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Book Review: Exile On Front Street

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A Review by J.J. Solari

Hells Angel… And Beyond, by George Christie

The first sentence of Chapter 13 of this 16-chapter book is…..

“Solitary confinement is the worst thing one man can do to another.”

Now, since this is a “book review” and since I don’t know this guy, but I do know who he is, mostly from the “news,” once I got to the above-mentioned sentence in the course of my already having read the first 12 chapters of the book – which I was reading not to give a “report” on it but to get some familiarity with the fellow, from, ya know, his own self, rather than from the news…….where was I. Oh yeah: so I’m reading this here book, and most of it has been read and stuff, I’m almost done, and I’m goin’ along fine, and then I get to this sentence, the opening sentence of chapter 13.

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Buell® Announces Upcoming Job Openings for Q1 of 2023

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Buell® Announces Upcoming Job Openings for Q1 of 2023 based in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Buell Motorcycles, a Grand Rapids, Michigan-based manufacturer of high-performance motorcycles, is looking to add skilled and motivated individuals that have a passion for building exciting new products, contributing to a dynamic work environment, and becoming part of the Buell team.

“We are excited to take another big step forward in the continued growth of Buell. Today that big step forward is growing the Buell team here in West Michigan,” said Steve Laham, Chief Products, Development & Strategist Buell Motorcycle Co. “The Buell team’s expansion is in a multitude of areas of growth and will allow us to continue providing high performance motorcycles in the marketplace.”

Over the next three months, Buell will be hiring full and part-time employees across multiple areas within the company including:

  • Engineering
  • Manufacturing Operations
  • Digital Marketing Specalist
  • Production Staff
  • Painting Professionals

Prior skills and experience are a plus, but not a must with the right enthusiasm, self-motivation and a willingness to contribute to a dynamic work environment, and becoming part of the Buell team.

“We’ve built out an excellent senior leadership team with deep experience across the motorsports and transportation industries that all have a passion for two-wheeled products.” said Bill Melvin, CEO of Buell Motorcycle Co. “We are looking towards the future of the company and will continue to grow our team here in Grand Rapids to keep up with demand and develop some new exciting products.”

With formal job postings expected in Q1 of 2023, interested parties can submit their resume and position of interest to careers@buellmotorcycle.com.

Buell is back and delivering performance and excitement at every turn. For future Buell updates, follow our news page on our website and our social media pages.

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MotoGP 22 Game Review: its the season for living-room-speed

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Its Raining MotoGP Madness !!!

by Silvian Secara from https://www.autoevolution.com

Purposeful Refinements, Better Graphics and an All-New Game Mode (PC)

You’ll find that it can feel way more accessible to beginners while simultaneously catering to a more sim-focused crowd.

The ongoing MotoGP season has been an absolute blast so far, with each race offering plenty of entertainment for motorsport fans to enjoy. We’ve seen fantastic performances as well as embarrassing mistakes from riders like Aleix Espargaró, Francesco Bagnaia, and the reigning world champion Fabio Quartararo, whose DNF in Assen is sure to spice up the title challenge after the summer break.

Since we’re currently waiting for the action to restart at Silverstone on August 7, it’s a perfect time to discuss the newest installment of Milestone’s officially-licensed videogame franchise. Just like its predecessor, MotoGP 22 hasn’t managed to butter everyone’s toast, and a common complaint you’ll hear people make is related to the lack of any major improvements over last year’s title.

In all fairness, the game isn’t considerably better than its 2021 counterpart, but subtle tweaks and baby steps are what we’ve come to expect from annual sporting releases of this sort. Nonetheless, it is a shame the developers haven’t taken the opportunity to make the career mode more interesting, nor did they add the dynamic weather feature that people were hoping for.

As far as graphics are concerned, substantial steps have been taken to refine the overall look of textures, liveries, and, most notably, riders’ faces. Whereas the previous MotoGP was rather awful as regards the latter, I was pleased to find that facial models are vastly improved this time around. Credit where credit is due; this year’s GP racing sim from Milestone Interactive offers the best visual experience of the whole series!

