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Yamaha TMax 560cc Scooter for 2022 unveiled

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2022 Yamaha TMax comes with updated ergonomics and features
from https://www.rushlane.com by Arun Prakash

Yamaha has taken the covers off from the upcoming 2022 TMax for European markets. The flagship Maxi scooter has received multiple updates in its current iteration over the outgoing model. The scooter is expected to go on sale in many European markets including UK at the start of next year.

TMax has been an immensely successful scooter in Europe since it was first launched in 2001 and has been the best-selling sports scooter in the past two decades. The 2022 model comes equipped with a range of new features as well as updated aesthetics that make it more appealing than before.

Features on offer
In terms of features, 2022 TMax gets a new 7-inch full-colour TFT instrument console enabled with full smartphone connectivity and in-built navigation with Garmin maps connectivity via Bluetooth, Wifi and USB. All these could be controlled through a joystick-like setup on the left handlebar.

Practical creature comforts on offer include heated handlebar grips, heated seats, cruise control, electrically adjustable windshield, and backlit handlebar switches. Other amenities such as traction control, keyless start with Smartkey remote, remote opening fuel cap and seat and multiple ride modes are also included in the package. However, most of these techs are available in the top-spec Tech Max trim.

Powertrain, Hardware Specs
Powertrain of TMax hasn’t been changed with the same 560cc two-cylinder DOHC engine propelling the latest iteration. This motor cranks out 47.6 bhp at 7,500rpm and 55.7 Nm of torque at 5,250rpm with power going to the rear wheel via an automatic transmission and belt drive. That said, there are some tweaks made to the scooter’s hardware configurations.

Suspension setup comprises new 41mm USD forks upfront and a single rear shock which offers a better front-end feel and damping at the rear. Braking duties are handled by dual 262mm front discs and a 282mm rear disc which are complemented by a dual-channel ABS.

Updated Styling
In its latest avatar, TMax has been updated with a sportier and more aggressive styling inspired by supersport motorcycles. It gets restyled twin LED headlamps and a larger windscreen mounted on top of the front apron. The front apron also features a large air intake scoop which gives the face of the scooter a beak-like appearance. The panels are new with a more compact body on offer.

The single-piece seat with a raised tail section features lumbar support for the rider for additional comfort during long journeys. The new TMax sits on a lighter aluminium chassis which should feel easier to manoeuver and handle around corners. A sporty riding posture has been attained with a slightly forward-leaning position by adjusting all points of the ‘rider triangle’.

Yamaha is offering the Maxi scooter in two derivatives- TMax and TMax Tech Max. The former will be offered with three colour options namely Extreme Yellow, Icon Blue and Sword Grey. The latter, on the other hand, will be reserved for UK markets only and will be available in two shades- Dark Petrol and Power Grey. The yellow-coloured alloys and rims also add to the visual appeal of the scooter.

 

Serpent-Like Exhaust on Custom H-D Breakout

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A Custom Harley-Davidson Breakout with a “designer” Exhaust
from https://www.autoevolution.com by Daniel Patrascu

If you look from far away, superficially enough, and you don’t know what those twisted pipes on the side of this motorcycle are, your brain might trick into believing you’re looking at a couple of snakes doing their thing in plain daylight.

Over the years, as we combed through some of the most extreme, visually appealing, or mechanically-impressive rides on two wheels, we’ve seen plenty of hardcore representations of exhaust systems. The one we have here though is so far ahead of all the others, it deserves a title of its own.

The serpent-like piece of hardware sits on one side of a custom build called Criminal for one reason or another. The bike started out as a stock Breakout, but was heavily modified to earn its place in the select gallery of custom rides we constantly feature.

The visual effect of the exhaust system was achieved by the garage behind this build, Poland-based Nine Hills Motorcycles, through a clever play between the copper color of the pipes and welding stripes placed at almost equal intervals. The garage calls the system a piece of jewelry, and as far as design for these bits goes, they’re spot on.

Although from a color standpoint it has nothing in common with the rest of the body (in fact, it is exactly this mismatching that makes the exhaust stand out so much), it does seem to blend pretty well with the green hues deployed on most of the handcrafted body.

The shop did not limit itself at replacing the pipes, but fitted other custom bits on the thing as well in their bid to make it unique. Up front we’ve got a custom headlight, the wheels are of Performance Machine-make, and Roland Sands supplied the engine housings.

