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Music, Meaning & Motorcycling

By General Posts

Rocking On Requires Some Rolling

by Wayfarer

Sound has more impact on life than we know or credit it for. Sound is not just significant to humans but many lifeforms.

We now have turned sound to music. W have a whole range of music genres to choose from – for entertainment, for ‘edu-taiment’ of kids, for relaxing, for hitting the gym, for romantic night dinners, for wild parties and more.

In this article, there are also a few examples offered of some myths & inspirations from iconic Rock group ‘Creedence Clearwater Revival’ music & songs.

Often people assume meanings of songs based on lyrics, music style or other socio-cultural information from the period when a song first appeared.

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Road Glide Ultra Trimming

By General Posts

She went from a 100lb barge to a much lighter and sleeker machine.

Bassani Exhaust, Legends Suspension, and V&H Fuelpak
by Johnny White

My 2016 Road Glide Ultra FLTRU has been a reliable ride that has endured 70,000 miles without any major issues.

One of the first things a guy wants to change is the sound – as a new Harley sounds great until you hear it next to one with a tuned exhaust system.

The change now vs. days of old is it’s no longer change your pipes and re-jet the carb.

Now, with electronic fuel injection, ‘void warranty’ and emission controls, it can seem a bit daunting if you don’t know where to look.

Well, it’s easier today than most realize and it doesn’t require a ton of time, knowledge, or money … well, it does require some money.

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Vance & Hines Launches Exhaust for BMW R1250 GS Motorcycles

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Vance & Hines Launches Exhaust for BMW R1250 GS Motorcycles and

Announces New Proving Grounds Facility in Mojave Desert

Santa Fe Springs CA – October 1, 2021 – Vance & Hines, America’s premier manufacturer of motorcycle performance equipment, today introduced its first exhaust product for BMW R 1250 GS and GS Adventure motorcycles. In addition, the company announced the opening of a new Off-Road Proving Grounds in the Mojave Desert.

The exhaust for BMW adventure touring motorcycles (ADV) is the company’s second product in this category, following the recent announcement of an exhaust designed for the new Harley-Davidson Pan America.

The Vance & Hines Hi-Output Adventure 500 is the largest capacity exhaust ever made by Vance & Hines, manufactured with a 5-inch diameter, high-grade, 304 stainless steel tube. The system features a brushed, works-style finish, a CNC-machined, billet aluminum endcap, black heat shield, stainless mid-pipe, spring clip assembly, and Vance & Hines new adventure badging, while having a lower weight than the stock exhaust. The stepped exhaust delivers smooth tractable torque throughout the powerband. The glass-wrapped, perforated baffle core design delivers a rich, smooth rumble while still meeting SAE J2825 sound level standards. In addition, the system is 50-state emissions compliant.

The Hi-Output Adventure 500 will be shown to riders at the BMW Motorad GS Trophy Qualifier USA West this week. The challenge is one of two US qualifying events to select riders to compete in the International GS Trophy 2022, the ultimate adventure riding skills competition in Albania next year. Vance & Hines staff will help support the event which is at RawHyde Adventures in Castaic, California.

“BMW riders are the core of the ADV bike world and we know they will love this new Vance & Hines exhaust,” said Mike Kennedy, president of Vance & Hines. “More performance, a great look and more rider comfort are attributes every rider can appreciate.”

The Vance & Hines Hi-Output Adventure 500 is priced at $699.99 and will be available late in 2021.

Vance & Hines Off-Road Proving Grounds to Open Late this Year

Vance & Hines also announced the creation of the Vance & Hines Off-Road Proving Grounds (ORPG) at the well-known Zakar Overland Terrain Park and Event Center in the Mojave Desert, about two hours from the company’s Santa Fe Springs, California headquarters. The ORPG will be the company’s private test site for off-road products. The ORPG will include a test lab and service facility where company R&D staff will develop and evaluate future Vance & Hines Off-Road products.

“We are focused on bringing Vance & Hines exhilaration to all types of off-road riders. Our new proving grounds is an example of our commitment to create a steady flow of great products for off-road fans,” continued Kennedy.