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Aesthetics aside, the gameplay feels responsive and way more accessible to beginners than that of prior releases. New players may access a plethora of comprehensive tutorials to learn the ropes, and the various assists can certainly make the learning curve feel less terrifying. Turn them off, and you’ll be punished for the slightest mistake, but the game’s difficulty is perfectly manageable when some (or all) of these functions are employed.

Giving you the ability to find an ideal balance for your skillset, MotoGP 22 is a much better pick for newcomers than its forerunner. One should not, however, rely too heavily on things like braking point markers or the color-coded ideal trajectory line, as they’ll often cause you to brake later than necessary and end up in the gravel.

Even though more seasoned players won’t be using these aids anyway, it’s something to keep in mind if you’re just starting out. As for the AI, I found it to be a little more aggressive and spatially aware than before, though there’s copious room for improvement left in this area. Instances where other riders bump straight into you on corner exits, are still present, so be prepared to deal with such annoyances from time to time.

An additional layer of complexity is added by the freshly-introduced ride height device (RHD), which can be used when accelerating out of turns to prevent wheelies. Furthermore, many found the curbs to be harsh and largely unusable last year, and that’s one aspect of track design the developers have addressed since then. As the physics were also updated, they may feel a bit weird at first, but it’s not too much of a hassle to get used to them.

While the career and quick modes fall firmly within what we’ve grown accustomed to over time, the same can’t be said for the documentary-style Nine: Season 2009 campaign. Directed and narrated by Mark Neale, the said mode takes you on a trip down memory lane to a time when four contenders battling ruthlessly for the world title.

Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo, Dani Pedrosa, and Casey Stoner; are all coming within a few points of one another in the first half of the season. The Doctor went on to secure his seventh and last championship in the premier class that year, and you’ll be stepping into the shoes of multiple riders as the storyline progresses through iconic moments.

Separate chapters depict every race from Losail to Valencia, with each of them providing various challenges for players to complete. These are intertwined with approximately 50 minutes of footage from the 2009 season, alongside Neale’s masterful narration describing how the events unfolded. Add smooth gameplay and the thrilling wail of inline-fours to that equation, and you’ve got yourself a recipe for pure bliss!

Regardless of the mixed feedback MotoGP 22 has received thus far, this nostalgia-rousing element really sets it apart from older iterations. Most players seem to agree that it’s an enthralling experience, and I’m personally hoping to see Milestone deliver more like it in the future. Besides the single-player game types, one may also join online lobbies to race against other people or bring some friends over and engage in good old split-screen duels.

Menus are way tidier than the cluttered mess we saw in earlier releases, with the main background showing bikes from different teams every time you fire things up. Not that it’s such a huge deal, but it definitely is yet another step in the right direction for this franchise. Although there isn’t much of a soundtrack to talk about here, the music you will be hearing doesn’t become irritating after a few minutes or so, which is much appreciated.

Conclusion : Folks may call MotoGP 22 a reskin all they like, but what they need to understand is that developers can’t afford to stray too far from the established formula on yearly sports titles. Just look at the incremental manner in which EA Sports’ series is progressing, and you’ll immediately see what I’m trying to convey. With this being said, it’s time to answer the pivotal question: is the game worth your hard-earned cash?

Priced at 50 bucks on Steam, Milestone’s latest Grand Prix sim packs just the right amount of novel content to be categorized as money well spent. The brilliantly-executed Nine: Season 2009 affair is heavily responsible for this, though it’s far from being the only thing that makes the new MotoGP stand out. With its (optional) welcoming attitude towards beginners and subtle yet effective refinements, I’d say this installment is totally worth checking out.

Rating: 82/100

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Barn-Find Delights: Tom Cotter’s new book

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Books That Make You Get Out & Explore

“After having read about Tom Cotter in the Bikernet.com Thursday News, shared by National Motorcycle Museum (click here) (past few weeks ago), I started watching Tom’s video series on YouTube.

