Skip to main content
Tag

miles

Electric Cars Can Kiss My Ass

By General Posts

Eclectic article on Electrifying Changes in Our Lives

by the Wicked Bitch

Here it from the lady who has driven everywhere and tweaked the vehicle to get anywhere. ‘Charge’ up your courage and decide the road for your own fate.

“My dad bragged that I could tell a Ford from a Chevy by the time I learned to walk.. and when i did learn to walk, I left tiny handprints in the dust of an old yellow Volkswagen bug in the corner of the shop.”

CLICK HERE To Read this “Heart to Kickin’ Butt” article on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina if you aim to Ride Free Forever!!! Sign up by Clicking Here.

Chopper Chronicles : The Sundance Meeting

By General Posts

K.Randall Ball kicks off the first chapter of Stolen Motorcycle Files – Exclusively on Bikernet.com

READ Episode One now !!!

The Sundance Meeting
by K.Randall Ball

Three brothers rode into Sundance, Wyoming on their way to Sturgis in late July, hell bent to make their 20th run to the Badlands.

The small town, population just over a grand, was a mere 52 flying miles from the Rally. They rode long and hard for almost 400 miles, and this could be the final watering hole stop before the last blast on interstate 90 into Sturgis, South Dakota.

Sundance located in the bare open plains of Wyoming was named after the Sun Dance ceremony practiced by several American Indian tribes.

CLICK HERE To Read This Latest Biker Fiction only on Bikernet.com

Check Out All the Books in the Cantina or in 5-Ball Racing Shop.

CLICK FOR Books Section at 5-Ball Racing Shop.

CLICK To Subscribe To Cantina & Read All the Fiction Anytime Anywhere

Honda Motorcycle bought in 1981 with zero miles in original condition

By General Posts

Honda motorbike bought in 1981 that has zero miles on the clock because it was confiscated by its teenage owner’s father and locked in garden shed goes up for auction for £2,000

  • Honda CB100N was bought 40 years ago but was never ridden by its teen owner
  • Strict father banned him from riding it and it stayed untouched locked in storage
  • After father died, son found his bike in remarkable condition four decades later
  • The 1981 bike is now going up for auction and is expected to fetch up to £2,000

by Katie Feehan from https://www.dailymail.co.uk

A 40-year-old Honda bike with no mileage on it has been rediscovered and is up for auction after the disapproving father of its first teen owner banned him from riding it and locked it away in storage for decades.

The 1981 Honda CB100N was bought brand new by the youngster in his youth while he lived with his parents.

However, his boyhood fantasy of riding a motorcycle never materialised because his strict father banned him from riding it.

Instead the machine was left to languish in storage for the next four decades.

After his father died the unnamed owner, who is now aged in his 50s, was tasked with clearing out his house in Bridgewater, Somerset, and stumbled upon his old but immaculate bike.

He agreed to sell the time-capsule Honda to neighbour Graham Tozer who has now put it up for sale at auction.

The bike still has its original tax certificate with an expiry date of July 31, 1982. The odometre displays the exact mileage of a mere four tenths of a mile.

Mr Tozer, 64, said: ‘I’m a collector of classic bikes and cars, so six months ago my neighbour called me up and said they needed rid of it.

‘He was born in the house and spent all of his life there. When he was a youngster he really wanted his own bike but when he brought it home his dad wouldn’t let him ride it.

‘He’d saved up for such a long time to buy it but his father just said, ‘you’re not going on that. You can stick it in the shed’.

‘Apparently his dad was really strict. He was ex-military and he was the boss of the house.

‘I would have loved a bike like that when I was younger but my dad probably would have done the same thing.

‘To have a motorbike from the eighties which hasn’t been touched is so unique. It really is like the Holy Grail for collectors.’

George Beale, a specialist at Charterhouse Auctioneers of Sherborne, Dorset, said: ‘These bikes were ordinarily used for commuting, so those which are still on the market from the 1980s tend not to be in the greatest condition.

‘But with a little work this one could be like brand new, which is incredibly unusual for something so old.

‘It would be rare to find any vehicle from the 1980s without any miles whatsoever. It just so happens that this young boy’s tyrant father was far more forceful than he was.’

The Honda is being sold with a pre-sale estimate of £2,000 at the Haynes International Motor Museum on October 14.

