oil

The Tall Tales of the Climate Crisis

by Daniel W. Nebert For the past 35 years, the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has warned us that emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, predominantly carbon dioxide (CO2), are causing dangerous global warming. This myth is blindly accepted — even by many of my science colleagues who know virtually nothing about climate. As a scientist, my purpose here is to help expose this fairy tale. From his seminal work while prisoner of war during WWI, Serbian mathematician Milutin Milankovitch explained how climate is influenced by variations in the Earth’s asymmetric orbit, axial tilt, and rotational wobble — each going through cycles lasting as long as 120,000 years. Click here to read this article on Bikernet.com * * * *

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How Much Oil Do Wind Turbines Use?

As the world seeks cleaner sources of electricity, renewable energy is heralded for not burning fossil fuels to produce energy. However, wind turbines contain moving parts and they require lubricants to operate at peak performance due to environmental and mechanical pressures. The amount of oil used by a wind turbine varies greatly depending on the size and type of turbine. A small turbine for powering the home only requires a very small amount of oil, whereas the largest offshore wind turbines regularly need topping up with large amounts of oil and other lubricants to keep them running efficiently. Proper maintenance including the use of oil ensures the reliability of cost-effective wind energy. As the fleet of wind turbines ages, many are entering a post-warranty period. This means that equipment repairs are becoming more costly for wind farm owners. Thus, proper maintenance including the use of oil to prevent equipment failure is critical to reduce costs and promote renewable energy production. Lubrication protects wind turbines from premature wear of many critical parts so they operate at maximum performance for greater productivity. Grease oil and grease are used in the gearbox, pitch gear, open gear, and yaw gear. Did you know every wind turbine contains 80 gallons of oil? At the moment, the average wind farm has 150 turbines. Each wind turbine requires 80 gallons of oil for lubrication, and this isn’t vegetable oil; this is a PAO synthetic oil based on crude… 12,000 gallons for one 150-turbine wind farm. Once a year, its oil must be replenished. To power a city the size of New York, it is estimated that about 3,800 turbines would be required… For just one city, that’s 304,000 gallons of refined oil. –Edward Rivis Wind Turbine Magazine and –Utility Smart * * *

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Wyoming Republicans Propose Ban on Electric Car Sales

from https://www.newsmax.com A group of Republican state legislators in Wyoming have proposed a ban on electric vehicles in the state until 2035 in an attempt to protect the oil and gas industries. A group of Republican state legislators in Wyoming have proposed a ban on electric vehicles in the state until 2035 in an attempt to protect the oil and gas industries. The bill, which was introduced on Friday, states: “The proliferation of electric vehicles at the expense of gas-powered vehicles will have deleterious impacts on Wyoming’s communities and will be detrimental to Wyoming’s economy and the ability for the country to efficiently engage in commerce.” Wyoming state Sen. Jim Anderson, a Republican and one of the bill’s sponsors, told The Cowboy State Daily that the legislation came after several states moved to ban the sale of gas combustion cars, and noted that if the measure passes, “The Legislature would be saying, ‘If you don’t like our petroleum cars, well, we don’t like your electric cars.’ ” Co-sponsor Sen. Brian Boner said that the resolution would be a symbolic measure, but that it would still be meaningful. “One might even say tongue-in-cheek, but obviously it’s a very serious issue that deserves some public discussion,” Boner said. “I’m interested in making sure that the solutions that some folks want to the so-called climate crisis are actually practical in real life,” he added. “I just don’t appreciate when other states try to force technology that isn’t ready.”  

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At Largest Market: Two-wheeler sales crash to 10-year-low in FY22

