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Lon Nordbye Joins Electrify Expo

By General Posts

Lon Nordbye brings two decades of leadership experience

Lon Nordbye Joins Electrify Expo as Business Development and Sponsorship Executive

(Sioux Falls, SD December 9, 2021) Lon Nordbye has joined Electrify Expo, North America’s largest Electric Vehicle Festival to lead Business Development and Sponsorship efforts. A recent recipient of ‘Expo of The Year’ honors at the 2021 IMPACT Conference, Electrify Expo is focused on scaling the experiential platform, and this appointment highlights the commitment to achieve that.

Nordbye brings two decades of leadership experience in business development and integrated marketing to the Electrify Expo executive team. Lon Nordbye most recently served as VP of Strategy & Commercial Development at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip where he played a significant role in developing some of the rally’s most successful promotions, events, and brand partnerships.

“Our team is excited for Lon to join the company and know he will make immediate contributions that will benefit our partners and fans,” said BJ Birtwell, Founder and Executive Producer of Electrify Expo.

In his new role with Electrify Expo, Nordbye will lead development of Electrify’s e-motorcycle, e-bike, e-scooter, e-skate, and e-surf lifestyle categories. He will also oversee larger scale activations with national, non-endemic brands looking to reach the e-mobility consumer.

“BJ, Jeff and their dynamic team have not only pioneered how consumers engage and interact with e-mobility, they’re pushing the industry, culture and lifestyle of electric mobility forward,” said Nordbye. “I couldn’t be more excited to join an enterprising team and get immersed into the day-to-day work to achieve the high expectations we have for Electrify as well as ourselves.”

Electrify Expo is a weekend festival that takes place multiple times per year featuring the world’s leading brands in e-mobility. Consumers get the opportunity to demo and drive the best electric vehicles the industry has to offer as well as engage with interactive brand displays, enjoy live music and more.

2021 took Electrify Expo to Southern California, Miami, and Austin. 2022 will add additional events in hot e-mobility markets.

Companies interested can learn more by visiting: https://www.electrifyexpo.com/exhibits-press#Exhibitors

About Electrify Expo:

Attend North America’s largest Electric Vehicle event! Fun for all ages, Electrify Expo is a weekend festival that gathers the World’s top EV manufacturers all in one place!

Come see your favorite electric car, motorcycle, bike, scooter, skateboard, surfboard, e-foil and other electric mobility brands as they show off their latest products and technology. Visit their interactive displays, talk with EV experts, and BEST OF ALL, take a free test drive on one of our thrilling demo courses. Kids, have fun on the latest stability bikes or play in the Kids Zone!

With over 500,000 square feet of exhibit and festival space, Electrify Expo is a full day of electrified fun mixed with great food, drinks, music and more. Yes, this is an e-mobility party and everyone is invited!

Honda Rebel 500 & 1100 Cruiser 2022 Debuts

By General Posts

from https://www.rushlane.com/ by Arun Prakash

Honda presently has three models in the Rebel range of cruisers- Rebel 250, Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100

Honda has updated its cruise lineup for 2022 specifically for Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100 in European markets. Both motorcycles offer a typical cruiser experience to riders with their signature old-school design and ergonomics.

About a month ago, Honda reinvented the entry-level Rebel 300 in a down-sized version as Rebel 250.

2022 Honda Rebel 500 Colour Options
The Japanese bikemaker has introduced new colour options for Rebel 500 and Rebel 1100. Honda is offering a new paint scheme called Pearl Organic Green in Rebel 500. This option will be available alongside the current paint schemes on offer namely Graphite Black, Mat Axis Gray and Matte Jeans Blue Metallic.

The latest addition to the colour palette is a stark contrast to dark and stealthy shades currently available for Rebel 500. On the other hand, Rebel 1100 sees the addition of a flashy new colour called Pearl Stallion Brown. The paint scheme also benefits from the blacked-out components lending the motorcycle a sporty dual-tone appeal.

Rebel 500- Specs
Apart from the added colour options, there have been no changes made in either of the cruiser bikes in terms of mechanicals or features. Rebel 500 is powered by a 471cc parallel-twin motor that also propels CB500X and CB500R.

This unit pushes out 47 bhp at 8500rpm and a peak torque of 44.6Nm at 6000rpm. This engine is paired with a 6-speed transmission via a slip-assist clutch. The motorcycle rides on 16-inch front and rear wheels that are shod with fat 130-section front and 150-section rear rubber respectively.

Suspension setup comprises 41mm telescopic forks at front and twin shock absorbers at rear. Braking duties are handled by a 296mm front disc and a 240mm rear disc aided by a dual-channel ABS.

