Skip to main content
Tag

auction

Peter Fonda’s motorcycle from ‘Easy Rider’ is heading to auction

By General Posts

from https://www.malaymail.com

‘Captain America,’ the motorcycle that had a starring role in ‘Easy Rider’ should easily find a buyer at an auction held in Texas on June 5, 2021. ― Picture courtesy of Cord & Kruse Auctions via ETX Studio.

LOS ANGELES, May 15 ― The iconic “Captain America”, the motorcycle that Peter Fonda rode in the movie Easy Rider, will be auctioned off in Texas on June 5, 2021. Famous for the star-spangled banner painted on its gas tank, the motorcycle is currently estimated at between US$ 300,000 and US$ 500,000.

The motorcycle in question, symbol of freedom and the hippie movement of the era, will be sold without a reserve price. This exceptional model, famous across the world, was built from an old 1952 Harley-Davidson bike bought for a pittance at the time. In 1996, the bike’s owner at the time, collector Gary Graham, sold the Captain America bike at the Dan Kruse Classic Car Productions auction to Gordon Granger. Since then, the bike has resided in Austin, Texas, where it even survived a fire in December 2010.

For anyone who needs a reminder, the film Easy Rider was directed by Dennis Hopper and released in 1969. The movie is a cult road movie about two bikers leaving California to reach Louisiana. The authenticity of this model for sale is nevertheless debated among some aficionados. For the record, two bikes were used for the shoot. In 2014, one of them was sold for 1.3 million dollars.

In addition to Captain America, about 20 other vehicles from Gordon Granger’s collection will also be offered at auction on June 5, all without reserve prices. This selection includes, for example, several Rolls-Royces from the 1920s and 1930s, a 1954 Jaguar XK120 Roadster and a 1964 Ford Mustang convertible. Also noteworthy in this sale is a replica of the famous “General Lee” Dodge from the series The Dukes of Hazzard. ― ETX Studio

Harley-Davidson FL 1946 Sells for 473 Times Its Original MSRP

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Born at a time when World War II was raging all across the world, the FL line of motorcycles turned out to be a hit in the Harley-Davidson portfolio. Little did the bike maker know however that many decades after its introduction, this line of Knuckleheads will be worth many times over their original money.

The FL you’re looking at, sporting a bit more chrome than what the bike maker offered back then, comes from the year immediately after the end of the war. It looks so shiny and new thanks to a restoration process it went through about a quarter of a century ago. A restoration process that also helped significantly increase its value.

You see, back when it was made alongside close to 4,000 others of its kind, the two-wheeler had an MSRP of just $465. Adjusted for inflation, that would be around $6,200 in today’s money. Still a very, very long way from the sum it just sold for last week.

The bike was listed on the massive lot that went under the hammer during the huge Mecum motorcycle auction in Las Vegas. This particular FL shares the second position on the podium for most expensive bikes sold there with an E model from 1943, behind the champion of the event, the $297,000 Strap Tank.

$220,000 is how much someone paid for the FL, which would be 473 times more than its original price back in 1946, or 35 times more if we do the math with the inflation-adjusted amount.

Although we’re not specifically informed of this, we reckon the 74 cubic inch engine linked to a four speed transmission is still in working order, but do not expect this motorcycle to take to the roads anytime soon. That’s because there are only two reasons people generally pay this much for a bike this old: included it in a collection, or waiting for its value to increase some more so it could be sold for a profit.

Indian Motorcycle from 1903 sold for $143K

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s been a hell of a ride for those taking part last weekend in the massive motorcycle auction in Las Vegas. The top highest-selling two-wheelers, for instance, were responsible for getting close to two million dollars combined, in a bidding frenzy that seemed to have had no limit.

Out of this select team of ten motorcycles, eight of them were Harley-Davidsons, including the champion when it comes to money earned, the $297,000 Strap Tank. The other two were a Vincent Black Shadow from 1953 (sold for $165,000), and this here 1903 Indian that went for $143,000.

For all intents and purposes, the Indian is the oldest in this select lot. What’s more important is that for the first 62 years of its life, from 1903 to 1965, it was owned by the same guy, a California motorcycle racer by the name Gus Cheleini.

Looking probably just as good as it did 118 years ago when it was made, the motorcycle comes in a dark shade of blue and it is equipped with a tiny 13ci engine and an atmospheric valve that is still working, hinting according to auction house Mecum, which handled the sale of the two-wheeler, that the bike could be “started and ridden.”