NCOM Legislative Motorcycle News for September 2021

By General Posts

RPM Act re-introduced, NTSB Chief demands re-designed roads to stop speeding vehicles, Presidential Executive Order of 50% of All Vehicles Sold to be Emission-Free by 2030, NY Governor Bans Sale of Combustion Vehicles from 2035, Zero-Emissions Legislation, More than 38,000 deaths in road-accidents in 2020 is highest since 2007, Per-Mile Motorcycle Insurance in USA, FEMA Survey, Programs to Slow Speeding Vehicles, Robot-cop in Singapore.

Click Here to Read the NCOM Biker Newsbytes for September 2021 on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

ABOUT AIM / NCOM: The National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) is a nationwide motorcyclists rights organization serving over 2,000 NCOM Member Groups throughout the United States, with all services fully-funded through Aid to Injured Motorcyclist (AIM) Attorneys available in each state who donate a portion of their legal fees from motorcycle accidents back into the NCOM Network of Biker Services (www.ON-A-BIKE.com / 800-ON-A-BIKE).

Harley-Davidson Announces “Let’s Ride Challenge” Sweepstakes

By General Posts

Celebrating the Open Road with a Sweepstakes that Unlocks Prizes as Miles are Ridden and Tracked Via H-D.com App

  • 0-999,999 mi: $2,500 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card
  • 1M mi: $5,000 USD cash and a $2,500 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card
  • 3M mi: Riding trip with 3 friends
  • 5M mi: Custom Harley-Davidson® Motorcycle†

You’ll also be automatically entered for a chance to win a $1,000 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card.
*Miles update daily. When more miles are tracked and a bigger prize is unlocked, the previous prize will no longer be available.

MILWAUKEE (JULY 26, 2021) – Harley-Davidson is celebrating the summer riding season and the open road with the “Let’s Ride Challenge”. This sweepstakes encourages riders to rack up miles via the H-D.com app in order to unlock bigger prizes, as each milestone is reached. In addition, the sweepstakes also features personal riding challenges, including instant win games that provide riders a chance to win.

“We want to acknowledge and reward our Harley-Davidson riders, in the United States and Canada, for all the miles they’re putting in this summer,” said Theo Keetell, VP Marketing. “The ‘Lets Ride Challenge’ sweepstakes will encourage our riders to seek out new adventures, unlock new prizes via the H-D.com app and experience instant win games, as part of the Harley-Davidson community.”

From July 23 through September 30, riders in the U.S. and Canada who enter by registering on www.Harley-Davidson.com/ride or the H-D App. Through riding-related milestones and activities, by visiting their local Harley-Davidson dealer, and by alternative methods of entry, participants can earn entries for a chance to win prizes at increasing thresholds. Depending on the threshold number of miles entered via the H-D.com app, prizes would include H-D gift cards, cash rewards, a riding trip, or a custom 2021 Harley-Davidson® touring motorcycle.

For sweepstakes Official Rules, program and prize details and more information visit this page.

https://harleydavidson.promo.eprize.com/letsridechallenge/public/COMPILED/en/fulfillment/rules.649d0b8ca0016d712e194aaf1794b981.pdf

For full information on 2021 Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Genuine Motor Parts and Accessories, and general merchandise visit: www.h-d.com.

Become an AMA LongRider

By General Posts

AMA LongRider Program – Recognizing AMA Members Who Love to Ride

The AMA LongRider program is your chance to show others that you’re serious about riding your motorcycle. AMA members are invited to earn patches for various mileage milestones.

Mileage awards are available at 10,000, 25,000 and 50,000 annual miles. In addition to the awards, AMA LongRiders will be recognized on the AMA website.

If you don’t get a chance to ride that often, let your miles accumulate for a Lifetime Mileage award at 25,000, 50,000, 100,000, 250,000, 500,000, 750,000 and 1 million miles. Riders who achieve 1 million miles will earn a special AMA LongRider plaque.