I could resist no more and bought Tom Cotter’s Best Barn-Find Collector Car Tales (Sep 2018) and his latest mentioned by National Motorcycle Museum, Secrets of the Barn Find Hunter (May 2022). Both Hardcovers, sitting pretty, reminding me to get outdoors & cruise.”

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Harley-Davidson Reveals new Apex Factory Custom Paint

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H-D Legacy of Competition Inspires Custom Paint for Nine Touring Models

MILWAUKEE – Harley-Davidson today revealed the new Apex factory custom paint option for select Harley-Davidson® Grand American Touring models.

The dynamic new paint scheme debuts at the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.

Apex custom paint is inspired by the long and successful competition history of Harley-Davidson, the world’s most iconic motorcycle brand. A racing legacy established more than a century ago in hill climbs, enduros, and fairground flat tracks continues today as the Harley-Davidson® Screamin’ Eagle® factory team defends its 2021 MotoAmerica King of the Baggers championship.

“Apex factory custom paint gives riders the opportunity to express the thrill of speed and competition on the bodywork of their bagger,” said Brad Richards, VP of Design and Creative Director – Motorcycles. “This paint scheme communicates velocity and forward momentum with lines and colors inspired by Harley-Davidson competition motorcycles.”

The Apex paint scheme features a graphic outline on the fuel tank which mimics the shape of the tank on the legendary Harley-Davidson® XR750 flat track racing motorcycle. On models with a fairing the graphic sweeps back to align with the tank graphic and leads with an angle that suggests speed. The lines on the front fender connect visually to those on the side covers and saddlebags, creating a flowing effect. When viewed in profile, the motorcycle appears to be in motion.

The color scheme starts with a base of Vivid Black paint. A graphic element adds Gauntlet Gray panels surrounded by an accent stripe of Jet Fire Orange – the original color applied to the XR750 competition models. Each panel is designed with inner drop shadows and a subtle Bar & Shield pattern that fades in and out throughout the scheme. This fade effect was inspired by the checkered fade seen on Harley-Davidson Factory Team race bikes. Clear coat paint is applied as a final layer. The Apex custom paint is applied in-house at Harley-Davidson York Vehicle Assembly and Harley-Davidson Tomahawk Operations.

The Apex custom paint will be offered globally for the remainder of the 2022 model ordering period as a factory-installed option for nine Harley-Davidson Grand American Touring models:

  • Road King® Special model
  • Street Glide® Special model (Chrome and Black trim versions)
  • Ultra Limited model (Chrome and Black trim versions)
  • Road Glide® Limited model (Chrome and Black trim versions)
  • Road Glide® Special model (Chrome and Black trim versions)

Harley-Davidson® Genuine Motor Parts & Accessories will offer Tour-Pak® luggage carriers and custom front fenders painted to match the Apex paint scheme. This will allow riders to further customize a motorcycle ordered with Apex factory custom paint.

See a local authorized Harley-Davidson® dealer (click here) for details on ordering a Harley-Davidson® motorcycle and accessories with Apex factory custom paint.

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Rolling with the All American, Most Innovative Half Shell

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The KIRSH CHM-1 Lid by Prince Najar

Donny Devito, President and Chief Operating Officer of KIRSH Helmets, is the go-to guy for introducing the latest technology in helmets – the KIRSH’S CHM-1 Helmet Technology.

I met up with Donny at the 2022 Flying Piston Benefit during Daytona Bikeweek and discussed his latest product offering, the CHM-1, which features fluid displacement technology.

What is this Fluid Technology?
KIRSH’s innovative liner features fluid, not Styrofoam. Because of its fluid, it performs better at both low and high-energy impacts, from any direction at any one point in time.

KIRSH says that the silicone and fluid construct mimic the body’s natural protective functions. The brain sits in fluid in the skull. And now with this technology, the skull sits in the fluid within the helmet.