Part of a select and limited number of bikes made under the Indian name that year, it still wears the first name of the company, Hendee Manufacturing, and features the large gas tank on the rear fender that earned it and its breed the nickname Camelback.

Since the death of its first owner, the Indian changed hands a few more times, and was featured in The Classic MotorCycle in 1988, but mostly spent its time out of sight. It’s unclear what the future holds for it, as we are not told who purchased it, but chances are we’ll get to see it again at a similar auction in the not-so-distant future.

Harley-Davidson 1907 Strap Tank Nets Close to $300K in Las Vegas auction

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s been a very hot weekend for motorcycle enthusiasts. On one hand, we had the MotoAmerica series of events over in Atlanta, and on the other the mammoth motorcycle auction conducted by Mecum over in Las Vegas.

As far as the Road Atlanta event goes, we’ve already seen how Indian once again crowned itself King of the Baggers by barely outrunning Harley-Davidson. But the Nevada auction had a champion of its own, and its name is 1907 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank.

Described by fans as the most desirable of all Harley-Davidsons, the Strap Tank family managed to score a number of records when it comes to the sums they went for over the past few years. Back in 2015, for instance, one of them sold for $650k, making it the most expensive Harley ever sold at auction until that time.

The one we have here sold for less, but for an impressive amount nonetheless. $297k is how much someone paid for it, making the model the most expensive one to sell at this year’s event.

Coming from a private collection, the motorcycle is somewhat related to the record-setting one from 2015. It was put together by its owner, Ronald Moreschini, and with the backing of the guy who purchased the $650k Strap Tank, Lonnie Isam.

Seeing how desirable these bikes were, Moreschini set out a few years back to come up with 13 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank replica motors. While doing this, he stumbled upon an original 1907 engine that still had the original carburetor, but also on the native gas and oil tank, forks, and belt tensioning gate.

The motorcycle we have here came to be around these original parts, and was further gifted with original seat and wheel hubs. The result is so exciting, that the two-wheeler was even shown at the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum for a while.

Now it is probably heading over to another private collection, where it will most likely spend some time before it will most definitely show up for sale once more.

Highlights

  • Color Grey
  • Not for highway or public road use
  • Engine # 1877
  • Original factory engine
  • Original carburetor
  • Original gas tank and oil tank
  • Original belt tensioner
  • Original front forks
  • Original wheel hubs
  • Original seat

Creating a 1916 Harley-Davidson from only an original engine

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Recreating a historic Harley-Davidson racing model without the original parts except the original engine.

Believe it or not, it’s been 118 years since the foundations of the company we now know as Harley-Davidson were laid. Somehow, the company managed to get through two hot world wars, a cold, long one, and more near-death experiences that we care count.

Such a long history means there are more models in the company’s past than in its present (and some, might argue, more than in the future). Some are so old it’s literally impossible to come across one, and people have to turn to all sorts of gimmicks to get their hands on a historic model.

Like the guys behind this build did. Trying to bring back one of Harley’s historic racing models, a Swedish museum by the name of MC Collection got their hands on an original motorcycle engine from 1916 and built a bike around it, trying to capture the essence of what was once the Model 11K racer.

The engine belonged to a Model F, and was slapped inside a full loop frame constructed (together with the forks) by former German road racing cyclist Christian Henn. The frame presents itself just like it did on the original Harley of more than a century ago, in the so-called keystone configuration, with stressed members and steel engine plates.

This way of building racers gave them better handling but, perhaps equally as important, allowed for the cylinder to be removed with the powerplant still fitted on the bike, allowing for quick intervention during races, if they were required.

This 1916 Harley was put together in Sweden more than a decade ago, and in the meantime it made it to the U.S. It was listed as for sale during the Mecum motorcycle auction this weekend, and it got sold for $57,750. As a side note though, whoever bought it will only be using it as a museum piece, because it is not street legal.

Rare unused CZ Motorcycle at Mecum auction

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

This CZ Motorcycle Arrived in New York Decades Ago, Was Left Untouched

Say you read these two words: Ceska zbrojovka. For an English speaker, they are tongue-twisting, and they probably don’t mean that much either. Except, perhaps, if you’re into firearms. Or motocross machines. That’s because the Czech company by that name makes products for both these worlds.

