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Spec Showdown: Triumph Rocket 3 Vs. Yamaha VMax

By | General Posts

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

Power cruisers punch out.

For 2019, Triumph upped the ante on the Rocket 3 with the introduction of an entirely new generation. The upgrades included a new look and also a bigger engine which is no small feat considering the Rocket 3 already rocked the biggest production motorcycle engine on the market. Just like that, a new benchmark was set in the power cruiser segment. 

While the definition of power cruisers is rather broad, there’s only handful of 1,500cc-plusmodels the Rocket 3 can measure up toConsidering the Triumph sits at the top of the category with a higher price tag, we thought we’d take a look at how it compares to one of its more affordable competitors, its Japanese counterpart, theYamaha VMaxLet’s have a look at how the two models compare on paper. 

2020 Triumph Rocket 3R 2020 Yamaha VMax
Engine: 2,458cc, water-cooled, inline-three cylinder 1,679cc, liquid-cooled, 65-degree V4
Bore, Stroke, Compression: 110.2mm x 85.9mm, 10.8:1 90mm x 66mm, 11.3:1
Transmission and Final Drive: gears, shaft 5 gears, shaft
Performance: 165 hp/163 lb-ft -/123 lb-ft
Weight 641.5 pounds (dry) 683 pounds (wet)
Price: $21,900  $17,999

Performance 

Of course, we can’t talk power cruisers without discussing their performance. The Rocket 3 boasts the biggest production motorcycle engine of the industry which gives it an undeniable appeal versus the Yamaha. That being said, though its engine is almost half the size of the Rocket (displacement wise), the VMax can pull its own weight and give the Triumph a run for its money. 

While the Rocket 3 produces more torque than the Vmax (163 versus 143)there’s a possibility that the Japanese power cruiser outperforms its British counterpart on the pony front.  While Yamaha doesn’t disclose any horsepower figures, several sources suggest it produces “over 170 horsepower”, possibly even 200, according to some. That’s easily between 5 to as much as 35 hp more than the Rocket. Because the numbers aren’t from Yamaha, however, we can’t take them into consideration.  

What Yamaha does confirm, however, is that the VMax has a higher compression ratio than the Rocket 3 which means you get more bang (literally) for your buck.  

As for weight, the two companies both showcase different information. Triumph sticks to the dry weight (without the fluids) while Yamaha gives a more reallistic, ready-to-operate weight. Fueled up and ready to go, the Rocket 3 likely weighs about the same as the VMax, give or take a couple of pounds. Based on manufacturer-provided date, this means that the Rocket 3 offers the best power-to-weight ratio (unless Yamaha eventually confirms a horsepower figure.) 

Cruising

Though they like to flex their massive engines and show off their muscles, the Rocket 3 and the VMax are cruisers above all. How well do they perform on that front? Pretty darn well if I may say so.  

Neither Triumph and Yamaha have lost sight of their models’ role in their respective lineups and in the segment they compete in. As good as high-performance ratings look, riders are also interested in the ride itself—or shall we say the “cruise”? For that reason, both companies offer a wide range of elective accessories owners can outfit their cruisers with. The selection in both ranges includes saddle bags, luggage racks, heated grips, taller windscreens, etc. Triumph also offers the Rocket 3 GT which comes fully loaded with a number of additional accessories for a $700 premium over the Rocket 3 R’s starting price.  

Whether you prefer British or Japanese muscle, both offer equally good customization options to help make them more cruising and travel friendly. While creature comfort and equipment weigh heavy in the balance when buying a bike you’d like to travel onthe range is also another factor to consider. This is where the Rocket 3 gets to shine.  

The Triumph is armed with a 4.8-gallon fuel tank and despite the size of its engine, it’s rated at a reasonable 32.43 miles per gallon (mpg). This means that you should be able to get roughly 155 miles out of a single tank. The Yamaha has a smaller, 4-gallon tank. With a fuel economy rating of 27 mpg, this means you should get 108 miles out of a full tank of gas.   

Price 

There’s a healthy $4,000 different between the Yamaha and the Triumph. Interestingly, the despite the price gap, both models have a lot to offer in terms of standard equipment. However, the Rocket 3 does have a leg (or a wheel?) up on its competitor thanks to such standard features as Bluetooth connectivity, navigation, Showa suspension hardware, a beefier engine (of course), and cruise control. Plus, let’s not forget that the Triumph badge tends to come with a small premium anyway.  

