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Insane No Time To Die Stunt

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by Jessica Rawden from https://www.cinemablend.com

Insane No Time To Die Stunt Created By Daniel Craig Needed James Bond, A Motorcycle, and 8,400 Gallons Of Cola

At this point we’ve heard so much about James Bond’s upcoming 25th outing on the big screen No Time To Die, it may feel like we know everything about the movie already, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Case in point: We recently learned there will be a major sequence involving a sticky street doused with Cola James Bond will need to navigate …and it was outgoing Bond actor Daniel Craig’s idea.

Thanks to a profile in Total Film, we learned about yet another No Time To Die stunt sequence (it should not be a spoiler that there will be several) and how it was accomplished for the big screen. Apparently, at one point, as James Bond is chasing down a lead on a motorbike, Daniel Craig figured out a way to get his stunt double, a man named Paul Edwards, to hit a ramp and land on cobblestones.

Cobblestones are apparently pretty slippery generally, so the film crew had to device a way to make them stickier. Enter: Coca-Cola, which for a price did the trick. Apparently, the production spent €60,000 or more than 70K in U.S. dollars to pull off the one quick stunt, with stunt head Lee Morrison revealing that 8,400 gallons of the brown stuff was also used.

“I spent nearly €60,000 spraying Coca-Cola around Matera. I’ve been spraying Coca-Cola on slippery surfaces for a very long time.”

The James Bond franchise has been a fan of product placement in the Daniel Craig era, including some memorable shots in Skyfall of Craig drinking a Heineken instead of his usual martini, shaken not stirred. This time around it seems as if it is Coke getting the shoutout – and also worked as a cleaning agent on the cobblestones to boot.

Still, motorcycle stunts in general can be the most difficult portions of a movie to film, so it’s great the team on 007’s latest had a trick up their sleeves. Though it is helping me understand how the latest Bond film may be the most expensive to date.

There are a ton of YouTube videos devoted to Coca-Cola’s alternate purposes, so none of this comes as a huge surprise, but now when No Time To Die hits theaters, finally, you’ll be able to spot the cool motorcycle moment and already know more about its origins during filming.

In fact, I think we’ve already seen this amazing leap in the early footage for No Time To Die. James Bond’s on a motorcycle and he’s scaling some wall and clearly looking to land on what seems to be cobblestones. You can take a look at the moment in the early trailer for the movie, below.

Bond 25, aka No Time To Die was initially expected to hit theaters in the spring. Its release was pushed several times, at one point landing in November and now more likely to come in April of 2021 – nearly one whole year after it was initially expected to hit theaters. Anticipation for the film is still high, but as we move closer and closer to 2021, we’ll have to keep an eye on how crowded the theatrical schedule for next year is getting.

Deadpool 2 Production Company Hit Big With Fine After Death Of Stuntwoman Joi Harris

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by Dirk Libbey from https://www.cinemablend.com

In the summer of 2017 while Deadpool 2 was in production, Joi Walker, a professional motorcycle racer who was working as a stunt performer for the first time, was killed when she was ejected from her bike and went through the plate glass window of a building. Now, the Vancouver-based production company, TCF Vancouver Productions LTD, has been fined nearly $300,000 by WorkSafeBC, the British Colombia equivalent of OSHA in the U.S.

The exact fine comes to $289,562 and is due to the finding that the production of Deadpool 2 was in violation of five requirements of Canada’s Workers Compensation Act and the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. The finding of WorkSafe BC, is that, among other things, the production failed to identify the hazards involved in the stunt or control the risks. The stunt performer was not only not wearing appropriate safety gear, but according to Deadline, she was actually instructed by the production not to do so.

Joi Walker was working as a stunt performer in place of Zazie Beats as Domino. The motorcycle stunt was Joi Walker’s first stunt performance on the film. This may have something to do with the fact that one of the other violations listed is the fact that the production failed to provide a new worker orientation for Walker.

Joi Walker’s death is not only not the only significant stunt accident in recent years, it’s not even the only significant one that took place on a motorcycle. Two years before the Deadpool 2 accident, a motorcycle crash on the set of Resident Evil: The Final Chapter left stuntwoman Olivia Jackson in a medically induced coma. And while Jackson ultimately survived her injuries, she was left with permanent damage, including an amputated arm. Jackson was recently awarded damages in a lawsuit against the film’s South African production company.

