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AUCTION LIVE: 396-Powered 1950 Mercury Eight Coupe Custom

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This 1950 Mercury Eight coupe was modified under previous ownership by Bo Huff Customs of Carbon County, Utah. The car is finished in black with orange accents over black leather upholstery, and power is from a replacement 396ci V8 paired with a replacement four-speed automatic transmission. Additional modifications include a chopped roof with a tan canvas cover, a replacement grille and bumpers, shaved trim and door handles, and stacked headlights as well as a hydraulically adjustable suspension system, four-wheel powered disc brakes, and Vintage Air climate control. The current owner acquired the car in 2012, and subsequent service involved replacing the spark plugs and changing the oil. This modified Mercury Eight is offered by the seller on behalf of the owner with a South Carolina title in the current owner’s name listing the car as a Mercury 505.

BID ON IT NOW: Less than 4 hours left

https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1950-mercury-custom-2/

Tell ’em Bikernt.com sent ya !!

BaT Essentials:

Seller: JimmiVonHaas

Location: Taylors, South Carolina 29687

Listing Details

  • Chassis: 50SL86985
  • 272 Miles Shown, TMU
  • Replacement 396ci V8
  • Replacement Four-Speed Automatic Transmission
  • Black Paint w/Orange Stripes
  • Tan Canvas Roof Cover
  • Black Leather Upholstery
  • Chrome-Finished Steel Wheels
  • Disc Brakes
  • Hydraulically Adjustable Suspension
  • Chopped Roof
  • Frenched Taillights
  • Shaved Trim & Handles
  • Replacement Bumpers & Grille
  • Vintage Air Climate Control
  • Power Window & Locks
  • Jensen Cassette Stereo
Private Party or Dealer: Private Party
Lot #124468

The body was shaved and tunneled with a chopped roof, stacked headlights, and frenched taillights before being refinished in black with orange side stripes under prior ownership. Additional modifications include a tan canvas roof cover, spotlights, and decorative side pipes. The grille was reportedly sourced from a 1953 DeSoto, while the split bumpers are from a 1956 Pontiac. The left rocker panel is dented, crazing is visible in the paint, and scratches are present on the body panels.

Chrome-finished steel wheels wear polished hub caps and are wrapped in Coker classic wide whitewall tires that show age. Stopping power is from four-wheel powered disc brakes with red-finished calipers. The car has been channeled over the chassis, and equipment includes front and rear suspension components that were reportedly sourced from a Chevrolet Monte Carlo and are hydraulically adjustable.

The cabin houses swiveling front bucket seats and a rear bench that were reupholstered in black leather under prior ownership. A color-coordinated headliner, door panels, and carpets have been fitted, and cedar wood trim accents the center console and armrests. Additional features include Vintage Air climate control, power windows and locks, a glove box, sound-damping material, and a Jensen cassette stereo. The dome lamp lens is stained.

The four-spoke woodgrain steering wheel is mounted on a tilt-adjustable powered steering column, and center-mounted instrumentation includes a 120-mph speedometer as well as gauges for oil pressure, coolant temperature, voltage, and fuel level. The six-digit odometer shows 272 miles, approximately 25 of which were added by the seller. Total mileage is unknown.

The 396ci V8 was installed under prior ownership and is equipped with a finned Hilborn-style air intake, a Holley carburetor, Mickey Thompson valve covers, and an aluminum radiator. Service under current ownership included changing the oil and replacing the spark plugs.

Power is sent to the rear wheels through a replacement four-speed automatic transmission. Corrosion is visible on the underside, and additional underbody photos are presented in the gallery below.

Magazine articles featuring the car are included in the sale.

The South Carolina title carries an Exempt brand, and a reproduction VIN tag is affixed to the firewall.

396-Powered 1950 Mercury Eight Coupe Custom

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Get the gear– get riding— its still sunny in your heart and soul.
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OLD YELLER: Still A Viable Street Machine

By General Posts

by Buck Lovell with photos from Buck Lovell

This little Yellow Bobber sold for above $15,000 dollars at a recent Mecums auction

Most motorcycles in America in the early 1950s were no nonsense, kick-start only iron with few if any frills or comfort features as we have today. America’s modern super-speed interstate highway system wasn’t even a twinkle in President Eisenhower’s eye, and gasoline was less than 15 cents per gallon almost everywhere across the Unites States. Two wheeled motorcycles were economic, fair-weather transportation for those men and women who loved the sun on their face and the wind in their hair!