While the VMax has quite the striking the design, this generation of the model has been around for over a decade compared and the platform is quite old by the industry’s standards. That being said, though it offers fewer standard features than the Rocket, the VMax manages to stay competitive and relevant thanks to its price also dating from 2009. Launch MSRP was $17,990 11 years ago which at the time was considered premium. A $9 increase in the span of a decade is more than reasonable. 

In Conclusion

The new-generation Triumph Rocket 3 is a beast worthy of its legacy with a bigger, meaner engine and some serious cruising chops. It doesn’t hold a candle to its American competitors. At $21,900, Triumph makes sure that customers get a good deal for their money by loading the bike up with features. Look-wise, from a subjective point of view, it’s also the better-looking bike with a flowing silhouette, dual headlight, and an overall assembly that looks more “finished”.

That being said, while the platform is a bit long in the tooth despite a few recent updates, the Yamaha VMax is just quirky enough to deserve to be on any cruiser lover’s shopping list. Between its massive air ducts and eclectic silhouette, the model stands out, for better or for worst. Plus, the 2.5L inline-three might be the biggest, most powerful engine of the two but the V4 has the most distinct sound.

The Rocket 3 is the power cruiser poster child and the VMax is the weird but endearing cousin.

Other Features

Wheelbase: 66 inches 66.9 inches
Seat Height: 30.4 inches 30.5 inches
Brakes: Dual 320mm discs with Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial monobloc calipers front, Single 300mm disc, Brembo M4.32 4-piston monobloc caliper back, Cornering ABS Dual 320mm wave-type discs6-piston calipers with Brembo master cylinder front,  

298mm wave-type disc, single-piston caliper with Brembo master cylinder back 

Suspension Showa 47-mm inverted fork front, Showa monoshock with reservoir RSU with remote hydraulic preload adjuster 52mm inverted fork front, Single shock with remote reservoir and remote adjustable for preload back.
Features: High-specification Avon Cobra Chrome tires, LED headlight, 2nd generation TFT instruments, Four riding modes, Hill-hold control, Cruise control, Keyless ignition, USB charging port, Free ‘MyTriumph’ app.  slipper clutch, ABS, drag-style instruments, LCD.

Kawasaki’s Open-Road Ready 2020 Ninja 1000SX Ups The Comfort, Tech And Power

By | General Posts

by Bill Roberson from https://www.forbes.com

It’s raining and I’m sheltering in place with my family, which sadly means no motorcycle riding as spring weather imminently arrives in the Northwest. Thankfully, Kawasaki just broke the boredom by holding a model reveal online, as is the sudden new norm, and the new bike is the 2020 Ninja 1000SX. It looks to be another fine machine from the always capable Kawasaki. But after the presentation, I found myself wandering down memory lane (and through digitized photos) to the first and only Ninja I personally owned. In the early 1990’s, I happened across a pristine first-gen Top Gun era 1986 GPz 900 Ninja in bone-stock, unblemished like-new condition (below). Resplendent in original red, white and blue livery, it was by that time somewhat of a performance relic, but I bought it anyway because, well, I had always wanted one and the price was right. Compared to the back-road-strafing Suzuki GSX-R 750 I was riding at the time, it was heavy, a bit wobbly when pressed in the curves, and big. But still, it was just so cool. It still is.

One weekend, a riding buddy and I saddled up our respective bikes with some soft bags and headed out to parts unknown in the wide-open (and very lightly patrolled) reaches of eastern Oregon. Midway into a long leg of the trip, my cohort was complaining about the uncomfortable riding position of his mount and tried everything from using the rear pegs to sitting on towels to soothe the pain. But I had made an unexpected discovery: That big, heavy GPz Ninja was a near-perfect sport-touring machine, with a supple yet sporty suspension, a comfortable seat, a near-perfect bar-seat-peg triangle (for myself at least), and a willing, powerful engine. That was the first of many long trips on the Ninja.

Over 30 years later, Kawasaki’s now-venerable Ninja nameplate has gone through numerous iterations and generations, ranging from sword-sharp track attack weapons to the beyond-bonkers 300+hp H2R supercharged exotic. But sitting in the sweet spot in the lineup is the great, great grandchild of that first GPz machine, the 2020 Ninja 1000SX. It still looks fast, with rakish, geometric bodywork and a mean, purposeful stance. And it is Ninja fast, with a new 1,043cc inline-four that puts out triple-digit horsepower and is tuned for more torque than your typical sportbike screamer. But best of all, this modern Ninja calls out to me like my old friend, with more focused capabilities that weren’t readily apparent in my sturdy GPz.

