Skip to main content
Tag

software

Cardo unveils the All-New Packtalk

By General Posts

CARDO UNVEILS THE ALL-NEW PACKTALK GENERATION – The PACKTALK EDGE. GREATNESS. REBORN.

Following extensive research and development, and a complete overhaul of the entire component make-up of the PACKTALK series, Cardo Systems is proud to announce a new generation of the world’s best motorcycle communications system, the all-new PACKTALK EDGE.

Key highlights include:

  • New slim modern design with no external antenna
  • New magnetic Air Mount for effortless and secure attachment of unit to helmet
  • Second-generation Dynamic Mesh Communication with faster and easier pairing process and wide-band intercom
  • Most advanced Bluetooth 5.2 Technology with “Live Intercom“ support and improved universal connectivity
  • Upgraded Natural Voice engine, enhanced JBL Sound, improved noise-cancelling microphone
  • Additional new features include over-the-air software updates and fast charging via USB-C

The new small, slimline, antenna-free unit, has been completely redesigned, boasting a whole host of new features as well as benefiting from all the user-favorite attributes of the previous generation, to make the world’s best motorcycle communications device, even better.

In 2015, Cardo Systems launched the world’s first motorcycle communicator to go beyond Bluetooth, with its introduction of Dynamic Mesh Communication (DMC). The state-of-the-art technology means the devices function with a self-adjusting network that not only automatically maintains a connection between up to 15 riders, but allows them to seamlessly join, leave and rejoin. The PACKTALK EDGE takes this technology one step further and boasts second-generation DMC connectivity with benefits including: an unparalleled deep wideband sound quality, a simpler and faster grouping process in DMC mode, faster pairing in Bluetooth mode, and Live Intercom Bluetooth support.

Helping cement its ‘edge’ over its predecessors, the PACKTALK EDGE has enhanced sound thanks to redesigned JBL speakers and three new sound profiles, attaches to any helmet using a new magnetic cradle for ease of use, and boasts universal fitment and has an improved noise-cancelling microphone. It also houses the most advanced Bluetooth 5.2 chip on the market for universal connectivity. The upgraded Natural Voice Operation engine also means that riders can continue to keep their eyes on the road, hands on the bars and activate their device by simply saying “Hey, Cardo.”

Other features include 13-hours battery life, USB-C and fast charging as standard – a quick 20-minute charge gives users two hours of ride time and 1.5-2 hours offers a full charge.

Over-the-air software updates via the Cardo Connect App, mean no cables or Wi-Fi adapters are required to ensure the PACKTALK EDGE device is loaded with the latest firmware.

Alon Lumbroso, Chief Executive Officer, Cardo Systems, comments: “The PACKTALK EDGE is the best communication device we have ever developed. With the ultimate audio performance in the industry, a novel Air Mount for rapid and secure attachment, and beautiful sleek, and clean design. The PACKTALK EDGE is a fantastic flagship to our extensive range of communicators. This latest offering is testament to Cardo’s three pillars – quality, purposeful innovation and user-first. Innovation is in our company DNA and we’re proud to translate that into a product for fellow motorcyclists.”

The new PACKTALK EDGE has an MSRP of $389.95/€389,95 – single and $699.95/€699,95 – duo and will be available from retailers in late April or alternatively, it can be ordered directly from www.cardosystems.com now. The PACKTALK BOLD will continue to be offered alongside the PACKTALK EDGE and available worldwide.

For more information about Cardo Systems, visit cardosystems.com or join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and see all the latest videos on YouTube.

About Cardo Systems
Cardo specializes in the design, development, manufacturing and sale of state-of-the-art wireless communication and entertainment systems for motorcycle riders. Since inception in 2004, Cardo has pioneered the vast majority of innovations for Bluetooth motorcycle communication systems and in 2015, it has also introduced the world’s first mesh powered communication protocol into the motorcycle market. The company’s products, now available in over 100 countries, are the world’s leading communication devices for the motorcycle industry.

Now stay updated on Motorcycle market news, tech, tips, reviews, products, deals, events & fun –
simply Subscribe to Bikernet Free Weekly Newsletter – click to sign-up

Dynojet to Launch Its Power Vision Product for 2021 Harley-Davidson Touring & Softail Models

By General Posts

A world leader in developing and manufacturing performance enhancement products for vehicles is slated to unveil a new product.

