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METZELER CRUISETEC Tires and New Indian Motorcycle Pursuit Lineup

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METZELER CRUISETEC™ tires were developed to provide the performance of METZELER’s award winning sport touring tires to riders of heavyweight cruisers and baggers motorcycles.

METZELER CRUISETEC Tires Selected as Original Equipment Tires of New Indian Motorcycle Pursuit Lineup

The next generation of American touring performance motorcycles will be factory equipped with METZELER CRUISETEC™ tires.

Rome, GA – March 29, 2022 – METZELER USA is proud to announce that Indian Motorcycle has once again selected the METZELER CRUISETEC™ as original equipment tires on a new collection of models: the Indian Pursuit Dark Horse and Pursuit Limited.

Building on the already strong relationship between the German-born tire brand and America’s First Motorcycle Company, METZELER CRUISETEC™ is now the original equipment on most Cruiser, Bagger, and Touring models, including the all-new Indian Pursuit.

Indian has built the Pursuit around the comfort and features of a traditional touring bike, but with more power and attitude. These motorcycles are designed to provide both rider and passenger with ultimate luxury while also delivering a staggering 122 hp and 128 ft-lbs of torque. With a chassis-mounted fairing, premium suspension, inverted front forks, a cast-aluminum frame, and of course METZELER CRUISETEC™ tires, the Pursuit models offer rock solid stability and control.

“As Indian Motorcycle continues to push the envelope and build cutting v-twin motorcycles that are extremely powerful and capable while also featuring cutting edge comfort and technology, the need for high performance tires is paramount,” explains Josh Whitmire, North America OE Manager for Metzeler. “The METZELER CRUISETEC™ is simply the perfect tire for the new Indian Pursuit models.”

METZELER CRUISETEC™ tires will offer Pursuit riders unparalleled performance and grip in all riding conditions.

The METZELER CRUISETEC™ was especially designed to offer superior grip, handling, control and durability under the intense forces produced by today’s heavyweight and high powered motorcycles. Dual compound rear tires promote fast warm-up and chemical grip even in wet conditions, while the brush-like tread pattern helps clear water and keep your motorcycle glued to the road. The profile, reminiscent of a more aggressive sport touring tire, helps maximize the contact patch while cornering and offers incredible stability for those riding with a passenger.

OE Fitment:
Front Tires: METZELER CRUISETEC™ 130/60B19 M/C TL Reinf
Rear Tires: METZELER CRUISETEC™ 180/60R16 M/C TL 80H Reinf (I)

For more information on the new Pursuit Dark Horse and Pursuit LImited models from Indian Motorcycle, visit www.indianmotorcycle.com. To learn more about the METZELER CRUISETEC™, visit www.metzeler.com, or follow along on Facebook and Instagram.

About Metzeler:
Metzeler has manufactured motorcycle tires since 1892 and our history goes hand in hand with the history of the motorcycle. From the use of new materials and the development of innovative tread designs to the introduction of advanced rubber compounds, the German brand is always at the forefront of technical development. Learn more at www.metzeler.com.

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Alt-Rock Cruisers: BMW targets American brand’s market

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by Jack Baruth from Hagerty.com

BMW R18 meets Indian Challenger and Harley Heritage Classic

The slightly ridiculous 1800cc, two-cylinder, leather-saddlebag, CHiPs-windshielded cruiser I’m trying to force through six stopped lanes of Los Angeles traffic can’t be taken as anything but an admission on the part of the Bayerische Motoren Werke that Harley-Davidson knows

a) what boys like;
b) what men want …

in America, anyway.

CLICK HERE To Read a comprehensive Road Test & Review of the cruiser models from the 3 motorcycle brands.

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The “Biker Lives Matter” Organization

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Rogue with his son Dale and grandson Reese – a family that rides together.

Click Here to Get Involved – http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

Article by Rogue – Founder of Biker Lives Matter, Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame

I have been asked a lot why I and some others started an organization named Biker Lives Matter and why it is important to me. My answer is simple, there is a need for an organization that calls attention to the tragic loss of lives and livelihoods from motorcycle crashes.