The $12,399 2020 Ninja 1000SX is both a sport-riding and a sport-touring platform with a definite emphasis on sport, but Kawasaki has also embraced and expanded its touring acumen. Hard bags that use a slick low-profile mounting system are an OEM option, the quick-release windscreen adjusts across four settings, there are four seat options, and the SX has been retooled digitally for open-road riding including, at long last, electronic cruise control (the real kind, not the plastic throttle lock I used on my ‘86 Ninja). But it’s also designed to be a competent back-roads tool, including a new clutchless quick shifter and slipper clutch, giving riders the ability to scratch an itch in both worlds.

For 2020, Kawasaki has also upped the tech quotient to a large degree over the 2019 model. The KIBS ABS smart braking system is now standard, and a new Bosch inertial module adds more safety options to the braking and acceleration parts of the ride, including a novel new cornering management system. For pilots wanting less tech intervention, certain aspects of the system, such as the three-level traction control, can be set to “off.” Incredibly, the Bosch IMU doing all that thinking for you only weighs a scant 40 grams, or about as much as a handful of paperclips. There are also expanded ride modes including Sport, Rain and Road, as well as a custom Rider mode where you can set up your own favorite profile. Parameters within riding modes can be adjusted as well and everything can be set up on the bike’s new 4.3-inch TFT color cockpit display, or through the Kawasaki Rideology smartyphone app. As I recall, my Top Gun Ninja had a gas gauge, which I thought was pretty damn trick at the time. I taped an LCD clock from the dollar store to the tach to really take things to the next level. Ah, the carbureted days…

To be sure, the 2020 NinjaSX is a smart-looking bike, and Kawasaki’s engineers have tweaked the fairing for better airflow, as well as moving from a two-pipe muffler layout to a more sporty (and lighter weight) single-sided affair more in tune with its pure sportbike brethren.

Probably my only complaint is the color scheme, which is a natty grey and black scheme with Kawi-green accent stripes (as above) as the only option, at least so far. Come on, Kawasaki, find some old cans of Ninja red, white and blue paint already!

Once the world starts turning again, the new Ninja 1000SX should be available in Kawasaki showrooms, and it’s only a $200 bump over the old model.

BMW R 18 Motorcycle with Monster Big Boxer Engine to Be Unveiled on April 3

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s been a long time in the making, but BMW Motorrad’s newest entry to the cruiser segment, a bike aptly called the R 18, is just around the corner. On Friday, April 3, the Germans will pull the wraps off what is to become one of the most potent motorcycles in its segment.

And this bike owes it all to a new engine BMW likes to call the Big Boxer. First shown on a bike called the Concept R 18 at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este in May 2019, the engine moved over to two custom builds, before getting the official thumbs up at the end of 2019.

The two-cylinder powerplant has a capacity of 1,802 cc, which should make it the highest-capacity engine ever used on a production motorcycle. According to the specs revealed by the Bavarians, the engine has a power output of 91 hp and 158 Nm of torque, and that should also make it the most powerful boxer ever built by BMW.

It’s the R 18 that will see the first application of the Big Boxer, and on the bike it will be linked to a single-disc dry clutch that sends torque to the 6-speed transmission. Although the power ratings have already been announced, the performance specs are still unknown.

“All of us at BMW Motorrad are very much looking forward to the absolute highlight of the year for us – the world premiere of the BMW R 18,” said in a statement Dr. Markus Schramm, Head of BMW Motorrad.

“BMW Motorrad achieved record sales for the ninth year in succession in 2019. With the R 18 and the associated entry into the cruiser segment, we are consistently pursuing our growth strategy with the clear goal of becoming the number one in the premium segment worldwide.”

More details and official photos of the bike will become available at the unveiling.

Honda’s all-new superbike

By | General Posts

by Nicole Garcia Merida from https://moneyweek.com

The Honda Fireblade has been overhauled to deliver even more power and speed.

“It’s not the same bike with different colours, it’s not a facelift. The new Fireblade is a completely different beast,” says Cristian Predoi in DriveMag Riders. The CBR1000RR-R boasts an all-new, ultra short-stroke inline four-cylinder engine, which means the machine packs quite a punch, with a lot more speed and a lot more torque than its predecessor.

