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Golden Age Kit from reputed Florida based NMoto custom Co

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Nmoto Nostalgia based on present day BMW R Nine T inspired by BMW R7 pre-war prototype

from https://www.autoevolution.com by Cristina Mircea

Golden Age Streamliner Concept Turns Your BMW C 400 X Scooter Into an Art Deco Masterpiece

Massively spread all across the globe, the pre-war Art Deco style is all about glamour and luxury.

It left its mark on everything from buildings to jewelry, fashion, and of course the automotive industry. Aiming to recapture those exuberant times when style and craftsmanship were the norm, Nmoto welcomes motorists back into the Golden Age, with one of the coolest motorcycle concepts we’ve seen.

Born in France before World War I, the Art Deco international style impressed through its richness and exuberance, using expensive and rare materials. But it was also about modernism, trying to express the technological progress of those times.

Nmoto is a custom motorcycle manufacturer based in Florida and its creations make constant appearances at prestigious museums, festivals, and events such as the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, and the likes. There are currently eight models in its lineup, and the Golden Age is one of them.

Announced last year, the Golden Age motorcycle concept is a true masterpiece characterized by a vintage look and modern features. It is the newest design released by Nmoto, aiming to take you back to a time when transportation was about speed but also about skill and style.

Described as a modern incarnation of the 1936 Henderson Courtney Prototype, the bike is based on BMW’s C 400 X scooter. For those who are not familiar with the aforementioned prototype, it was a custom motorcycle built in 1936, at the peak of the Art Deco movement, by O. Ray Courtney. The guy specialized in building custom bikes and this particular one was inspired by the 1930 KJ Henderson and was his most popular build. Also as a side note, Henderson was a motorcycle manufacturer who was renowned for making the fastest and biggest bikes between 1912 and 1931.

Modern incarnation of 1936 Henderson Courtney Prototype, the bike is based on BMW’s C 400 X scooter

Back to our Golden Age, Nmoto sells this model as a kit for the BMW C 400 X scooter, which is powered by a 350cc engine that produces 35 hp. It can reach a top speed of almost 140 kph (87 mph). While its design is as retro and Art Deco as it gets, this streamliner is conceived to offer all the modern features and convenience of the C 400 X.

The Golden Age has a low center of gravity, it is powerful and makes for a great city cruiser, which is no wonder, given that it is based on the C 400 X. The design and reduced weight of BMW’s mid-size scooter make it a practical urban commuter that can tackle dense traffic and tight alleys.

Nmoto’s Golden Age custom bike kit comes in four finishes, with black, red, white, and teal being your available options. You can’t go wrong with either of them, as they all look absolutely gorgeous. The motorcycle is quite hefty at 425 lb (193 kg) and can hold two helmets, for both you and a passenger.

The bike keeps all the modern features of the C 400 X, including the connectivity dashboard with a 6.5” display, keyless ignition, Bluetooth connectivity, ABS (anti-lock braking system) and ASC (automatic stability control), Brembo disc brakes, the heated seat, and on-board computer, to name the most important of them.

Nmoto’s Golden Age kit includes a carbon fiber body made of nine pieces, front and rear subframes that are powder-coated, new headlight housing and adapter, new turn signal housings, as well as the headlight, turn signals, and rearview mirrors. You also get Golden Age badges for the rear part of the body, a kidney grille, side moldings, and grilles for the rear, an exhaust system relocation kit, premium mountings (original BMW Torx screws), and of course, instructions on how to assemble everything.

Starting at $12,490, the Golden Age kit is now available to order.

Visit their Website at: https://nmoto.com/

Ducati DesertX with twin fuel tanks revealed

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from https://menafn.com/ by MENAFN

Ducati has officially revealed the DesertX adventure motorcycle in the global market.

It gets a new off-road-friendly chassis and a host of electronic riding aids.