Follow Vance & Hines social media for updates from the GS Trophy Qualifier USA West this weekend. Facebook, Instagram, YouTube

About Vance & Hines
The Vance & Hines brand has always been about enhancing the exhilaration of the motorcycle ride. It started over 40 years ago, when Terry Vance and Byron Hines were two young enthusiasts in the fledgling Southern California motorcycle drag race scene. Terry always wanted to go faster and Byron knew how to make that happen. In short order, their on-track success and innovation drew the attention of other racers, riders and motorcycle manufacturers, which ultimately translated to commercial demand for their products and services. Today, the Company’s mission and activity is the same; make bikes go faster on the racetrack and take those learnings to make impactful products for riders around the world. Since the Company’s inception in 1979, it has run factory race programs in partnership with Suzuki, Yamaha, Ducati and Harley-Davidson in drag racing, road racing and flat track. Vance & Hines is based in Santa Fe Springs CA and has its Racing Development Center in Brownsburg IN. Learn more about the company’s history and products at www.vanceandhines.com.

Vance & Hines Adventure Hi-Output 450 Exhaust for H-D Pan America

By General Posts

by Silvian Secara from https://www.autoevolution.com

It certainly looks great on a technical level, but just wait ‘til you hear the way it sounds.

With its drool-worthy design and brutal power output figures, the Harley-Davidson Pan America is an absolute legend straight out of the box. Its 1,252cc Revolution Max V-twin is capable of producing as much as 150 hp at 9,000 spins per minute, along with 94 pound-feet (128 Nm) of feral twist lower down the rpm range. Needless to say, Milwaukee’s mighty adventure bike isn’t messing around, alright?

However, riders will always be looking for ways to improve their beloved machines, regardless of how sensational the stock motorcycle might be. For instance, replacing a two-wheeler’s standard exhaust system with a high-grade aftermarket alternative is not only going to extract some additional oomph from its engine, but it will also make your two-wheeler sound even more thrilling.

If you happen to be the happy owner of a Pan America, you’ll definitely want to hear about the latest plumbing solution from Vance & Hines! To be more specific, we’re talking about the Adventure Hi-Output 450 – a complete stainless-steel exhaust that’s six pounds (2.7 kg) lighter than Harley’s original module.

When equipped with the Hi-Output setup, the bike’s liquid-cooled V-twin engine will go about delivering an additional 5 hp at the rear wheel, along with 5 pound-feet (6.8 Nm) of extra torque. Vance & Hines’ premium pipes are compliant with emission standards in all 50 states, as well as SAE’s J2825 noise regulations.

The muffler – which sports a CNC-machined billet aluminum end cap – is also compatible with Harley-Davidson’s factory center stand and saddlebags, while the exhaust headers improve boot clearance for the rider.

Finally, the aptly named Adventure Hi-Output 450 is priced at $599.99, and it can be ordered directly from the manufacturer’s official website.

For your viewing pleasure, Vance & Hines created a promotional video portraying just how sweet this bad boy looks and sounds on the Pan Am.

BMW Motorrad & legendary music brand Marshall enter strategic partnership

By General Posts

from Press Release at BMWgroup.com and from http://www.tradearabia.com/

BMW Motorrad has agreed a long-term partnership with world-renowned British company Marshall Amplification, to raise the innovation and quality of BMW Motorrad sound systems.

The legendary Marshall spirit and the development power of BMW Motorrad will in future be reflected in new innovative products for motorcycles and music, especially in the BMW Motorrad Heritage segment.

For 60 years, Marshall, originally from Hanwell, London, now based in Bletchley, Milton Keynes (UK), have produced legendary guitar amplifiers used by the world’s best musicians. Since 2012 it has expanded their audio quality into award winning headphones and active speakers designed for music lovers.

PRESS RELEASE:
Innovation and premium quality for future BMW Motorrad sound systems.

Munich. Riding a motorcycle while listening to music – both fit well together, as they promise deep emotional experiences and intense pleasure on two wheels. It is not for nothing that generations of artists have dedicated their songs to the experience of motorcycling. “Born to be Wild” is a notable example.

To ensure that beats and basses perfectly complement the ear while riding, BMW Motorrad has long been engaged in intensive development work on its sound systems. With its now agreed long-term partnership with world-renowned British company Marshall Amplification, the innovation and quality of BMW Motorrad sound systems are set to reach new heights.

For 60 years, Marshall, originally from Hanwell, London, now based in Bletchley, Milton Keynes (UK), have produced legendary guitar amplifiers used by the world’s best musicians. Since 2012 they have expanded their audio quality into award winning headphones and active speakers designed for music lovers.