Mechanically, the brakes on the Breakout have been modified, and there’s an air suspensions system on deck to make both the thing’s stance more visually appealing, and the ride more comfortable.

As far as we can tell, the engine of the motorcycle was left pretty much unchanged, and only got a small number of new and improved hardware, including the exhaust system that brought us face to face with it, and a BDL clutch.

The Poles describe the end product of their work as a “real designer firecracker,” a one-off machine that retains the elements that make the Breakout such a go-to platform for customizers, but also brings something unique to the table.

For how much it does this, though, is anybody’s guess. In the usual European style we’ve grown accustomed to by now, Nine Hills keeps the price of the project under wraps, so we have no way of telling how much the modifications made cost the owner.

CLICK HERE To See at Nine Hills Motorcycles website.

Norton Motorcycles opens new Global Headquarters

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TVS-owned Norton Motorcycles opens new Global Headquarters: 8,000 bikes to roll out every year
from https://www.financialexpress.com by Pradeep Shah

The new headquarters is creating over a hundred new high-skilled jobs and more in the coming years and will be able to build around 8,000 motorcycles a year.

Norton Motorcycles has announced the completion of its new global headquarters that includes state-of-the-art manufacturing capability and the company’s new global design and R&D hub as well. The new HQ is a display of significant commitment by TVS Motor Company in its partnership with Norton Motorcycles. Within just 18 months of acquiring the iconic British marque, TVS has overseen the creation of its world-class facility in Solihull, West Midlands, UK.

The new Norton leadership, together with TVS Motor Company, has conducted a wide-ranging review of Norton Motorcycles operations, resulting in new appointments and processes and these have been specifically in engineering, design, and manufacturing areas in order to ensure the highest quality standards, the company stated.

Moreover, the new headquarters is creating over a hundred new high-skilled jobs and more in the coming years and will be able to build around 8,000 motorcycles a year.

As part of the new manufacturing process, every single component of every new Norton bike will be evaluated in a new quality-testing laboratory to ensure the highest build quality. Moreover, the company says that within the laboratory are inspection rooms, testing areas including destruction testing, and a rolling road while a customer reception and showroom, service workshop, and office are also housed at the new HQ.

The Norton manufacturing facility has also been engineered to be highly sustainable and to minimize waste. The brand says that the build used numerous sustainable and rapid build techniques on the project, the components of which are almost 50% reconfigurable as a proportion of total construction cost – in order to increase special flexibility. The new facility is supported by the West Midlands Growth partnership, the UK Government, and is a great example of Anglo-Indian cooperation.

Airlite Lowers – form & function & durable

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Soft Lower Leg Warmers? It’s not the ’80s anymore
Story & Photos by Koz Mraz
https://www.kozmoto.com/

Engine Guard Lowers, Engine Chaps, Rain Guards, Soft Farings…Leg Warmers? Whatever you want to call those things that go on engine guards to stop the rain, cold air, wind, and flapping pant legs from sanding the hair off your calves.

Sometimes you want the airflow, sometimes you don’t. There are a plethora of options and they all come in two parts, left side, right side, just like those 80’s leg warmers—except one. Airlite’s one-piece, full cover soft lowers can be installed and removed quickly.

There are many reasons riders need soft lowers. They cut down the cold wind and rain, keeping boots and legs dry. They can extend your riding season so you can cruise earlier – cruise later – cruise longer – cruise safer.

Because of its one-piece design, Airlite claims that air is captured, screened, and directed exactly where it belongs; into the radiator and/or cooling fins. They also claim that wind buffeting around your upper body is reduced. They’re efficient and form-fitting in the highway bar cover with no gaps, so there’s no cold and wet wind slapping onto the rider.

The soft lowers are constructed with vinyl used on car bras which means they can be in the sun and wind 24/7 and don’t harden and crack like upholstery vinyl. The soft woven fabric backing material makes it impossible to tear or rip.

The screen is made of a heavy-duty mesh for bug and rock chip protection. It’s the same material that dump trucks use to cover loads. Poly webbing that snugly surrounds the bars is also used in seat belts. Airlite uses the same nylon thread employed in aircraft upholstery and a computerized long arm sewing machine allows for topstitching.

With a background in aviation, owner Bob Morris has designed his soft lowers to be extremely durable and uses all U.S materials. These things seem indestructible and he claims to have never had a defective or damaged lower returned.