The bike has a retro look, dual fuel tanks for fulfilling additional fuel needs, a 5.0-inch TFT screen, and a 937cc engine that comes paired with a 6-speed gearbox.

Here’s our roundup.

Takeaways
The Ducati DesertX concept was showcased at EICMA 2019 and two years later, we have the production model. It has a similar appearance as the concept version and looks like the Ducati motorbikes of Dankar racing from 1990s.

Distinct features such as dual fuel tanks and dual-pod headlight make it a unique offering.

Design
The bike has a generous ground clearance of 250mm.

The front and rear fuel tanks on Ducati DesertX have capacity of 21 liters and 8 liters, respectively.

Ducati DesertX features a muscular front fuel tank, a transparent windshield, a twin-pod LED headlamp, a split-style seat, an upswept exhaust, and an auxiliary fuel tank at the back.

It houses a 5.0-inch TFT display and rides on 21-inch front and 18-inch rear wheels.

The two-wheeler has a seat height of 875mm, a ground clearance of 250mm, and a kerb weight of 223kg.

Engine & Specs
The Ducati DesertX is powered by a 937cc, Testastretta twin-cylinder motor that churns out 108hp of power at 9,250rpm and 92Nm of peak torque at 6,500rpm. Transmission duties are handled by a 6-speed gearbox.

For the rider’s safety, Ducati DesertX is equipped with disc brakes on both the front and rear wheels, along with cornering ABS, wheelie control, traction control, and engine brake control. It offers six riding modes.

The suspension duties are taken care of by fully-adjustable Kayaba inverted forks on the front and a fully-adjustable mono-shock unit on the rear end.

Pricing and availability
Ducati DesertX will start at $16,795 in the US. It will likely be available in North America starting June 2022.

Perewitz Paint Show Photo Gallery

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No one has a paint show as the Perewitz crew has.

Photos and Text by Jack McIntyre

It’s amazing what the artists come up with regarding concepts, ideas, colors, and layouts.

This particular show was in Daytona at the Broken spoke & is a perfect example of the rest of their shows. Enjoy.

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Concept Motorcycle for the Moon: global debut at ADV Overland exhibition

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by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

This Spectacular Moon Concept Motorcycle Opens the Door to a New Space Experience

Since the “billionaire space race” has been accelerating, you might have imagined cosmonauts doing a lot of things, but we bet you didn’t picture them riding motorcycles on the moon. Yet, that’s what’s coming, because somebody just built an actual moon motorcycle, one of the most insane concept two-wheelers you’ll ever come across.

Last year, a Russian designer imagined what a “NASA motorcycle” would look like. Just one year later, that concept turned into reality and is about to make its world debut in California. The folks who made this happen are a small team from a German company called Hookie, which specializes in custom moto design and parts. Inspired by Andrew Fabishevskiy’s fantasy motorcycle, they were determined to bring it to life.

This is how Tardigrade, presented as the world’s first moon concept motorcycle, was born. You might wonder why it got the name of an apparently primitive creature, but these nearly-microscopic beings are incredibly resilient and able to adapt to any kind of environment, including outer space. Despite its otherworldly look, the Tardigrade motorcycle was also meant to be resilient and completely functional, “as close as possible to an original concept of a NASA moon rover.”

This futuristic-looking electric motorcycle blends a lightweight frame with single-sided swing arms, balloon tires, and drive-by-wire steering. With a length of 8.5 feet (2.6 meters), and almost 3-foot (0.9 meters) tall, Tardigrade has a battery range of up to 68 miles (110 km). Its maximum speed of 9 mph (15 kph) is comparable to that of the Moon Buggy. Plus, it’s designed to also carry equipment.

Incorporating 3D-printed parts, in house-developed wheels, plus a Cake drivetrain and sustainable lubricants from Puraglobe, this one-of-a-kind concept is innovative from start to finish. The folks at Hookie have shared glimpses from the building process along their journey, and are now proud to present their creation to the world.