This allows for less mass, reducing impact torque, and a fluid buffer that more effectively protects the skull and brain… meaning that it has better brain protection. And the malleability of the liner ensures that it conforms uniquely to each user’s head, ensuring better protection and a custom fit, which means much greater comfort.

How does the CHM-1 Feel on a Ride?
I sent a text to Bill Brissette about his real-world road test with KIRSH. We set a time to confab about his test. Bill is a hardcore long-distance rider that within 4 months put 10,000 miles on a new bike wearing the CHM-1 helmet. Previous bikes clocked 112,000 miles in six years and 158,000 miles in nine years.

Bill Brissette on the gas with KIRSH
He said that in high wind conditions, riding between 65 to 80mph, the helmet acts like a gyroscope. “My head’s never been so steady and stable,” explained Bissette. “It’s really bizarre. I don’t know how else to describe it.”
Bill also said that the gel shapes to the contours of your head and at the same time you can feel cooling because you feel the air circulating around your head.

And the fit? “They really fit snug nicely across the face so I don’t have any strap smacking me or moving around or making a whiny noise in the wind,” commented Bill.

6 Questions with Donnie Devito, President of KISH Helmets
Question: Why when everyone is sourcing products overseas is he building an American-made product.

Donnie Devito – We found out that v-twin riders really valued American-made products. And we know it is better for the United States.

Question: KIRSH Helmets employ veterans and Americans with disabilities. Why is that important?

Donnie Devito – Both veterans and Americans with disabilities show up. They work hard and care about the work they do. And they get excited about doing things to make a difference.

Question: Why do you think that you get so much loyalty from your product?

Donnie Devito – The proof is in the ride. Riders come back and say how stable that helmet is. They experience the freedom of riding without having to think about the helmet. You don’t have to think about buffeting and the discomfort that comes from that or neck strain or head wobble. You can look around and actually enjoy your ride and focus more on the experience of riding.

Question: In Sturgis last year I saw a peculiar sight. At your booth, you were pulling helmets out of a refrigerator. Why?

Donnie Devito – It’s probably one of the best features. Riders can chill the liner for 10 minutes and get a couple of hours of a cool head.

Question: So what’s your most popular color of helmet?

Donnie Devito – Matte black or gloss black, no surprise there. Also very popular is our hydro-dipped patriotic helmet.

Question: Where can you get a helmet?

Donnie Devito – Check out the website at KIRSH Helmets. You can get it online from us or go to the dealer locator on the site. Also, check them out at the Indian Motorcycle Sturgis located at 2130 Main St, Sturgis, SD 57785.

Win a Signed Billy Lane Sons of Speed KIRSH CHM-1 Helmet

Experience the technology for yourself. A custom builder signed KIRSH helmet from the Flying Piston Benefit that features Billy Lane’s Son of Speed racing. It’s up for auction at the 2022 Sturgis edition of the Flying Piston Benefit. Check out the online Flying Piston Benefit silent auction – https://qtego.net/qlink/flyingpiston

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Movie Review by Amy Irene White

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A review by Amy Irene White

Here is Amy’s views on a documentary on the subject of “Ride Free or Die”

Click Here to have a look.

This documentary covers biker and specifically motorcycle club profiling, which is a major issue followed by the Confederation of Clubs and Motorcycle Riders Foundation. Check it out and her compelling report on the Waco shooting.

Click to View other movie and documentary reviews in the ‘Books, Movies & Music Reviews’ Section on Bikernet.com

British Review of new Harley-Davidson Street Glide ST

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by Geoff Hill from https://www.mirror.co.uk/

Another icon of the American dream

It weighs as much as a small tank, goes like stink and handles very nicely for such a beast, so even though it costs more than an average UK hatchback, for Harley fans it’s a metal and rubber incarnation of their mythical aspirations

I was having a beer one night in Los Angeles in 2013 with the head of Triumph USA when we got to talking about Harleys.