Two-wheeler sales crash to 10-year-low in FY22; motorcycles fall below 9 mn India is the largest manufacturer of two-wheelers and also the largest market for it. (China being second) One of the primary reasons for this downfall is the spiraling cost of fuel prices. by John from https://www.newswwc.com/ New Delhi: Rural distress impacted the Indian two-wheeler segment, one of the largest in the world, in a big way that their sales in 2021-22 fell sharply, for the first time in ten years, to 13,466,000 units, as per the latest data from the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM). It was in 2011-2012 that the two-wheeler sales were close to this number at 13,409,00. ( India’s Financial Year is calculated as from 01-April-2021 to 31-March-2022 ) Throughout the year, demand for motorcycles and scooters was impacted by rural distress and higher ownership cost amidst soaring fuel prices. Sales of two-wheelers, particularly motorcycles failed to gather momentum even during the festive months, leaving the companies burdened with a pile of unsold stocks. As a result, the overall sales of motorcycles fell below the 9-lakh mark for the first time since 2016-2017, SIAM report said. One of the primary reasons for this downfall is the spiraling cost of fuel prices. Barring two months, petrol prices escalated in almost all months of FY22, sometimes even thrice a month that severely impacted the demand of entry-level motorcycles which is the primary choice of the budget-conscious low-income consumers. New motorcycle sales are directly correlated with fuel prices, as 62% of the country’s fuel sales are consumed by the two-wheeler segment. According to market experts, spike in auto fuel prices has triggered the rate of deferment majorly among the consumers of below 125cc two-wheelers that hold about 80% of the total market. Besides, shortage of semiconductors and

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Different Types of Fire Extinguishers for your Workshop

Different types of Fire? Yes ! Know the Class Category for Fire Extinguishers by Keith Dooley and Roger Tunsley from ehow.com Auto garages are full of electrical equipment, gasoline, oil and chemicals, any of which can cause or make a fire worse. For this reason, it is best that your workshop is equipped with relevant type/s of fire extinguishers to deal with different types of fire. Fires are classified by the type of material that’s burning. There’s a broad international agreement on fire classifications in Australia, Asia and Europe. But the American classifications differ. CLICK HERE To Read this key Tip for your DIY Workshop or full-fledged Garage business. Stay updated with important motorcycle news, products, events and tech – SUBSCRIBE to Bikernet FREE Weekly Newsletter – CLICK HERE

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Climate Dogma Killed Biden’s “Build Back Better”

by Michael Shellenberger A half trillion dollars to subsidize renewables would have raised energy prices, worsened inflation, and undermined decarbonization. But what do we do now? The centerpiece of President Joe Biden’s legislative agenda is dead. Senator Joe Manchin today announced that he could not support Biden’s “Build Back Better” legislation which consisted of $1.7 trillion in new spending and would have added $158 billion to the national debt over the next decade, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. The largest component of spending, $570 billion, was for renewables, electric cars, and other climate change investments. Progressives, environmentalists, and Democrats are furious with Sen. Manchin, but it was their own climate and renewables dogmatism that doomed the legislation. Democratic Senators could have written legislation that expanded nuclear energy and natural gas, the two main drivers of decarbonization, which are strongly supported by Manchin, and Republicans, but instead investments went overwhelmingly to solar panels, wind turbines, and electric cars. It’s true that there were good things in Build Back Better, and that one of the worst climate provisions, the Clean Energy Performance Program, was already removed. Build Back Better included a tax credit for existing nuclear power plants, funding for advanced nuclear fuels, funding for fusion R&D, and financial support for communities hurt by the transition to renewables. But the money for nuclear would not have made much if any difference to the operating of nuclear plans. Nuclear plants in California, Massachusetts and New York are being shut down, despite already being profitable, for ideological reasons. Legislatures in less anti-nuclear states like Illinois, New Jersey, and Connecticult step in to save their plants when they need to. And higher electricity prices due to natural gas shortages are making nuclear plants in other states even more profitable. Of Build Back Better’s

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Energy Clarity: Our need for cheap, plentiful, reliable energy

By Alex Epstein From Center for Industrial Progress When making energy choices, there are three major criteria that need to be considered: 1. Is it cheap? Simply put, if you can’t afford energy, then you don’t have energy. 2. Is it plentiful? If energy is scarce, then many people will have little to no energy. 3. Is it reliable? If energy is unreliable, then you won’t have it when you need it. In other words, energy is only valuable to the extent that it is cheap, plentiful, and reliable. And to make it that way, we have to discover cheap, plentiful, reliable processes for generating energy. Energy is a process Energy is a process. Whether it’s coal, oil, gas, solar, wind, we describe them as materials, but they’re really processes. The materials are just one part of the process, but the whole process can include things like mining, refining, manufacturing, transportation, operation, maintenance, and disposal. And then you have to look at how the whole process adds up. When we see something in the marketplace being cheaper or more expensive that reflects the whole process. The general reason why certain forms of energy are not adopted is because the process to produce them is too expensive or it’s not reliable. Let’s look at some examples of this. Jimmy Fallon’s irrefutable case against “renewables” For this first example, I’m going to let comedian Jimmy Fallon do the talking. “New Scientist Magazine reported on Wednesday that in the future, cars can be powered by hazelnuts. That’s encouraging considering an eight ounce jar of hazelnuts costs about nine dollars. Yeah, I got an idea for a car that runs on bald eagle heads and Faberge eggs.” So you may be thinking, “Isn’t hazelnut energy renewable? Doesn’t it come from the sun? Isn’t the