A stuntman on The Walking Dead fell to his death a month before the accident on the set of Deadpool 2.

More recently a stuntman on the set of F9 sustained a serious head injury in a fall. While this most recent injury is from this past summer, it appears that we’ve seen fewer serious injuries to stunt people more recently, which hopefully indicates that extra care is being taken to ensure safety of all involved.

Stunt people have, without question, the most dangerous job on any film set. They’re trained to be able to do these stunts safely, but there is always going to be risk. Considering the great amount of respect that many in Hollywood clearly do have for stunt performers, there’s little argument that nothing is more important than their safety.

WorkSafe BC says the purpose of the fine is to motivate the employer, and other employers, to comply with health and safety requirements. Deadpool 2 was ultimately dedicated to Joi Walker.

Ford Mustang driven by Steve McQueen in ‘Bullitt’ sells for $3.4 million

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This was the highest price a Ford Mustang ever fetched in any auction.

The 1968 Ford Mustang GT that Steve McQueen drove in the classic car chase from the movie “Bullitt, one of the most famed cars from American cinema, sold for $3.4 million (£2.60 million) at auction in Florida on Friday, Mecum Auctions said.

It was the highest price ever paid for a Ford Mustang at auction, according to David Morton, marketing manager for the auction house in Kissimmee, near Orlando. The buyer has not been publicly identified.

“The hammer dropped at $3.4 million, but with buyers’ fees, the total cost is $3.74 million,” he said, adding it shattered the auction house’s previous record set last year of $2.2 million.

The unrestored muscle car, its “highland green” paint looking rusty and black upholstery splitting apart, starred in a 10-minute sequence in the 1968 film, getting airborne a few times as it sped through the hilly streets of San Francisco.

The car was auctioned without a reserve, or minimum sale price, a risky decision that could have forced the owners to sell low.

McQueen filmed with the window down so viewers could see he was behind the wheel. Although credited as the driver, McQueen actually shared the wheel with Hollywood stunt driver Bud Ekins, according to the movie database IMDB.

Many movie buffs view the chase as ground-breaking for its duration and white-knuckle drama. The sequence forgoes a score in favour of roaring engines and screeching tires. McQueen, playing the no-nonsense police Lieutenant Frank Bullitt, was chasing bad guys who drove a black 1968 Dodge Charger.

After filming, the Mustang was sold to a Warner Brothers employee, and later to a New Jersey police detective. He in turn sold it for $6,000 in 1974 to Robert Kiernan of Madison, New Jersey, who held onto the car until he died in 2014.

Kiernan rejected multiple offers for the car, including one from McQueen himself, according to the New York Times. He left it to his son, Sean.

“I would like to appeal to you to get back my ’68 Mustang,” McQueen wrote to Kiernan in 1977, according to the Times. “I would like very much to keep it in the family, in its original condition as it was used in the film, rather than have it restored; which is simply personal with me.”

McQueen died in 1980 at age 50. Robert Kiernan never responded to McQueen’s letter, which Sean Kiernan still has, the Times said.

Sean Kiernan told Mecum in a promotional video that his mother drove the car until the clutch failed in 1980. It went nearly 40 years without being driven until recently, with 65,000 miles on the odometer, Kiernan said.

Motorcycles Tom Cruise rode as Captain Maverick and Ethan Hunt are now nothing short of icons

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from https://www.financialexpress.com/

Top Gun 2 is set to release on 26 June next year. That is still a lot of months before Captain Maverick’s glory takes over our screens. So, until then, here’s a look back at the coolest Tom Cruise motorcycle moments that have been and well be.

Top Gun is about to relive on our screens soon and we can’t wait to see Maverick being nothing but magnificent behind the joystick of a fighter jet or behind the handlebar of a pretty iconic Kawasaki. Yes, Top Gun 2 movie trailers have confirmed that Kawasaki GPZ900 will be back on the silver screen. Tom Cruise is one of the most revered motorcycle people in Hollywood. The other hotshot motorcyclist would be Keanu Reeves but let’s just focus on the Cruise missiles for now.