In the 1970s, I became involved in motorcycle rights and safety. At the time, motorcycle injury and death rate were high so the government and insurance companies began trying to pass laws that they hoped would help protect motorcyclists when crashes happened.

I have been riding motorcycles for 69 years and both my life and that of the others who ride has always been important to me.

I have seen many people injured and I know too many that have died.

I consider myself one of the lucky ones to still be riding at the age of 83 years old.

CLICK HERE To Read this insightful feature article on Bikernet.com

SUPPORT Biker Lives Matter – Visit website to know more: http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

Honda Rebel 500 & 1100 Cruiser 2022 Debuts

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from https://www.rushlane.com/ by Arun Prakash

Honda presently has three models in the Rebel range of cruisers- Rebel 250, Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100

Honda has updated its cruise lineup for 2022 specifically for Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100 in European markets. Both motorcycles offer a typical cruiser experience to riders with their signature old-school design and ergonomics.

About a month ago, Honda reinvented the entry-level Rebel 300 in a down-sized version as Rebel 250.

2022 Honda Rebel 500 Colour Options
The Japanese bikemaker has introduced new colour options for Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100. Honda is offering a new paint scheme called Pearl Organic Green in Rebel 500. This option will be available alongside the current paint schemes on offer namely Graphite Black, Mat Axis Gray and Matte Jeans Blue Metallic.

The latest addition to the colour palette is a stark contrast to dark and stealthy shades currently available for Rebel 500. On the other hand, Rebel 1100 sees the addition of a flashy new colour called Pearl Stallion Brown. The paint scheme also benefits from the blacked-out components lending the motorcycle a sporty dual-tone appeal.

Rebel 500- Specs
Apart from the added colour options, there have been no changes made in either of the cruiser bikes in terms of mechanicals or features. Rebel 500 is powered by a 471cc parallel-twin motor that also propels CB500X and CB500R.

This unit pushes out 47 bhp at 8500rpm and a peak torque of 44.6Nm at 6000rpm. This engine is paired with a 6-speed transmission via a slip-assist clutch. The motorcycle rides on 16-inch front and rear wheels that are shod with fat 130-section front and 150-section rear rubber respectively.

Suspension setup comprises 41mm telescopic forks at front and twin shock absorbers at rear. Braking duties are handled by a 296mm front disc and a 240mm rear disc aided by a dual-channel ABS.

Rebel 1100
Specs Coming to the flagship Rebel 1100, the cruiser is powered by a 1084cc SOHC liquid-cooled, parallel-twin, 270 degree crank motor which pumps out 86 bhp at 7000rpm and a peak torque of 98Nm at 4750rpm. This engine also propels Africa Twin adventure bike and is mated to either a 6-speed manual transmission or a DCT automatic gearbox.

The diamond frame of Rebel 1100 sits on Preload-adjustable 43mm cartridge-style front forks and twin piggyback shock absorbers at rear. Rebel 1100 rides on 18-inch front and 16-inch rear wheels shod with tubeless tyres. Braking duties are handled by 330mm disc up front and 256mm disc at rear complemented by a dual-channel ABS.

Take a look at the first look video below, from TravelMoto channel.

Crazy Affordable Honda Navi wrapped in miniMoto package Coming to the U.S.

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from https://www.autoevolution.com  by Florina Spînu

Honda is finally bringing the Navi to the U.S.! Adding to the miniMoto family for 2022, the machine combines the looks of a motorcycle with scooter features. Given its compact size, it makes up for a sporty and fun commuter that’s easy to maneuver around the city.

Flaunting miniMoto aesthetics, the Navi is somewhat a cross between Honda’s Ruckus and Grom. It features a low 30-inch seat height that allows most riders to touch the ground with their feet and effortlessly hop on the ride. Not only that, but it’s easy to find a parking spot or handle it through the concrete urban jungle.

The bike weighs 236 lbs (104 kgs), including all of its standard equipment and a full tank of fuel, so it’s a light machine that can be transported on an RV bumper rack. It even has a storage unit that is big enough to carry a backpack, a jacket, or a laptop.

