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Motorcycle Buying 101: The Basics

By General Posts

Are you looking to buy your first motorcycle?

by Law Tigers at www.lawtigers.com
Congratulations — you’re about to begin one of the most enjoyable, rewarding hobbies. However, the bike you purchase plays a significant role in your experience as a motorcyclist. As a result, you’ll want to perform adequate research to determine the best bike for your needs.

Read ahead to learn our motorcycle buying tips and the basics you should understand before purchasing your first bike.

Consider Styles of Motorcycles

Before you can determine which bike to buy, you’ll need to choose a style of bike. Motorcycles come in the following styles:

  • Standard: Offers a comfortable ride, neutral ergonomics, a shorter seat, and room for variations
  • Cruiser: Includes a lower seat and comfortable riding experience for cruising around town
  • Touring: Offers amenities for cross-country tips, including significant storage, easy ergonomics, and sizable fairings
  • Sport bike: Optimizes speed and agility with a high seat and lightweight build
  • Sport touring: Blends the characteristics of a sport and touring bike
  • Dual sport: Includes a versatile build suitable for most terrains

You can always perform more research about each of these bike types to learn their specific builds and features. However, we recommend first considering how you plan to use your bike. Will you primarily take short rides around town, or are you planning cross-country road trips on your motorcycle?

Once you narrow down the best type of motorcycle for your needs, you can begin searching for a bike within that style.

Understand Engine Sizes

Motorcycles also come with various engine sizes, so you’ll want to consider the appropriate size for your riding habits.

Typically, smaller engines are more cost-effective, as their bikes come with cheaper price tags, and they are more affordable to insure. However, small-engine bikes have less power and drive than large-engine ones.

Determine Used vs. New

Next, you’ll want to consider whether you will purchase a used motorcycle or a brand-new one.

Used motorcycles are almost always more affordable than their brand-new models. As a result, if you’re on a tight budget or are looking for a good first bike to start your new hobby, you may want to purchase a used one.

However, used motorcycles are also less reliable than new ones. These motorcycles pose the risk that something could go wrong while riding, leading to costly repairs or even accidents. Generally, before you purchase a used motorcycle, you should have a mechanic examine it thoroughly to determine its condition.

You should also look at a used bike’s mileage before purchasing it. Motorcycles have shorter lifespans than cars. While 20,000 miles is relatively low for a car, this mileage is high for small motorcycles. Be sure to consider a bike’s mileage to estimate how much life you may be able to get out of it.

Set a Budget

You should have at least a vague idea of your budget before searching for a motorcycle. If you’re not sure what price range you want to stick to, you may be tempted to purchase something absurdly cheap or expensive.

If you’re planning to purchase a used bike, we recommend looking in the $1,500 to $3,000 range. However, if you’re hoping to buy a new motorcycle, you’ll need to spend more. The average cost of a new bike in 2022 is around $16,000.

Start Searching

Now you should have all of the information you need to start searching for your first motorcycle. You can check out dealerships, private sellers, and online shops to view their current inventory of motorcycles in your preferred style. Just be sure to compare price points across a few sellers to ensure that you get a good deal.

Sign up for your free rider benefit package while you’re here. If you have a motorcycle and have been injured in an accident call Law Tigers at 1-888-863-7216.

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Cops Stealing Motorcycles

By General Posts

True Story by Rogue

There have been many stories about stolen motorcycles over the years and one that has to be included is about a Connecticut State Trooper R.J Kenny. We originally did some articles on him and his tactics back in the ’70s in Easyriders and were retaliated against for doing so. More on that as the article continues.

Click Here to Read this Article on Bikernet.com

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Texas Man Charged with Unlawful Carry Solely for Being a Bandido

By General Posts

The MPP has heavily reported on the recent trend of individuals being arrested for possession of handguns merely for membership in a motorcycle club. This includes individuals with no criminal records and License To Carry holder’s. The MPP has even issued a travel warning to motorcyclists traveling through Texas.

One such case against a member of the Bandidos Motorcycle Club (Ashley Becker) in Lubbock, TX continues with a refiling of charges for Unlawful Carry for mere membership in the club, which authorities label a criminal street gang.

Law enforcement and prosecutors should dismiss all such cases in the name of justice because they rely on an unconstitutional application of statute which ignores the basic principle of personal guilt.

Texas Penal Code 46.02, the statute prohibiting gang members from carrying weapons, is being misapplied to individuals simply for being members of motorcycle clubs. Take Ashley Becker, who was originally charged with Unlawful Carry and suspicion of possessing a controlled substance in Lubbock, Texas in 2018. The weapon wasn’t illegal, and no crime was committed. He was arrested under 46.02 for being a Bandido in possession of an otherwise legal weapon. The alleged controlled substance, after being tested multiple times, turned out to be inconclusive.

While prosecutors make no admission that they misapplied statute 46.02, they filed a motion to dismiss. The motion reads, “The interest of justice cannot be served through further proceedings in this matter.”

Although the 2018 indictment was dismissed without prejudice, on February 9, 2019 charges were refilled against Becker on the Unlawful Carry charges. The affidavit identifies Becker’s membership in the Bandidos as the only probable cause for arrest.

Authorities persist despite absurd, unconstitutional interpretation of law.

Despite the fact that their interpretation of statute is unconstitutional and in violation of established state and federal rules of evidence, law enforcement and prosecutors persist in wasting public resources targeting individuals like Becker for participating in Constitutionally protected expression and association. This absurd interpretation of 46.02 would mean that carrying a weapon is unlawful for any individual that is a member of the Bandidos Motorcycle Club, with no other evidence, even with a License to Carry.

“If this seems outrageous, your instincts are correct. The MPP, after conducting cursory research on 46.02, has identified precedent, Ex Parte Flores 483 SW 3d 632 (2015), that clearly articulates how law enforcement is currently misinterpreting and misapplying Texas statute in violation of the basic rules of evidence and the US Constitution.”

“Law Enforcement and prosecutors should immediately cease and desist misapplying Texas statute. Applying Texas Penal Code 46.02 to members of clubs with no criminal records, and even LTC’s, would chill 1st Amendment Association and ignore the doctrine of personal guilt, “a cornerstone of American Jurisprudence.”

In the name of justice, prosecutors in Lubbock should again file a motion to dismiss all charges against Becker, this time with prejudice. Furthermore, prosecutors and law enforcement in El Paso, Dallas, and across the state of Texas should follow suite.

http://www.motorcycleprofilingproject.com

After motorcycle clubs, who’s next?
Everyone should ask themselves, “After motorcycle clubs, who’s next?” Every large identifiable group has individuals that have committed crimes. Should your civil liberties be taken based on the actions of other individuals you associate with even if you had no involvement in criminal activity?

The blatant attempt to disarm the entire community regardless of an individual’s personal involvement in criminal activity will not stop with motorcycle clubs if authorities are successful. Every American should be deeply concerned about this assault on basic civil liberties. Unpopular speech, including unpopular association, is the most important speech to protect. Or so long has held the Supreme Court.