The legendary Marshall spirit and the development power of BMW Motorrad will in future be reflected in new innovative products for motorcycles and music, especially in the BMW Motorrad Heritage segment.

BMW Motorrad will present the first new products resulting from this strategic partnership very soon. Stay tuned to find out more about this on 29 July 2021.

MMA & Princeton PD Team Up for Voluntary Sound Check

By General Posts

Your Massachusetts Motorcycle Association is teaming up with the Princeton Police Department to conduct a Voluntary Motorcycle Sound Emissions Check at the Thomas Prince School on Route 62 in Princeton, Massachusetts on July 11, 2020 beginning at 11 AM.

This is a “no enforcement” and no cost awareness event aimed at educating riders and the public regarding the realities and implications of Motorcycle Exhaust emissions, specifically regarding sound levels.

On Tuesday, June 9, your Massachusetts Motorcycle Association was invited to participate in the Princeton Select Board meeting to address growing and continuing concerns among Residents concerning the problems of Motorcycle Sound Emissions and reckless riding in and around the town of Princeton.

Alerted by a MassMotorcycle member to the concerns, numerous potential approaches to tackling what is perceived as an invasion of residents rights to a safe and peaceful weekend were being discussed including Motorcycle Original Equipment Exhaust Enforcement, Traffic Restrictions for Motorcyclists, and other options. Your MassMotorcycle Association immediately contacted the Chief of Police, Michele Powers, to discuss the concerns and approaches. Chief Powers in turn discussed the MassMotorcycle feedback with the Select Board resulting in the invitation to speak with the Select Board at the June 9th Meeting.

In 2009, in response to similar concerns at the time and numerous town warrants and Legislative Bills aimed at addressing the issue, your MassMotorcycle Association created the “When in Town, Throttle Down!©” program to address a wealth of misinformation concerning Motorcycle Exhaust and Sound Issues, specifically aimed at education and awareness of “What’s the Noise about Noise?” The resulting program included a Voluntary Sound Check program, including investing in Sound Testing Equipment and Training. This program has been used with great affect around the Commonwealth in the following 11 years and the “noise” has significantly quieted down since.

This program has since also been used successfully in numerous towns across the Commonwealth, in other States around the Country, and education sessions have been given at regional and national conferences such as the ABATE of Oklahoma S.M.I.L.E. and Motorcycle Riders Foundation Meeting of the Minds.

To be conducted by the MMA in conjunction with the Princeton Police, the Voluntary Sound Check planned for July 11th will be a “no enforcement” awareness-only event. All riders are invited to stop by for a few minutes for a free bottle of water while they learn about the issues concerning Motorcycle Exhaust Sound Emissions, the legal limits of those emissions, whether their motorcycles are within them, and how to potentially control them. The testing takes only a few short moments – far less time than it will take to finish a bottle of water.

A motorcycle that legally passes these tests may still be perceived by some to be “too loud” depending on how the rider operates the motorcycle. Riders are aware that simple modifications regarding RPM control mitigates the motorcycles’ impact and sound emissions levels upon the public. All testing will be conducted according to Registry of Motor Vehicles stationary noise level standards defined by the Code of Massachusetts Regulations.

Non-riders are also invited to stop by to witness the testing and participate in the program.

Your MMA thanks the Princeton Police Department, Chief Powers, and the Princeton Select Board for inviting riders and the public to participate in this event.

For more information, please contact Chairman@MassMotorcycle.org or visit www.MassMotorcycle.org.

BMW’s i4 Electric Concept Comes With a Hans Zimmer Score

By General Posts

Composer Hans Zimmer (right) and his collaborator, BMW sound designer Renzo Vitale, are creating new sounds for the German automaker’s coming wave of electric cars.

 

by Brett Berk from https://www.wired.com

To fill the aural vacuum left by the disappearance of the engine, BMW brought in a ringer.

Thelma & Louise. Rain Man. The Lion King. True Romance. Interstellar. Dunkirk. Each film works to take its viewers on an emotional journey, and each leans on a shared tool: a Hans Zimmer score that serves as a guide, signaling joy, grief, conflict, passion, and more in turn. Now, though, the Oscar-winning composer has turned his talents away from the silver screen and toward the windscreen, where he’s found a new vehicle that could use a touch of emotional direction: the electric car.