The bike is equipped with a 109cc air-cooled four-stroke single-cylinder, and it has scooter-like features that set it apart from other members of the miniMOTO family, such as a CVT transmission. That means no clutch, no shifting, no neutral or park. All the riders have to do is hop on, turn the key, press a button and start Navi-gating (pun intended).

Those who want to get a taste of what this bike feels like will have the opportunity to get up close and personal with it this weekend at the IMS Outdoors motorcycle show in Costa Mesa, California. The Navi is set to hit the U.S. showrooms in January (February for California) next year. The bike will be available in four colors: Red, Grasshopper Green, Nut Brown, and Ranger Green. What’s more, it is offered at a crazy affordable price of $1,807.

According to Honda, another five on-road models for 2022 will make a comeback: the Gold Wing tourer and NC750X adventure tourer, the Rebel 1100 and Fury cruisers, and the CBR600RR sportbike. Most of them will be available in multiple trim levels and will sport a fresh set of paint.

BMW R 18 Going on Three-Nation Tour, including U.S.A.

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The Great Getaway. That’s what German bike maker BMW Motorrad calls its first event dedicated to the moniker that marked its return to the cruiser segment, the insane R 18 motorcycles.

from https://www.autoevolution.com by Daniel Patrascu

The motorcycle was first shown back in 2020, and quickly expanded into an entire family that now comprises no less than four models, namely the standard cruiser and the Classic, and the more recent R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental.

Advertised as one of the most important two-wheeled BMWs in recent memory, the family makes use of the most “powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production,” the mighty Big Boxer – 1,802cc in displacement and rated at 91 hp at 4,750 rpm, and a maximum of 158 Nm of torque at 3,000 rpm.

Now, not enough time has passed since the model’s introduction for the world to have plenty of them on the roads, but that isn’t stopping the Germans from coming up with a series of mammoth ride events meant to advertise the bike to new customers.

The Great Getaway is in fact the first in what will be a series of travel events dedicated to R 18 riders. Next year, BMW promises “three inspiring destinations […] to provide riders with outstanding motorcycling pleasure in heritage style.”

The tour kicks off in March 2022 in Costa Rica, moves to Portugal in June, and ends in August in the U.S. Each of the tours in these countries will comprise eight days of riding “along rugged coasts, through dense forests and past mountains and waterfalls,” and benefit from “a tour guide, hotel accommodation and meals, support vehicle and an extensive social program.”

At the time of writing, BMW does not give any info on the cost for the rides, but says more info will be provided in due time on the dedicated webpage.

Visit The Great Getaway Website at: https://thegreatgetaway.net/

PRESS RELEASE: 15 NOVEMBER 2021

Experience the beauty of nature for eight days on the “Big Boxer” motorbikes of the R 18 family, enjoy the freedom of endless expanses, immerse yourself in the urban jungle, sometimes discover the unexpected and leave the stress of everyday life behind. In “The Great Getaway”, BMW Motorrad will be offering the perfectly organised travel format for a perfect time-out, arranged and carried out by BMW Motorrad partner Elephant Moto.

For the 2022 motorcycle season, three inspiring destinations have been planned to provide riders with outstanding motorcycling pleasure in heritage style: Costa Rica, Portugal and the USA. Each tour includes eight days of riding on motorcycles from the R18 family, a tour guide, hotel accommodation and meals, support vehicle and an extensive social programme. In short: everything has been thought of.

The “Big Boxers” will be cruisng along rugged coasts, through dense forests and past mountains and waterfalls. The participants will get to know hidden places and exciting people, indulge in local and international cuisine and recharge their batteries for the next day in accommodation specially tailored to the tours.

With a maximum of twelve participants per tour, the 150 to 200 kilometre daily stages guarantee speedy progress on the road, great fun together in the evening and an intensive shared experience on the “Urban Day”, where the participants get to immerse themselves in the melting pot of famous cities: San José in Costa Rica, Lisbon in Portugal and Portland/Oregon in the USA.

New, intense impressions await the participants at every turn: pulsating life, foreign scents, spectacular architecture, even the soundscape is never the same. After all, every city has its own rhythm. And you meet the people who make the city’s heartbeat. For example, when visiting a handcrafter or a local market.