Rebel 1100
Specs Coming to the flagship Rebel 1100, the cruiser is powered by a 1084cc SOHC liquid-cooled, parallel-twin, 270 degree crank motor which pumps out 86 bhp at 7000rpm and a peak torque of 98Nm at 4750rpm. This engine also propels Africa Twin adventure bike and is mated to either a 6-speed manual transmission or a DCT automatic gearbox.

The diamond frame of Rebel 1100 sits on Preload-adjustable 43mm cartridge-style front forks and twin piggyback shock absorbers at rear. Rebel 1100 rides on 18-inch front and 16-inch rear wheels shod with tubeless tyres. Braking duties are handled by 330mm disc up front and 256mm disc at rear complemented by a dual-channel ABS.

Take a look at the first look video below, from TravelMoto channel.

Royal Enfield recalls 236,966 motorcycles on ignition coil defect

By General Posts

from https://www.financialexpress.com

Royal Enfield recalls Meteor 350, Classic & Bullet bikes sold.

The company states that the defect was discovered during routine internal testing and the issue has been clearly identified and isolated to specific batches of material.

Royal Enfield has announced a recall of three models in seven countries over a defect discovered in one of the parts. The defect is in the ignition coil that can cause misfiring, reduced vehicle performance, or rarely an electric short circuit. The three motorcycle models include the Meteor 350, Classic and Bullet. While the company is recalling Meteor 350 units built between December 2020 and April 2021, the Classic and Bullet units produced between January and April 2021 have been recalled.

In a press statement, Royal Enfield states that the defect was discovered during routine internal testing and the issue has been clearly identified and isolated to specific batches of material sourced from an external supplier.

The recall has been initiated as a precautionary measure, the statement continues adding that the issue is rare and does not impact all motorcycles manufactured during the mentioned period.

Is your motorcycle affected?
Close to 2,36,966 motorcycles of the Classic, Bullet and Meteor models will be recalled. As mentioned above, only those manufactured and sold between December 2020 and April 2021 for the Meteor, and between January and April 2021 for the Classic and Bullet.

The recall will be applicable to Meteor, Classic and Bullet motorcycles sold in India, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, Australia, New Zealand and Malaysia.

What to do?
The company states that only an estimated 10 percent of motorcycles will require replacement of the part. All recalled units will undergo inspection and if required, the defective part will be replaced.

Royal Enfield service teams, and/or local dealerships will reach out to consumers whose motorcycle Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) number falls within the manufacturing period mentioned. Consumers can also proactively reach out to their local Royal Enfield Workshops or call Royal Enfield to verify.

Harley Davidson: The Road Only Goes Downhill

By General Posts

Harley-Davidson delays its first $30,000 electric motorcycle after unexpected findings during final quality checks

  • The company delayed the motorcycle after ‘non-standard conditions’ were discvoered during final quality checks
  • Dealers had begun selling pre-orders of the bike in January
  • Harley-Davidson had forecast shipping 1,600 bikes

Harley-Davidson has delayed production on its first electric motorcycle, called LiveWire.

In an email sent to dealers last week, the company announced it had found a ‘non-standard condition’ in its final quality checks but didn’t elaborate further.

The LiveWire was officially announced for commercial release last fall with a planned price of $29,799.

‘We recently discovered a non-standard condition during a final quality check; stopped production and deliveries; and began additional testing and analysis, which is progressing well,’ the company said in a statement.

The Wall Street Journal reported that the decision came after a problem with the vehicle’s battery charging was discovered. The manufacturer did not say when they planned to resume production.

The company had already begun delivering models of LiveWire to dealers in September.

The company had expected to ship around 1,600 bikes, or an estimated 1 percent of the company’s total big shipments.

The LiveWire is said to go from 0-60 mph in three seconds and reach top speeds of 110 mph.

Harley-Davidson recommends users go to dealers to charge the vehicle rather than trying to use standard electrical outlets in their homes.

It is powered by a 15.5 kWh battery and has a 105 horsepower magnetic engine and a range of 146 miles city driving on a single charge.

Harley-Davidson had told potential customers to charge the bike only at registered dealers and not in their homes.

The bike was first shown in The Avengers: Age of Ultron as a sleek prototype ridden by Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow character.

The LiveWire promised a slew of advanced technical features, including what PR Manager Paul James descried as ‘twist-and-go.’

‘Because it’s all-electric, it’s twist-and-go,’ Paul James, PR Manager at Harley-Davidson, told Dailymail.com at the Las Vegas Convention Center earlier this year.

The LiveWire’s battery is said to have a range of 146 miles of city driving.

‘There’s no transmission, there are no shifters, no clutch – it’s very easy to ride.’

