, packs a 7.2-kWh battery and lists an 89-mile range in city riding. On the HyperTek, the standard pack sits inside the metal box ahead of the frame. The gray box of the supplemental battery can be seen in a couple of photos hanging underneath that, featuring a cell pattern along the front, otherwise replaced with green, logoed fairings.

The custom front end molds the triple clamp and down tubes in a single piece of carbon fiber. The front suspension was inspired by the Horst Leitner unit on an ATK motorcycle, the rear suspension is a mono-shock slipped inside a single-sided swingarm akin to that on the Terblanche-designed Moto Guzzi V12 concept from 2009. The package sits on BST’s 17-inch Rapid Tek wheels with a wheelbase of 58 inches, and the bike weighs 450 pounds.

There’s no cockpit instrumentation. Riding vitals are instead beamed to a heads-up display inside the Cross X1 helmet. The HUD shows a rear-view camera image, too. Another novelty is the electronically modulated clutch that enables revving, burnouts and wheelies thanks to “Wheelie & Traction Control.” Cruise control eases the highway miles, hill stop eases inclined launches, and a built-in sound generator gets attention in urban environments.

Bike EXIF says BST wants to start production on the HyperTek in 18 months, and each example will cost $80,000. Those are steep numbers, but HyperTek’s design, technology and pedigreed backers convince us to say “Yes.”

Vanderhall EV Autocycle Available for Driving Impressions in Beverly Hills

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Vanderhall to debut first electric autocycle at Beverly Wilshire Hotel on 11/22. New Carmel and Venice models also available for driving impressions.

Utah-based Vanderhall Motor Works is thrilled to debut the 2020 Vanderhall Edison2 model at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel on Friday, November 22nd. These vehicles exemplify Vanderhall’s commitment to continuously expanding its product line using the latest in innovative technology.

The all-new Vanderhall Edison2 will make its first public appearance at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel, and driving impression slots are available for members of the media to get their first experience behind the wheel of this powerful yet eco-friendly machine.

Highlights of the new 2020 Vanderhall Edison2:

• DRIVE: Front, twin electric / 52 kW each

• FRAME: Aluminum mono

• BODY: Composite

• SUSPENSION: Pushrod front coil over, rear single-sided swing arm coil over

• PERFORMANCE: 0-60 in 4.4 Seconds

• BRAKING: 60 mph to 0 in 100 feet

• STEERING: Electric Power Steering

• BATTERY: 28.8 kilowatt

• CURB WEIGHT: 1400lbs / 635kg

• RANGE: Up to 200 miles / single charge, est.

• 2 Year Roadside Assistance

• 2 Year Limited Warranty

Test-drives of the Edison2 and other Vanderhall models will be available throughout the day (Edison2: 10-2; Venice & Carmel: 10-5).

For more information, please visit Vanderhall at vanderhallusa.com.

Paris e-scooters under pressure to prove green credentials

By | General Posts

Hadjali and Gompo are part of the “urban patrols” carried out by the US start-up Lime, which says the recovered units are recycled as much as possible — though the lithium-ion batteries are usually shot.

Paris – Pulling on makeshift roped hooks along a sun-drenched bank of the Seine River in Paris, Youva Hadjali and Edison Gompo fish out two electric scooters — not the most ecological fate for devices billed as a carbon-free fix for strained urban transport systems.

As city officials vow to rein in the use of wildly popular e-scooters, their short lifespans, along with the energy consumed to build and service them, have many wondering if they are as good for the environment as operators say.

Hadjali and Gompo are part of the “urban patrols” carried out by the US start-up Lime, which says the recovered units are recycled as much as possible — though the lithium-ion batteries are usually shot.

“Overall in Paris, Lime scooters have saved the equivalent of two days without any cars at all” since they arrived 16 months ago, Arthur-Louis Jacquier, head of French operations, told AFP.

Critics say such claims fail to take into account the carbon emitted in constructing the scooters and the daily collections for recharging the so-called “dockless” vehicles.

Those emissions are compounded by lifespans of barely a year, due to wear and tear but also vandalism.