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Dream E-Type: Early days of the Honda 4-Stroke

from https://www.thesundaily.my Mr Honda’s disdain for two-stroke engines fuelled the relentless pursuit of perfection for his little four-strokers. It was March 1951 when Soichiro Honda summoned engineer Kiyoshi Kawashima from Hamamatsu. “‘Kawashima, would you mind coming over for a moment?’ It was the beginning of a two-month stint in the capital as I worked on the design of the E-Type 4-stroke engine in a corner of the Tokyo Plant,” recalls Kawashima. “When the plans were at last ready the Old Man dashed in to see it, bringing Fujisawa, with him.” (Takeo Fujisawa was Honda Motor Co Ltd’s co-founder.) Kawashima can remember clearly that day in May 1951. “As he showed the plans to Fujisawa, Mr. Honda gave us an enthusiastic commentary: ‘Ah, I see. You have this kind of valve and the cam goes like that. This is what I call an engine, it isn’t just a two-stroke machine that looks as though it’s been cut from a bamboo tube with holes drilled. This will sell. Honda will do well with this!’ Mr. Fujisawa didn’t have any understanding of the plans, he didn’t know anything about mechanical things at all, so he just said things like ‘Hm, yes, that’s great,’” said Kawashima, laughing. The now-legendary test crossing of the Hakone Pass took place on July 15. In those days the Hakone Pass was considered the ultimate test for a motor vehicle. Even lorries could only get over it if they stopped for a rest every now and then. So it was certainly a challenge for a small 150cc motorcycle. Kawashima acted as both the engine designer and on that occasion, as test rider. “Actually we’d been using the Hakone Pass as a test track for quite some time by then. I was sure we could climb it, but I was

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Motul Set For 2021 MotoGP Campaign With Team Suzuki And Pramac Racing

from https://www.scoop.co.nz Motul continues winning partnership with reigning MotoGP champions Team Suzuki- Motul and PRAMAC Racing sign exclusive deal for 2021 The 2020 MotoGP World Championship season was an incredible year, which saw Team Suzuki and Motul claim a clean sweep across the Drivers and Teams Titles. The famed Japanese manufacturer will continue with riders Alex Rins and Joan Mir, a line up that remains unchanged since 2019, with a clear aim of repeating the championship successes in 2021. Motul will continue as the Official Lubricant Partner of the Suzuki factory team, extending the close working relationship between the two brands that have delivered success at the top flight of motorcycle racing for the past 32 years. This partnership has pinned its hopes on the championship-winning Suzuki GSX-RR, which has seen only minor upgrades due to a MotoGP engine freeze over the winter. The aim is clear for 2021 – to repeat the success of 2020 and achieve back-to-back titles. Motul also confirms a key technical partnership with PRAMAC Racing for the MotoGP World Championship, inking a three-year deal which will see Motul and PRAMAC Racing competing at the top flight of motorbike racing until 2023. Jorge Martin and Johann Zarco will be leading the charge in 2021, both on the highly competitive Ducati Desmosedici GP bike which scored 5 podium finishes in the hands of PRAMAC Racing during the 2020 season. This partnership extends away from the race track, where Motul Heavy Duty will be working closely with PRAMAC’s industrial applications in the energy and material handling sector. Motul will provide first fill lubricants at factory level for PowerGen equipment, providing high-performance diesel and gas lubricants to improve mechanical efficiency. The 2021 MotoGP World Championship season begins this weekend, at the Losail International Circuit in Qatar on the 26-28

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