NORTH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, UNITED STATES, September 15, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Representatives with Dynojet Research, Inc. announced today that it will soon launch its Power Vision product for the 2021 Harley-Davidson.

Dan Hourigan, Vice President of Product Management for Dynojet Research, Inc., explained that the Power Vision for 2021 Harley-Davidson Touring and Softails models (part number PV-3B) is slated to launch around Oct. 1. Dynojet Research, Inc. is the world leader in the manufacturing and development of performance enhancement products and tools. The company’s EFI tuning devices, diagnostic products and personalized services empower customers with the necessary resources to maximize performance and efficiency.

As it relates to its soon-to-launch Power Vision product, Hourigan pointed out that some 2021 Harleys use a new ECU that required ground-up development efforts, while other models are already supported. The models using the new ECU include Touring, Softail, Pan-America, and Sportster S. The Power Vision PV-3B will support Touring and Softail to begin with, and then additional support will follow. The current Power Vision PV-2B already supports the remaining 2021 Harleys like the Sportster and Street 500/750.

“No matter your brand of motorcycle or style of riding, our EFI tuning devices can help optimize power, torque, improved rideability, overall speed and fuel-efficiency,” Hourigan stressed before adding, “With our extensive library of dyno-tested tunes and the ability to flash your ECU at your convenience, you’ll have a tune for any combination of parts on your next adventure. Our Power Vision easily connects to your motorcycle through the OEM diagnostic connector, so installation is a snap. You can then flash your bike and unplug the device, or you can use it as an instrument panel for more information on your fuel efficiency, engine temperatures, air/fuel ratio, and more.”

Hourigan noted that its product was also built to last with a weather and shock-resistant design.

“Our Power Vision for Harley-Davidson even has a unique autotune capability that can monitor specific data from your Harley while you ride and create a specific custom tune suited just for your parts and riding style,” Hourigan said. “Our Power Vision can hold multiple tunes right on the device and flash them without the need of a computer. It also allows you to alter the tune with our exclusive “Quick Tune” feature, which means that you can reflash your ECU changing conditions and fuel quality right from the road. Keep a tune available to suit your needs, from maximizing MPG’s to flatout grudge match power, the flexibility to change tunes is at your fingertips.

Additional features and benefits include:

● Flash performance tunes via OEM diagnostic connector directly to your ECU, no need to remove ECU or add additional electronics

● Display vehicle data channels in real-time, even set alarms

● Weather-resistant for use in all conditions

● Full color touchscreen display

And more.

“It’s not just a flash tuning device, the Power Vision is also a powerful monitoring and diagnostic tool that provides peace of mind while you ride,” Hourigan said. “The data can also be logged and analyzed using our Power Core Software to help you improve your tune. It also has embedded features such as Autotune, Quick Tune, DTC read / clear, and much more to make it the ultimate EFI tool for your Harley.”

With over four decades of experience, Dynojet, a member of SEMA, has relied on state-of-the-art technology to provide its customers with the best products available. Its philosophy stands behind the belief that its customers are number one. Individualized attention is given so that customers can take full advantage of the products it offers.

When it comes to service, Dynojet Research prides itself on customer service. The company’s team is always standing by to answer any question customers may have about its wide range of products, from dynamometers to EFI tuning devices.

For more information, please visit www.dynojet.com/about-us and https://www.dynojet.com/blog/.

About Dynojet Research, Inc.
At Dynojet Research, our mission is to make every ride the ultimate ride. All of our products, from EFI tuning devices to clutch kits, were made to help your motorcycle, UTV, or other vehicles keep up with your ambitions and exceed your expectations. Our team is made of racers, outdoor enthusiasts, and rebels, so we have the years of experience both on and off the road to help you make every ride the ultimate ride.

Self-Driving Vehicles – Available Soon? Part 2

By General Posts

From https://www.motorists.org By Gary Witzenburg, Automotive Senior Writer and Contributing Editor, President of the North American Car, Truck, and Utility of the Year, and NMA Member.