Along with more than 500 horsepower and a range of 370 miles, BMW’s all-electric Concept i4 comes with music by Zimmer. These mini scores, which BMW calls “sound worlds,” will ripple out their smoothly vibrant vibrato—think Lionel Hampton on the theremin—when the doors open, as the car starts up, and as the car drives along the road.

On the i4, a concept four-door coupe BMW unveiled earlier this month, the composition morphs slightly based the car’s current driving modes, whether “core,” “sport,” or “efficient.” Zimmer and his collaborator, BMW sound designer Renzo Vitale, call the i4’s soundtrack “Limen,” the word for the threshold below which a stimuli can’t be perceived. It’s all about connecting sound to an emotional experience, which in this case happens to be driving on battery power instead of watching Rafiki hoist Simba into the air.

“We are at a moment in time, with electric cars, when we get to change the whole sonic landscape of everything in a vehicle,” Zimmer says. “We can allow the interiors of cars to set moods and give people an experience, to let people devise their own experience, not be forced into the rumbling of a petrol engine anymore.”

Zimmer’s BMW sound worlds are in concept form now, but the company intends to roll them out over the next few years on more than two dozen electric vehicles. That will start with the production version of the i4, later in 2021.

The key here is that by replacing a rumbling engine with a silent battery and whirring motors, BMW and every other automaker are ditching the sonic experience that has been part of the automobile for more than a century. Car lovers may miss the angry sewing machine clack of a Porsche 911’s flat-six, the throaty grumble and whine of a supercharged Dodge Hemi V8, or the cranial wail of a Ferrari V-12. So might unsuspecting new EV buyers. Without the rumpus of an internal combustion engine, wind roar and tire slap sound all the louder. Zimmer and Vitale strive not just to mask those perturbances but to add delight and uplift to the driving experience.

“Think about your morning, where you have to go and start your car and go to your job,” Zimmer says. “Wouldn’t it be nice if the starting sound was something beautiful, something that put a smile on your face, something that makes your day better?”

The score does sound energizing and engaging, especially in the symphonically crescendoing “sport” mode. It definitely doesn’t sound “rumbling.” But it has some additional, and perhaps questionable, 1970s sci-fi movie overtones.

“There’s this idea that all battery electric cars should sound like a spaceship,” says Jonathan Price, senior research and development manager for Harman, a sound engineering firm that supplies the automotive industry with stereo systems, speakers, noise-cancellation equipment, and electric vehicle soundtracks–both internal and external. “Unfortunately, we don’t know what a spaceship sounds like, right? None of us have ever heard a spaceship before.”

Price is working with consumers as well as client automakers to create a relevant vocabulary for the sounds they will soon be adding to the interiors and—as regulation requires—exteriors of electric vehicles. Following recent research, his team came up with 40 different terms ranging from, as Price says, “something really progressive and futuristic—the pulsing, the whirring, the droning—all the way up to something more aggressive.”

The goal here is not just to update our terminology for car sounds, but to assist with their identification and branding. And there, Price’s work aligns with Zimmer’s. The composer’s parents always drove BMWs, and he could pick out the unique tone of their Bimmer from the balcony. “When I heard that sound,” he says, “everything was fine. Safety. Mom and Dad were home.”

Likewise, contemporary carmakers want to create soundtracks that will help people identify, and identify with, their vehicles. And because this sound is no longer tied to a physical source, like an engine, the potential choices are boundless. Which presents automakers with a new kind of quandary.

“Everybody wants to have something iconic,” Price says, pointing to how Harley Davidson attempted to patent the sound of its motorcycles’ exhaust note. So he wants his team to create the tones that will distinguish a Ford EV from a Hyundai EV. “These need to not only be very unique sounds, they need to be pleasing,” Price says. “Almost like a piece of jewelry that you wear and you hope other people envy.”

Maybe you’re wondering if all of this runs counter to one of the core promises of electric cars, the luxury of silence at speed. But Zimmer argues that for many, silence is unnerving, especially at speed. It can feel uncanny, unmoored from the physical processes that provide acceleration. When Zimmer scored Interstellar, he played on that feeling to convey the awe of rocket travel. The blastoff was the loudest moment of the film, and he blew out a few speaker systems before getting it right. But then the score goes silent. “That’s when everything was at astronomical speeds,” Zimmer says.