After dinner, the day ends in a variety of ways. For example, with a whiskey tasting, cocktails “on the roof” or live music, before everyone is back in the saddle the next morning: “The Great Getaway – start your R 18, please!” Eight days of unforgettable riding pleasure combined with impressive experiences await the participants.

The time slots for “The Great Getaway” are:

1. Costa Rica, March 2022

2. Portugal, April to June 2022

3. USA, August to October 2022

Further information and bookings via www.thegreatgetaway.net

Get Your Kicks on Route 666

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Motorcycling Arizona’s Mountains
Story and photos by Koz Mraz
www.kozmoto.com

Arizona has incredible geological diversity that lie between Flagstaff’s Humphries Peak, at 12,637 feet to the Grand Canyon, the Red Rocks of Sedona to lush Verde Valley.

Arizona also has the longest continuous stretch of uninterrupted Route 66 two-lane asphalt and is home to Route 666. Renamed SR 191 in 2003 because the Department of Transportation was constantly replacing stolen highway signs.

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First Ride Review of 2022 BMW R 18 B

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

A Tour(ing) De Force – Conquering California’s coast with a Bavarian bagger.

BMW made no bones about moving in on the Harley-dominated cruiser market when it launched the R 18 in April, 2020. Drawing from the Motor Company’s Softail Slim, the Bavarians literally took a page out of Harley’s book to attract buyers. BMW then returned to the well in October, 2020, introducing the R 18 Classic. Equipped with leather bags and a large windshield, the variant shared more than a moniker with Harley’s Heritage Classic.

That first offensive wasn’t BMW’s endgame, however. To truly hit the Harley where it hurts, the company went after the Bar and Shield’s bread and butter: the grand touring segment. Released in July, 2021, the R 18 B added long-distance comfort and convenience to the platform’s repertoire. BMW did more than just slap on a full-size fairing and hard bags though. The House of Munich re-engineered the chassis to suit the cruiser’s new touring ambitions as well.

A 19-inch front wheel steps in for the R18’s 16-incher, the rake tightens to 27.3 degrees, and the wheelbase shrinks to 66.7 inches. That revised double-loop frame not only accommodates two-up touring but also lightened the standard model’s heavy steering. BMW addressed another common R 18 complaint when it increased the bagger’s rear suspension travel to 4.7 inches while adding position-dependent damping and hydraulically adjustable ride height.

The advanced technology doesn’t stop at the tail end though. The new front fairing houses the IMAX of all motorcycle displays, a 10.25-inch-wide, HD resolution (1920 x 720) TFT dash. On the left switchgear, BMW’s trademark WonderWheel makes its R 18 debut, allowing riders to scroll through the bike’s diagnostics, settings, and available navigation. The Marshall stereo system encourages users to jam out to local radio stations or Bluetooth-connected media while the optional radar-assisted adaptive cruise control outfits the R 18 B for the long haul.

Improved geometry and cutting-edge tech may lead BMW’s latest charge, but the Beemer still has to stand up to the class benchmark: the Harley-Davidson Street Glide. With that gold standard in mind, we set out for a 1,100-mile trip up the California coast to test whether the new BMW R 18 B is a checkmate in a brewing battle of the baggers.

On Tour
Despite all the changes that went into the R 18 B, the big-bore boxer remains unchanged. The air/liquid-cooled, 1,802cc opposed twin still produces 116 ft-lb of torque (at 3,000 rpm) and 91 horsepower (at 4,750 rpm). For that reason, the Beemer shines between 3,000 rpm and 4,000 rpm. Within that range, the bagger pulls like a freight train, but as the torque curve dives, the R 18 B’s direct throttle response trails off as well. Beyond the 4,000-rpm mark, the burly boxer still chugs up to its 5,500-rpm redline, but without all the gusto found in the mid-range.

Though the R 18 B idles at around 1,000 rpm, riders have to coax the 1.8-liter engine up to 2,000 rpm, or else it stutters and bogs away from the line. Lean fueling (due to modern emissions standards) may be the root of the issue, but riders can manage takeoffs with a conservative clutch hand and a liberal right wrist.