It looks like Honda really means business with the 2020 Blade, says Jordan Gibbons in Motorcycle News – it is “gunning for all-out superbike glory”. The engine delivers an astounding 215bhp, making it more powerful than almost all its competitors. (The only exception, the 988cc Ducati Panigale V4R, sneaks ahead with 217bhp.) And clever new technology and reworked engine details means you can “rev the engine like mad and achieve the big power figures they’ve clearly been chasing for track success”. It looks like Honda “got bored of being beaten by its rivals on road and track and pulled out all the stops to create a far sharper Blade”.

The new frame is designed to maximise feel for the rider. It is also far more aerodynamic, says Ben Purvis in Bennetts. “A trio of winglets hides behind the outer fairing panel on each side… The tank is shaped to let riders tuck in better, and the bellypan is more enclosed than any rival and runs right back to the rear wheel, where it’s shaped to deflect air and water away.” Honda has clearly not come to play with this version of the Fireblade. “When a Honda is named, every ‘R’ in its title means more performance.” The new model boasts an “R” more than its older sibling. Is it worthy? “Without a doubt.”

Introducing the PowerPlus Engine

By | General Posts

Indian Motorcycles are delivering their all-new liquid-cooled PowerPlus V-twin, which is now the most powerful engine in its class.

We have raised the bar for American motorcycles with our most powerful engine to date, the PowerPlus. The all-new 108 cu in, liquid-cooled V-twin engine delivers a class leading 122 hp and 128 ft-lbs of torque, establishing a new standard for V-twin performance.

Tested, Refined, Proven
We put the PowerPlus through the industry’s most rigorous development and testing program. We piled on almost one million miles of simulated testing, including state-of-the-art dyno testing and over 250,000 miles on the road.

Power you can depend on
The PowerPlus motor’s overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder deliver incredible V-twin power. Hydraulic valve lash adjusters and hydraulic camshaft chain tensioners make it easy to maintain and reliable.

All new powertrain
Six-speed transmission with true overdrive, assist clutch to reduce effort and three ride modes – Rain, Standard and Sport. Now riders can customize throttle mappings and traction control settings to their riding preferences.

Iconic heritage
A nod to Indian Motorcycle’s iconic history, the new PowerPlus motor is named after one of our original motorcycles, produced from 1916 to 1924.

Modern performance

  • Engine Displacement: 108 cu in (1769 cc)
  • Power: 122 hp at 5,500 RPM
  • Torque: 128 ft-lbs at 3,800 RPM
  • Maximum Engine Speed: 6,500 RPM
  • Architecture: 60-degree V-twin, liquid-cooled
  • Timing: Overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder
  • Transmission: Six-speed with true overdrive, constant mesh
  • Clutch: Assist clutch

Our all-new liquid-cooled PowerPlus V-twin is the most powerful engine in its class. With overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder delivering a blistering 122hp and 128 ft-lbs of torque, it redefines American performance.

 

Hennessey’s Venom F5 engine bench tested at a furious 1,817 horsepower

By | General Posts

by Loz Blain from https://newatlas.com

It’s only been live for a week, but we’ve already had to update our list of the world’s most powerful cars, after Hennessey Performance surprised itself with an extreme dyno reading.

The Venom F5 is the car Hennessey hopes will demolish not only the fastest production car record now held by Bugatti, but also the 0-400-0 record recently reclaimed by Koenigsegg. With a long enough piece of road, there’s every chance this wild machine could be the first to break 500 km/h (310.7 mph), which is the next nice round number to aim at since the Chiron hit 300 mph (483 km/h) last month. That’s if Koenigsegg’s Jesko doesn’t get there first.

To claim the record, the Venom will need power. Lots and lots of power, to fight through the massive force of wind resistance you get at speeds more than four times faster than highway limits. Up until this morning, Hennessey was saying the Venom F5 would make some 1,600 horsepower, a truly staggering total and enough to place it equal fifth on our list of the most powerful production cars available, alongside the Jesko and the Chiron Super Sport 300+.

But the engine hadn’t been dyno tested until now. And while 1,600 horses was the target, even John Hennessey himself appeared surprised with the bench test readout of 1,817 hp and 1,193 lb-ft (1,617.5 Nm) of torque.