He’d been sent to LA in advance of that year’s launch of the Thunderbird LT, an extremely capable cruiser which Triumph hoped would convince American riders that there was more than one type of bike in the world.

On his first weekend there, his Harley counterpart took him to an open day at Bartels, the city’s biggest Harley dealership, where hundreds of riders and their families were enjoying a free hog roast, burgers, raffles, gifts, music, beer or soft drinks and test rides.

“See? This is what you’re up against. It’s not just about the motorcycles,” said the Harley guy.

I was reminded of it in 2018, when I rode a Harley from Oxford to Prague for a three-day bash to celebrate the company’s 115 th anniversary to find 60,000 Harleys and 100,000 riders and partners, all with leather waistcoats, tattoos and chains, proclaiming their particular allegiances with patches saying Naples Military Chapter, Hanoi Chapter, Jeddah Chapter and so on.

It is, of course, all harmless fun – middle-aged men who during the week are Reg in Accounts, but at the weekends become Rebel Reg, King of the Road, riding west on his iron steed into the setting sun for a burger and beer with his sweetheart in a Route 66 diner.

And while non-Harley fans who have never ridden one wrongly condemn them as basic and agricultural ridden by chaps wearing chaps with tassels, no other motorcycle make in the world earns such astonishing passion and camaraderie.

And it’s not just from patriotic Yanks – there were Harley fans there from 75 countries, all of them walking, talking expressions of an infinite yearning for the innocence of an American dream which the rest of us may think blossomed into its fullest fruition in the Fifties, then died in the Sixties and Seventies after Kennedy and Vietnam, but which was still alive in the heart and soul of everyone walking around Prague on those sunny days.

On a slightly smaller scale, my biking buddy Gareth and I rode down on his Kawasaki Versys 650 and my BMW R 850 R to the recent open day at the local dealers. It’s called Belfast Harley, and it’s in Antrim. You need to be Irish to understand that.

We arrived to find the expected chapter members with their patches, leather and denim and tattoos, and a small woman looking slightly terrified as she tried to reverse her large Road Glide into a parking space.

“Help, I’m going to fall over!” she muttered. We strode manfully over to help, and she finished the job and got gratefully off.

“I’ve only had it two weeks. It’s very heavy, but I love it when it’s moving,” she said.

“Just don’t stop, then,” I said helpfully, and Gareth and I went inside to see Wilmer the boss about the two bikes we were going to take out for a test ride – Gareth the Pan America and me the new Street Glide ST.

ROAD-TEST REVIEW:

The ST is basically a standard Street Glide on steroids, with the 1868cc engine thrown in the bin and replaced by a 1923cc version, increasing the power and torque from 93bhp and 117 ft lb to 103bhp and 124 ft lb.

And, er, the price from a sharp-intake-of-breath £25,795 to a get-me-to-the-defribillator-on-time £27,795. No wonder Harleys are mostly sold on PCP. Still, they hold their value, so you get a good deal when you trade them in for a new one after three years.

The standard Glide is a beefy 375kg wet, and although the ST has shaved off 6kg to 369kg, that’s like a sumo wrestler claiming he’s gone on a diet by only having 10 chickens for lunch instead of 11.

I was just glad I wasn’t a small woman trying to reverse it as I trundled carefully out of the car park and opened the throttle.

Well, heavens to Betsy, that’s impressive. In spite of weighing the same as a small tank, it soared towards the horizon with surprisingly alacrity, helped by a bottomless well of creamy torque and a solid but precise gearbox which was light years away from the agricultural clank factories of Harleys of old.

With that weight on board, handling is never going to be quicksilver, but it’s agile enough for such a big beast, allowing you to dip and sway through A-road bends with happy precision, particularly as the Showa suspension is set firm for good handling, although at the expense of comfort on rough roads, as I found when it bottomed out on one bouncy stretch and left my spine an inch shorter.