The narrow powerband may be a limiting factor, but the mid-range also dampens the boxer’s raucous vibrations. In the lower gears, the vibes are most prominent, buzzing through the bars and mini-floorboards. At highway speeds, however, the sensation is much more tolerable.

At 70 mph in sixth gear, the R 18 B lumbers along at a steady pace, though throttle pick up slightly lags. As a result, I regularly cruised at highway speeds in fifth gear to stay within the 3,000-4,000-rpm sweet spot, which yields the best passing power for emergency situations. While the power pulses and delivery presented challenges, the optional adaptive cruise control (ACC) smoothed out all the rough edges.

The Bosch-developed system operates similar to standard cruise control, but with a following distance button at the right switchgear, the rider remains in control of the semi-automated functions. Even in the closest setting, the three-second buffer between the BMW and the vehicle ahead leaves enough time for the evasive maneuvers. If that following distance is too close for comfort, two additional settings enable users to extend that cushion to a more cautious gap.

On the open road, ACC proved invaluable. Those familiar with motorcycle cruise control systems know that the technology not only covers ground in the most efficient manner but also provides much-needed rest for the rider’s right wrist. With ACC, on the other hand, the user is even freer to set it and forget it. Gliding down the road at 75 mph, I regularly let the system take me along for the ride while I added intermittent steering inputs. Even when a car cut into my lane, the R 18 B throttled down to a comfortable 65 mph in a matter of seconds to maintain my buffer zone.

In those situations, ACC kicked in immediately but not abruptly. I never felt like I (or the system) was out of control. Of course, pulling in the clutch or brake lever disengages the cruise control, but users can also override the system with extra throttle if they need to escape a hairy situation. The ACC is also quite intuitive, slowing to the set speed after a throttle burst or ramping up once the vehicle ahead switches lanes.

The system not only accurately distinguishes between cars in neighboring lanes, but if the fairing-integrated radar detects a vehicle ahead picking up speed, it proportionately adds throttle as well. In its category, BMW’s R 18 B is the first to adopt the Bosch-developed ACC and that gives the Bavarian bagger a definite edge in technology. However, there’s more to touring than gizmos and gadgets, and the R 18 B brings its own bag of tricks to the party.

Every Twist And Turn
While the standard R 18 favored a stance and style perfect for bar-hopping, BMW had to outfit the touring variant for cross-country travels. To make the handling more responsive, the firm steepened the bagger’s rake by more than five degrees. The 19-inch wheel may seem counterintuitive to those goals, but the R 18 B changes direction with the slightest input at the handlebars.

Shod in Bridgestone Battlecruise H50 tires, the larger front wheel and 49mm fork did a commendable job of communicating the differing road surfaces. From super slab interstates to gravel-strewn backroads to tar-snaked twisties, I always understood the bagger’s available grip. At lean, the front end was just as accurate, providing predictable feedback and response. However, it’s hard to shower the rear suspension with similar praise.

The R 18 B’s updated monoshock certainly improves on the standard model’s harsh rear end. With just 3.5 inches of travel, the original shock sent each bump and pothole straight through the rider’s back. To atone for that oversight, BMW jacked up the bagger’s back end to 4.7 inches of travel, delivering an ultra-plush ride. The Beemer practically negates all road irregularities as a result, smoothing out even the hardest hits. Unfortunately, the soft rear end and direct front fork don’t always get along.

At tip-in, the R 18 B is planted and predictable. Conversely, if the rider deviates from the original line or encounters mid-corner bumps, the rear wallows with a slight undulating action. As a result, the feel out back becomes vague and disconnected. If you select and stick to a line throughout the curve, the bike plows right through without so much as a wobble. Unfortunately, unforeseen adjustments quickly expose the buoyant back end. Of course, we don’t expect a bagger to hustle around corners, but a manually adjustable monoshock could go a long way to addressing the issue.