Editor’s Note: HOUR Detroit Magazine has graciously permitted the NMA to publish this piece, which initially appeared in a slightly different version on its pages. Please Click Here to Read Part 1.

Missions and Issues

“Automated vehicles’ potential to save lives and reduce injuries is rooted in one critical and tragic fact: 94 percent of serious crashes are due to human error,” contends the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). “Automated vehicles have the potential to remove human error from the crash equation, which will help protect drivers and passengers as well as bicyclists and pedestrians.”

Another mission will be to provide much-needed mobility for the aged and disabled, though ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft are already serving many Americans. “Roads filled with automated vehicles could also cooperate to smooth traffic flow and reduce traffic congestion,” NHTSA continues. “With automated vehicles, the time and money spent commuting could be put to better use. In many places across the country, employment or independent living rests on the ability to drive. Automated vehicles could extend that kind of freedom to millions more.”

But major hurdles lie ahead.

To be as safe as envisioned, AVs will need to see, understand, analyze, and react to everything around them through a complex system of sensors, radar, LiDAR (radar-like, using laser light), and visual and thermal cameras.

All that will add a lot of cost.

And how effective will those systems be in darkness and nasty weather? When dirt covers their lenses? When snow blankets lane markers and road edges?

“Inclement weather is a challenge,” says GM engineer Jason Fischer, “We are working with suppliers on advanced cleaning systems that will help us solve those problems.” Ford’s John Rich says, “All varieties of weather are being tested, and there will be a learning curve with capability expansion over time.”

Will AVs be programmed to protect their occupants at the expense of others? Which way will they dodge if they can’t stop to avoid a sudden pedestrian hit when the alternative may be an oncoming vehicle, a tree, a lake, or a cliff? “We have to make these vehicles better than humans,” Rich says, “constantly alert with better reflexes and better ability to avoid an accident. They may never be perfect, but if they are considerably better than humans, we almost have a moral imperative to put them on the road because we will be saving lives.”

And when someone inevitably is hurt or killed despite everyone’s best intentions and preventions, who will be liable? The vehicle’s owner? Its manufacturer? The software programmer? The town or city where the incident occurs? All of the above?

“Initially, the lawyers will sue everyone involved,” says Carla Bailo, CEO of the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) in Ann Arbor. “As these cases are settled and precedent established, it will become more clear. The automakers and others must have the utmost confidence in the safety of these systems.”

And will AVs be rolling roadblocks obeying all (often too slow) posted speed limits while everyone else swarms around them at 5-10 mph faster? Will they hold up traffic waiting for openings at non-stoplight intersections while streams of human-driven vehicles take advantage of their excessive caution?

“The vehicles are programmed to obey the law,” Rich points out. “We won’t be able to speed or do a lot of things you see human drivers doing today.”

Partial Autonomy

So that scenario of Level 5 “Full Automation” for privately owned vehicles looks to be a long way off…if ever. “Level 4 is essentially here now,” CAR’s Bailo points out. “Level 5 is later pending many other non-technical parameters such as regulation, public policy, legal and insurance.”

And no current AV is intended for private ownership.

“They will be able to move goods and people in a controlled environment,” Rich says, “but you will not be able to go out and buy one. They are difficult to manage and will require professional service to run.”

The good news is that Level 2 “Partial Automation” is available today.

Many new vehicles, even at very affordable prices, offer Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), which adjusts speed to maintain a set gap behind the vehicle ahead, and Lane Keeping Assist (LKA), which keeps your vehicle in its lane; and that combo allows hands-off cruising for a few seconds where road edges and lane markers are clearly visible to their cameras.

Some systems work better than others; you must pay full attention and be ready to take control at any time. The system will tell you when to take the wheel, and it will shut off if you don’t. One of the best we’ve tried is Cadillac’s Super Cruise, available on some models now and expanding to more, which will soon add an auto-lane-change feature. GM says its ultimate Super Cruise vision is hands-off driving capability 95 percent of the time on “enabled” (precisely GPS mapped) roads.