Tardigrade, the moon motorcycle, will make its global debut at the ADV:Overland exhibition, held at the Petersen Automotive Museum in California, in mid-October.

What is Hub-center Steering Motorcycle & Why it is Better

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by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Hub-center steering is one of several different types of front-end suspension and steering mechanisms used in motorcycles and cargo bicycles. It is essentially a mechanism that uses steering pivot points inside the wheel hub rather than a geometry that places the wheel in a headstock like the traditional motorcycle layout.

Perhaps the most venerable example of the idea came in the form of the 1930 Majestic. This Georges Roy design used a novel pressed-steel monocoque chassis, and it incorporated an automotive-type chassis with hub-center steering. Other bikes had already used the configuration in such machines as the Ner-A-Car and the Zenith Auto-Bi, but the Majestic made it lovely to behold.

Another bike, the Vyrus 984 C3 2V Razzetto, was one such motorcycle that used hub-center geometry.

Vyrus is a small Italian motorcycle manufacturer based in Coriano, Italy, and their bikes such as the “Tesi” – Thesis in Italian – had their designs originate from a university engineering project linked to the motorcycle legend Massimo Tamburini. The Tesi, and the Vyrus 984, were instantly identifiable by their use of their hub-center steering front suspension and steering arrangement.

Those fabulously expensive bespoke motorcycles have been called “functional works of art,” and they look a bit like something you might see in a video game.

In hub-centered bikes, the front wheel is attached to a swingarm with a shock and an internal pivot point. Steering is achieved using those linkages to turn the wheel on a pivot point. Hub-center steering has been employed on motorcycles for more than a century, but the design, despite what some engineers say offers a distinct advantage, never took hold.

But the founder of Vyrus, Ascanio Rodorigo, once worked for Bimota as a race mechanic and engineer during the 1970s and his tenure there lasted until 1985. When Rodorigo finally left Bimota, he started his own company but partnered with Bimota on the hub-center-steered Tesi. He then went on to take the steering concept deeper and refined it for his own company’s motorcycles.

A Ducati dual spark bored out to 1,079cc and making 100hp L-twin provides the power for the 319 lbs (145 kg) Vyrus 984 bike, and it’s delivered to the road for via a six-speed transmission.

Now builders like Bryan Fuller of Fuller Moto, Revival Cycles, and others have built beautiful machines which harken back to the hub-centered glory days of the Majestic. Builders such as Stellan Egeland used a hopped-up 1200 boxer engine from a BMW HP2 Sport. He also added his own hub-center steering setup from ISR to a frame he made from a 2391 steel tube. The ISR kit is a thing to behold.

Revival’s ‘The Six,’ which features a ballsy Honda CBX motor, is another take on the hub-steer geometry. It was commissioned by museum owner and bike collector Bobby Haas for his Haas Moto Museum in Dallas and made by Revival’s Alan Stulberg and his crew.

Stulberg said the commission was aimed at paying homage to the Art Deco classic Majestic and added that he and the team became “obsessed with its design language and flow” since they first saw the bike at the Barber Museum.

Hub steering systems don’t dive as much under braking and hard cornering as do conventional telescopic fork setups. They push braking forces back into the chassis more efficiently rather than transferring immense bending forces to a pair of upright forks. The ride experience is exceptional as braking performance throughout corners is greatly enhanced.

It works like this: A wheel hub pitches back and forth on a central pivot and is supported by two large steering arms actuated by handlebars. The handlebars connect to the front steering and swingarm using complex linkages. A fixed arm connects a pull-and-push rod on either side of the hub-center to help steer the bike. The geometry also includes a second pair of static rods to ensure the axle stays level with the bike’s mass.

While hub steering has a number of clear advantages, its downfall is that it is considerably more expensive to manufacture and maintain and requires exceptionally experienced mechanics to tune and repair.

