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Can you Ride with a Pet on your Motorcycle?

By General Posts

ASK A TROOPER: “Motorcycle Riding Dog”
by Ryan Janke from https://kfgo.com/

Question: Can someone with a motorcycle permit have their small dog riding on the motorcycle or would that be considered a passenger? We have already purchased a helmet and leather jacket for this lucky pup! Thank you for your response.

Answer: First of all, where will this dog be seated and how? I see less issues if you are talking about a motorcycle side car or a motorcycle trailer equipped with a kennel. But if you are talking about on the actual motorcycle with you, I don’t think this would be very safe for you or your pet.

If you are going to carry a passenger, there are a few key items to keep in mind:

Equip and Adjust Your Motorcycle:

  • A passenger seat and footrests are required by law.
  • Adjust tire pressure and suspension settings for the additional weight. (Do not exceed weight limitations specified in the owner’s manual.)
  • Readjust mirrors.

Passenger Preparation:

  • Provide protective riding gear: eye protection, a DOT-approved helmet, boots, gloves, long riding pants and a high-visibility motorcycle jacket.
  • Passengers under age 18 are required by law to wear a DOT-approved helmet.
  • Small children are required by law to be able to reach both footrests with their feet while sitting on the passenger seat.

Getting On and Off the Motorcycle:

  • Start the engine before the passenger gets on.
  • Squeeze the front brake while the passenger gets on or off the bike.
  • Passengers should get off the bike before the operator.

Passenger Safety Tips:

  • Hold operator’s waist or hips, or motorcycle’s passenger hand-holds.
  • Keep feet on footrests at all times, including while stopped.
  • Keep hands and feet away from hot or moving parts.
  • When turning, look over the operator’s shoulder in the direction of the turn.
  • Avoid turning around or making sudden moves that might affect operation.
  • If crossing an obstacle, rise off the seat keeping your feet on the foot pegs with knees slightly bent and allow legs to absorb the shock upon impact.

Operator Safety Tips:

  • A passenger will affect handling due to extra weight and independent motion.
  • Braking sooner with greater pressure may be necessary.
  • Use extra caution in a corner.
  • Allow more time and space for passing.
  • Be ready to counter the effects of wind.
  • Avoid extreme speeds and dramatic lean angles.

If you have any questions concerning traffic related laws or issues in Minnesota, send your questions to Trp. Jesse Grabow – Minnesota State Patrol at 1000 Highway 10 West, Detroit Lakes, MN 56501-2205. (You can follow him on Twitter @MSPPIO_NW).

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Why UPS Drivers Don’t Turn Left And You Probably Shouldn’t Either

By General Posts

from https://www.iflscience.com

It might seem strange, but UPS delivery vans don’t always take the shortest route between stops. The company gives each driver a specific route to follow and that includes a policy that drivers should never turn through oncoming traffic (that’s left in countries where they drive on the right and vice versa) unless absolutely necessary. This means that routes are sometimes longer than they have to be. So, why do they do it?

Every day, along with thousands of other companies, UPS solves versions of the vehicle routing problem. In these mathematical problems, you are given a set of points and the distances between them, and you have to find the best route(s) to travel through all of them. Best is usually defined as the route with the shortest overall distance.

Vehicle routing problems are used to organise many things, from coping with more delivery trucks in cities and hailing taxis to catching chickens on a farm. The concept was introduced by George Dantzig in 1959. Over 50 years later, and despite a large body of scientific research, scientists are still looking for new ways to tackle the problem.

UPS have moved away from trying to find the shortest route and now look at other criteria to optimise the journey. One of their methods is to try and avoid turning through oncoming traffic at a junction. Although this might be going in the opposite direction of the final destination, it reduces the chances of an accident and cuts delays caused by waiting for a gap in the traffic, which would also waste fuel.

UPS have designed their vehicle routing software to eliminate as many left-hand turns as possible (in countries with right-hand traffic). Typically, only 10% of the turns are left turns. As a result, the company claims it uses 10m gallons less fuel, emits 20,000 tonnes less carbon dioxide and delivers 350,000 more packages every year. The efficiency of planning routes with its navigation software this way has even helped the firm cut the number of trucks it uses by 1,100, bringing down the company’s total distance travelled by 28.5m miles – despite the longer routes.

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