Click here to read this photo feature by master photographer Buck Lovell on Bikernet.com

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Daytona Edition of the Flying Piston Benefit

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Revving up for a Good Cause: 2023 Flying Piston Benefit Charity Breakfast and Auction

by Prince Jeffrey Najar

Each year, I produce the Daytona edition of the Flying Piston Benefit Builder Breakfast and online silent auction with industry maven, Marilyn Stemp.

This year it was a tale of 2 rides, the cold one and the hot one. The cold ride is where all the trouble happened and, well, I’m still thawing out.

Click here to read this photo feature event coverage only on Bikernet.com

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World’s Oldest Production Motorcycle Sells For $212,000

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This example may be the earliest one still in existence in 2023.
World’s Oldest Production Motorcycle Sells For $212,000 At Auction

by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

The early days of motorcycling were a wild time. From strapping engines to the frames of unsuspecting bicycles, to steam-powered velocipedes, people were eager to find new and improved ways to get around. New technological frontiers are typically a time of great experimentation, and this era in motorcycling was certainly no different.

In February, 2023, an extremely interesting piece of that early history went up for auction at Bonhams Paris The machine in question is an extremely rare 1894 Hildebrand & Wolfmüller, which bears the reputation of “the first powered two-wheeler to enter series production,” as well as the first vehicle to be called by the name “motorcycle” (or “motorrad,” in German). It ultimately sold for €195,500, or roughly $212,000 Yankee dollars including the premium.

Brothers Heinrich and Wilhelm Hildebrand set to work crafting their first powered two-wheeler designs during the crucial transition between steam-powered and gasoline-powered vehicles. As the story goes, they started with steam, but eventually turned to a two-stroke design in cooperation with two other individuals: Alois Wolfmüller and his mechanic Hans Geisenhof.

Development is often an iterative process, and what the team eventually came up with to make this production vehicle was a water-cooled, four-stroke, parallel twin engine with what must have been a breathtaking displacement at the time: 1,489cc. This reportedly made about 2.5 brake horsepower at 240 RPM, and resulted in a machine that could top out around 30 miles per hour. That might seem terribly slow in 2023, but was likely more impressive in a time when motor vehicles (let alone faster ones) weren’t so commonplace.

If this machine seems like an alien contraption to your modern eyes, that’s because it’s quite different from any motorcycle we know today. Here’s how the Bonhams listing describes some key features of this bike:

“Steam locomotive practice was further recalled by the long connecting rods directly linking the pistons to the rear wheel, which opened and closed the mechanical exhaust valves via pushrods actuated by a cam on the hub. The latter contained an epicyclic reduction gear and there was no crankshaft flywheel, the solid disc rear wheel serving that purpose. Rubber bands assisted the pistons on the return stroke. Fuel was fed from the tank to a surface carburetor and thence via atmospheric inlet valves to the cylinders where it was ignited by platinum hot tube, as developed by Daimler. The box-like rear mudguard acted as a reservoir for the engine’s cooling water, while one of the frame tubes served as the oil tank. The tires, manufactured under license from Dunlop by Veith in Germany, were the first of the pneumatic variety ever fitted to a motorcycle,” it reads.

Also, this bike didn’t have a clutch. Instead, the starting procedure involved pushing it until the engine fired up, then jumping into the saddle and riding it wherever you needed to go. (Perhaps it wasn’t only the world’s first production motorcycle, but also the world’s first production exercise bike?)

The design for this bike was patented in 1894, and the machines were produced both in Munich, by parent company Motofahrrad-Fabrik Hildebrand & Wolfmüller , and also under license in France as La Petrolette. People of the time were reportedly optimistic about the new bikes, but their optimism was soon tinged with regret and demands for their money back due to starting difficulties and unsatisfactory running performance. By 1897, after French licensee Duncan, Superbie et Cie lost a court case with a customer about these issues, both the German and French concerns went bust. It’s unclear how many of these machines were ever made, but it’s believed to be somewhere between 800 and 2,000 in total.

This specific example is believed to be the earliest numbered example still existing today, with frame number 619 and engine number 69. It was last sold in 1990, and documentation that accompanies this sale includes papers from that time, as well as period marque literature (mostly, if not all, in German). The tires and bands have been replaced (and one of the bands needs replacing yet again), but this bike is otherwise in mostly untouched condition—which makes it even more remarkable, given the fact that it’s almost 130 years old.