“We exceeded our target horsepower number. Actually, we blew our target number out of the water by delivering over 1,800 horsepower,” said Hennessey. “The F5 engine has a very broad power band with over 1,000 lb-ft of torque available from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. Give it the full throttle and it’s the most furious engine that we have ever built. Thus, we gave our F5 engine a special name: ‘Fury.’”

Fury indeed. Check out the rage in action on the dyno below, and imagine that sound happening when you put your foot down in a lightweight, sub-3,000-lb (sub-1,361-kg) hypercar.

And how might you squeeze 1,800 hp out of a 6.6-liter, twin turbo V8, you might well ask? Well, Hennessey has seen fit to publish a detailed set of components and specifications, which we have reproduced in full below.

Hennessey Venom F5 V8 Engine Specifications:

  • Power: 1,817 bhp @ 8,000 rpm
  • Torque: 1,193 lb-ft @ 5,500 rpm
  • Redline: 8,200 rpm
  • Displacement 6.6 liter (400 CID)
  • Bore: 4.125 in.
  • Stroke: 3.750 in.
  • Billet aluminum intake manifold with integrated air to water intercooler system
  • Forged aluminum pistons (10.0:1 compression ratio) with steel extreme duty wrist pins
  • Forged steel light weight H-bean connecting rods
  • Extreme duty forged steel connecting rod bolts
  • Light weight extreme duty billet steel crankshaft
  • Forged steel V8 engine block with billet main caps, increased cylinder wall & deck thickness & 6 bolts per cylinder
  • High-flow aluminum cylinder heads with canted titanium intake valves
  • Inconel exhaust valves with dual valve springs
  • Extreme duty billet steel hydraulic roller camshaft
  • Extreme duty hydraulic roller lifters
  • Extreme duty billet steel pushrods
  • Extreme duty stainless steel shaft mounted rocker arms
  • Dailey Engineering 4 Stage billet dry sump oiling system
  • Dailey Engineering Billet CNC aluminum oil pan
  • Precision ball bearing twin turbochargers (76 mm billet aluminum compressor wheels) rated at 1,350 bhp per turbo, making 23 psi boost pressure at 1,817 bhp
  • 3D printed titanium turbo compressor housings
  • High-flow twin turbo wastegates
  • High-flow twin turbo blow-off valves
  • High-flow billet aluminum 90 mm dual throttle bodies
  • High-flow fuel injectors, 2 per cylinder
  • High-flow stainless steel twin turbo headers with 1 7/8 in. primary tubes
  • High-flow stainless steel 3.0 in. twin turbo downpipes
  • High-flow catalytic converters
  • High-flow 3.5 titanium exhaust system

S&S Cycle’s Shadow Pipe for the Sidewinder 2 into 1 Exhaust!

By | General Posts

Love the performance of a two into one, but need the aesthetic of dual exhaust on your touring bike?

The folks at S&S Cycle completely get it.

The big power of their stepped header Sidewinder 2:1 system is the ultimate addition to any performance bagger and to keeps things balanced, they just launched their Shadow pipe.

Perfectly matched to the 4.5” Sidewinder system, the Shadow pipe fills the left side gap under your saddlebag for a well sorted symmetrical look. Check out both the Sidewinder and Shadow pipe for 1995-2019 HD touring models

https://www.sscycle.com/sidewinder-2-into-1

S&S has successfully developed its own emissions testing laboratory. It is a recognized testing facility by the US Environmental Protection Agency and is listed on the California Air Resources Board’s list of approved independent test laboratories for testing of aftermarket products on motorcycles.

The S&S Emissions Certification Laboratory (ECL) is capable of performing both exhaust emissions and evaporative emissions testing. The ECL is set up specifically for testing vehicles in the power sports industry. Motorcycles, ATVs, UTVs, scooters, and trikes are all welcome candidates for testing at S&S.

S&S Cycle, Inc. exhaust systems and slip-on mufflers are legal for sale and use on U.S. EPA and California pollution controlled motorcycles not originally equipped with a catalyst in the exhaust system. In addition S&S slip-on mufflers are legal for sale and use on U.S. EPA and California pollution controlled motorcycles that have the catalyst located in the header pipes upstream of the muffler.