Optional storage pouches are available on one or both sides. As stated, fitment is a snap. There are in fact no snaps, clips, or zippers, just Velcro where you need it and it comes with a stowaway bag.

In the real world, Soft Lowers are leg warmers. The radiant engine heat reflecting off the back of the soft lowers creates warm air vortices noticeably increasing the ambient air temperature behind them.

The Airlite soft lowers look and function flawlessly. It’s easy to install, will stop the rain, bugs, and rocks and stows easily away when unused.

Airlite has a soft lower that’s specifically made for almost every bike and year.

Price Range: $94.95 to $126.95

https://www.airlite.ca/

Check out their website for choices and options.

Perewitz Paint Show Photo Gallery

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No one has a paint show as the Perewitz crew has.

Photos and Text by Jack McIntyre

It’s amazing what the artists come up with regarding concepts, ideas, colors, and layouts.

This particular show was in Daytona at the Broken spoke & is a perfect example of the rest of their shows. Enjoy.

CLICK HERE To See the Perewitz Paint Show Photo Gallery only on Bikernet Cantina.

Jack McIntyre covers all major Motorcycle Events all year round.

Catch all the fun, event photographs and the parties – in the Cantina Section only at Bikernet.com

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Indian Motorcycle introduces 2022 Lineup

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  • Indian Motorcycle introduces 2022 Lineup featuring Updated Technology.
  • New Ride Command Update, Adaptive Headlight for Scout.
  • All-New Accessories for Cruiser, Bagger & Touring.
  • Prices, Paint and Specs announced.

“Rider feedback continues to be at the forefront of what drives refinements and enhancements for our model year offerings, and that is once again the case for 2022. With the help of customer feedback, we aim to consistently enhance and improve the lineup with new technology and wider-ranging accessory options like these for 2022.” – Mike Dougherty, President for Indian Motorcycle

CLICK HERE To See the Full 2022 Indian Motorcycle Lineup Info and Photos.

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Turning a Cuddly Honda Super Cub into a Beast

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Cuddly Honda Super Cub Turns Into Beast, Looks Meaner Than Some Harley-Davidsons

Like it or not, even the many fans of the Honda Super Cub have to admit this particular two-wheeler is not exactly custom material. The underbone machine is a huge customer favorite, but most of the time we don’t get to see the results of investments made in customization processes.

The Super Cub is one of the longest-running nameplates in the Japanese bike maker’s portfolio. It was introduced all the way back in the late 1950s, and since that time, it sold over 100 million units, becoming in effect the world’s most-produced motor vehicle (and that includes cars).

Given the huge number of them on the market, it was only natural for some owners to customize their rides even if, as said, we don’t get to see such projects all that often. Yet this week, thanks to a garage called K-Speed, we’re treated to exactly that, a too-good of a Super Cub not to discuss.

The Japanese say this is their first custom Super Cub C125, but even so, they seem to have nailed a look that might even put some Harleys to shame. The conversion rides closer to the ground than its stock siblings, the front end has been completely restyled, and much larger wheels than we’re used to were fitted front and back.

The rear end has been chopped as well, making the motorcycle look more like a vintage bike than an overgrown scooter. The black paint spread head to toe enhances that impression even more.

Click Here to See Details of this custom Honda Super Cub by K-Speed.

K-Speed says no changes were made to the thing’s engine and brakes, but even so, the price is about three times higher than that of a stock machine. Whereas, for instance, you could buy the 2021 Super Cub C125 for just under $4,000, this one has a retail price of over $13,000.

Visit K-Speed Website at: https://k-speed.com/

Launch of Honda CB750 & Dick Mann at AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race

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by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

On Twitter by Honda Powersports: Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann, American Honda sends its heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and fans. Mann’s 1970 Daytona 200 win aboard the CR750 (the racing version of the CB750 four-cylinder) was momentous in Honda’s history Thank you, Dick, and godspeed.

The Honda CB750 Changed the Way Motorcycles Were Made, Raced and Sold

Though now highly prized for their potential as re-imagined cafe racer machines, the venerable Honda CB750 was – back in its infancy – the bike that changed the game.

So how did it happen that the Japanese took over the worldwide motorcycle manufacturing industry? To a large extent, it came down to the creation of a single model.

With five consecutive championship titles under their belts, Honda decided to withdraw from the World GP circuit in 1967 with a plan to develop high-performance consumer motorcycles at the forefront of their vision.