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Extremely Rare 1908 Harley Strap Tank Auctioned for $850,000

By General Posts

by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

It’s one of the finest examples of this model known to still exist in 2023.

When you’re talking about highly collectible motorcycles, there are a few makes that consistently come up. Vincent. Brough Superior. Henderson. Occasionally, a rarity among rarities makes its way to the auction block, such as a Crocker Big Twin, or, if you’re really lucky, a Harley-Davidson Strap Tank. The latter extremely rare machine is what just took the honor of the top-selling bike at the 2023 Mecum Las Vegas auction, and one of the coolest things about it is that it’s lived in Wisconsin for its entire life.

As you can see in the video, as the bid amount quickly increased into the high six figure range, it still hadn’t met reserve. When it got to $850,000, the seller decided to lift the reserve—and indeed, that’s the selling price at which this pristine, beautifully restored, 1908 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank crossed the stage.

Under Mecum’s listing of its top ten bikes from this auction, it gives the total price (including all applicable fees) as $935,000.

For those unfamiliar, the Strap Tank is most definitely one of the most important models in Harley history—if not the most important.

This model is what evolved from William S. Harley and Arthur Davidson’s initial shed builds, and was the first model to roll out of the Chestnut Street—later Juneau Avenue—factory. It quickly established a reputation for the brand’s builds that endured through the decades.

As the story goes, 150 Strap Tanks rolled out of the factory in 1907, increasing to 450 in 1908. Of those 450 bikes produced in 1908, fewer than a dozen are thought to still exist in 2023—and far fewer in as correct a condition as this one.

What makes this particular example so special? As the story goes, Milwaukee businessman David Uihlein, heir to the Schlitz Brewing fortune, discovered it in a barn about 70 miles outside Milwaukee, all the way back in 1941. This bike was complete—so he brought it home, and kept it there for the following 66 years. It was restored at some point by noted vintage Harley restoration expert Paul Freehill, and the original tank, wheels, engine belt pulley, seat cover, and muffler sleeve were included in this auction.

Watch the Auction Video here:

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Charitable Custom Motorcycles & Wonderful Sponsors

By General Posts

by Jack McIntyre

At Johnny Mac’s Chopper House in Philadelphia, our focus has been on building motorcycles for qualified charities, and so far it’s been terrific. We have one rule when choosing a charity, it has to support the military, kids, or dogs. We then work closely with the charity to handle advertising, social media, colors, and more.

We had HUGE success with our first charity build for Philabundance in Philadelphia, only to be followed up by our latest Tunnel to Towers Foundation Custom Build at the MECUM Auction in Las Vegas 1/28/22, which brought in $41,000.00.

What’s up next?

Click Here to discover the cool Choppers & Charities: a Photo Feature Article.

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RIDING FREE for 25 Years

Modern-Day Incarnation of Lincoln Cosmo Carrera Panamericana

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Delightful tribute Rally Car showcases masterful rally mods

This Cosmopolitan is a modern-day recreation, made to race in the late 1990s and now boasting a significant number of accolades.

Editor’s Note:

Plus this stinkin’ Lincoln is directly connected to Bikernet.com and 5-Ball Racing.

This car brings back memories. I was a crew member/co-captain with its new owner Dr. Christian Reichardt or Doctor Hamster to you in 2005. It was originally raced in the ‘70s and the body was modified in the ‘90s. We worked on the classic mechanically and prepared the car for the 2005 La Carrera Pan Americana road race in the vintage class. We brought a 2nd Place trophy home.

— Bandit

CLICK HERE to get Bandit’s insight into this unique Carrera Panamericana.

While you are at it read the Original Photo Feature Article from Hagerty.com at that link as well.

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4 Major Motorcycle Trends Sir Hagerty Witnessed at the Mecum Auction

By General Posts

by James Hewitt from Hagerty.com

Values have skyrocketed of late in the motorcycle world but there were still deals to be had.

The spending frenzy at Scottsdale’s January auto auctions may have garnered the headlines, but just a short road trip away in Las Vegas, Mecum’s motorcycle auction put on a similarly spectacular show for the two-wheeled crowd.

We reported last year that millennials prefer classic & vintage Harleys over Indians.

Knuckleheads are benefitting from broader, multi-generational appeal, and demand is increasing because younger buyers continue to move into the market while older ones aren’t leaving.

CLICK HERE To Read this Classic Motorcycle Market Report on Bikernet.com

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