Long Rider Rules:

  • Must be current AMA member
  • Must agree to abide by AMA verification rules and procedures
  • Must register for program (miles begin to accumulate once registered)
  • May use multiple motorcycles

How it works: 

  • Riders register using the AMA LongRider Application. Click Here.
  • Mileage counts from this day forward, unless you can provide verification of previous mileage with documentation from an AMA-chartered club. The AMA will consider verified mileage awards from non-AMA groups/clubs/dealers on a case-by-case basis. Mileage will not be credited for years that you were not an AMA member.
  • If you were enrolled in the AMA LongRider program in 2008 or prior, previous verified AMA LongRider Emeritus mileage counts.
  • Send a current odometer photo with your AMA card in the photo or other verification as listed on the mileage award form. Odometer pics and other verification will be kept on record with the AMA.
  • If multiple motorcycles are used, mileage will count from time each motorcycle is registered with the LongRider Program.
  • AMA LongRiders receive a decal and patch with registration.
  • Forms can be sent to AMA LongRider, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. It’s recommended to make a copy or keep a record of the mileage you are submitting, so you know when to submit for awards.

Mileage Awards:

  • Once you reach a milestone, return the AMA LongRider Mileage Award Request Form (Click Here) to AMA LongRider, 13515 Yarmouth Dr., Pickerington, OH 43147. It’s recommended to make a copy or keep a record of the mileage you are submitting, so you know when to submit for your next award.
  • Send an updated odometer photo with your AMA card in the photo or other verification as listed on the mileage award form.
  • Only verifiable mileage counts toward AMA LongRider Awards (odometer vs. “trail miles”). This is a road/adventure riding program.

Share Your Achievements:

  • Share photos of your odometer, patches or photos from a trip using the #AMAlongrider on social media.
  • Email amalongrider@ama-cycle.org with your photos, name and contact info. for a chance to be featured on AMA social media or in American Motorcyclist magazine.

Questions?

Contact amalongrider@ama-cycle.org if you have questions.

View AMA LongRider Achievements at https://americanmotorcyclist.com/longrider/

View 2021 LongRiders
View 2020 LongRiders
View 2019 LongRiders
View 2018 LongRiders
View 2017 LongRiders
View 2013 LongRiders

MotoGP Inspired Honda RC213V-S Limited Edition

By General Posts

by Dragos Chitulescu from https://www.autoevolution.com

MotoGP Inspired Honda RC213V-S Costs as Much as a Ferrari, Comes With Zero Miles.

When Honda first announced the RC213V-S a few years ago, quite a few people were hoping that they would at least get a chance to see this bike with their own eyes. After Honda took Dani Pedrosa and Marc Marquez to the RedBull Ring to test it, pointing out that this is the closest you could ever get to a MotoGP motorcycle, levels of excitement continued soaring.

Not long ago, we showed you a very spectacular Ducati 1299 Superleggera, which was already a very fast and very expensive motorcycle, and it looks like it still hasn’t been sold. But the fact that this RC213V-S just popped up is even more impressive. Because it’s nearly three times more expensive than the aforementioned Ducati, and it’s also much rarer.

Honda initially planned to release just 250 units of this bike, but rumors have pointed out that a smaller number has made it to production stages. It is a hand-built motorcycle in a dedicated factory in Japan, and the bike that is for sale here is unit number 007, which gives it an extra degree of coolness.

Looking over the specs, this particular unit is almost like the MotoGP bike but without the pneumatic valves and the seamless transmission.

Those were changed to provide increased reliability for people using them on public roads. There are also other elements to make it road-legal such as the headlights, taillights, side mirrors, a horn, and a license plate holder. While the “normal” (if you can call it that) version came with just 157 horsepower, this bike also has the optional HRC Sport kit, which should provide you with about 212 horsepower.

The parts included in the kit are just what you need to get the whole racing experience. There are many lightweight materials on this bike, and the way the chassis was built means that you will need a fair share of courage and skills to even acknowledge its potential. Not to mention the fact that just by riding it down the road won’t be enough for you to tell the difference from a tamer, albeit fast 1000cc bike.

All you need to do now is come up with £219,995 ($306,796), which is what you would expect to pay for a brand new Ferrari. But I guess it makes sense considering the odometer reads zero miles. Right now, I’m tempted to say that if I could afford to pay that much for a motorcycle, and if I had considerably more experience with race bikes than I do now, I would probably go all out and on a world tour of all the race tracks where MotoGP is held and see what it can do.

But I guess it’s considerably more likely for someone just to buy this and place it in storage or put it on display for years to come. And in 20 or 30 years from now, when everyone is likely to be riding electric bikes only, people will look at it and probably label it as a slow, outdated motorcycle, but a fascinating piece of history nonetheless.

