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Former Milwaukee mansion of H-D co-founder William S. Harley was on the market

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by Sarah Hauer from https://www.jsonline.com

Former Milwaukee mansion of Harley-Davidson co-founder William S. Harley was recently on the market.

The former mansion of Harley-Davidson co-founder William S. Harley in Washington Heights was recently on the market for the first time in decades.

The home at 4906 W. Washington Boulevard was built in 1916 and designed by architect Charles Valentine. The original estimated cost was $8,000, according to the Wisconsin Historical Society.

The Harley family moved into the home a couple of years after it was built.

Harley, along with his friend Arthur Davidson and Arthur’s brother Walter Davidson, founded the motorcycle brand.

Harley and the Davidsons built their first motorcycle in 1903. By 1913, the company had built almost 13,000 motorcycles.

The vintage Mediterranean revival mansion was listed for sale at $399,000.

The 3,821 square-foot home has six bedrooms and four bathrooms. It also features a sun room, grand foyer, formal dining room, fireplace and indoor fountain.

Throughout the home are hardwood floors, French doors and arched windows.

While the home is spacious (sitting a .28-acre lot), there is a lot of work that needs to be done on it. The electrical system needs updating. The bathrooms are all vintage tile with pedestal sinks.

The current owners lived in the home for decades and moved out a couple months ago. The mansion will be sold in “as-in” condition, according to the listing.

The property went under contract Tuesday, said the listing agent Mike Argeropoulos of Riverwest Realty. Argeropoulos said the buyer intends to preserve the home.

Argeropoulos said more than 200 people came to the open house last weekend. Multiple offers were received, Argeropoulos said.

The last time this property was on the market was 1976 when John and Camille Shaw bought it for $44,500, according to city records.

H-D Pan America™ Becomes No.1 Selling Adventure Touring Motorcycle

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H-D Pan America™ Becomes No.1 Selling Adventure Touring Motorcycle in North America.

Built to Endure, Designed to Explore, and Engineered for Adventure

MILWAUKEE (August 30, 2021) – Since launching in February 2021, the Pan America™ 1250 Special adventure touring motorcycle has taken the motorcycling world by storm. In creating the Pan America™, Harley-Davidson leveraged its cutting-edge design and engineering capabilities to create both the Pan America 1250 and Pan America 1250 Special. Today, we are pleased to announce that the Pan America 1250 Special has become the #1 selling adventure touring motorcycle in North America.

Jochen Zeitz, Chairman, CEO and President, Harley-Davidson:
“Taking inspiration from our heritage, we wanted to create a motorcycle that redefined the adventure touring category and most importantly was designed and built in America. With the Pan America Special now the #1 selling ADV motorcycle model in North America, we targeted a selective expansion into adventure touring as part of the Hardwire Strategy with the goal to reach new and existing Harley-Davidson customers. Pan America is squarely built on our mission to deliver a timeless pursuit of adventure for our riders. Those who now own or have tested one of our Pan America’s absolutely love this bike – having sold out of our 2021 allocation, we are excited about what the future has in store for Pan America and for the Adventure Touring category at Harley-Davidson.”

Visit Details of all things Harley-Davidson at www.harley-davidson.com

Custom Harley-Davidson Dyna

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

There are countless customized Harley-Davidson motorcycles out there, spread across almost a century and the many bike families the Milwaukee company has been making. But if there’s one bike that could probably be worthy of more exposure on the custom motorcycle scene, then that’s the Dyna.

Born in the 1990s as a new platform for the Evolution engine, the family was around for about two decades, being pushed aside in 2018 when the new line of Softails came onto the scene.

So yes, we’re talking about a rather new machine, and that could explain why shops are not all that crazy about it yet. Then again, the V-Rods are rather new as well, and we get plenty of those, especially from over in Europe, so who knows.

If there is one shop that likes Dynas more than others, that’s Bad Land. Coming from the Land of the Rising Sun, Japan, Bad Land is one of the most active custom motorcycle garages on the market.