What we envision in the not-too-distant future is a potentially worrisome mix of driverless AVs sharing the roads with a large majority of human-driven cars and trucks. The AVs will be capable of communicating vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) with each other and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2X) to avoid conflicts. Still, they will have to monitor everything around them continually and make assumptions (as alert drivers do) about other vehicles’ expected behavior.

Will you trust a vehicle with no driver (or controls) to shuttle you around, or will you prefer a human-driven Uber, Lyft, or taxi? Or to continue piloting those trips behind your own wheel? If you are not yet AV ready, you may be when your own capabilities someday diminish.

What the Analysts Say

“The development of autonomous vehicles continues to move forward steadily, though several automakers slowed their development in early 2020 and some commercialization targets were delayed. While there remains tremendous promise for the technology to ease congestion and contribute to reducing accidents, getting to the point where they are a fixture in the automotive landscape remains on the horizon. However, in 2021 and 2022, we expect to see deployments increase in limited situations. Waymo, GM, and Ford are among those most aggressive in this space in the US, along with the Aptiv-Hyundai joint venture Motional.”  – Stephanie Brinley, principal analyst, Automotive, IHS Markit

“Autonomous technology continues its march from test phase to widely-embraced, mainstream functionality. But the variety of circumstances facing a computer-controlled vehicle have proven far more difficult to address, delaying the 2020 arrival of self-driving cars that many were predicting as recently as 2018. Major obstacles include changing weather conditions and the impact they have on sensors, a standardized, functional communication network between cars (V2V) and infrastructure (V2X), and ensuring security against computer hackers. These hurdles will eventually be overcome, but we’re likely looking at 2025 or later before the average citizen can leverage autonomous vehicle technology on a wide scale. Look for the limited test zones in cities like Austin, Phoenix, and Miami to slowly spread across more metro areas as well as controlled environments, such as college and corporate campuses.” – Karl Brauer, executive analyst, iSeeCars

“The industry’s thinking about autonomous vehicles has evolved and focused on commercial fleets [and] delivery vehicles. AVs in the commercial vehicle space are like a laboratory experiment that will allow the opportunity to make sure the technology works and the gathering of data to glean insights about patterns of behavior of the users. The commercial vehicle business is lucrative. Automakers know how many orders they have and thus how many they need to produce versus the individual retail business that is unpredictable. – Michelle Krebs, executive analyst, AutoTrader

“Automakers have very ambitious plans to incorporate autonomous driving features into their vehicles. Most of this is a technology push rather than a consumer pull. Our data show that less than 10 percent of vehicle buyers want a fully autonomous vehicle. About 30 percent would consider some level of autonomy. Today’s ADAS [Advanced Driver Assistance Systems] are the first step that many drivers are experiencing on the road to autonomy. Adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go and lane-centering systems sometimes lets people drive for a short time, hands-free.

When we talk about Level 4 and Level 5 autonomy, the pandemic needs to be factored in. Car sharing, which was a cornerstone of some autonomous plans, looks more problematic now. How does a driver know the vehicle is clean and sanitary? – George Peterson, president, AutoPacific

“Autonomous cars that can drive anywhere and that you can buy at a dealership will not be available this decade. Maybe next decade. Tesla claims otherwise with its Full Self Driving, but it’s up to them to prove it since it’s been delayed multiple times. That said, 2020 is really the year of autonomous vehicles. They’re on the streets and running now. The technology is available, and it works. It’s expensive, but the cost is coming down fast. For now, AVs are relegated to geofenced areas that have been 3D mapped, but those fence posts keep moving. Waymo is covering a 50-square mile area in Phoenix that will soon expand to 100-square miles. For now, AVs make the most sense for fleets. They can run their vehicles almost continuously and amortize the cost of the AV equipment more easily.” – John McElroy, host, AutolineTV

“The best chance is in geo-fenced areas, not on public roads. The infrastructure is nowhere near ready for AVs, which are never going to be 100% safe. There is not enough computer code on the planet to cover all situations.” – Richard Truett, technology and engineering reporter, Automotive News

Self-Driving Vehicles – Available Soon? Part 1

By General Posts

From https://www.motorists.org By Gary Witzenburg, Automotive Senior Writer and Contributing Editor, President of the North American Car, Truck, and Utility of the Year, and NMA Member.