As far as motorcycles go, people know the company best as CZ. Present mostly on the European market, the moniker reached American shores in the 1970s, forever changing how motocross racing was done. For instance, a racer by the name John DeSoto won the 1970 Elsinore GP on a CZ bike.

That is just one of CZ’s achievements; the nameplate holds six Motocross Grand Prix World Championship titles (consecutive ones, won between 1964 and 1969), but is also responsible for impressive wins in enduro.

Presently, finding a new CZ motorcycle is almost impossible, as they don’t make them anymore. One has to look long and hard just to come across such a two-wheeler with a few miles on it. But what if we told you the one you see before your eyes, although almost half a century old, is literally brand new?

Over the years, we’ve come across machines that could have easily been described as virtually new, but this one is literally so. As in, the thing has never ever been ridden, and it still comes in the original factory crate it was shipped to the U.S. in. It is the complete package, with all the packing plastic and oiled paper, and even an original spare parts list.

We stumbled upon this incredible piece of motoring history on the lot of motorcycles that are going under the hammer this week in Las Vegas. Sadly, we don’t know why this bike was never used for the purpose it was brought to the U.S.

Mecum is trying to sell the bike as is, saying it can be assembled and used for racing or kept as a museum piece. There’s no indication as to how much it is expected to fetch.

Mecum motorcycle auction returns to Las Vegas

By General Posts

from https://www.reviewjournal.com

Mecum Auctions’ annual vintage and antique motorcycle auction will take place Wednesday though May 1 at the Las Vegas Convention Center, featuring an estimated 1,750 motorcycles. Celebrating its 30th anniversary, the event is recognized as the largest global gathering of consignors, buyers and spectators who share a passion for the history, beauty and camaraderie invoked and inspired by vintage and antique motorcycles.

Among the 13 collections currently consigned to the auction are a total of 386 consignments, of which 325 are offered at no reserve. Private collection highlights include 96 offerings from The Dick Ray Estate Collection—which includes BSAs, Nortons, Triumphs and many others at no reserve—and another 90 no-reserve offerings from The Stephenson Collection, including a historic 1929 Douglas SW5 Speed model.

The J.C. Burgin Collection is another main attraction assemblage slated to sell in Las Vegas, and this group of approximately 50 motorcycles stands as one of the only collections in the world to contain at least one example of all 12 of Harley-Davidson’s famed Knucklehead series. From the 1936 Harley-Davidson EL and the ultra-rare 1943 Harley-Davidson E Model, all the way up through the 1947 Harley-Davidson FL, all 12 model years of the venerable Knucklehead are present and accounted for, all are in stunning condition and all will be offered at absolute no reserve.

Another Harley-Davidson highlight among the Vegas auction lineup is a 1907 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank with an original engine bearing No. 1877. Already one of the most desirable Harley-Davidson models in existence, this example is one of the most correct and original of its kind and has a rich personal history that is well documented, including time on display in several museums and a feature in the book “Heroes of Harley-Davidson.”

Included among the six high-quality motorcycles that make up The East Coast Motorcycle Collection is a restored 1911 Pierce Four Cylinder that is powered by a 4 HP four-cylinder backed by a two-speed gearbox and a rebuilt and restored 1940 Crocker Big Twin. This Crocker features Motor No. 40-61-113, which was rebuilt by the late Dale Walksler of the Wheels Through Time museum.

An iconic 1950 Vincent Black Lightning from The Sinless Cycles Collection will also grace the Las Vegas auction stage. The bike was originally ordered by Danish sidecar racing champion David Axelson through the Copenhagen Vincent dealer Villy Egen.

Bidder registration for Mecum Las Vegas Motorcycles 2021 is available in advance online at Mecum.com and on-site at the auction for $200, and it includes admission for two to all four auction days. For those unable to attend in person, enhanced remote bidding options are also available, with options for both online and telephone bidding.

Doors open daily at 8 a.m. with the vehicle auction beginning at 10 a.m.

For more information on Mecum Las Vegas Motorcycles 2021 and all other scheduled 2021 auctions, visit Mecum.com. To view the list, to consign a vehicle or to register as a bidder, visit Mecum.com, or call 262-275-5050 for more information.