The Brembo brakes haul it in so briskly and smoothly that, unlike most big Harleys, I didn’t need to call on the rear brake for assistance when steaming a bit hot into a corner.

As for the details, the mirrors are excellent, the traditional analogue dash is supplemented by a large TFT screen for the entertainment and comms systems, and the speakers in the fairings are pointless, like all speakers on all bikes anywhere.

The batwing fairing and sliver of screen, meanwhile, do a surprisingly good job of keeping the wind at bay, since I still have nightmares of a turbulent 90mph dash through France at night on a Harley with a batwing fairing while wearing an open-face helmet and shades.

So if you’ve got the dosh and like the whole Harley social thing, it’s significantly better than the standard Street Glide.

Oh, and Gareth loved the Pan America, so he got on the Versys and rode home to tell his wife that they’re selling the house, her mother, the dog and the camper van.

I haven’t heard from him since, so he’s probably buried in a shallow grave in the garden, and if anyone’s looking for a tidy used Versys, get your people to talk to my people about his wife’s people.

SPECS (price in British Pounds currency)
Harley-Davidson Street Glide ST
Engine: 1923cc air-cooled V-twin
Power: 103bhp @ 5,450rpm
Torque: 124 ft lb @ 3,500rpm
Colours: Black; grey
Price: £27,795

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Triumph Collector Stumbles Across Ultimate Collectible, the 1901 Prototype

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from https://www.autoevolution.com/ by Daniel Patrascu

At the turn of the last century, a time when horse-drawn carriages turned into automobiles and bicycles into motorcycles, most of the companies active back then wanted a piece of the new action, and turned their businesses around to include the production of the new mechanical wonders.

So did a British enterprise that went by the name Triumph Engineering, which used to make bicycles. Which, if you come to think of it, are just like motorcycles, only without engines, hence easy to re-make.

And that’s exactly what Triumph did with one of its bikes, fitting it with a Minerva engine and opening the doors to a history that has spanned so far for 120 years. That production motorized two-wheeler came to be in 1902, but as you can imagine, a prototype had to be made before that. A prototype that, like many others of its kind, was considered lost for a long time, despite rumors surrounding its existence floating around.

Extremely conveniently-timed, the first 1901 Triumph motorcycle prototype just resurfaced, having been uncovered by a collector named Dick Shepherd, and put back into the spotlight by the company itself.

According to the available details, attesting to the motorcycle’s authenticity are the engine number, “consistent with references in Minerva’s engine records of a 1901 first Triumph engagement,” and a “letter from Triumph, dated in 1937, that outlined the bike’s unique origins and provided key details.”

As far as we understand, the bike was uncovered some time ago, as the collector had time to restore it.

“As a lifelong passionate fan of the history and achievements of this incredible British brand, to have discovered this amazing survivor and restored it to the glorious condition it would have been in when it first went on display in 1901, has given me an immense amount of satisfaction,” Shepherd said in a statement.

The prototype will be, of course, included in the celebration events the British company has planned for next year, and it will be shown, together with the millionth Triumph manufactured in Hinckley, in a special display being set up at the factory.

PRESS RELEASE

4 DECEMBER 2021 – An amazing historic find, discovered and restored by leading vintage Triumph collector Dick Shepherd, the 1901 Prototype rewrites the history books, adding a whole new chapter prior to Triumph’s official sales starting in 1902.

Long rumoured to exist and referenced within advertising and reviews that appeared in 1901, this first Triumph prototype was developed from a standard Triumph bicycle, with an engine provided by Belgian manufacturer Minerva, in order to generate interest and gauge the public’s demand for a Triumph motorcycle.

Dick Shepherd said “Having been approached by a friend of a collector, who had sadly recently passed away, to evaluate an old Triumph I was incredibly excited to discover that the bike they had featured unique details that were not present on the first production Triumphs. Along with the bike, the collector had also received a letter from Triumph, dated in 1937, that outlined the bike’s unique origins and provided key details.”