Editor’s Note: HOUR Detroit Magazine has graciously permitted the NMA to publish this piece, which initially appeared in a slightly different version on its pages. Part 2 will be presented in next week’s newsletter.

Ready for your family outing, to the mall, then dinner. You call your car. It backs out of the garage and waits in your drive. You pile in and sit wherever you want since no one will drive. You face front, your spouse and kids swing their seats around to face each other.

You’ve told the car where to go, so it chooses the quickest route, obeying all stops and speed limits, keenly aware of what is happening around it. Someone steps off the curb ahead, and it slows, ready to stop if necessary. It warily eyes an errant dog cavorting to one side. You’re catching up on emails, your spouse is texting, the kids are enjoying video games. It lets you out at the mall, then zips off to park.

Shopping done, you call it to pick you up. Then it’s off to your favorite restaurant. After dinner, you catch a quick nap on your way home.

That is the scenario most envision when they think of self-driving vehicles. But how far off is that scenario? Assuming that autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be wonderful for ride-sharing, ride-hailing, and deliveries (which will put a lot of drivers out of work) and that folks will happily embrace them for personal use whenever they become available and affordable, automakers and others have been investing billions of dollars in developing them.

But not everyone wants to give up driving. Some of us still enjoy it and will as long as we are capable.

Detroit Hard at Work
Automakers and others worldwide are testing and developing AVs on closed tracks and public roads while governments at all levels scramble to define rules and regulations for safe AV operation. Two Michigan facilities — the American Center for Mobility next to Willow Run airport in Ypsilanti Township and the 32-acre mock city called Mcity on the University of Michigan’s Ann Arbor campus — are dedicated to AV testing and development.

General Motors’ Cruise LLC subsidiary has been testing Chevrolet Bolt EV-based Cruise AVs in San Francisco and elsewhere while developing a fully autonomous (no driver, no controls) Origin A.V. with Honda for urban passenger and delivery service. Unveiled this January 2020, the self-driving, six-passenger Origin has production approval, and development prototypes are being tested at GM’s Milford Proving Grounds.

“We feel that Cruise has all the building blocks in place to lead in self-driving vehicles,” says GM President Mark Reuss, “and the first ones will be built right here at Factory Zero, our Detroit-Hamtramck assembly facility. In October, Cruise received a permit from the California DMV to remove human backup drivers from its self-driving cars. That means Cruise can send its cars out onto the streets of San Francisco without anyone at the wheel.”

Cruise should have Bolt-based driverless AVs running around San Francisco by the time you read this. “This is our moonshot,” says Cruise CEO Dan Amman. “The chaotic, gritty streets of San Francisco are our launchpad, and it’s where over two million miles of city testing will truly hit the road for the first time: an electric car, driving by itself, navigating one of the most difficult driving cities in the world.” In addition, Walmart plans to start testing automated deliveries using Cruise AVs in Scottsdale, AZ, early this year.

GM’s bold commitment to no-driver AVs, focusing first on city transportation, is one major element of its ambitious vision of a world with “zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion.”

“We operate AVs in very clearly defined geofenced areas within the city that we have mapped,” chief engineer of the Cruise Origin Jason Fischer. “We will not go into areas that we haven’t mapped.” And while current Cruise AVs retain their steering wheel and pedals so a driver can take control if needed, the Cruise Origin does not. “There will be no ability to take control of the vehicle,” Fischer says. “The autonomous driving system will always be in control.”

Ford, partnered with technology developer Argo AI, has tested AVs (with safety drivers) on Michigan Ave. around Michigan Central Station. The automaker has established AV terminals, command centers, and high-resolution mapping for ride-hailing and deliveries in Austin, TX, Miami, FL, and Washington, DC, beginning in 2022. The company is also testing AVs in Pittsburgh and Palo Alto, CA. The Ford/Argo AI program will “assess the need for a safety driver and make a decision based on several factors, including the regulatory environment, safety performance data and an appropriate level of community acceptance” before operating without one.

“We are very focused on level 4 [see graphic above],” says Ford Autonomous Vehicles and director John Rich, “removing the driver from the equation and operating within a geonet.” A geonet, he explains, is different from a geofence, within which AVs should be able to self-drive anywhere. “We will initially choose not to drive some places within that area, but our geonet will expand as we move forward.”