Cut-Down 1926 Harley-Davidson JD

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Cut-Down 1926 Harley-Davidson JD Is a Throwback to Custom Bikes of a Century Ago

Like with cars, ever since motorcycles were born, their stock appearance and performance were not enough for some owners. Attempts at giving machines, regardless of the number of wheels, new capabilities, have led over the years to the many custom shops we have around today, but also to a wide range of styles and visions.

Back in the 1920s, motorcycles were already evolved enough to be taken racing. The novel sport naturally attracted lots of fans, including some that wanted to feel on the road at least part of the thrills riders felt on the track.

As a result, modifications started being made, and they ultimately began to coalesce into different customization styles. In the U.S., one of the first such styles, considered by some to be the first widely-copied one, was the cut-down. That’s not to be confused with the term that stands for modified Italian scooters from the 1970s and 1980s.

Taking inspiration from racing motorcycles, cut-down two-wheelers were made lighter by removing several elements, and visually unique by the elimination of the front fender and the modification of exhaust pipes and headlamps, for instance.

These changes were largely performed on the Harley bikes of the age, especially those from the J family. And we have a taste of how they looked like in the 1926 JD model we have here.

We found it on the lot of bikes going under the Mecum hammer next week in Las Vegas. It’s described as a “proper period custom with no radical changes to the chassis or engine,” but with all the enhancements one would expect from a cut-down model.

We are not given any details on who is responsible for the changes made to the stock JD but the green and red machine will probably make quite an impression next week in Vegas.

Harley-Davidson XR750 from 1980 on Auction

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Back in 1969, the AMA Grand National Championship rules changed enough that the dominant force of the time, Harley-Davidson, had to come up with something new to replace the KR750 it was fielding back then. It ended up unleashing into the world what was to become the series’ most successful motorcycle in history.

XR750 is how it’s called, and it was introduced in 1970 in both flat track and road racing variants. Several big names of the competition rode the model, and managed to earn it 28 of 37 AMA Grand National Championships ran from 1972 to 2008.

Last time we heard anything about the XR750 at an official level was in 2019, when Harley decided to use the Jet Fire Orange, the competition colors deployed by the Harley-Davidson Factory Flat Track team back in the day, across the company’s racing hardware. But despite this effort, nothing can match in appeal an original XR750.

We managed to dig one up as it awaits a new buyer on Mecum’s Las Vegas sale at the end of the week. We’re not being told who was its rider back in the day, but that probably matters little for the ones eyeing to buy it.

Sporting the native orange and black of its breed, the bike is ready for the track, it seems, and has even been fitted with new tires, ventilated hubs, rear sprocket and disc, and clean air filters. According to the seller, “track safety inspection looks ok to pass with springs and other updates.”

The engine that powers it is the original 750cc unit, sporting the aluminum heads that replaced the iron ones in 1972,

The motorcycle is presently part of the George Schott collection, but hopes are it will not be for long. There is no estimate as to how much this particular bike is expected to fetch during the auction.

California Highway Patrol Harley-Davidson EL Knucklehead from 1937

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

The California Highway Patrol (CHP) might very well be the most famous American state law enforcement agency. A big reason for that is the “CHiPs” TV series that ran in the 1970s and 1980s and followed the adventures of two fictional CHP officers.

Set up in 1929, the organization currently covers everything from highway patrol duties to guarding state officials. And an important element the CHP officers use in performing their duties are vehicles, most notably motorcycles.

Presently, most of the two-wheelers serving with the CHP are Harley-Davidsons, with the Electra Glide forming the backbone of the several-hundreds strong fleet since 2013. But the law enforcement agency has always had an interesting love story with the Milwaukee company, and the Knucklehead we have here is proof of that.

What you’re looking at is one of about 1,829 EL motorcycles Harley made in 1937. It was deployed since new with the CHP, and thanks to its current owner, who purchased it in 1994, it now looks pretty much as it did back in the day it served.

The motorcycle lacks police-related hardware, such as a siren, a two-way radio speaker, and of course the red and blue flashers, but it has the right colors, badge, and the 61ci Knucklehead engine in the frame.

The bike is presently part of a collection called John Bernard Estate, and was for a long time on display at various museums, including its present location, the National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa.

But hopes are it will not be so for long. It is going under the hammer at the hands of Mecum in Las Vegas at the end of the month. The two-wheeler is going with an original historical 1944 California pink slip, but no estimate on how much it is expected to fetch is given.