Kawasaki GPZ900R – Top Gun

Tom Cruise has been doing it for decades – including motorcycles in his films. Years before a lot of us were even born, Cruise rode the Kawasaki GPZ900R for the big screen as Captain Maverick in Top Gun 1986. If you like motorcycles, this one is every bit of a celebrity as Mr Cruise is and we’ll also see it in the upcoming Top Gun 2.

Kawasaki H2 – Top Gun 2

Sticking with Top Gun 2. As the GPZ900R was the fastest production motorcycle back in 1986, Maverick had to ride the fastest production motorcycle in today’s day and age. Hence, the supercharged Kawasaki H2. The other good thing about seeing these motorcycles share the screen with Tom Cruise is that he does most of the riding himself.

BMW R nine T Scrambler – Mission Impossible Fallout

The chase scenes make up a huge of reasons why we love Mission Impossible films. MI: Fallout had Cruise riding a BMW R nine T Scrambler on the streets of Paris and around the Arc de Triomphe against the flow of the traffic. Fun fact: an electric bike was used to film the tracking shots of the chase scene.

BMW S1000RR – Mission Impossible Rogue Nation

This one was perhaps the coolest chase scene of all Mission Impossible films (if you’re not still swooning over 2000 Mission Impossible 2 Tom Cruise). Rogue Nation had a load of BMW Motorrads but we love the crooked-faced S1000RR doing high-speed corners with a Tom Cruise on it.

Triumph Speed Triple – Mission Impossible 2

We’re mentioning this one twice because we haven’t stopped swooning over it. This chase scene with Cruise on a Speed Triple and the baddie on a Daytona remains on the top of the list of MI film chase scenes. The dual ‘bug-eye’ headlamp design and polished frame gave the bike a strong streetfighter look that became the trademark of the series, especially the shot where Cruise emerges from a cloud of flames astride the Speed.

‘Bullitt’ Mustang auction-bound next January at Kissimmee sale

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The Highland Green 1968 Mustang fastback that starred alongside Steve McQueen in Bullitt is, quite possibly, the most-recognized Ford Mustang on the planet, despite spending decades in the shadows. After returning to the spotlight in 2018, the car has made appearances at auto shows, museums, concours d’elegance events, and even on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The Bullitt Mustang has been in the Kiernan family since 1974, but next January may well become the most expensive Mustang ever sold at auction when it crosses the stage during Mecum’s Kissimmee, Florida, sale.

In January 1968, Warner Brothers purchased a pair of S-code Highland Green Mustang fastbacks, with sequential vehicle identification numbers, for use in the filming of the movie. Chassis 8R02S125558 was modified for use as the stunt car, while its twin, chassis 8R02S125559, was selected as the hero car, used primarily for close-ups. Both received chassis reinforcements, heavy-duty front springs, Koni shocks and a thicker anti-roll bar, and their already-potent 390 V-8s gained machined heads, larger four-barrel carburetors and a hotter ignition for added performance.

From there, the paths of the two cars diverged. Chassis 558 received a roll bar that doubled as a camera mount, and a small generator (needed to power cameras and lights) was installed in its trunk. Once production of the movie wrapped, only one of the cars – chassis 559 – remained in salable condition, while the badly damaged stunt car, chassis 558, was sold for scrap. Long considered lost to history, chassis 558 surfaced early last year, rescued from a Mexican junkyard in 2016.

Chassis 559 was purchased by Warner Brothers employee Robert Ross, who kept the car for nearly two years before advertising it for sale in Hemmings Motor News in 1970. Its next owner, fittingly, was New Jersey police detective Frank Marranca, who reportedly paid Ross $6,000 for the screen-used Mustang. Marranca kept the car until 1974, when it sold to Robert Kiernan for the same $6,000 the detective had paid for it in 1970.

In 1977, Steve McQueen contacted the Kiernans looking to reacquire the Bullitt Mustang, which was then in use as a daily driver. An equivalent Mustang was offered in exchange (plus, presumably, some unspecified amount of cash), but the New Jersey couple opted to keep the Bullitt Mustang instead. In 1979, Robert’s wife Robbie purchased “Bulitt” vanity plates for the couple’s anniversary, and nearly 40 years later, these remain on the car.