LiveWire is equipped with a full suite of electronic lateral aids, with a slew of sensors and programmable touch controls.

It also has cellular connectivity, making it the first mass market motorcycle in North America with the capability.

This means it can alert the owner if the bike has been tampered with or moved. It also has built-in GPS for location tracking.

As for the sound, Harley says its electric powertrain will produce a ‘new signature Harley-Davidson sound,’ with minimal vibration, heat, and noise.

The ‘twist-and-go’ bike ditches the traditional shifters and chirps out a turbine-like whir in lieu of the characteristic rumble. The company is hoping this will usher in a ‘new signature Harley-Davidson sound,’ with minimal vibration, heat, and noise.

LiveWire will also launch in Canada and most of Europe later this year, Harley-Davidson says.

  • Harley Davidson sales have been on a decline the past five years hurting the company’s bottom line. The company has introduced new initiatives to buck this trend.
  • Despite the new strategy Harley Davidson will have a hard time attracting millennial customers and will face stiff competition in Asia.
  • Harley Davidson is highly levered and not trading at a large enough discount to warrant an investment.

Harley Davidson (HOG) has been having a rough last couple of years, with its current stock price nearly half of where it was in 2018 as it fell from around $50 per share to its current price of about $35 per share. The company is an American icon, with the Milwaukee-based motorcycle maker being founded more than 100 years ago, and conjures up a certain type of imagery – that of big bikes, loud engines and groups of somewhat older riders riding together in large groups.

This level of brand loyalty and, dare I say, cult following has been a cornerstone of Harley Davidson’s strategy for years. However, Harley Davidson’s sales have begun to slump in recent years after reaching a high in 2014 with this trend set to continue in 2019. In Q2 2019, the company delivered nearly 69,000 bikes for the quarter, down 5% compared to the same period a year earlier and overall sales fell 6% to $1.4 billion.

The brand loyalty that Harley Davidson has cultivated has become its weakness as its core demographic of rider’s ages the company struggles to attract the new millennial rider and re-align its brand messaging to match what that segment is looking for.

UBS conducted a survey of more than 2,000 people between the age of 21 and 34 in an attempt to figure out why Harley-Davidson stock has fallen 32% in the past 12 months. While their findings are bad news for big expensive cruisers and touring bikes, they are actually good for other parts of the industry. Unlike older buyers who considered a bike “as a hobby” or because “motorcycles are cool” Millennial responders want them for “ease of transportation.” Young buyers are interested in practical and affordable bikes, for now, partially because many of them don’t have a lot of money. There is no telling if hooking Millennial customers now with affordable and practical might lead to selling them a big touring bike when they are older and have more time and money. Among the young target demographic, the second most common reason listed for buying a bike was “it goes with their self image” so the important thing might be to not try to sell them their dad’s motorcycle.

Harley will have difficulty attracting the millennial audience

I struggle to see how 10 years from now a millennial who would have values such as being more frugal, more minimalistic and more environmentally conscious would not opt for a sleek, sporty high-tech Ducati and go for a big, loud, chrome-plated Harley Davidson. Therefore, it makes sense that Harley Davidson would try to shift its brand away from this older image and embrace something more modern. And the fact is, the company is well aware of that. On July 30, 2018, the Company disclosed its “More Roads to Harley-Davidson” plan to accelerate the Company’s strategy to build the next generation of riders globally. Under the plan, the Company intends to introduce new products including electric motorcycles, a new middle-weight platform of motorcycles that includes adventure touring, custom and streetfighter models with engine displacements ranging from 500cc’s to 1250cc’s; and smaller displacement motorcycles for emerging markets. The Company plans to introduce these new motorcycles between 2019 and 2022, starting with a new electric motorcycle, LiveWire, in the second half of 2019.

These plans are hitting a bit of a snag, as the company is seeing soft demand for its Livewire electric vehicles. These electric motorcycles, which are aimed at millennial customers and billed as a way to attract a new generation of riders, come with a sticker price of $30,000 nearly as much as a Tesla model 3. It’s as if the company ignored the main necessary selling points (i.e. “practical” and “affordable”) for this demographic. Harley Davidson does make some decent, affordable bikes in their Street lineup. But they still have that stigma, of being expensive toys. In the sub-$10,000 motorcycle market, Harley can’t compete in terms of bang-for-the-buck with the likes of Triumph, Ducati, and the Japanese big four that’s been cashing in on cheap Harley alternatives since the 1980s.