It’s a similar story with the brakes. The dual four-piston calipers and twin 300mm front discs provide enough stopping power in the end, but they don’t provide much in the way of initial bite or feel. For those that favor the front brake, BMW’s system distributes a portion of braking power to the single four-piston caliper and 300mm rotor out back as well. The linked brakes help shed speed more efficiently, but you can also feel the system borrowing braking power at the lever. That’s a disconcerting sensation when you’re descending a steep hill. Luckily, the rider aid only intrudes in select situations and heavy braking zones.

Comfy Confines
Even if the R 18 B’s bag of tricks is a mixed bag, the infotainment system draws from BMW’s industry-leading interface. Unlike the R 18’s stripped-down controls and throwback circular speedometer, BMW throws the kitchen sink at the bagger’s new fairing. Four analog gauges report remaining fuel, speed, rpm, and voltage while the 10.25-inch TFT boasts enough room for a dual-pane layout. Using’s BMW’s intuitive Wonder Wheel and menu button, the user can access trip data, local radio stations, smartphone media, navigation, and bike settings.

While the system puts endless options at the rider’s fingertips, navigating those options with the Wonder Wheel and menu button can become cumbersome. Accessing certain submenus requires punching the menu button while others involve a lateral press on the Wonder Wheel. With practice, your left thumb develops the muscle memory necessary for jumping through the folders quickly, but a simplified interface would also speed up the process. Additionally, the turn Wonder Wheel is located next to the turn signal switch, and I embarrassingly pushed the wrong control during many a left-lane change.

As for the infotainment system’s performance, the Marshall speakers deliver crisp, clear audio. With two fairing-mounted speakers and optional subwoofers in each bag, the sound literally envelopes the rider. During testing, the system worked seamlessly with Apple iOS devices but frequently encountered connectivity issues with Android smartphones. Upon connecting, the interface offered full operation of the phone’s media, but functionality would suffer after a second startup. Disconnecting and reconnecting the device restored full control to the rider, but I eventually switched to the radio to avoid the hassle.

The rest of the R 18 B’s cockpit prioritized comfort and convenience as well. With wide buckhorn bars sweeping back to the rider, the upright position suits long-distance road trips. The broad fork-mounted fairing mitigated buffeting but the short windshield left turbulent air dancing on the top of my helmet. A taller windscreen from BMW’s catalog will easily remedy that situation for taller riders, but anyone under five foot, eight inches will be just fine with the stock shield.

Further back, BMW raised the seat 1.1 inches over the standard model’s saddle to relax the bend at the rider’s knees and the adjustment worked. Due to the massive outboard cylinders, the bagger’s legroom hasn’t increased over the R 18, but the taller seat does help relieve stiff knees during long journeys. On the other hand, extra padding on the touring seat would have gone a long way as well, but my bony back end typically endured the 225 miles between fill-ups.

The features that I can’t praise enough are the heated seat and hand grips. During my travels, I hit spots of rain and heavy winds. The chill temperatures eventually receded by the afternoon, but the five-level heated accessories allowed me to maintain my mileage quota in relative comfort. The premium features made the long stints in the saddle more enjoyable than ever, but they all come at a price.

Bringing It Home
Starting at $21,495, the 2022 BMW R 18 B slightly undercuts the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide’s MSRP ($21,999). However, BMW’s Premium Light Package (hill start assist, adaptive headlight, reverse assist, and Marshall subwoofers) tacks on $2,300. The Select Package (alarm system, locking fuel cap, heated seat, tire pressure monitor, and electric bag locks) adds another $1,275 to the price tag. Throw in Roland Sand Designs milled cylinder covers, an engine housing cover, a two-tone black wheelset, and Vance & Hines slip-ons, and the asking price swiftly approaches $30,000.

Many riders will opt for the base package, but a fair share will also order the works, and for good reason. Features such as the tire pressure monitor system, heated seat, and Marshall Gold Series Audio amplify the R 18 B’s touring chops. However, it’s a solid package in stock trim. No, the new Beemer isn’t a death blow to Harley-Davidson, but it’s a worthy competitor. At 877 pounds, it has 22 pounds on its main rival, but it’s also the only bike in the category to offer adaptive cruise control and a 10.25-inch TFT display. The R 18 B may not be BMW’s endgame either, but it definitely changes the game for bagger customers.