Why UPS Drivers Don’t Turn Left And You Probably Shouldn’t Either

By General Posts

from https://www.iflscience.com

It might seem strange, but UPS delivery vans don’t always take the shortest route between stops. The company gives each driver a specific route to follow and that includes a policy that drivers should never turn through oncoming traffic (that’s left in countries where they drive on the right and vice versa) unless absolutely necessary. This means that routes are sometimes longer than they have to be. So, why do they do it?

Every day, along with thousands of other companies, UPS solves versions of the vehicle routing problem. In these mathematical problems, you are given a set of points and the distances between them, and you have to find the best route(s) to travel through all of them. Best is usually defined as the route with the shortest overall distance.

Vehicle routing problems are used to organise many things, from coping with more delivery trucks in cities and hailing taxis to catching chickens on a farm. The concept was introduced by George Dantzig in 1959. Over 50 years later, and despite a large body of scientific research, scientists are still looking for new ways to tackle the problem.

UPS have moved away from trying to find the shortest route and now look at other criteria to optimise the journey. One of their methods is to try and avoid turning through oncoming traffic at a junction. Although this might be going in the opposite direction of the final destination, it reduces the chances of an accident and cuts delays caused by waiting for a gap in the traffic, which would also waste fuel.

UPS have designed their vehicle routing software to eliminate as many left-hand turns as possible (in countries with right-hand traffic). Typically, only 10% of the turns are left turns. As a result, the company claims it uses 10m gallons less fuel, emits 20,000 tonnes less carbon dioxide and delivers 350,000 more packages every year. The efficiency of planning routes with its navigation software this way has even helped the firm cut the number of trucks it uses by 1,100, bringing down the company’s total distance travelled by 28.5m miles – despite the longer routes.

Click Here to Read the Full Article

Support Bonneville Salt Flats restoration

By General Posts

 

Utah Appropriations Committee urgently needs push to support Bonneville Salt Flats restoration

Your email support is critically important

As part of its work with SEMA, the Save the Salt Coalition and the Utah Alliance, the AMA recently asked Utah residents to contact their state legislators to ask for their support for a program to restore the Bonneville Salt Flats.

The race track at Bonneville-once 13 miles long-is now less than 8 miles, due to salt erosion. The Utah legislature is considering a 10-year program to dramatically increase the amount of salt pumped onto Bonneville.

As a result of input like yours, the Utah Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee has ranked our “Restore Bonneville” budget request No. 4 of 28 budget requests. If it keeps this ranking, Utah’s Restore Bonneville program should be funded in the state budget that will be up for approval in mid-March. The program will dramatically increase the volume of salt being pumped onto Bonneville Salt Flats each year.

We are not finished. Using a Bonneville analogy, we’ve just entered the timing lights for a land speed record. Now the hardest part: the budget requests must still be approved by a second group, the Utah legislature’s Executive Appropriations Committee, which could change the rankings.

Your very important task now is to contact the Utah Executive Appropriation Committee members right away. Please send a personalized email to all the members of the committee now. Their decision will determine if the restoration program gets funded.

Follow this link Take Action to enter your information, and edit our prewritten message to express your personal stance and reasons for supporting this funding.

The prewritten email can stand on its own as written, but it will be MUCH more effective if you edit both the subject line and the content to stress your involvement with the Bonneville Salt Flats. If you are a land speed racer and/or Utah resident, please put that in your subject line and first line of your email. Whether you are a racer, on-site spectator or fan, please add a few sentences describing the importance of Bonneville Salt Flats to you, your family or your business.

Thank you in advance for providing comments. Please forward this alert to any of your Bonneville Salt Flats racer or fan friends and ask them to do so, as well. If you do send a letter, please forward a copy to us at grassroots@amacycle.org.

Now more than ever, it is crucial that you and your riding friends become members of the AMA to help protect our riding freedoms. More members mean more clout against the opponents of motorcycling. That support will help fight for your rights-on the road, trail and racetrack and in the halls of government.

Join the AMA at americanmotorcyclist.com

If you are an AMA member, encourage your friends to join by telling them about the many AMA benefits you appreciate and the role the AMA plays in promoting the motorcycle lifestyle and protecting the future of motorcycling.