Ford/Argo AI’s fourth-generation self-driving vehicles are Escape Hybrids equipped with the latest advanced sensing and computing technology. “We have upgraded our sensing suite with even more advanced LiDAR, higher resolution cameras, and more capable radar sensors,” says Ford Autonomous Vehicles chief engineer John Davis. “Combined, this helps improve detection of fixed and moving objects on all sides…providing a blind-spot curtain, detecting things like a passing car or bicyclist in a nearby bike lane.” A larger high-voltage battery supports these vehicles’ heavy electrical loads. A sophisticated sensor-cleaning system with forced-air chambers and high-pressure spray nozzles keeps its sensors and camera lenses clean.

Stellantis is partnered with self-driving technology company Waymo. Launched in 2009 as the Google Self-Driving Car Project, Waymo has developed a Level 4 Waymo Driver system that powers Waymo One, a ride-hailing service, and Waymo Via for trucking and deliveries. It claims 20 million-plus miles of autonomous driving on public roads in 25 US cities and 15 billion miles of simulation testing and is now offering AV rides to the public in Phoenix.

“Our now four-year partnership with Waymo continues to break new ground,” says Stellantis CEO Mike Manley. “By incorporating the Waymo Driver, the world’s leading self-driving technology, into our Pacifica minivans, we became the only partnership actually deploying fully autonomous technology in the real world, on public roads.” Stellantis is also working exclusively with Waymo on light commercial vehicles such as Ram ProMaster vans for deliveries and plans to expand it across its product line.

“Stellantis was our first OEM partner, and we’ve come a long way together,” says Waymo CEO John Krafcik. “Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans were the first vehicles in our Waymo One fleet and, guided by the Waymo Driver, have now safely and reliably driven more fully autonomous miles than any other vehicle on the planet. Together, we’ll introduce the Waymo Driver throughout the Stellantis brand portfolio, opening up new frontiers for ride-hailing, commercial delivery, and personal use vehicles around the world.”

Meanwhile, a very ambitious “connected corridor” linking downtown Detroit to Ann Arbor (and Metro Airport) along some 40 miles of Michigan Ave. (US 12) and Washtenaw Ave. (M-17) is in the planning stages.

“At the outset, the vision calls for one dedicated interior lane for both the east and west side of Michigan Ave,” writes editor R.J. King in the Nov./Dec. issue of DBusiness magazine. “Those two lanes will need barriers at first, to separate autonomous from general traffic including pedestrians. Several crosswalks will be needed, traffic lights must be coordinated, and all manner of hardware and software is required to connect GPS satellites, cellular arrays, Wi-Fi systems, sensors, and underground fiber cables.” An alternative plan suggests using a new lane along I-94 instead of Michigan Ave.

According to King, this project’s vision began with Ford executive chairman Bill Ford. It will be managed by Cavnue, a subsidiary of New-York-based Sidewalk Infrastructure Partners, working with Michigan’s Department of Transportation, Office of Future Mobility and Electrification, Economic Development Corp., and Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity, along with state and local partners, stakeholders and communities.

“The project will be designed to evolve to meet transportation goals,” he writes, “but in the beginning, the dedicated lanes will accommodate linked buses and shared mobility vehicles such as vans and shuttles and expand to other connected and autonomous vehicles like freight and personal vehicles.” Phase one completion is targeted for the second half of 2022.

Click Here to Read part 2 of Autonomous (Self-Driving) Vehicles –Available Soon (Yes and No). Gary explains the critical missions and asks the experts how soon we will see AVs on the road.

Harley-Davidson recalls some LiveWire electric motorcycles citing ‘software issue’

By General Posts

by Cortney Moore from https://finance.yahoo.com

Harley-Davidson Inc. is voluntarily recalling about 1,000 of its electric LiveWire motorcycles because they “may unexpectedly shut down and not restart.”