In any case, people aren’t seeking total silence. As automakers got better at isolating their customers from engine noise with better insulation, double-paned windows, and active noise cancellation, some customers complained. So manufacturers started piping engine noise into the cabin. BMW went further, playing artificial tunes through the stereo system. Some of this desire for sound at speed, or sound correlated to speed, may be out of habit, a generational quest for the familiar, the way that the keyboards on smart phones still make typing noises, or the cameras on smart phones still make shutter clicks. Zimmer thinks that this may vanish over time. “I think it’s sort of important to leave nostalgia behind,” he says.

Then he reconsiders. “As I said that, I suddenly remembered that every sci-fi movie we have ever seen is incredibly nostalgic.” He points to Blade Runner and Interstellar. Perhaps our dreams of the future are always enmeshed with our fantasies of the past. And our dream cars will always sound like the vehicles from our outmoded idea of the future, like something out of The Jetsons, because that’s what reassures us.

Zimmer sees his automotive work as fostering the way a car catalyzes this kind of big-picture thinking. “A car is such a great place to think, it’s such a great place to dream and have your own thoughts,” he says. “The car is the perfect private place to have constantly great ideas.”

From eardrum bursting motorcycle roar to soft music

By General Posts

by Fadhli Ishak from https://www.nst.com.my/

KUALA LUMPUR: MotoGP rider Franco Morbidelli, who is used to scorching speeds around the world’s racing tracks, including Sepang, has slowed down to a stop — following the Covid-19 pandemic.

Morbidelli, a member of the Petronas Yamaha Sepang Racing Team (SRT), has yet to twist a throttle this season.

The 2018 MotoGP rookie of the Year is now spending his time at home, under lockdown in Italy.

Instead of listening to the eardrum bursting roar of motorcycles’ engines, Morbidelli now tunes into soft music.

He is keeping himself occupied with a new hobby, playing musical instruments, while doing his best to remain physically fit.

“I am trying to stay in shape but without leaving my house. I can go running if I stay within the land boundaries of my household. I am doing that but not much more,” said Morbidelli.

“I have some musical instruments and I am trying to learn to play them. It’s not easy, I need to practise a lot. Maybe by the end of this thing (lockdown) I will be able to play the harmonica and cajon.”

Cajon is a box-shaped, percussive instrument which originated in Peru.

“We should try to enjoy the time that we now have at home and get the maximum from it. We can do things at home that we usually don’t have time to do.”

The MotoGP second, third and fourth rounds in Thailand, Argentina and the United States have been postponed to later this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

My Harley Sounds Like a Sewing Machine, So Many Google Users Say

By General Posts

by Bogdan Popa from https://www.autoevolution.com

If you use Google’s search engine or Microsoft’s Bing to look for information online, you probably know that both services provide you with suggestions (or predictions, as Google calls them) as you type, all in an attempt to make the whole process faster.

So technically, if you go to Google and type “Harley-Davidson,” you should then be provided with a series of suggestions that are based on data like popular keywords that other people used when searching the web and trending topics.

One of the top searches related to Harley-Davidson shows that way too many owners believe their motorcycles “sound like a sewing machine.”

The suggestions for “Harley sounds like a” are “my harley sounds like a sewing machine,” “harley 103 sounds like a sewing machine,” and “honda that sounds like a harley.” Also, Google users also tried to figure out “what motorcycle sounds like a harley.”

On the other hand, if you turn to Microsoft’s Bing for searching the web, the suggestions are a lot different.

If you use the same “my harley sounds like a” keyword, you’re not getting a sewing machine suggestion, but something totally different. “My truck sounds like a harley davidson,” is the suggestion this time, which is a little bit unexpected since Harley-Davidson motorcycles sound pretty cool in the first place anyway.

Bing also has a few other suggestions for the sounds generated by a Harley-Davidson engine. “Harley livewire sounds like jet coming,” one suggestion reads, while another one potentially indicates a problem with the motorcycle because “harley sounds like it grinds on a cold start.”

Google calls these suggestions “predictions” because the whole system tries to guess what you’re more likely to type in the search box.

“We look at the real searches that happen on Google and show common and trending ones relevant to the characters that are entered and also related to your location and previous searches,” Google says.

These predictions could thus be a little different depending on your location and should be provided regardless of the device you use to search the web.