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International Motorcycling Advocate Deb Butitta Dies in Crash

By General Posts

June 4, 2022: International Motorcycling Advocate Deb Butitta Dies in Arizona Crash

It is with a heavy heart and a great sense of loss that the Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) shares the passing of Deborah Butitta. Deb had been committed to serving and protecting motorcyclists’ rights at the state, federal and international levels during the last four decades. Deb was taken from us due to internal injuries suffered in a motorcycle crash after a truck turned left in front of her on June 3, 2022.

Deb was particularly active with ABATE of Arizona, holding many different offices through the years, and in 2001 was selected as the first designated lobbyist for the Arizona Confederation of Motorcycle Clubs (AZCMC). Deb was a member of many state motorcyclists’ rights organizations, including the MMA of Arizona. She also served on the MRF Board of Directors for many years and was instrumental in the formation of MRF A&E (Awareness and Education), a 501(c)(3) charitable, non-profit organization created to assist the MRF in providing resources to promote motorcycle awareness and ‘share the road’ programs, along with all aspects of motorcycle safety education including rider training. A highly successful businesswoman in her own right, Deb was extremely well connected, not only in the motorcycling community and industry, but legislatively and in some very influential social circles as well. These relationships were of incredible value to the bikers of Arizona and the entire country.

Deb’s accolades and awards are many, including being inducted into the MRF Hall of Fame in 2020 and the Sturgis Hall of Fame and Museum in 2021. Deb is a past winner of the MRF President’s Cup (2003), the MRF Founder’s Award (2017), and the MRF Lifetime Achievement Award (2020). Among her many other duties, Deb served as the MRF’s State Representative for Arizona for 14 years. For several years now, the MRF has given the ‘Deborah Butitta Award’ to it’s highest performing State Representative in her honor.

A true leader, Deb had a profound influence on many of her fellow activists. Few people have dedicated so much of their life or contributed as much to motorcycling as Deb Butitta. Personally and professionally, her passing leaves a tremendous void in our “family”.

About Motorcycle Riders Foundation: The Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) provides leadership at the federal level for states’ motorcyclists’ rights organizations as well as motorcycle clubs and individual riders.

Visit: http://mrf.org

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Cameraman collides with Batman’s motorcycle, filming halted

By General Posts

by Jeremy Mathai from https://www.slashfilm.com

‘The Flash’ movie Production Halted Following Accident on Set.

The long, arduous journey to get The Flash into development and finally begin production has unfortunately met another setback, this time interrupting the actual filming of the movie. Reports out of the UK indicate that an accident has occurred on the set of The Flash while shooting on location in Glasgow, causing the apparent hospitalization of a member of the camera crew.

Glasgow Live is reporting that a camera operator was involved in a collision with a stunt man in full Batman garb who was riding atop the Batcycle in the Andy Muschietti-directed production. Eyewitnesses claim that the cameraman, on a motorcycle of his own, accidentally collided with the Batcycle from the rear while racing down one of the city streets in an attempt to capture the action up close. There has been no official word from Warner Bros. just yet, but filming immediately paused while the crew member had to be extricated from underneath the vehicle and subsequently received medical attention. All indications are that the injured party was then treated at a local hospital, while an ambulance was seen leaving the site. However, no other details or updates are known at this time.

We recently reported on pictures taken from the UK set that showed off the newly-redesigned Batcycle that will appear in the multiverse-spanning crossover film, with the stuntman’s Batman outfit pointing towards an appearance by Ben Affleck‘s costumed crime-fighter. Michael Keaton is also set to make his grand return to the DC universe, having seemingly hung up the cowl for good in Batman Returns nearly 30 years ago.

Somewhere in the middle of all this action, presumably, will be Ezra Miller‘s Barry Allen. The Flashpoint-inspired film will recount the complications that spring up as a result of some serious timeline shenanigans on Barry’s part. In the famous comic series, the Flash travels back in time to prevent the death of his mother, but these actions only create another splintered universe and alternate timeline.

As of yet, it is unknown just how much of a setback this will cause production. Obviously, the health and safety of the injured crewmember are of paramount importance and we can only hope for his full recovery. Blockbuster film sets are notoriously dangerous places to work, which is why the director and producers work overtime with all involved parties on multiple levels of production to ensure a safe working environment. We’ll provide more updates as they come in.

