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Over 8500 Motorcycles Ride in Support of Marine Cpl Humberto “Bert” Sanchez

By General Posts

by Rogue and John Lee

What an honor it was to be part of the procession for Marine Cpl Humberto “Bert” Sanchez. Over. 8500 bikes came in from multiple other states to show their support. That alone was something amazing to see. There were so many bikes that there was no good way to even get a photo to show the amount of bikes that were there.

The Marine Riders were towards the front of the procession and when we pulled out to follow the behind Cpl Sanchez there were people lining the streets. From the gates of Grissom Airforce base all the way to Logansport. A good 20 miles of people on the side of the road.

Everyone had American Flags waving. Lots of Marine Corps flags too. Multiple ladder trucks with flags draped over the road. Old men in their uniforms from when they served saluting the entire procession. Children holding their parents hands. Family pets. People crying and holding their hands over their hearts. People playing Patriotic music.

And that’s before we even got to Logansport.

Cpl Sanchez received an aerial escort from 4 A10 Warthogs as we neared. They flew over us multiple times before circling the front end of the procession. They would come buzzing in a couple hundred feet off the ground.

Then as we come into Logansport it’s just a sea of people lining the street. Tens of Thousands of people lined the city streets for Cpl Sanchez’s final few miles. I would guess anywhere from 10,000-20,000 people were lined up along the roads from Peru to Logansport.

Absolutely amazing. Well done Indiana! That’s was an amazing homecoming for a hero.

I am honored to have been a part of this and happy I got to ride next to my Marine Rider Brothers. Please keep the Sanchez family in your thoughts and prayers as they prepare to bury their hero in a couple of days.

Omaha Police refuse motorcade access to Patriot Guard Riders

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from https://www.ketv.com

Omaha police: Only law enforcement in Cpl. Page motorcade for safety reasons

Patriot Guard Riders say they’ll follow behind motorcade.

OMAHA, Neb. — Omaha police said it’s not safe to have hundreds of motorcycles on the route that will only be blocked off for the fallen Marine Cpl. Daegan Page and his family to pass. The Patriot Guard Riders said it’s their honor to pay tribute to Page and still plan to follow the motorcade.

“I’m a bit flabbergasted with the decision. It really took me by surprise,” said Scott Knudsen, Nebraska State Captain, Patriot Guard Riders.

Knudsen and other Patriot Guard Riders said they’ve never been denied a place in a military motorcade and asked Page’s father for permission to be part of Friday’s event.

“We never go anywhere unless we are invited. We always seek out permission to achieve permission from appropriate people,” Knudsen said.

But Omaha police asked all groups to stay out of the motorcade for safety reasons, disappointing Knudsen and hundreds of riders coming from Western Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa.

“It’s really a shame that it has come to this, but we are in different times today. I don’t know all the details I’m certainly not blaming the Omaha Police Department or the sheriff’s department or anybody else,” Knudsen said.

“We decided for safety sake and not tie up the intersection,” said Steve Lahrs, Director of American Legions Millard Post.

Millard American Legion Riders were planning to join the escort to honor the fallen Marine until police asked them to stay parked on the sidelines.

“They are short-staffed and short-manned and it would create too much of a havoc for the city of Omaha to have hundreds of bikers blocking intersections,” Lahrs said.

In a statement to KETV, Omaha police said once again the decision is about safety.

“The ultimate goal for tomorrow’s motorcade escort of Marine Corporal Daegan Page is to safely transport him and his family from Eppley Airfield to the mortuary in Millard. We understand there are many organizations who want to assist us in this endeavor. We appreciate that and thank you. However, this motorcade is not a procession or parade. The route will be open, meaning traffic will be temporarily stopped just ahead of the motorcade to allow it to pass smoothly and safely. Once the motorcade is passed, traffic will again flow as normal. Only trained law enforcement officers with vehicles equipped with lights and sirens will be assisting with the motorcade to ensure the safety of all involved along the nearly seventeen mile route. We encourage the public to support Cpl. Page and his family along the route of the motorcade.

“On Friday, September 17th, the date of the funeral, there will be a closed route from St. Paul Lutheran Church to the Omaha National Cemetery. A closed route will allow the opportunity for organizations to safely assist with the procession at that time.”

That message came from Lt. Neal Bonnacci.

“We are absolutely not going to violate any laws and absolutely not go against their wishes and need to respect that and I do respect that,” Knudsen said.

“We start losing the reasoning behind the whole motorcade and it’s to show respect for the family and show respect for Cpl. Page,” Lahrs said.

Bonnacci also gave some safety tips to citizens wanting to pay honor on the motorcade route.

Citizens are encouraged to show their support along the route of the motorcade, but are reminded to allow room for the vehicles, and be mindful of the following:

• Park in compliance with parking regulations

• Ask permission before parking in private business parking lots

• Do not block private driveways

• Be patient if in traffic, and expect delays along the route

• Do not illegally park along the route, block intersections or impede the motorcade. Citizens are encouraged to utilize interstate overpasses for viewing, rather than stopping alongside the interstate.

Hundreds of bikers rev engines at funeral so motorcycle-mad boy can ‘hear them in heaven’

By General Posts

Hundreds of bikers made the wish of a grieving dad come true by revving engines at his young son’s funeral so he could “hear them in heaven”.

Romeo Ferreira, who loved motorbikes, died aged three in December after battling a brain tumour.