“With an engine number that is consistent with references in Minerva’s engine records of a 1901 first Triumph engagement the historic significance of this motorcycle became incredibly clear.”

“As a lifelong passionate fan of the history and achievements of this incredible British brand, to have discovered this amazing survivor and restored it to the glorious condition it would have been in when it first went on display in 1901, has given me an immense amount of satisfaction.”

First unveiled at the UK’s Motorcycle Live show the 1901 prototype will feature in dedicated event at Triumph’s Factory Visitor Experience on the 14th December, where the machine will be ridden in public for the very first time in over 100 years.

This incredible, historic motorcycle will then be on display, alongside the millionth Hinckley Triumph, in a new, specially created 120-year anniversary display, hosted within Triumph’s Factory Visitor Experience.

The Triumph Factory Visitor Experience is free to visit and is located at Triumph’s HQ in Hinckley, England and is open daily Wednesday through Sunday, from 10am – 4.30pm.

Chix on 66 Teams Up with WomenRidersNow.com

By General Posts

December 2, 2021—The Riveter Chapter of the AMCA (Antique Motorcycle Club of America) proudly announces that leading motorcycle publication WomenRidersNow.com (WRN) has been named Premier Media Partner for the “Chix on 66” event June 11-25, 2022. This partnership will enable extensive media coverage for the ride, bringing the excitement of this amazing cross-country journey to WRN readers worldwide.

WomenRidersNow.com editor Tricia Szulewski will be joining the ride, providing day-to-day social media updates as well as pre- and post-event coverage. Tricia is a veteran moto-journalist who has worked with some of the top motorcycle magazines in the U.S.

Chix on 66 is a cross-country ride that follows Route 66 from Chicago, Illinois, to Santa Monica, California. This is the classic American journey on classic machines, with some women riding vintage motorcycles, and others making the trip on modern mounts. Each day the group will begin and end together, but each woman will make the journey what she wants it to be. Instead of riding in a single pack, a turn-by-turn app will allow each rider to follow the route at her own pace.

Riveter Chapter President Karan Andrea says, “When I first started riding—actually, even before I got my endorsement—I subscribed to the WRN newsletter. That was the first suggestion that there were, indeed, other women who rode, because I did not know any. To be able to introduce WomenRidersNow.com as our premier media partner, all these years after I first subscribed to its newsletter, is a great honor. I am looking forward to working with WRN to create an inspiring and powerful experience for the women who join us for Chix on 66.”

WomenRidersNow.com is the #1 (number one) resource for motorcycling news and reviews from a female perspective. WRN is a web magazine and its content is available to read online for free. The publication shares the latest in motorcycles, gear, products, and articles specifically for women riders and those who ride with them.

WomenRidersNow.com editor Tricia Szulewski, comments, “Women’s motorcycle events like the Chix on 66 ride create special opportunities to form lasting bonds with other women riders and those who support them without judgement or intimidation. When women get together in like-minded groups they feel more comfortable about openly sharing their stories, issues, fears, and triumphs. This leads to more than just friendships. It paves the way for having more confidence and empowerment—from becoming a better rider, to being inspired to troubleshoot mechanical problems, or to simply make the decision to ride with or without a partner.”

She adds, “I’ve been fortunate to have ridden in many different parts of the country, but never the length of Route 66. When the opportunity to ride with a group of really cool chicks—many on vintage motorcycles—came along, I jumped at the chance! There is nothing like the feeling of riding into town and watching heads turn as everyone realizes it’s all women riding the motorcycles.”

WRN is excited to chronicle many of the participants’ stories before, during, and after the ride. Besides featuring daily Chix on 66 posts on its Facebook and Instagram channels, WRN will showcase many of the Riveters on its web site. Please sign up for WRN’s free monthly newsletter (womenridersnow.com/newsletter-signup) to stay informed.

www.chixon66.com @chixon66 @chixon66
www.womenridersnow.com @womenridersnow.com @womenridersnow.com