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fossil fuels

Mandate Madness: Latest Episode of Bandit’s Cantina

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Bandit’s Cantina Episode 98: Mandate Madness
Trying Business Survival in Los Angeles
By Bandit with George Fleming and Jon Towle Illustrations

Between Covid and multiple mandates, the Cantina business model imploded. It was no longer about food and parties. It was all about survival. Every Monday morning the staff met to discuss how to get through the next week.

More and more young loners came to the Cantina to help or hide out. Walker’s Café on Pt. Fermin closed after almost 70 years as a coastal biker hangout. Between break-ins and anti-fossil fuel zealots Bikers were no longer allowed to ride along the scenic winding coast.

Brothers who needed cash sold extra parts in a small swap area in the Cantina garages. Some gave parts to the Cantina to sell to pay the bills, others brought stuff to sell and split with the Cantina.

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Energy Poverty Kills

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From Center for Industrial Progress by Alex Epstein

Last week we looked at the need for a process of producing energy that is cheap, plentiful, and reliable—and we saw that solar and wind cannot produce cheap, reliable energy.

How Germany embraced solar and wind and ended up in energy poverty

Let’s take a look at this in practice. Germany is considered by some to be the best success story in the world of effective solar and wind use, and you’ll often hear that they get a large percentage of their energy from solar and wind.

You can see here on this chart how this claim was made and why it’s not accurate.

First of all, this is just a chart of electricity. Solar and wind are only producing electricity and half of Germany’s energy needs also include fuel and heating. So solar and wind never contribute half as much to Germany’s energy needs as this chart would imply.

But that’s not the biggest problem. What you notice here is that there’s certain days and times where there are large spikes, but there are also periods where there’s relatively little. What that means is that you can’t rely on solar and wind ever. You always have to have an infrastructure that can produce all of your electricity independent of the solar and wind because you can always go a long period with very little solar and wind.

So then why are the solar and wind necessary? Well, you could argue that they’re not and that adding them onto the grid will impose a lot of costs.

In Germany, electricity prices have more than doubled since 2000 when solar and wind started receiving massive subsidies and favorable regulations, and their electricity prices are three to four times what we would pay in the U.S. (Because of its low reliability, solar, and wind energy options require an alternative backup—one that’s cheap, plentiful, and reliable—to make it work, thus creating a more expensive and inefficient process.)

Nuclear and hydro

Fossil fuels are not the only reliable sources. There are two others that don’t generate CO2 that are significant and are more limited, but still significant contributors. Those are hydroelectric energy and nuclear energy.

Hydroelectric energy can be quite affordable over time, but it’s limited to locations where you have the right physical situation to produce hydroelectric power.

Nuclear is more interesting because nuclear doesn’t have the problems of hydro but it’s been very restricted throughout history so today in the vast majority of cases it’s considerably more expensive than say electricity from natural gas. This may change in the future and one thing we’ll discuss under policy is how we need to have the right policies so that all energy technologies can grow and flourish, if indeed the creators of those technologies can do it.

The reality of energy poverty: a story

To illustrate just how important it is to have cheap, plentiful, and reliable energy, I want to share a story I came across while doing research for my book, The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels. This is a story about a baby born in the very poor country of Gambia.

The baby was born underweight and premature, but not in such a way that would be a big problem in say, the United States. In the United States, the solution would have been obvious: incubation. This technology would almost certainly bring this baby up to be completely healthy, and if you met the baby later in life you would never know that there had ever been a problem.

Unfortunately, in the Gambia, in this particular hospital, they needed something that billions of people in the world do not have, and that is reliable electricity.

Without reliable electricity, the hospital didn’t even contemplate owning an incubator, the one thing this baby desperately needed to survive.

Without access to this technology, the baby could not survive on her own, and sadly, she died. I think this story reminds us of what it means to have access to cheap, plentiful, and reliable energy, and how having more energy gives us the ability to improve our lives.

To summarize what we discussed, if you can’t afford energy you don’t have energy, and if energy is scarce or unreliable, then you don’t have energy when you need it. It’s not just enough to have energy, the energy and the process to create it has to be cheap, plentiful, and reliable.

Fossil Fuel Bikernet Weekly News for October 14th, 2021

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It’s All Good and Packed with Info

We are living in the absolute best of times. Let’s ride free forever.

Never a dull moment, but it’s all a positive adventure. Even fixing stupid shit, is a positive endeavor and keeping me from thinking about building another motorcycle.

There’s always something going on in Deadwood. If it has to do with whiskey, I’m in.

Let’s hit it.

–Bandit

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Fossil fuels are 100% organic & were produced with solar energy

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Watch: Greenpeace Co-Founder Dr. Patrick Moore: ‘Fossil fuels are 100% organic & were produced with solar energy. Sounds positively green’

Dr. Patrick Moore: “Coal, oil and natural gas are the remains of those plankton and plants that have been transformed by heat and pressure deep in the earth’s crust. In other words, fossil fuels are 100% organic and were produced with solar energy. Sounds positively green.”

CO2 is “Essential ingredient for life…It has become common to refer to the emissions from burning fossil fuels for energy as ‘carbon’ emissions. That is entirely misleading. Carbon dioxide is not carbon. Carbon dioxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas which is an indispensable food for all living things…From a big picture perspective, we are actually living in a low carbon dioxide era.”

Prager University video: Global Warming activists will tell you that CO2 is bad and dangerous. The EPA has even classified it as a pollutant. But is it? Greenpeace co-founder Patrick Moore provides some surprising facts about the benefits of CO2 that you won’t hear in the current debate.

Watch Below: 

https://www.climatedepot.com/2020/02/21/watch-greenpeace-co-founder-dr-patrick-moore-fossil-fuels-are-100-organic-were-produced-with-solar-energy-sounds-positively-green/

Ecologist Dr. Patrick Moore: Partial transcript: “All life is carbon-based. And the carbon for all that life originates from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. All of the carbon in the fossil fuels we are burning for energy today was once in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide before it was consumed by plankton in the sea and plants on the land.

Coal, oil and natural gas are the remains of those plankton and plants that have been transformed by heat and pressure deep in the earth’s crust. In other words, fossil fuels are 100% organic and were produced with solar energy. Sounds positively green.”

CO2 is “Essential ingredient for life.” 

“It has become common to refer to the emissions from burning fossil fuels for energy as ‘carbon’ emissions. That is entirely misleading. Carbon dioxide is not carbon. Carbon dioxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas which is an indispensable food for all living things.

From a big picture perspective, we are actually living in a low carbon dioxide era…

The optimum level of co2 for plant growth, for example, is 4- 5 times what is currently found in our atmosphere…

We are already seeing the positive effects of increased CO2 now. Satellite measurements have noted the greening of the earth as crops and forests grow due to our higher levels of co2. It turns out that carbon dioxide are not dirty words after all. We should celebrate co2 as the giver of life that it is.”

In the Cantina – Future of Automobile Conference

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All the Best Minds Met at the Petersen Museum and Discussed the Wrong Topics

Recently the Petersen Museum proposed a symposium to study the future of Automobiles with leaders in the industry. I was dying to be there to listen to vehicle designers discuss the future of the automobile and travel. I’m going to post some of the YouTube links here to allow you to watch the findings. Below is the design and my take on this effort.

The Future of the Automobile Conference, held at the Petersen Automotive Museum, brings together immersive and inspirational talks, demos, test drives and exhibitions to give a glimpse into the future of our mobility. The conference explores the brave new world of the personal transportation revolution that is set to transform every city in the world.

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