After a motorcycle accident, this man gained 60 pounds. Here’s how he lost the weight

By General Posts

by Stephanie Thurrott from https://www.nbcnews.com/

After a motorcycle accident left Jeremy Bromwell sidelined and inactive, he learned to eat more mindfully and is now healthier than ever.

Name: Jeremy Bromwell

Age: 38

Residence: Full-time RVer based in Florida for the winter

Job: Founder, Your Marketing Explorer

Family status: Single

Peak weight: 243 pounds

Current weight: 174 pounds

Height: 5’11”

Jeremy Bromwell always made it a point to stay active and maintain a healthy weight — he lifted weights at his gym and ran 5ks, 10ks and a half marathon. “[Exercise] was something I did pretty regularly to help keep my weight in check, so I wouldn’t be giving up the experience when I sat down to a meal at a restaurant,” he says.

That all changed in October 2014, when Bromwell was riding his motorcycle home from work in San Francisco and was hit by an SUV. The accident shattered both of the bones in his lower leg. He was expected to recover in about six months, but his bone became infected.

“Talk about adding some mental and emotional barriers on top of the physical. At the six-month mark I was supposed to be back to normal. That got blown up — it became ‘wait and see, we don’t know’. My brain was not able to wrap around it,” he says. Bromwell needed 10 surgeries before that bone healed properly, and the last one was performed in December 2016, more than two years after his accident.

“The motorcycle accident was the first time I had physical limitations imposed that I couldn’t work out on my own,” he says. “I lost control of the activities I could and couldn’t do. That was where I really started to struggle.”

He splurged as he healed

As Bromwell recovered, he concedes that he overdid it. “For a long time, I couldn’t do the things I enjoyed. As I started to get more mobility back and I was able to drive myself, I over-indexed for all the things I hadn’t been able to do, whether that was a glass of wine or a restaurant or both,” he says.

Samantha Cassetty, MS, RD, a nutrition and weight-loss expert with a virtual nutrition counseling practice based in New York City, understands the desire to turn to food after an event like Bromwell’s. “He went through a very tragic and challenging experience, and food can be such a source of pleasure and comfort. It’s the quickest route to feeling better,” she says.

Bromwell says his ramped-up social life contributed to his weight gain. “Once I could start to meet friends and colleagues out of the house it was nice to do that. That, combined with not being able to do things like weights a couple of days and cardio three to five days, was the catalyst for the weight gain.”

Cassetty points out that while exercise isn’t as useful for weight loss, it’s very helpful for weight maintenance. “So, the decline in activity levels can definitely promote weight gain,” she says.

Bromwell gained 30 pounds, and during a four-month long road trip with his partner in summer 2017, trying restaurants in different U.S. cities, he added another 30 pounds.

Back in California in November 2017, Bromwell and his partner split up. “I was single for the first time in four years and I was really heavy. It’s amazing — when you see yourself every day you don’t see yourself changing. You look back and think, ‘What the hell happened to me?’”

He changed his life and focused on his health

Inspired by the summer road trip, Bromwell decided to try living and working on the road full-time. He also decided he needed to get serious about losing weight.

“I had a lot of leg pain from carrying around the extra weight. I wanted to move forward in a happier, healthier way and get back to my pre-accident weight, even though it seemed like an infinity away,” he says.

Cassetty recognizes that a lot of people, like Bromwell, want to get back to a previous weight. But focusing on the scale can be a challenge. “The number on the scale is often beyond your control — stress, sleep, age, medications, can all play a role,” she says.

She recommends goals you can control, like exercising twice a week, cooking two dinners at home, or meal prepping for an hour over the weekend. “When you focus on a goal that you can accomplish, it can lead to behavior change and that will typically result in achieving a more comfortable weight,” she says.

With a background in digital marketing and analytics, Bromwell loves tracking and understanding data. He also knew he wanted a healthy lifestyle, not a diet where he felt forced to give things up. “I learned enough about my body through all those surgeries that I knew I needed to listen to my body,” he says. “I wanted to make healthy choices in a mindful way.”

He started using the Lose It! app to log his food, bring together data about his activity and sleep, and track his progress toward his goal of losing a pound a week.