While Honda exported more than half of their output back in the mid-’60s, they didn’t make a large-displacement sport bike model which would appeal to the hardcore rider in the U.S.

And it’s not like the honchos at Honda failed to notice that glaring deficiency. Sales of Honda motorcycles in America were flagging in 1966, and the company knew a brand-new worldview was in order. While the company had created the Dream CB450 in 1965, they were still being outgunned by big bikes from other makers. The CB450 sold well, but for the vast majority of American riders, it just didn’t have the requisite zing and bottom-end torque they craved.

What really drove Yoshiro Harada, the head of Honda product development at the time, was hearing the news that Britain’s Triumph was deep in the development process of a high-performance, 3-cylinder 750 cc engine. With the ante thus upped, Honda laid out plans to compete by creating their own 750 cc engine, which would lay down 67 horsepower to overtake the juice you could get from the 66-horsepower Harley-Davidson’s 1300 and the proposed Triumph Triple.

Though Honda was already the industry’s leading maker of motorcycles (due in no small part to the success of the most popular motorcycle in history, the Super Cub), the introduction of the CB750 sought to become the world’s top manufacturer of quality motorcycles as well. They were up against some formidable competition as comparable models from Triumph, BMW, and Harley were already on the road.

So what were the targets? Honda wanted to make a long-range, high-speed touring machine, so they turned to science for answers in the form of a newly-minted paradigm dubbed “ergonomics.”

Those targets included: Stability at highway cruising speeds, a reliable and cooled braking system that would handle frequent rapid decelerations from high speed, minimal vibration, and noise to fight rider fatigue on long hauls with a rider position which complimented the smoother power plant, lights and instruments which were large, gauges which were easy to read, easy maintenance and servicing for all the various modules of the bike and the use of top-quality materials and production techniques.

Perhaps the most significant innovation for Honda’s showpiece bike? The adoption of disc brakes. While that design decision proved costly and time-consuming, it was also a stroke of brilliance and one which made the CB750 a favorite of the serious riding set.

Released to the U.S. public in January 1969, the announcement of the new bike’s retail price, $1,495, was met with stunned silence at a dealer meeting in Nevada. The other shoe had officially dropped. Large-displacement bikes were selling at that time for between $2,800 and $4,000, and the 2,000 dealers on hand for the announcement exploded into applause when they recovered their wits.

And they had good cause for their optimism. The CB750 immediately commanded a premium sales price in dealer showrooms of between $1,800 and $2,000 to get one out the door.

Featuring an integrated crankshaft and metal bearing to replace the split-type, press-fit crankshaft with a needle bearing used in previous Honda motors, the CB750 was a great leap forward in design as well as price.

As great as this new machine was, the company initially had a serious problem. They could only manage to make something like five bikes a day, and that was clearly not enough to meet the demand for what had become a major hit with the market. Production was pushed to 25 units per day and then to 100 units, but that still left an enormous pile of backorders building up under and an entirely expected sales landslide.

It became clear that the production of the original sand-molded crankcases would never meet the rate requirements of mass production, so the factory switched over to producing crankcases of a metal, die-cast construction. The bikes were such a hit with the riding public that the production of engines and chassis was moved to a Suzuki factory in mid-1971. The “sandcast” CB750 models are now fetching enormous prices from collectors of up to ten and fifteen times higher than their new-off-the-line premium price back in the day.

But what really made the bikes a smash hit with the public?

Performance. Pure and dependable performance.

The factory racing team at Honda R&D took the new machines to compete at a 10-Hour Endurance Race in August 1969 to coincide with the commercial launch of the big bike, and Honda dominated, notching one-two finishes with the teams of Morio Sumiya and Tetsuya Hishiki taking first place and Yoichi Oguma and Minoru Sato pulling in a close second.

The deal was done when rider Dick Mann blew away the field on his CR750 during the AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race run during March 1970. The field was now wide open for large-displacement Japanese bikes, and in 1972, Kawasaki launched the 900cc ZI to compete on the big-bike stage…and the rest is, as they say, history.

Concept Motorcycle for the Moon: global debut at ADV Overland exhibition

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by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

This Spectacular Moon Concept Motorcycle Opens the Door to a New Space Experience

Since the “billionaire space race” has been accelerating, you might have imagined cosmonauts doing a lot of things, but we bet you didn’t picture them riding motorcycles on the moon. Yet, that’s what’s coming, because somebody just built an actual moon motorcycle, one of the most insane concept two-wheelers you’ll ever come across.