Harley to face stiff competition in the emerging markets

Harley Davidson’s other area for potential growth is through expanding in emerging markets, particularly China and India. The company announced a collaboration with Qianjiang Motorcycle Company Limited (“Qianjiang”) to launch a smaller, more accessible Harley-Davidson motorcycle for sale in Harley-Davidson dealerships in China by the end of 2020. Motorcycles have been a presence in Asia for years with brands like Honda and Yamaha, along with local country-specific brands, dominating the sale of smaller vehicles.

There is a difference in motorcycle riding philosophy between the US and Asia. In many Asian countries, a motorcycle is considered a legitimate transportation option. A motorcycle is easier to park in the densely packed cities, can squeeze right through traffic, and is far more affordable than a car. Fuel in many Asian countries is also more expensive, and the taxes and permit fees for motorcycles are much lower too.

Given these considerations, in my view for Asian customers the main selling point of these motorcycles would be affordability and reliability as the next “tier” in terms of status symbols would be purchasing a car. The way I see it, Harley Davidson’s Asian motorcycles will slot in a premium category as is typical with other Harley products. The question then becomes for the Asian customer who may not be as familiar with the Harley brand and who do not view motorcycle riding as a “hobby” is that will they be willing to pay for that premium.

Harley Davidson is highly leveraged

Looking over at the financials, the company is trading at a low forward GAAP P/E of about 13. This is justified though as the company’s revenue has declined by 8.21% from 2014 to 2018 and its Net income has declined at an even faster rate of 37% in the same timeframe. The company is not trading at a cheap valuation.

Even more worryingly, the company is highly leveraged at 82 percent of total liabilities to total assets and with a debt to equity ratio of 4.62. Furthermore, a large portion of the company’s assets (nearly 70%) are finance receivables i.e. amounts owed by customers who have bought Harley Davidson motorcycles on finance. As we have seen in the experience of Kraft Heinz (KHC), a large amount of leverage would limit the flexibility of the company to make the necessary changes to its strategy. Given the headwinds the company faces due to declining sales and the need to change its strategy, I am quite bearish on Harley Davidson. The company is not trading at a large enough discount to warrant an investment.

NEWS SOURCE:
https://seekingalpha.com
https://www.dailymail.co.uk
https://www.wheels24.co.za

Veloce Publishing new Kawasaki Book

By General Posts

The story of the air-cooled ‘big’ Kawasaki bikes in definitive detail, researched and written in Japan with the full co-operation of the factory.

This series of models put the company on the map during the sixties and seventies, helping it to survive a difficult era that saw hundreds of Japanese motorcycle makers reduced to just four. Successful immediately, these models defended Kawasaki’s honour on the tracks as well as in the showrooms, handing the company numerous world championship titles. The series was recently revived as part of a retro boom, and a new machine has been launched, delivering the same thrill and charm as its predecessors.

Book Title: Kawasaki W, H & Z – The Big Air-Cooled Machines
Author Name: Brian Long

Features
• Definitive history of the early air-cooled Kawasakis.
• Sales in all major markets covered in detail.
• Written by a recognized author and historian.
• Racing exploits covered year-by-year.
• Written with the full co-operation of the factory.
• Handy reference charts throughout.
• Detailed production figures, including exports.
• Unravels what is indeed a very convoluted story.
• Contemporary photography to help owners with authenticity issues.
• The author is an owner of vintage motorcycles.

Description
The definitive history of the big air-cooled Kawasakis, from little known machines hardly seen outside Japan to the early Zs that took on the world. The book covers all major markets and uses stunning contemporary photography gathered from all over the globe to help owners establish authenticity or simply take a trip down memory lane.

Synopsis
The story of the air-cooled ‘big’ Kawasaki bikes in definitive detail, researched and written in Japan with the full co-operation of the factory. This series of models put the company on the map during the sixties and seventies, helping it to survive a difficult era that saw hundreds of Japanese motorcycle makers reduced to just four.

Successful immediately, these models defended Kawasaki’s honour on the tracks as well as in the showrooms, handing the company numerous world championship titles. The series was recently revived as part of a retro boom, and a new machine has been launched, delivering the same thrill and charm as its predecessors.

Additional Information
Period Covered: 1965-1980
Models Covered: Kawasaki W1, W2 & W3 (1965-1974), H1 & H2 (1968-1976) and early Z-series, including Z1, Z2 & Z1R (1972-1980). Also includes details on the retro W models (1998-).
Models NOT Covered: 1980 onwards, except retro W models of 1998 on.

The Kawasaki air-cooled models helped establish the Kawasaki brand as a top motorcycle maker.
This book tells the full story of these celebrated models in a depth never before attempted.
Contemporary photography from around the world, virtually all in colour.

ON AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1787112179/

ISBN-13: 978-1787112179

Publisher: https://www.veloce.co.uk