Cassetty says this type of tracking can be a good tool. “For those who appreciate the data and feedback, studies show that this form of self-monitoring can be very effective for weight loss, and research shows that many people don’t have any problems with it,” she says. It’s a personal choice, though. “Some people find it tedious and it can lead to an unhealthy obsession about food,” she says.

He logged everything he consumed

Focusing on portion size made a big difference for Bromwell. “I had to get back in the habit of cooking for one,” he says. “I had to figure out on the road how to make better choices. I had to balance the experiences of meeting people, seeing new places, and traveling solo with affordable and easier-to-eat healthy cooking.”

He explored farmers’ markets to find fresh, healthy ingredients. He also started weighing his food. “I’m not a person who wants to give something up. I’m more deliberate and more conscious. Instead of a high-calorie, high-carb meal I’ll have something steamed, fresher and leaner,” he says.

On holidays and vacations he still tracked what he ate, but he gave himself the flexibility to go over budget.

He became more mindful about his alcohol consumption

“If I wanted to have a glass of wine with dinner, I needed to have the calories available for that through more activity or by giving something else up. These things are all interconnected,” he says. “I do enjoy a glass of wine, but I’ve given up a lot of that now, too. It doesn’t actually give me as much satisfaction as the cost on the calorie side of things. It’s empty carbs so it’s much less frequent.”

Cassetty applauds how mindful Bromwell has been along his journey. “Throughout this process and by using the app, he’s learning how to eat foods that fill him up and make him feel better, and he has also learned what trade-offs he’s willing to make. It’s not about restriction, but about figuring out what’s important to him and what’s not,” she says.

He weighed himself just once a week

“I was not going to step on the scale every day. I had to do what I needed to do consistently, and get on the scale one time a week max. I was looking for bigger trends over time,” he says.

Cassetty says weighing yourself is another form of self-monitoring that has pros and cons. “It can be very effective if it doesn’t trigger any emotional distress. Some people find it helpful to weigh themselves more frequently. For those who feel any sort of negativity when hopping on the scale, there are other tools to consider,” she says. Routine lab monitoring is one option.

After 13 months, Bromwell was within a pound of his goal weight. “I did not feel like I was giving anything up. I was more conscious and more deliberate about my weight and my body and what I was putting into it,” he says.

Cassetty is thrilled to see Bromwell reaching his goal. She notes, though, that everyone’s weight-loss journey is different. “I don’t want people to compare their personal weight loss journey to Jeremy’s. Jeremy reached a point where he was eating more purposefully and healthfully, and he didn’t feel restricted or as though he couldn’t participate in a full life that included social activities and travel. Those are the feelings you’re going for — that you’re able to enjoy life fully and that you’re also able take care of yourself and nourish your body well. This point is different for everyone, so you need to find that magic spot for yourself,” she says.

Now Bromwell is on year three of full-time travel and work, and he continues to track what he eats. He celebrated his 37th birthday by climbing Crosier Mountain in Rocky Mountain National Park. And last year he traveled to India to be trained as a yoga teacher. “Yoga is something that helped me get back a lot of my range of motion and flexibility. I see a connection to yoga and body mechanics and how joints work. It helped me get back to a functional place in my life.”

Jeremy’s typical meals

After his trip to India, Bromwell gave up meat and eggs. He’s focused on the right balance of protein, carbs and fat. He starts his day with yoga and doesn’t eat breakfast until around 11 a.m., so he’s close to following an intermittent fasting schedule. “It’s a good idea to eat within an hour of a workout,” Cassetty says.

Breakfast: Greek yogurt with granola and fruit, or a smoothie.

Lunch: Salad, roasted vegetables, or leftovers from dinner morphed into something different.

Dinner: Tofu or bean protein, curry in the Instant Pot, or grilled veggies and a black bean burger. He still goes out to eat two or three times a week.

Cassetty says Bromwell has a nice start to his day and a solid emphasis on veggies with these meals. If he wants to further amp up his nutrients, he could add some nut or seed butter or chopped nuts to breakfast, and some protein at lunch.

“Tofu, lentils and chickpeas are great plant-based options. Hemp seeds, with 10 grams of protein per three tablespoon serving, are another way to boost protein content in meals. Jeremy can sprinkle some on top of his roasted veggies,” she says.