BMW to Expand R 18 Cruisers With Two New Models

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

A little more than a year ago, BMW returned to the cruiser segment with the mighty R 18 motorcycle. Designed to take on the big boys of the segment, specifically Harley-Davidson and Indian, the range will get a few more versions very soon.

The line already comprises the standard cruiser and the more touring-oriented Classic. They will be joined by a sportier incarnation, R 18 B, and the Transcontinental classic tour-oriented two-wheeler, which according to our sources, will likely be revealed as soon as this June.

Like all other bikes in the family, the new ones are said to use of the same 2-cylinder engine that is 1,802 cc in displacement, albeit fitted inside a slightly larger frame required to accommodate the needs of longer cruises. Named by the Germans Big Boxer, the powerplant is rated at 91 hp and 158 Nm (116 lb-ft) of torque in the existing bikes, and that will probably be the case with the new ones as well.

The B will come with a large fairing and a short windshield, while the Transcontinental will sport a larger windshield, additional headlights, and a top case at the rear. Both new models will get a larger tank, 10.5-inch TFT screen, and even an area with inductive charging for smartphones.

The wheels are likely to remain the same in size, namely 19-inch front and 16-inch rear wheels, only in a new design. Visually, the B will take a darkened approach to things, while the Transcontinental will go for chrome.

According to the spies that captured the photos you see in the gallery, the R 18 B should tip the scale at 365 kg (805 pounds), while the Transcontinental is said to come in at over 400 kg (882 pounds).

Full details on the new bikes, and uncamouflaged photos, will be thrown into the wild by Motorrad soon.

Spec Showdown: Triumph Rocket 3 Vs. Yamaha VMax

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by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

Power cruisers punch out.

For 2019, Triumph upped the ante on the Rocket 3 with the introduction of an entirely new generation. The upgrades included a new look and also a bigger engine which is no small feat considering the Rocket 3 already rocked the biggest production motorcycle engine on the market. Just like that, a new benchmark was set in the power cruiser segment. 

While the definition of power cruisers is rather broad, there’s only handful of 1,500cc-plusmodels the Rocket 3 can measure up toConsidering the Triumph sits at the top of the category with a higher price tag, we thought we’d take a look at how it compares to one of its more affordable competitors, its Japanese counterpart, theYamaha VMaxLet’s have a look at how the two models compare on paper. 

2020 Triumph Rocket 3R 2020 Yamaha VMax
Engine: 2,458cc, water-cooled, inline-three cylinder 1,679cc, liquid-cooled, 65-degree V4
Bore, Stroke, Compression: 110.2mm x 85.9mm, 10.8:1 90mm x 66mm, 11.3:1
Transmission and Final Drive: gears, shaft 5 gears, shaft
Performance: 165 hp/163 lb-ft -/123 lb-ft
Weight 641.5 pounds (dry) 683 pounds (wet)
Price: $21,900  $17,999

Performance 

Of course, we can’t talk power cruisers without discussing their performance. The Rocket 3 boasts the biggest production motorcycle engine of the industry which gives it an undeniable appeal versus the Yamaha. That being said, though its engine is almost half the size of the Rocket (displacement wise), the VMax can pull its own weight and give the Triumph a run for its money. 

While the Rocket 3 produces more torque than the Vmax (163 versus 143)there’s a possibility that the Japanese power cruiser outperforms its British counterpart on the pony front.  While Yamaha doesn’t disclose any horsepower figures, several sources suggest it produces “over 170 horsepower”, possibly even 200, according to some. That’s easily between 5 to as much as 35 hp more than the Rocket. Because the numbers aren’t from Yamaha, however, we can’t take them into consideration.  

What Yamaha does confirm, however, is that the VMax has a higher compression ratio than the Rocket 3 which means you get more bang (literally) for your buck.  

As for weight, the two companies both showcase different information. Triumph sticks to the dry weight (without the fluids) while Yamaha gives a more reallistic, ready-to-operate weight. Fueled up and ready to go, the Rocket 3 likely weighs about the same as the VMax, give or take a couple of pounds. Based on manufacturer-provided date, this means that the Rocket 3 offers the best power-to-weight ratio (unless Yamaha eventually confirms a horsepower figure.) 