Jasmine Cain Returns March 29 with “BE BRAVE”

By | General Posts

Produced by Caleb Sherman (Rex Brown, The Lacs), “Be Brave” Appears on SEVEN (Cain’s 7th LP) Releasing May 10

Listen to “Be Brave” https://soundcloud.com/1888media/jasmine-cain-be-brave/s-BAdcR

Nashville Album Release Show, Star Wars Themed Cantina Party, May 4 at Little Harpeth Brewery

Coast to Coast Tour Includes Bike Weeks in Daytona Beach, Arizona, Myrtle Beach and Sturgis

Nashville, TN: Music City Mayhem ‘Female Rock Vocalist of the Year’ and bassist extraordinaire Jasmine Cain has announced the March 29 release of “Be Brave,” the first single from her forthcoming album, SEVEN. With shimmering vocals and her trademark bassline, the melodic mid-tempo rocker recalls the best of Halestorm, Heart and Whitesnake. Inspired by her best friend, and lifetime co-writer, Paige Logan, Cain shaped the song with her friend’s infinite wisdom, “She has been my female inspiration for many of my transitions in life. I’ve seen her face almost everything life can throw at you, and each time she walked through the fire and came out of the ashes on the other side better than she was before. When I asked her how she does it, this is her only advice. Be brave.”

Brave is the first taste of SEVEN, Cain’s seventh album, and her first since 2016’s White Noise, a breakthrough album that featured Jeff LeBar of Cinderella and Michael Starr of Steel Panther. SEVEN is more than a number, it’s a life path that she connects to on a deeply spiritual level, “The number seven is about harmony and allowing yourself to think outside the box. I needed a new direction and fresh ideas and so I created my own trinity of sound with the help of some key element players and together we pushed through the boundaries I had locked myself into a new dimension that is SEVEN.”

Three years in the making, and due for release on May 10, Cain has delivered her magnum opus, packed with her most personal burdens, unpacked with emotional clarity and executed with a searing urgency. Anthems like “Let It Go” and “Ghost” showcase her incredible range as a vocalist, finding strength from scars while the razor sharps riffs of “Money,” Burnout” and “Real World” show that this power trio is an unstoppable force to be reckoned with.

Produced by Caleb Sherman, known for his work with The Lacs and Rex Brown of Pantera, the 10-track album deftly layers the edginess of Active Rock with the pop sensibilities of Adult Contemporary to create a comprehensive journey that stakes its claim as a towering achievement of classic rock and modern music. In addition to Sherman, who adds keys, synth, guitars, bass, and background vocals, Mills Logan was at the controls as recording and mixing engineer with contributions from songwriters Paige Logan, Monique Staffile (HER), and Kevin Bebout and all-star musicians including guitarists Jordan Roepke, and Kenny Olson (Kid Rock) and Accept drummer Christopher Williams.

In conjunction with the album release, Jasmine launched a Patreon to give her rabid “Cainiacs” exclusive access to subscriber-only videos, limited edition posters, behind-the-scenes photos and two bonus cuts not appearing on the album, the soul-baring, “Hurt” and a cover of “E.T.” by Katy Perry. Patrons will also have the opportunity to partake in VIP meetups.

Taking the show on the road is what she loves the most, logging 150 dates per year. 2019 will see her go coast-to-coast, from the beaches of South Carolina to the sands of San Diego including multi-date stints at bike weeks in Daytona Beach, Scottsdale, Myrtle Beach, Galveston, TX and Sturgis, SD. For her album release show in Nashville, she’s hosting a raucous celebration at Little Harpeth Brewery in East Bank. Dubbed “May The 4th Be With You,” her Star Wars themed Cantina Party will include a costume contest, burlesque, prop replicas, a Stormtrooper DJ and a full bore rock show. In addition to standard general admission tickets, a limited number of VIP passes will be offered that include a private viewing area and a special meet ’n’ greet with Jasmine and Femi Taylor (Oola from Return of the Jedi). For more info / tickets, please visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/jasmine-cain-tickets-55703140593

Endorsed by Warwick Basses, Teye Guitars, GHS Strings, Elixir Strings, Shure, Westone Audio, Traynor Amplification, Epiphone, Larrivée Acoustic Guitars, Peavey and Line 6 Wireless, Cain has amassed a loyal worldwide fanbase, playing 1500+ shows/festivals over the past decade, including gigs with Quiet Riot, Great White, Jackyl, Winger, Heart, Vixen, Skid Row, Bullet Boys, Lita Ford, 38 Special, Saving Abel, Puddle of Mudd, Saliva, Blackstone Cherry, Powerman 5000, Finger 11, Theory of a Deadman, My Darkest Days and Three Days Grace.