Harley-Davidson Motor Company has recalled “certain” 2020 LiveWire electric motorcycles, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

The recall, which began on Monday, Oct. 19, has been issued due to reports of some LiveWire motorcycles having powertrains that “unexpectedly shut down and not restart” as a result of a “software issue in the Onboard Charging (OBC) system,” the NHTSA states.

“An unexpected loss of propulsion without the ability to restart may increase the risk of a crash,” the NHTSA further explains in its published recall.

“In the interest of customers’ safety and satisfaction, Harley-Davidson announced a voluntary safety recall involving certain model year 2020 LiveWire motorcycles, which will require a software update,” a Harley-Davidson spokesperson confirmed to FOX Business via email. “This update will be performed at no cost to customers.”

The recall impacts bikes produced between September 23, 2019, and March 16, 2020.

“Customer notifications will begin on or about the week of Oct. 22,” Harley-Davidson’s spokesperson added. “Customers with these motorcycles should contact an authorized Harley-Davidson LiveWire dealer to schedule an appointment to have updated software installed.”

Owners of Harley-Davidson’s 2020 LiveWire (ELW) models can also contact the NHTSA by phone through its toll-free safety hotline: 1-888-327-4236. For anyone who may have impaired hearing, the NHTSA can be contacted through the federal agency’s dedicated TeleTYpe phone number: 1-800-424-9153.

Alternatively, the agency said owners of the recalled Harley-Davidson vehicle can contact representatives at the NHTSA online if they visit www.safercar.gov.

The recalled Harley-Davidson LiveWire motorcycles have been assigned an NHTSA campaign number, which is 20V624000.

It is estimated that some 1,012 bikes have been affected by the recall.

A redacted notification letter that will be issued to 2020 LiveWire (ELW) owners is available for viewing on the NHTSA’s website.

Harley-Davidson stock was flat on the news, however, the company has seen its stock struggle in 2020. It is down more than 21% year to date.

Jarvish’s Smart Helmet Can Provide a Better Experience for Motorcycle Riders and Set New Trends in the Motorcycle Industry

By General Posts

LAS VEGAS, Jan. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Jarvish and other notable homegrown startups led by Taiwan Tech Arena (TTA) are now showcasing their innovative solutions at CES 2020.

Smartphones have been around for more than 10 years. People nowadays tend to find smart mobile devices that suit their needs and are easy to use based on different usage scenarios. Recognizing this trend – as well as the development of 5G technology which will perfect connected vehicles – startup company Jarvish, whose core members mainly consist of former employees from Hon Hai, has spared no efforts to develop top-notch motorcycle gear for connected vehicles. By utilizing its strong technology integration capabilities, Jarvish has brought the world a smart helmet featuring a stylish design and practical functions.

Jarvish’s smart helmet comes with a built-in 2K HD action camera, a sensor that detects whether the helmet is being worn, OGS surrounding HD sound system, smart voice control system, wireless charging module, and HUD (Head-Up Display) that allows you to browse information while riding. “Unlike other mobile devices, smart helmets need to provide not only high performance and advanced technology but also security. Therefore, we have studied security regulations in different countries and set our eyes on markets with high-security requirements,” said Jeremy Lu, founder of Jarvish. To meet the security requirements, the materials, the placement of the microphone, camera, HUD, battery, and Bluetooth module, as well as the wiring of the helmet must be thoroughly planned. For example, since the battery is placed near the rider’s head, the lithium battery commonly used in commercial products must be replaced with the explosion-proof ceramic battery intended for military use. The ceramic battery can run for up to five hours. Also, the HUD consumes power constantly; therefore, the battery size and the thickness and weight of the EPS insulation panel must be designed properly. These details all demonstrate Jarvish’s ability to integrate technologies from different industries.

When the helmet is connected to the network via a smartphone, the rider can use leading brands’ voice assistants such as Siri, Google Assistant, or Alexa to make phone calls, activate navigation services, listen to music, or broadcast a live video on Facebook without using their hands. The rider can also customize voice commands via Alexa Skills Kit if needed.

Jeremy Lu added that they would try to provide support for all mainstream voice assistants in the helmet. That being said, there are less than 30 voice commands used when riding a motorcycle. Therefore, Jarvish has developed its own voice assistant specially designed for riding scenarios. The company has also worked with the world’s largest mapping software company. By using its own app, Jarvish’ smart helmet can be updated with all kinds of voice information including riding speed, speed camera warnings, weather forecasts, nearby gas stations, nearby Gogoro charging stations, and navigation data.