His father Leandro made a hopeful plea on social media for roadies to make his son’s final day special.

He said he never expected hundreds of clubs from across the country to appear in Leamington Spa on Thursday.

The bikers rode and revved their engines in convoy behind the Romeo’s tiny coffin in a funeral cart, attached to a bike.

Romeo’s mother Kelly told the riders: “The louder the better. And rev it up so everyone can hear them and Romeo can hear from upstairs.”

“Heaven needs to hear the bikes,” Leandro told BBC Midlands Today. “Most of the bikers, 99 per cent, they don’t know Romeo. Everyone has just been awesome.”

One biker said: “Any support we can show, that’s why we’re here,” adding of the small funeral cart: “I’m big and ugly and it teared me up.”

Bikers from across the country answered a grieving dad’s call to come and rev their engines at his son’s funeral so the youngster could ‘hear them in heaven’. Romeo Ferreira died from a brain tumour in December aged three. He loved motorbikes, so his father Leandro appealed for riders to come and make some noise as he was being laid to rest in Leamington Spa. His tiny coffin was even ferried to church in a small sidecar as the convoy of riders followed.

Leandro told the BBC: ‘Heaven needs to hear the bikes, the bikers. Most of the bikers, 99 per cent, they don’t know Romeo. ‘Everyone has just been awesome.’ Romeo’s mum Kelly said she told the bikers: ‘The louder the better. And rev it up so everyone can hear them and Romeo can hear from upstairs.’

Thousands of Outlaws attend Dayton funeral for Taco Bowman

By General Posts

Illinois, Texas, New York, North Carolina, Wisconsin and Connecticut were among the dozens of states represented Saturday at the funeral of the infamous former international president of the Outlaws Motorcycle Club – known to all as Harry Joseph “Taco” Bowman, at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds.

Police estimate there were more than 2,000 people at the funeral Saturday morning, coming in from all over the world on 1,200 motorcycles and hundreds of other vehicles.

Mark Lovett, a detective in the Columbus Police division’s intelligence unit said he saw patches from England as Outlaws drove in, and the crowd was large because many drove up Interstate 75 from Daytona Beach Bike Week, which is running from March 8 through today.

Lovett has been to more than 15 Outlaws motorcycle funerals in the last 20 years and this is by far the largest one he has witnessed. Even larger than the funeral for Dayton’s Harold “Stairway Harry” Henderson, Bowman’s mentor and one of the last International presidents of the Outlaws, Lovett said.

“This is one of those events that really only happen once in our career, to see something this big,” Lovett said.

Several police agencies and task forces were at the funeral outside of uniform to observe. Most of the funerals are peaceful, Lovett said. But uniformed police and fire departments were ready to respond to any needs, including general health concerns of members attending the services.

“You just never know what’s going to happen at a motorcycle gang funeral. They say they’re not a gang, but they fit the description,” he said.

Members of the Outlaws would not comment to the Daily News Reporters, but they said Bowman is a legacy.

Bowman died March 3 at age 69. He was serving two life sentences in a North Carolina prison after being indicted in Florida on murder, bombing, drug trafficking and racketeering charges. He had previously been a fugitive on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted list, according to CNN.

The Outlaws were established in 1935 and have 119 chapters including in Dayton, Columbus, East Columbus, Warren, Middletown, Toledo, Sandusky, Canton and Athens, according to its website.

PHOTOS: Thousands of bikers attend funeral for former Outlaw Motorcycle Club president

Outlaws Motorcycle Club leader’s funeral set for Montgomery Co. fairgrounds

By General Posts

‘Taco’ Bowman was president of the Outlaws Motorcycle Club.

DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – Harry Joseph “Taco” Bowman, the former president of the Outlaws Motorcycle Club who was on the FBI’s top ten most wanted fugitive’s list, will have his funeral on Saturday at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds.

Bowman’s funeral is scheduled for 10:30 a.m. A procession from the fairgrounds to Bear Creek Cemetery on North Union Road in Madison Twp. will begin at 12 p.m.

Sheriff’s Deputies will be shutting down North Union Road to Hoover Avenue in Trotwood for the funeral.

Additionally, deputies will also partially close down Infirmary Road from the Montgomery County fairgrounds to SR-35 for the procession.

Montgomery County Sheriff Rob Streck said officers are not expecting any safety issues but given the size of the crowd and the reputation of the group, they do have contingency plans in place.

“There’s always concerns when you have get large groups of people who have been known to be violent. They do not try to hide that fact,” Streck said. “(But) We don’t have any chatter of suspected violence, we don’t have any indications that other clubs are going to try and cause trouble at the event.”

Bowman, who was serviving a life sentence in federal prison, died on Sunday at the Federal Medical Center in North Carolina. He was 69 years old.

According to the Detroit News, Bowman was considered one of the most infamous motorcycle gang leaders in U.S. history. The Outlaws were rivals to the Hell’s Angels.

Bowman was placed on the FBI’s Most Wanted List in 1998, interrupting what had been a relatively low profile kept by Bowman while serving as leader of the Outlaws.

In 2001, he was convicted in a Federal court in Florida of the murders of several rival gang members, firebombings, racketeering and conspiracy among other charges. He was sentenced to two life sentences plus 83 years.

Bowman had a long-running feud with Hell’s Angels leader Sonny Barger over which gang was superior.

Several members of the Outlaws were previously interned at Bear Creek Cemetery.