TOUR DATES
3/07 – Cartersville, GA @ Sixes Tavern (Bike Night)
3/11 – Daytona Beach, FL @ Dirty Harry’s (Bike Week)
3/12 – Daytona Beach, FL @ Dirty Harry’s (Bike Week)
4/06 – Scottsdale, AZ @ Dirty Dogg Saloon (Bike Week)
4/07 – Scottsdale, AZ @ Dirty Dogg Saloon (Bike Week)
4/13 – Phoenix, AZ @ Cactus Jack’s
4/14 – San Diego, CA @ Tipsy Crow (2pm)
4/14 – San Diego, CA @ Goodbar (8pm)
4/20 – Cave Creek, AZ @ Roadhouse
4/26 – Las Vegas, NV @ Golden Nugget
4/27 – Las Vegas, NV @ Golden Nugget
5/03 – Atwood, YN @ Friday Night Boogie Hollar
5/04 – Nashville, TN @ Little Harpeth Brewery (Album Release)
5/10 – Daytona Beach, FL @ Hard Rock
5/12 – North Myrtle Beach, SC @ House of Blues
5/13 – North Myrtle Beach, SC @ House of Blues
5/15 – Murrells Inlet, SC @ Suck Bang Blow
5/16 – Murrells Inlet, SC @ Suck Bang Blow
5/17 – Murrells Inlet, SC @ Suck Bang Blow
5/26 – Sandusky, OH @ Jimmy Bukkett’s (Bike Week)
6/01 – Fairborn, OH @ Sugar Mellon’s

Jasmine Cain
SEVEN
1. Burnout
2. Do It For You
3. Be Brave
4. Are You Ready
5. Let It Go
6. Money
7. Ghost
8. Real World
9. Powers
10. Longshot

ONLINE
http://jasminecain.com
http://twitter.com/jasminecainrock
http://instagram.com/jasminecain
http://www.facebook.com/jasminecainrocks
https://open.spotify.com/artist/5Gq3cAe5zmaYP9ApN56mib

Zero introduces bold new SR/F Electric Streetfighter

By | General Posts

Zero launched a new SR/F streetfighter in Amsterdam, which claims to deliver an attractive blend of “industry-leading power, control and connection.”

It is a tangible improvement in range capability and recharging time, along with new styling that brings its electric powertrain with sharp and conventional – naked streetfighter looks.

The Californian brand leaps forward making electric motorcycles look and perform in a way more appealing to both new and largely electric-phobic existing bikers.

Vice President of Product Development, Brian Wismann, said: “The bike was inspired and influenced by the same things that inspire designers that are working on internal combustion bikes. “I don’t want anybody to think that this was meant to look like an electric Ducati, or Triumph – it’s not a derivative design, but having an understanding of where this cultural reference for having beautiful machines comes from and then integrating some of those design elements into the SR/F are pertinent in describing why it looks as good as it does.”

New Zero SR/F specs

  • 200-mile range potential
  • One-hour charge to 95%
  • Makes 110bhp / 140lbft
  • Two models available in May
  • Weight is 226kg

Zero’s new SR/F has the power and charm to attract regular street racers. The torque makes this a serious streetfighter.

The model uses Zero’s new ZF75-10 motor, coupled to a ZF14.4 lithium-ion battery. The powertrain uses air-cooling to improve longevity. It eliminates many routine maintenance jobs. A single charge is claimed to have the potential to deliver a 200-mile maximum range when ridden at town speeds, using Zero’s Power Tank, which arrives in Autumn 2019.

The innovative Rapid Charge System works on the large and growing network of Level 2 charge stations and provides a platform that allows for up to three independent charging modules. This means the SR/F can boast the fastest recharge capacity in Zero’s existing line up. It gives a maximum charging performance of empty to 95% charged in just one hour.

SR/F’s Cypher III operating system knits Zero’s next-gen app and dash to the well-proven Bosch Motorcycle Stability Control (MSC) system, ensuring the rider isn’t caught out by an over-eager right wrist or brake lever action. Zero SR/F has ABS and a host of electronic safety kit to ensure rider safety on the mean streets it is meant to race on.

The attractive dash can connect to a new app controlled by the rider. Rider modes on offer comprise Street, Sport, Eco, and Rain, and there are up to 10 programmable custom modes available.