Cruising

Though they like to flex their massive engines and show off their muscles, the Rocket 3 and the VMax are cruisers above all. How well do they perform on that front? Pretty darn well if I may say so.  

Neither Triumph and Yamaha have lost sight of their models’ role in their respective lineups and in the segment they compete in. As good as high-performance ratings look, riders are also interested in the ride itself—or shall we say the “cruise”? For that reason, both companies offer a wide range of elective accessories owners can outfit their cruisers with. The selection in both ranges includes saddle bags, luggage racks, heated grips, taller windscreens, etc. Triumph also offers the Rocket 3 GT which comes fully loaded with a number of additional accessories for a $700 premium over the Rocket 3 R’s starting price.  

Whether you prefer British or Japanese muscle, both offer equally good customization options to help make them more cruising and travel friendly. While creature comfort and equipment weigh heavy in the balance when buying a bike you’d like to travel onthe range is also another factor to consider. This is where the Rocket 3 gets to shine.  

The Triumph is armed with a 4.8-gallon fuel tank and despite the size of its engine, it’s rated at a reasonable 32.43 miles per gallon (mpg). This means that you should be able to get roughly 155 miles out of a single tank. The Yamaha has a smaller, 4-gallon tank. With a fuel economy rating of 27 mpg, this means you should get 108 miles out of a full tank of gas.   

Price 

There’s a healthy $4,000 different between the Yamaha and the Triumph. Interestingly, the despite the price gap, both models have a lot to offer in terms of standard equipment. However, the Rocket 3 does have a leg (or a wheel?) up on its competitor thanks to such standard features as Bluetooth connectivity, navigation, Showa suspension hardware, a beefier engine (of course), and cruise control. Plus, let’s not forget that the Triumph badge tends to come with a small premium anyway.  

While the VMax has quite the striking the design, this generation of the model has been around for over a decade compared and the platform is quite old by the industry’s standards. That being said, though it offers fewer standard features than the Rocket, the VMax manages to stay competitive and relevant thanks to its price also dating from 2009. Launch MSRP was $17,990 11 years ago which at the time was considered premium. A $9 increase in the span of a decade is more than reasonable. 

In Conclusion

The new-generation Triumph Rocket 3 is a beast worthy of its legacy with a bigger, meaner engine and some serious cruising chops. It doesn’t hold a candle to its American competitors. At $21,900, Triumph makes sure that customers get a good deal for their money by loading the bike up with features. Look-wise, from a subjective point of view, it’s also the better-looking bike with a flowing silhouette, dual headlight, and an overall assembly that looks more “finished”.

That being said, while the platform is a bit long in the tooth despite a few recent updates, the Yamaha VMax is just quirky enough to deserve to be on any cruiser lover’s shopping list. Between its massive air ducts and eclectic silhouette, the model stands out, for better or for worst. Plus, the 2.5L inline-three might be the biggest, most powerful engine of the two but the V4 has the most distinct sound.

The Rocket 3 is the power cruiser poster child and the VMax is the weird but endearing cousin.

Other Features

Wheelbase: 66 inches 66.9 inches
Seat Height: 30.4 inches 30.5 inches
Brakes: Dual 320mm discs with Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial monobloc calipers front, Single 300mm disc, Brembo M4.32 4-piston monobloc caliper back, Cornering ABS Dual 320mm wave-type discs6-piston calipers with Brembo master cylinder front,  

298mm wave-type disc, single-piston caliper with Brembo master cylinder back 

Suspension Showa 47-mm inverted fork front, Showa monoshock with reservoir RSU with remote hydraulic preload adjuster 52mm inverted fork front, Single shock with remote reservoir and remote adjustable for preload back.
Features: High-specification Avon Cobra Chrome tires, LED headlight, 2nd generation TFT instruments, Four riding modes, Hill-hold control, Cruise control, Keyless ignition, USB charging port, Free ‘MyTriumph’ app.  slipper clutch, ABS, drag-style instruments, LCD.