They were a specific target of activists at the Extinction Rebellion protest in Paris last month, who gathered up a huge pile of the devices to denounce what they labelled “pointless pollution.”

“Scooters don’t replace cars, they motorise walking trips,” one sign said.

Studies indeed show that most scooter trips are replacing walking or biking, with just a third displacing car use, said Jeremiah Johnson of North Carolina State University.

He and his colleagues analysed use in North Carolina’s capital, Raleigh, and found the electricity for charging was actually a pretty small contributor to scooters’ environmental impact.

But in terms of pollution, scooters most often end up causing a net increase in terms of global warming impacts.

“Forty percent of the CO2 emissions are from driving around to pick these things up (for charging), and about half of the CO2 emissions are from the materials and the manufacturing of the scooter,” Johnson told AFP.

– ‘Mass transport’ – In the coming weeks, Paris will pick just three operators allowed to keep their scooters on the streets, down from around a dozen which began flooding the city last year.

Lime, which says its charging depots run on so-called clean electricity and plans to use only electric vans for pick-ups, hopes to be one of them.

It also vows to get over some embarrassing growing pains: A few months ago videos emerged showing “juicers,” as Lime calls the freelance workers who gather scooters for charging the batteries, using gas-powered electric generators.

“In just a year and a half, we went from being a firm with innovative ideas to a mass transport company,” Jacquier said of the early decision to outsource charging, something it has since ruled out.

Even so, operators must also meet the challenge of keeping scooters rolling longer.

“If you are able to achieve a two-year lifetime, which would be a really rugged scooter and with really good anti-vandalism policies… that makes a big difference,” Johnson said.

But since September, when Lime launched its Seine searches, some 200 scooters have been pulled out, said Sonthay Detsaboun, who manages the urban patrols.

It’s a similar story in Lyon, where in September an environment group pulled out 109 scooters on just one 800-metre (half a mile) stretch along the Rhone, one of two rivers that weave through the city.

– Building a better machine – At Lime’s depot at Arcueil, just south of Paris, the din of clanking metal and power tools suggests vandalism will remain a challenge to profitability — just as it has been for the city’s pioneering Velib bike-sharing system.

Some 200 mechanics keep the place running around the clock, seven days a week, so the fleet can keep rolling.

Every day 1,000 to 1,500 scooters are put back in working order — common problems include snipped brake cables or spray-painted QR codes, meaning they can’t be unlocked.

Lime is upgrading its fleet to put bigger batteries under the floorboard, hopefully extending the life of the most costly — and environmentally damaging — component.

Those scooters can go 50 kilometres (30 miles) on a single charge, and have an improved lifespan of 16 to 18 months, Jacquier said.

“We’re aiming for a net environmental impact of zero, and therefore 100 percent positive for the planet,” he said.

This dirtbike can run at 120 kmph and it’s fully electric

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Ottobike MXR comes powered by an 11 kW continuous rated mid-drive motor that has a liquid cooling system along with electric speed controller.

Taiwan-based Ottobike has showcased a fully electric dirtbike concept at the 2019 EICMA Milan motorcycle show, dubbed as the Ottobike MXR.

The MXR stands for Maxi Extreme Rider and this motorcycle concept is capable of running at a speed of 120 kmph, claims a media report. It comes powered by an 11 kW continuous rated mid-drive motor that has a liquid cooling system along with electric speed controller.

The electric dirt bike is claimed to have a maximum torque output of 45 Nm and it weighs 100 kg.

The dirtbike looks rugged and aggressive. Instead of a proper headlamp, it gets three vertically positioned LED bars, while an LCD dashboard is there, which displays a wide range of information. Ottobike has used Android OS for the display to show the riders GPS directions, live maps and incoming calls, among other features, as claimed by the report.

It houses a non-removable battery that has a capacity of nearly 5 kWh and a 1.2 kW battery charger as well. Ottobike claims the bike’s battery takes 2.25 hours for a 20-80 per cent charge, while to get fully charged it requires around 4 hours of time.