In 1989, the Kiernans – now with nine-year-old son Sean – relocated to Kentucky, and then six years later, to Tennessee. Numerous Mustang collectors (and print publications) contacted the family over the years, inquiring about the Bullitt Mustang, but the answer was always the same; the car wasn’t for sale, and they weren’t interested in having the car featured in a magazine. Circa 2001, Robert and Sean began a restoration of the car, but the project didn’t progress at the originally intended speed and was soon set aside.

Robert Kiernan died in 2014, passing the Mustang along to Sean. A year later, Sean let slip to his boss, Casey Wallace, that he was the owner of the car, prompting Wallace to enlist the help of friend and filmmaker Ken Horstmann to document the car’s history. One minor detail delayed the start of the video’s production: In 2015, the Bullitt Mustang was in pieces, the restoration begun in 2001 never completed.

Instead of hastily restoring the irreplaceable Mustang, Sean instead opted to reassemble the car, which remains largely original throughout (its rebuilt and repainted 390 V-8 a notable exception). This task was completed in 2016, and on July 4, Sean fired the 390 V-8 for the first time in 15-plus years. In 2017, the Mustang was reunited with a member of the McQueen family – Molly McQueen, Steve’s granddaughter – who met with Sean at a Ford design studio in Dearborn, Michigan.

Its reemergence came in January 2018, at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Michigan. Three months later, thanks to its place on the National Historic Vehicle Register, it was displayed on the National Mall, part of an Historic Vehicle Association exhibit that included the first Chrysler minivan (a 1984 Plymouth Voyager LE) and the Ferrari-replica Modena Spyder that appeared in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. In July 2018, the Bullitt Mustang appeared at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, where it was driven up the hill in pursuit of a black ’68 Dodge Charger said to be used in the filming of the movie.

The decision to sell a car that’s been a part of his family for 45 years could not have been an easy one for Sean, but it’s worth remembering that the Bullitt Mustang is no ordinary collector car. The demands of ownership include constant appearance requests, the liabilities of shipping (in some cases, internationally), and, ironically, the inability to simply enjoy the car for the occasional drive without interruption or serious financial risk. Though some will view this as cashing in on the car’s history, it’s almost surely about returning to a normal life, albeit one with a comfortable reserve in the bank.

Dana Mecum announced the Bullitt Mustang’s upcoming sale, alongside Sean Kiernan, at the firm’s Monterey auction. No pre-auction estimate has been announced, though it’s a safe bet that the sale will set a record for a Ford Mustang sold at auction.

Mecum’s Kissimmee Auction takes place January 2-12, 2020, at the Osceola Heritage Park in Kissimmee, Florida. For further details, visit Mecum.com.

News from https://www.hemmings.com

Journey of Discovery / Tucker Films

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There are few better ways to kick-off a new partnership than by riding motorcycles together. The open road brings those that ride together closer together through ritualistic moments of shared experience on the journey along the way.

Emails get ignored, phones muted, camaraderie ensues, and the mind begins to relax as you start to live more in the moment. So, to kick off a new partnership with META, they went on a motorcycle road trip together from Denver to Sturgis and back. Here’s some of their journey.

Direct Link to Video:

 

In Memory of Peter Fonda

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Peter Fonda, celebrated actor known for Easy Rider, dies aged 79

The actor Peter Fonda has died at the age of 79 following a battle with lung cancer, his family has said.

Fonda, who co-wrote, produced and starred in the classic 1969 road movie Easy Rider, died peacefully at his home in Los Angeles on Friday, his family said in a statement.

“In honor of Peter, please raise a glass to freedom.”

Fonda died at 11.05am local time, according to his family. The official cause was respiratory failure due to lung cancer, they said.

Fonda collaborated with another struggling young actor, Dennis Hopper, on the script about two pot-smoking, drug-slinging bikers on a trip through the south-west and deep south.

Fonda produced Easy Rider and Hopper directed it for a meager $380,000. It went on to gross $40m worldwide, a substantial sum for its time.

The film was a hit at Cannes, netted a best-screenplay Oscar nomination for Fonda, Hopper and Terry Southern, and has since been listed on the American Film Institute’s ranking of the top 100 American films. The establishment gave its official blessing in 1998 when Easy Rider was included in the United States National Film Registry for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.