The Dyna you’re looking at now was shown back in 2019. It’s official name is Hermosa x dios, and it has nothing to do Spain. The name was probably chosen for impact, given how hermosa is Spanish for beautiful, and dios stands for god.

The bike is radically different from stock, and you get a sense of that as soon as it comes into view. There’s a huge 21-inch tire up front, wearing a slim tire, and a tiny-by-comparison 15-inch one at the rear, though wearing a massive 230 wide tire that makes all the difference between the two irrelevant.

Put together with the same attention to detail Bad Land has gotten us used to by now, the Dyna packs a wealth of other custom parts, including a new fork, headlight, front fender, fuel tank, rear fender, exhaust, swingarm, and seat, all created in the Japanese shop.

Bad Land does not say how much the Harley-Davidson Hermosa x dios cost to make.

See Full Details of this Custom Dyna at https://www.badland.net/hd-custom/hermosa-x-dios/

Kirk Taylor’s 2018 Strider Custom is back

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by Marilyn Stemp

Kirk Taylor’s L’il Cha Cha was among the very first class of Tiny Strider Customs, a program of the Flying Piston Benefit that supports All Kids Bike – an organization that’s on a mission to teach every kid how to ride a bike as part of kindergarten PE class.

Custom creations are unveiled at the Flying Piston breakfast in August at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip then auctioned at the Mecum motorcycle event in Las Vegas the following January. Proceeds fund bike-riding programs for elementary schools.

Click Here to Read this Photo Feature Article on Bikernet.com

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https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special with Arctic Blast Limited Edition

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CORRECTION TO PRICE:
The Arctic Blast Limited Edition Street Glide Special MSRP is $32,999 (US). Optional RDRS adds $995.

HARLEY-DAVIDSON REVEALS STREET GLIDE SPECIAL® MODEL WITH ARCTIC BLAST LIMITED EDITION PAINT
Handcrafted Factory Custom will be Limited to 500 Serialized Motorcycles Worldwide

MILWAUKEE (August 9, 2021) – Harley-Davidson takes custom paint to a new level with the introduction of a limited run of 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide® Special motorcycles featuring the handcrafted Arctic Blast Limited Edition paint set. The motorcycle was revealed today at the 81st Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Availability will be limited to 500 examples worldwide, each serialized on the fuel tank.

https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/motorcycles/street-glide-special.html

“With the Arctic Blast Limited Edition paint offering for the Street Glide Special, at Harley-Davidson we continue to build on our reputation and lead by example, as the best in exclusive custom motorcycles and design,” said Jochen Zeitz, Chairman, President and CEO Harley-Davidson.

The Arctic Blast Limited Edition paint will be offered in a single colorway – metallic deep blue with bright blue strokes over a pearlescent white base.

“The Arctic Blast paint is executed in strokes of high-contrast color intended to communicate the appearance of motion,” said Brad Richards, Harley-Davidson Vice President of Styling and Design. “The design looks bold from a distance but offers interesting details that can only be seen up close, including a blue pearl effect over the white base, and a ghosted hexagon pattern on the fairing.”

The Arctic Blast Limited Edition paint is hand-applied by the artisans at Gunslinger Custom Paint in Golden, Colorado. The Gunslinger roster of nationally-known painters, designers, artists and manufacturing team leaders has decades of experience as a supplier of custom-painted components for Harley-Davidson® Custom Vehicle Operations™ motorcycles and Limited Edition paint sets.

https://gcpaint.com/

The Street Glide Special model is a Harley-Davidson hot-rod bagger that combines long-haul touring comfort and custom style with the authoritative performance of the Milwaukee-Eight® 114 V-Twin engine. Key features include the iconic Harley-Davidson batwing fairing with splitstream vent to reduce head buffeting, stretched locking saddle bags, a Daymaker® LED headlamp, low-profile engine guard, and Prodigy custom wheels. The Boom!™ Box GTS infotainment system with color touch screen, advanced navigation plus compatibility with Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay®, hand and voice commands (when paired with compatible headset), and two-speaker audio is standard equipment.