But it does look good, works more efficiently from an engineering standpoint, and directly addresses the most important factor in the motorcycling experience: braking.

The Majestic – Artistic Design from the 1920s
from https://www.odd-bike.com

While the engineering of the Majestic might have been relatively conventional, what was unprecedented was the styling, the hallmark of the Majestic to this day.

All the oily bits were fully enclosed under louvered panels, with partially enclosed fenders covering the wheels at both ends. The rider was completely isolated from the grime and muck of the running gear and powertrain, perched upon a sprung saddle and controlling the machine via levers and bars that poke through the all-encompassing body.

Presented in 1929, the prototype Majestic (which was reported as Roy’s personal machine) featured an air-cooled 1000cc longitudinal four-cylinder engine from a 1927-28 Cleveland 4-61. This would not remain for production, however.

While at least two Majestics were built with a 750cc JAP V-twin (arranged, like a much later Moto-Guzzi , with the Vee transverse and the heads poking through the bodywork) and records note that JAP singles, a Chaise Four, and at least one Gnome et Rhone flat twin were also employed, the majority of production machines coming out of Chartenay featured air-cooled Chaise engines.

These were overhead valve singles featuring unit two or three-speed gearboxes operated by hand-shift, available in 350cc and 500cc displacements. Distinctive for their single pushrod tube that resembles a bevel tower (but contains a pair of tightly-spaced parallel pushrods) and external bacon-slicer flywheel, these powerplants were a favourite of French manufacturers during the interwar period and were used by a variety of marques in lieu of producing their own engines.

The base price of the Majestic was 5200 Francs for a 350 with chain final drive; an extra 500 Francs netted you optional shaft drive.

An additional option that is rarely seen on surviving examples was a fine “craquelure” paint option that was applied by skilled artisans. It involves a process of deliberately screwing up the paint job in the most controlled and flawless way possible, applying a contrasting top coat over a base using incompatible paints that will cause the top coat to crack in a uniform fashion, something like a well-aged oil painting or antique piece of furniture.

The result is spectacular – and perhaps a bit tacky, giving the machine the appearance of a lizard skin handbag. (Maybe a later Rock Star would have loved to ride it as the “The Lizard King” ? )

The Majestic was impeccably stable at higher speeds compared to the other motorcycles of that era.

It was also agile and light footed in a way that similar machines, like the Ner-A-Car, were not.

The relatively low weight, around 350 pounds, carried with a very low centre of gravity made for tidy handling that was more than up to the meagre output offered by the powerplants.

Majestic was targeting a clientele that didn’t really exist: the gentlemanly rider who might desire a superior (read: expensive) machine as a stablemate to their elegant automobiles.

Georges Roy’s previous design produced under the name “New Motorcycle”

Georges Roy’s earlier 1927 brand called New Motorcycle was a far better barometer of things to come, predicting the style and design of machines that would emerge during the 1930s and beyond. The Majestic has far less impact and was more of a curiosity than predictor of trends to come.

Georges Roy’s brilliance as a designer is unquestionable, and deserves more praise than he ever earned during his lifetime.

Majestic is a little bit of elegance floating on the sea of staid machines that clutter up the history books.

Georges Roy was a French industrialist and engineer born in 1888 who achieved success in the textile business – specifically in knitting and sewing equipment. He was, however, an early adopter of motorcycling at the turn of the 20th Century – reportedly his first machine was a Werner, a Parisian machine that introduced the term “Motocyclette” in 1897.

This Ducati EV Artwork Is So Good, Folks Even Believe It’s Real

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by Cristian Curmei from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati is the sort of name that tells you right away just about everything you need to know about a vehicle. It’s even grown to be the sort of brand that inspires designers of all kinds to take a whack at building the perfect Ducati.

While building the perfect Ducati may just be a dream, here’s a fine example of one designer’s inspiration derived from the famed brand. The vehicle rendering before you is known as the Ducati è rossa monoposto, and it’s from the mind of one Romain Gauvin.

