Hagerty

Guess the first motorized vehicle to cross the U.S.

First motorized vehicle to cross the U.S. wasn’t a car – it was a bike by Jeff Peek from Hagerty.com George A. Wyman made a name for himself as a bicycle racer, but he reached legendary status 119 years ago. He rode a motorized two-wheeler from San Francisco to New York to become the first person to cross the North American continent aboard an engine-powered vehicle. Read this Photo Feature Article on Bikernet.com – Click Here * * * * Celebrating 25 years of www.Bikernet.com

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Five Motorcycle Sales Trends Shaking the Vintage Market

Prices for classic motorcycles are changing by James Hewitt from Hagerty.com There’s a Hagerty Motorcycle Price Guide that uses thousands of transactions to track values on 9751 motorcycles. Here are five trends that stood out to us in the most recent update, released in June. The smart take in the motorcycle community of late, much like for cars, is that a full-on, concours-level restoration rarely pays — at least financially speaking. Click Here to Read the full Feature Article. See Photos of the Motorcycle Brands & Models. STAY UPDATED With All Motorcycling & Industry Events, News, Updates, Products, Reviews and More. Simply Click & Subscribe to Bikernet’s FREE Weekly Newsletter.

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Used Volkswagens and Autonomous Cars

This is for those committed to keep driving alive Never Stop Driving ! Two things are on my mind: A recent sale of a used Volkswagen and a podcast in which Elon Musk said Tesla cars will have Level IV autonomous capability in 2023. I think the two are related. Let me explain. While I would not mind an autonomous pilot myself from time to time, I am first and foremost a driver. The one thing I’ve had in common at all my gigs is that I have no off-hours from cars. I spend nearly every waking minute either working on cars; driving cars, whether around town or, my favorite, long road trips; racing; or passing on my enthusiasm. Your humble narrator fathoms deep in the car thing. –by Larry Webster from Hagerty.com Read this Editorial Article on Bikernet.com by Clicking Here. * * * * If you haven’t already, Check Out the Brand New 5-Ball Racing Garage Online Shop !!! CLICK HERE: You will find unique Motorcycling Gear designed by Lifelong Bikers & Custom Builders. Riding Free for 25 Years, celebrate Bikernet.com

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Honda CBR300R ABS 2022 : Road Test

by Kyle Smith from https://www.hagerty.com/ Picture this: You’re hanging around the Rock Store at the top of Mulholland Highway with your rental Camry the day before you fly home. The leather-clad crowd around praises the virtues of the GSXR600 chassis and the electronics package on the R1 for what seems like hours before a voice from the ether comes down and declares that, in fact, all of that sucks. Instead the holy follow the real truth of Slow Bike Fast. This truly enlightened rider who belongs to that voice is astride a miniscule machine that looks like a sportbike that stayed in the dryer just a bit too long and has an exhaust note like a mix of an old enduro machine and the Singer your mom used to repair your jeans way back when. Is this person insane or a prophet? There’s only one way to say for sure. I took the Honda CBR300R out for a week of playing in the canyons alongside some high-horsepower (and highly capable) machines to see if it truly held up. This 250cc-400cc market segment is now a packed class, with the KTM RC390, Yamaha R3, Kawasaki Ninja 400, and Suzuki GSX250R all competing for both attention from new riders and track rats alike. That is two very different subsets of buyers but it all boils down to similar wants and desires: Reliability, approachability, and fun factor. Honda comes right out and calls the 300 a commuter machine in some of its press materials. It is an evolution of the CBR250R which lived from 2011 to 2015, after which the engine was upsized to the current 286cc. The non-ABS equipped model comes in at $4,899 plus $600 in destination and freight charges. Add in the well-tuned ABS, as seen on our test bike,

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Six Ways to Sunday project reaches its final discipline for racing

The Garage Fridge saves the day by Kyle Smith from Hagerty.com The garage fridge is not a tool. It does not actively assist in the completion of a project. If anything, the cooler in the corner often conspires to defeat productivity. For me, recently, it did just the opposite. Taking the one motorcycle out to compete in cross country, motocross, flat track, road racing, trials, and finally on ice requires a lot of time in the garage. So much that I was getting burnt out. Luckily this final conversion only required three items: studded tires, over fenders, and a tether kill-switch. Simple, right? I thought so, too. CLICK HERE To Read Kyle’s adventure in Racing at 6 Different AMA Race Categories Get latest Motorcycle industry & event news & more – CLICK to Subscribe to Free Weekly Email Newsletter

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Don’t skimp on these 6 pieces of personal safety gear

Tech & Maintenance Essentials for every garage by Kyle Smith from Hagerty.com It’s easy to become complacent with shop safety, especially when the effects of letting your guard down are not always immediate. Fact is, working on cars and motorcycles can be dangerous. Safety gear ensures you enjoy your work, your vehicle and your health for a long time to come. In this brief article, check out some items of essential kit for the home DIY enthusiast. CLICK HERE To Read this Feature Article on Bikernet.com Sign-up for our Free Weekly Newsletter to stay updated on motorcycle news, tech, events – CLICK HERE  

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Discovery of huge fuel-can stash reveals 500 rare artifacts

from https://www.hagerty.com by Charlotte Vowden A shedload of surprises: Discovery of huge fuel-can stash reveals 500 rare artifacts Editor’s note: In the interests of preserving the authentic whiff of petrol that pervades this remarkable story from our U.K. colleagues, we have made only slight concessions to an American lexicon. All quotations remain untouched. Alan Pooley’s pursuit of petroliana was purely sentimental, but the collection of more than 500 automotive artifacts that he amassed during three decades of buying for love not money is so remarkable that it could fetch up to £65,000 (roughly $88,600) at auction. Including over 250 oil cans, 60 two-gallon fuel canisters, and dozens of enamel signs, oilers, and pourers, it is set to go under the hammer later this year. “The important thing about this collection is that it is completely fresh to the market, but the exciting bit about it is that no one really knew about it,” says Tom Godsmark, an associate and vintage specialist at Cheffins auction house, the agency managing the sale. “It’s a big collection in terms of scale, but it’s the extensiveness that’s so interesting because it ranges from little items such as lapel badges, old match boxes, and advertising pencils for Rudge bicycles to a fully restored petrol pump.” Among the pieces which the late Mr. Pooley carefully stored, restored, and displayed in sheds at his home in Norfolk is a two-gallon fuel can that, to the untrained eye, stands out because of the large lightning bolt and bold lettering embossed on its side. Those in the know will recognize it as one of the few surviving examples of a limited-edition run of Shell Racing cans that were produced in the 1930s. With an estimated value of £400 to £600 (approximately $545–$818), it’s one of the rarest pieces of

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