Brembo’s electronic braking AI acts on JJuan calipers front and rear. The frame is a steel-trellis with concentric swingarm that’s claimed to help transfer the torque to the tarmac with the most mechanical grip possible. Both the battery and motor act as stressed members as well.

The new connected app also allows the rider to monitor their SR/F for: Bike Status & Alerts, Charging data, Ride Data Sharing, System Upgrades and Updates.

The first system of its kind on a production motorcycle, the status checker means owners can see information on charging interruptions, get unexpected motion notifications, and use the ‘Find my Bike’ function to see if their bike is where it should be.

The data captured on rides includes bike location, speed, lean angle, power, torque, charge and energy used/regenerated.

All the data is private unless the rider chooses to share it. The full suite of app functions are free at purchase, and for two years thereafter. Riders can opt out altogether if they so desire.

The two models will come in Seabright Blue and Boardwalk Red colourways, and are expected to be ready to plug in from May 2019.

H-D 2019 Electra Glide Standard new model announcement

By | General Posts

MY19 FLHT Electra Glide Standard. Touring.

Harley-Davidson ELECTRA GLIDE STANDARD delivers an elemental Touring experience powered by the Milwaukee-Eight engine

MILWAUKEE (Mar. 4, 2019) –Powered by the muscular Milwaukee-Eight™ 107 engine, the new Electra Glide Standard is a “Dressed down Dresser” that provides a raw, fundamental riding experience inspired by Harley-Davidson’s Grand American Touring roots.

Designed for the traditional touring customer, the Electra Glide Standard is for the rider seeking to disconnect from all the noise of the day-to-day through riding. No screens, simply a motorcycle that provides and heightens the experience of the journey. This fundamental experience is a key element in the design and engineering of the Electra Glide Standard.

The Electra Glide Standard features essential Harley-Davidson styling elements such as the iconic batwing fairing, chrome trim, standard saddle bags, and cast aluminum wheels. Chrome accents are added in high-impact design areas and complemented by polished rocker, cam and derby covers and select blacked out components – a blend of traditional elements and modern trends.

“To express the stripped-back essence of the Electra Glide Standard we focused on finishes that were simple, timeless, and fundamental to the Harley-Davidson’s touring line. Chrome was added to key components and complimented by polished and blacked out parts, said Harley-Davidson’s Vice President of Styling & Design Brad Richards. “The rocker, cam, and derby covers are finished with chrome to emphasize the V-Twin shape of the Milwaukee-Eight 107 engine. In addition, they add a dose of nostalgia that draws a through-line all the way back to the first Electra Glide.”

To provide a raw touring motorcycle experience without riding compromises, the Electra Glide Standard features all the latest ride and handling technology of Harley-Davidson’s Touring line such as standard electronic cruise control, hand-adjustable emulsion-technology rear shock absorbers, 49mm front forks with Showa dual bending valve suspension, and Brembo brakes with optional Reflex Linked and ABS features.

MY19 FLHT Electra Glide Standard. Touring.

A central part of the riding experience, and a highlight of the Electra Glide Standard, is its Milwaukee Eight 107 cu. in. V-twin engine that features sleek, modern styling that respects the heritage of previous Harley-Davidson big twin engines.

In the Electra Glide Standard, the Milwaukee Eight provides the performance and riding benefits that riders the world over regard and appreciate with quick throttle response, plenty of passing power, and the iconic Harley-Davidson big twin sound.

The Electra Glide Standard is a showcase of an aspect of Harley-Davidson’s More Roads promise to continue to lead the heavyweight Touring segment with compelling products that inspire more riders to fully engage in the sport of motorcycling.

The Electra Glide Standard model is offered in Vivid Black with an M.S.R.P. of $18,999*

* Prices listed are the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Prices for base models. Options such as color are available at additional cost. Prices exclude tax, title, licensing, registration fees, destination charges, added accessories, and additional dealer charges, if any, and are subject to change. Harley-Davidson reimburses dealers for performing manufacturer-specified pre-delivery inspection and setup tasks. Dealer prices may vary.

About Harley-Davidson Motor Company
Since 1903, Harley-Davidson has fulfilled dreams of personal freedom by leading the innovation of two-wheeled mobility. The company offers an expanding range of leading-edge, distinctive and customizable motorcycles and brings the brand to life through Harley-Davidson riding experiences and exceptional motorcycle parts, accessories, riding gear and apparel. Learn more about how Harley-Davidson is Building the Next Generation of Riders at www.harley-davidson.com.