No, Mr. Gauvin is not some artist that just graduated college and decided to test his drawing hand, but rather a very prolific designer. His resume currently shows that he is Senior Designer at Automobile Citroen. That should be more than enough to have you looking at this render a second time.

If it isn’t, here’s a fun little fact. Rumor has it that this design is the newest electric motorcycle from Ducati, according to an article by gomotoriders. However, upon a search that led me to Ducati themselves, there has been nothing to back up those claims. But I can see why some people want to believe so much that this is a real motorcycle; it’s definitely a one-of-a-kind piece of work, even as a render.

The idea behind the concept is a simple one, and Gauvin states on his Behance page that, “My goal was to blend cutting edge technology with pure emotional motoring fascination. I wanted to see an electric motorbike that was actually desirable.” Did he succeed? Well, you tell me. I’m just the messenger.

With the idea of creating a “desirable” EV branded Ducati, the monoposto was underway. Gauvin states that he started with the frame of the bike. Here, carbon fiber was the chosen material. From there, he just kept adding more and more elements until the bike was complete.

After the frame, an electric motor, rear suspension system, and rear hub are designed and set in their according position. One thing you can see is that this bike is a chain driven EV. I recently rode a chain driven EV, and I got to say, those things can be beasts.

Even though Gauvin doesn’t state what cues from the motorsport’s world are being used in the overall design, one feature is very clear; the panel work that wraps the motor housing looks a lot like the air intake to an F1 vehicle. That segment then blends beautifully into a leather seat that’ll have the rider leaning forward quite a bit. Those pits on the sides of the would-be “intake” also look like a perfect place for the rider’s arms to become one with the frame, resulting in some nice aerodynamics.

Speaking of aerodynamics, the carbon fiber fork flares out and looks like it, too, is made to manipulate oncoming air around the bike and rider. Even though the fork looks solid, it also seems like there may be some suspension properties hidden beneath the flares.

One thing is for sure, this motorcycle does not look like it’s one meant for just plain cruising on Sundays. Instead, the rims, massive front brakes, and slick tires tell you that the only place you will ever feel this EV’s true potential is on a track. Even the riders position tells you all you need to know about where this EV belongs.

Even though the designer makes no mention of this motorcycle’s range, he does include a visual as to where the recharge port would be, right underneath the seat and fed directly to the battery system.

Now, take a minute and have a nice long look at this design. If you do so, you too, may begin to believe the rumors about this possibly being the next Ducati motorcycle. Even though those rumors aren’t true, not currently anyway. If Ducati was to ever make an EV that looks like this, I would be out there in line waiting for the test ride.

BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100

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from https://www.bmwmotorcycles.com

The Great Escape – VISION NEXT 100: The motorcycle of the future
Concept Vehicle. Not available for sale.

Glasses in place of a helmet, smart clothing, full balance without a kickstand: Only three of the many inventions that could become standards for riding a motorcycle and add a new dimension to the sense of freedom in an increasingly digitised world. And the best thing about it: this vision vehicle is already here. Introducing the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100.

“When we develop a motorcycle, we are usually thinking around five to ten years in the future. Looking further ahead is particularly exciting for us and very appealing.” – Edgar Heinrich, Head of BMW Motorcycle Design

The frame follows the wheel.
The black triangular frame is visually reminiscent of the R 32 from 1923 – the first BMW motorcycle. However, the frame has functionally little to do with the original. The Flexframe is flexible and allows steering manoeuvres without the joints we are familiar with today. If the handlebars are moved, the entire frame changes shape and facilitates the change in direction. Depending on the traffic situation, the forces required for this vary: steering manoeuvres are especially easy at a standstill, while the frame firms up at high speeds. The surfaces are attached so that they offer the wind and weather protection of a fully enclosed motorcycle. The surface of the frame is made of matt black textile.