To protect the rider’s safety, Jarvish’ helmet is not only IPX6 water-resistant but also compliant with CNS, DOT, and ECE standards. When the sensor attached to the helmet detects a crash while it is being worn, Jarvish’s voice assistant will ask the rider if he/she needs an ambulance. The rider can also cancel emergency aid via voice commands.

“Once Jarvish’s smart helmets are widely adopted, the big data they collect can also be used to improve traffic conditions and construct smart cities,” said Jeremy Lu confidently.

Damon Motorcycles and BlackBerry QNX Revolutionize Motorcycling with the Introduction of Hypersport Pro Electric Superbike

By General Posts

– Damon to unveil flagship motorcycle, the ‘Hypersport Pro at CES 2020 in BlackBerry Limited’s (NYSE: BB; TSX: BB) booth #7515, North Hall.

– #FutureOfMotorcycling Interactive Experience will be open to all CES attendees in the BlackBerry booth from January 7 – 10, 2020

VANCOUVER, British Columbia and WATERLOO, Ontario, Jan. 3, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Damon Motorcycles announced today that its CoPilot™ advanced warning system will be powered by BlackBerry QNX technology across its entire line-up of advanced electric motorcycles.

As part of the agreement, Damon has licensed BlackBerry QNX technology, including its industry-leading real-time operating system to serve as the safe and secure foundation for the Damon CoPilot warning system on its new flagship electric motorcycle.

Damon will unveil this disruptive, limited edition superbike, the Hypersport Pro™, and open reservations to the public online and at CES at 10:00am PST, January 7th. In BlackBerry’s booth, attendees will also be able to experience Damon’s next generation motorcycle first-hand in the #FutureOfMotorcycling Interactive Experience, a rideable, leaning stationary motorcycle that uses virtual reality to showcase the motorcycle’s unique features on the show floor.These features include its powerful all-electric performance, its CoPilot advanced warning system, and Shift™, its patented rider ergonomics that lets riders electronically adjust the Hypersport’s riding position while in motion. CoPilot uses radar, cameras and non-visual sensors to track the speed, direction and velocity of moving objects around the motorcycle. Attendees can book a time slot to experience it at CES by visiting damonmotorcycles.com/VR.

“We’re on a mission to unleash the full potential of personal mobility for the world’s commuters,” said Jay Giraud, Chief Executive Officer of Damon Motorcycles. “To address this, we spent the last three years developing an AI-powered, fully connected, e-motorcycle platform that incorporates CoPilot, our proprietary 360º warning system. By building it on BlackBerry’s best-in-class technology that is safety certified, Damon motorcycles will be the safest, most advanced electric motorcycle in the market.”

“With its advanced collision warning system, Damon’s new Hypersport Pro is a game-changing model for the motorcycle industry,” said Grant Courville, VP, Product Management and Strategy, BlackBerry QNX. “We’re absolutely thrilled to have them in our booth and look forward to showing off the highly-secure software that delivers enhanced situational awareness and increased peace of mind for riders. BlackBerry QNX is leading the way in next-generation mobility systems by providing a safe and secure platform for connected vehicles and beyond and we’re proud to work with Damon on this exciting advancement.”

BlackBerry QNX is a leader in delivering trusted embedded operating systems and development tools to companies for which failure is not an option. Committed to the highest safety, reliability and security standards, BlackBerry QNX has developed a portfolio of software and services with a proven record of helping developers deliver complex and connected next generation products. BlackBerry QNX technology is trusted in over 150 million vehicles and millions of embedded systems, including medical, industrial automation, robotics, energy, defense and aerospace applications. For more information on BlackBerry QNX, please visit blackberry.qnx.com.

With performance specs to be released at CES 2020, Damon’s industry-leading advanced prototypes are set to hit the roads in mid-2020 to the world’s largest mobility segment well overdue for a safer, smarter, zero emission solution. For more information on Damon Motorcycles, please visit damonmotorcycles.com.