Last year, a Russian designer imagined what a “NASA motorcycle” would look like. Just one year later, that concept turned into reality and is about to make its world debut in California. The folks who made this happen are a small team from a German company called Hookie, which specializes in custom moto design and parts. Inspired by Andrew Fabishevskiy’s fantasy motorcycle, they were determined to bring it to life.

This is how Tardigrade, presented as the world’s first moon concept motorcycle, was born. You might wonder why it got the name of an apparently primitive creature, but these nearly-microscopic beings are incredibly resilient and able to adapt to any kind of environment, including outer space. Despite its otherworldly look, the Tardigrade motorcycle was also meant to be resilient and completely functional, “as close as possible to an original concept of a NASA moon rover.”

This futuristic-looking electric motorcycle blends a lightweight frame with single-sided swing arms, balloon tires, and drive-by-wire steering. With a length of 8.5 feet (2.6 meters), and almost 3-foot (0.9 meters) tall, Tardigrade has a battery range of up to 68 miles (110 km). Its maximum speed of 9 mph (15 kph) is comparable to that of the Moon Buggy. Plus, it’s designed to also carry equipment.

Incorporating 3D-printed parts, in house-developed wheels, plus a Cake drivetrain and sustainable lubricants from Puraglobe, this one-of-a-kind concept is innovative from start to finish. The folks at Hookie have shared glimpses from the building process along their journey, and are now proud to present their creation to the world.

Tardigrade, the moon motorcycle, will make its global debut at the ADV:Overland exhibition, held at the Petersen Automotive Museum in California, in mid-October.

What is Hub-center Steering Motorcycle & Why it is Better

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by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Hub-center steering is one of several different types of front-end suspension and steering mechanisms used in motorcycles and cargo bicycles. It is essentially a mechanism that uses steering pivot points inside the wheel hub rather than a geometry that places the wheel in a headstock like the traditional motorcycle layout.

Perhaps the most venerable example of the idea came in the form of the 1930 Majestic. This Georges Roy design used a novel pressed-steel monocoque chassis, and it incorporated an automotive-type chassis with hub-center steering. Other bikes had already used the configuration in such machines as the Ner-A-Car and the Zenith Auto-Bi, but the Majestic made it lovely to behold.

Another bike, the Vyrus 984 C3 2V Razzetto, was one such motorcycle that used hub-center geometry.

Vyrus is a small Italian motorcycle manufacturer based in Coriano, Italy, and their bikes such as the “Tesi” – Thesis in Italian – had their designs originate from a university engineering project linked to the motorcycle legend Massimo Tamburini. The Tesi, and the Vyrus 984, were instantly identifiable by their use of their hub-center steering front suspension and steering arrangement.

Those fabulously expensive bespoke motorcycles have been called “functional works of art,” and they look a bit like something you might see in a video game.

In hub-centered bikes, the front wheel is attached to a swingarm with a shock and an internal pivot point. Steering is achieved using those linkages to turn the wheel on a pivot point. Hub-center steering has been employed on motorcycles for more than a century, but the design, despite what some engineers say offers a distinct advantage, never took hold.

But the founder of Vyrus, Ascanio Rodorigo, once worked for Bimota as a race mechanic and engineer during the 1970s and his tenure there lasted until 1985. When Rodorigo finally left Bimota, he started his own company but partnered with Bimota on the hub-center-steered Tesi. He then went on to take the steering concept deeper and refined it for his own company’s motorcycles.

A Ducati dual spark bored out to 1,079cc and making 100hp L-twin provides the power for the 319 lbs (145 kg) Vyrus 984 bike, and it’s delivered to the road for via a six-speed transmission.

Now builders like Bryan Fuller of Fuller Moto, Revival Cycles, and others have built beautiful machines which harken back to the hub-centered glory days of the Majestic. Builders such as Stellan Egeland used a hopped-up 1200 boxer engine from a BMW HP2 Sport. He also added his own hub-center steering setup from ISR to a frame he made from a 2391 steel tube. The ISR kit is a thing to behold.

Revival’s ‘The Six,’ which features a ballsy Honda CBX motor, is another take on the hub-steer geometry. It was commissioned by museum owner and bike collector Bobby Haas for his Haas Moto Museum in Dallas and made by Revival’s Alan Stulberg and his crew.