Self-balancing: no chance of tilting over.
A motorcycle doesn’t need a stand. Not when assistance systems ensure perfect balance. Self-balancing enables the BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100 to remain stable both during the ride and at a standstill. This enhances safety for the driver. It also makes it easier for beginners, because they are led safely through every riding situation and cannot fall over. But experienced bikers can also profit from self-balancing. Because the motorcycle becomes even more agile, making the riding experience even more dynamic. The assistance systems also expand the rider’s capabilities. Regardless of ability and practice, riders are able to constantly expand their boundaries and positively intensify the riding experiences. Making every ride an experience of pure freedom from start to finish.

SEE DETAILS at BMW Motorrad Website by Clicking Here.

Art inspired rumble Sidecar Project

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Twenty Years of Chopper Dedication and Hard Work
by Dan Stern

Decades ago (mid ‘90s) Paisano Publications came out with an upscale magazine called VQ. I’m sure a take-off on GQ. People scoffed because the RUB thing was in full swing. I didn’t care because it was another great publication from bikers for bikers. It was tailored for the upscale market complete with ads for cologne, soap and other things you’d never find in Easyriders. The best part was a feature on artists concepts.

VQ’s editor, Keith (Bandit) Ball was running it while juggling the editorship of Easyriders and countless other publications.

Owner: Dan Stern
Bike: 2004 Harley-Davidson Softail w/left-hand sidecar

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Husqvarna Electric Motorcycle E-Pilen Concept Revealed

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Husqvarna E-Pilen is expected to undergo production by late this year with a launch aimed at late 2021 or late 2022

With every other OEM venturing into electric mobility space, we often get to witness new designs and advent of some new technology even if it’s minuscule. The latest manufacturer is Husqvarna who plans to enter the emission-free auto world with the production version of E-Pilen Concept revealed recently.

Based on the unique and pioneering design of successful twins- Svartpilen and Vitpilen, E-Pilen Concept is the Swedish bikemaker’s first step into urban electric mobility. The company has ensured that the production-spec electric motorcycle will bear stark resemblances to the concept version showcased.

Modern Design
The progressive design philosophy of Svartpilen and Vitpilen has been carried forward to the electric bike which features some distinct styling elements such as an exposed trellis frame, wide handlebars, a compact fuel tank and a round headlamp.

While a light paint scheme has been carried forward from Vitpilen, the tank rack has been inspired by Svartpilen. Other design elements included are inverted forks, mono-shock at rear, and a gullwing swingarm.

Expected Powertrain Specs
It should be pointed out that the fuel tank houses the electric battery setup. The battery supplies energy to an electric motor with a rated capacity of 8kW (10.73 bhp). Although exact details of the powertrain are yet to be revealed, the company claims a modest range of 100km on a single charge. However, Husqvarna has assured that it will address the range anxiety issues of consumers by equipping E-Pilen with swappable batteries featuring a modular system.

Official statement from the company read as “It has always been the aim of Husqvarna Motorcycles to develop new products accessible to the broadest possible spectrum of riders. The E-mobility range will retain and continue the riding pleasure and dynamics refined through the long history and experience of the brand.”

More Details
More details regarding E-Pilen will be revealed as the electric motorcycle nears its final production-spec version. Husqvarna’s Austrian cousin KTM has already ventured into electric mobility space with 5 kW SX-E and 16 kW Freeride E. If E-Pilen indeed undergoes production it can also pave the path for electric KTM Dukes. Motorcycles of both brands are manufactured at Bajaj’s manufacturing facility in Chakan near Pune, Maharashtra.

In fact, Bajaj and KTM have been working together on a common electric platform that will underpin products ranging from 3kW to 10kW electric motors using a 48V electric system. Also, it was reported a couple of months back that KTM and Husqvarna are developing an all-new electric scooter as well which will be based on Bajaj Chetak Electric. We can expect E-Pilen to be launched late this year or early next year.