Stulberg said the commission was aimed at paying homage to the Art Deco classic Majestic and added that he and the team became “obsessed with its design language and flow” since they first saw the bike at the Barber Museum.

Hub steering systems don’t dive as much under braking and hard cornering as do conventional telescopic fork setups. They push braking forces back into the chassis more efficiently rather than transferring immense bending forces to a pair of upright forks. The ride experience is exceptional as braking performance throughout corners is greatly enhanced.

It works like this: A wheel hub pitches back and forth on a central pivot and is supported by two large steering arms actuated by handlebars. The handlebars connect to the front steering and swingarm using complex linkages. A fixed arm connects a pull-and-push rod on either side of the hub-center to help steer the bike. The geometry also includes a second pair of static rods to ensure the axle stays level with the bike’s mass.

While hub steering has a number of clear advantages, its downfall is that it is considerably more expensive to manufacture and maintain and requires exceptionally experienced mechanics to tune and repair.

But it does look good, works more efficiently from an engineering standpoint, and directly addresses the most important factor in the motorcycling experience: braking.

The Majestic – Artistic Design from the 1920s
from https://www.odd-bike.com

While the engineering of the Majestic might have been relatively conventional, what was unprecedented was the styling, the hallmark of the Majestic to this day.

All the oily bits were fully enclosed under louvered panels, with partially enclosed fenders covering the wheels at both ends. The rider was completely isolated from the grime and muck of the running gear and powertrain, perched upon a sprung saddle and controlling the machine via levers and bars that poke through the all-encompassing body.

Presented in 1929, the prototype Majestic (which was reported as Roy’s personal machine) featured an air-cooled 1000cc longitudinal four-cylinder engine from a 1927-28 Cleveland 4-61. This would not remain for production, however.

While at least two Majestics were built with a 750cc JAP V-twin (arranged, like a much later Moto-Guzzi , with the Vee transverse and the heads poking through the bodywork) and records note that JAP singles, a Chaise Four, and at least one Gnome et Rhone flat twin were also employed, the majority of production machines coming out of Chartenay featured air-cooled Chaise engines.

These were overhead valve singles featuring unit two or three-speed gearboxes operated by hand-shift, available in 350cc and 500cc displacements. Distinctive for their single pushrod tube that resembles a bevel tower (but contains a pair of tightly-spaced parallel pushrods) and external bacon-slicer flywheel, these powerplants were a favourite of French manufacturers during the interwar period and were used by a variety of marques in lieu of producing their own engines.

The base price of the Majestic was 5200 Francs for a 350 with chain final drive; an extra 500 Francs netted you optional shaft drive.

An additional option that is rarely seen on surviving examples was a fine “craquelure” paint option that was applied by skilled artisans. It involves a process of deliberately screwing up the paint job in the most controlled and flawless way possible, applying a contrasting top coat over a base using incompatible paints that will cause the top coat to crack in a uniform fashion, something like a well-aged oil painting or antique piece of furniture.

The result is spectacular – and perhaps a bit tacky, giving the machine the appearance of a lizard skin handbag. (Maybe a later Rock Star would have loved to ride it as the “The Lizard King” ? )

The Majestic was impeccably stable at higher speeds compared to the other motorcycles of that era.

It was also agile and light footed in a way that similar machines, like the Ner-A-Car, were not.

The relatively low weight, around 350 pounds, carried with a very low centre of gravity made for tidy handling that was more than up to the meagre output offered by the powerplants.

Majestic was targeting a clientele that didn’t really exist: the gentlemanly rider who might desire a superior (read: expensive) machine as a stablemate to their elegant automobiles.

Georges Roy’s previous design produced under the name “New Motorcycle”

Georges Roy’s earlier 1927 brand called New Motorcycle was a far better barometer of things to come, predicting the style and design of machines that would emerge during the 1930s and beyond. The Majestic has far less impact and was more of a curiosity than predictor of trends to come.

Georges Roy’s brilliance as a designer is unquestionable, and deserves more praise than he ever earned during his lifetime.

Majestic is a little bit of elegance floating on the sea of staid machines that clutter up the history books.

Georges Roy was a French industrialist and engineer born in 1888 who achieved success in the textile business – specifically in knitting and sewing equipment. He was, however, an early adopter of motorcycling at the turn of the 20th Century – reportedly his first machine was a Werner, a Parisian machine that introduced the term “Motocyclette” in 1897.