Husqvarna announces a new concept for Electric Motorcycle
by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Just as more car manufacturers are switching over to electric vehicles, well-known motorbike companies are also extending their line-up to include e-motorcycles. This year, we are definitely seeing a lot of innovative electric motorbikes being released, and that’s just the beginning.

Husqvarna is one of the brands that recently announced a new concept that’s on its way to being added to their successful motorcycle range. The E-Pilen model is actually intended to be the first of an entirely new series. The company has not yet revealed more details about what the E-mobility line will consist of, but it’s proof that they are serious about developing environmentally-friendly alternatives to classic models.

Fans were not given a lot of information about the upcoming E-Pilen model but, from what we can see so far, it resembles Husqvarna’s classic Vitpilen and Svartpilen in terms of design. The sharp silhouette, five-spoke wheels and retro-inspired round headlight are some of the elements that all of these bikes have in common. The company itself states that E-Pilen is meant to look as good as their most popular models, with the added benefits of electric mobility.

Aimed at “leisure riders”, the Husqvarna electric motorcycle would be ideal for regular commuting in urban environments. The company promises a 62-mile (100 km) range and an 8 kW power output for the electric model, that’s also equipped with a modular and swappable battery system. With E-Pilen currently under development, the motorcycle manufacturer is still considering various options as far as batteries, so we’ll know more about that in the future.

Since they are now appealing to a wider public who is interested in electric alternatives, Husqvarna also intends to extend their dealership network in urban and metropolitan areas.

According to their official statement,“It has always been the aim of Husqvarna Motorcycles to develop new products accessible to the broadest possible spectrum of riders. The E-mobility range will retain and continue the riding pleasure and dynamics refined through the long history and experience of the brand”.

E-Pilen will be launched in the near future, stay tuned for updates.

Video: TMC Dumont is a 300hp motorcycle fitted with a Rolls-Royce aircraft engine

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by Jahla Seppanen from https://www.themanual.com

When you’re a retired Formula One driver, what else can you do in your free time except build mind-bending concept motorcycles? In the case of Tarso Marques of Brazil, that’s exactly what he’s doing with the insane TMC Dumont motorcycle.

Yes, it’s still a concept so, no, you can’t drive it yet. In fact, you might be wondering how it even works because the construction shouldn’t make sense in real life.

This hub-less bike swaps a traditional car engine for a 1960s Rolls-Royce aircraft engine, creating an absolutely sick design with a body aesthetic that is futuristic, svelt, and should definitely be in the next 007 movie.

Anatomically, the aircraft engine is positioned where a standard motorcycle engine and fuel tank would be, but takes up an enormous amount of space. Basically, as much as a full frame, radiator —the works. The massive 36-inch wheels are essentially spoke-less and completely open in the center, so with the 300-horsepower engine, we’re hoping the brake disk and caliper have something to hold on to … because we can’t see it.

Based on the low-riding profile of the seat and engine, it’s questionable how the bike could sit above the ground, but it does. At least, the concept does. Just pray for a road without speed bumps.

Some motorcycle enthusiasts have questioned the safety and turning abilities that would result from having the back “wheel” so close to the rider — hello, wedgie or mega backside tire burn — and have called the bike “impractical.” That being said, TMC Dumont drove away with the “Best of Show” award at the 2018 Daytona Bike Week.

This isn’t the first time a motorcycle fanatic has strapped an airplane engine to their hog. Back in 2013, the Red Baron bike featured the 150-horsepower, nine-cylinder Rotec Radial engine used in WWI-era planes. However, in terms of pure looks, we’ve never seen anything like TMC Dumont. The motorcycle has been compared to everything from a piece of art to a Tron bike — ultra-sleek, and record-breaking.

Previewing the other passion projects Marques is developing with his brand Tarso Marques Concepts makes us mildly jealous, somewhat shook, and overall excited to finally get back out on a bike.