The Arctic Blast Limited Edition Street Glide Special MSRP is $32,999 (USD). A Chopped Tour-Pak® luggage carrier with matching paint will also be offered through Harley-Davidson® Genuine Motor Parts & Accessories (P/N 53000650ERW MSRP: $1,699.95 USD).

Electric dream: Horwin CR6 reviewed

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by Fraser Addecott from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Sales of electric two-wheelers are booming and with manufacturers producing bikes like this one, it’s easy to see why.

It seems difficult to keep up with the number of new electric two-wheelers coming on to the market these days.

The trend was already under way and has only been accelerated by the pandemic, with commuters and others looking for alternatives to public transport.

Figures from the Motorcycle Industry Association show sales of electrics for June up 155% compared to the same month last year.

Sales for the year up until last month are also up 210% compared to the same period in 2020.

That is impressive growth, with the majority of bikes sold falling in the 50cc and 125cc equivalent categories.

Artisan Electric is a British company established in 2016 with a “mission to change the face of electric motorcycles and scooters with industry-leading innovation and product quality”.

The company offers a range of seven electric bikes and scooters – and the one I am testing here is the CR6.

This is a 125cc-equivalent machine, with a pretty cool retro-meets-futuristic look.

The air-cooled electric motor is powered by a 3.96kWh Panasonic lithium-ion battery.

Careful riding will produce a range of around 60 miles.

Haring around flat out – top speed is about 55mph – will cut your range to around 30 miles.

That may not sound much, but the CR6 is aimed at commuters and for jaunts into town, so it’s perfectly adequate.

A full charge from zero takes around four hours, but bear in mind you’ll hardly ever be charging from completely flat, so shorter times are more realistic.

Charging is via a standard three-pin socket and a socket in the side of the bike.

The battery comes with a reassuring three-year warranty.

On board, the ride position is relaxed and comfortable with a long and well-padded cafe-racer type seat.

There’s a round retro/modern, backlit, colour clock with a rather unnecessary rev counter across the top and a LCD panel with speed, charge level etc.

As with all electrics, the acceleration is instantaneous and impressive.

At just 134kg, this bike is light and it feels agile, manageable and nippy – perfect for the urban jungle.

With low-down weight, a decent aluminium chassis and an excellent turning circle, the CR6 handles extremely well.

The non-adjustable USD forks and preload-adjustable rear monoshock do a perfectly reasonable job.

And braking via a front 265mm disc and three-piston caliper and rear 220mm is plenty powerful enough.

The headlight is a nice bright LED and the “tank” is actually a lockable storage compartment, ideal for the charge cable, gloves etc.

It also contains a USB port – handy for charging your phone.

At five grand, the CR6 is obviously a bigger initial outlay than a petrol 125, but running costs work out at just a penny a mile.

Overall then, the Horwin is a solid little city commuter, easy to ride, with good looks and decent performance.

Specs:
Horwin CR6
Motor: Air-cooled electric
Max power: 8bhp
Max torque: 30ft lb
Colours: White; blue; green; black
Price: £4,992

This Ducati EV Artwork Is So Good, Folks Even Believe It’s Real

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by Cristian Curmei from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati is the sort of name that tells you right away just about everything you need to know about a vehicle. It’s even grown to be the sort of brand that inspires designers of all kinds to take a whack at building the perfect Ducati.

While building the perfect Ducati may just be a dream, here’s a fine example of one designer’s inspiration derived from the famed brand. The vehicle rendering before you is known as the Ducati è rossa monoposto, and it’s from the mind of one Romain Gauvin.

No, Mr. Gauvin is not some artist that just graduated college and decided to test his drawing hand, but rather a very prolific designer. His resume currently shows that he is Senior Designer at Automobile Citroen. That should be more than enough to have you looking at this render a second time.

If it isn’t, here’s a fun little fact. Rumor has it that this design is the newest electric motorcycle from Ducati, according to an article by gomotoriders. However, upon a search that led me to Ducati themselves, there has been nothing to back up those claims. But I can see why some people want to believe so much that this is a real motorcycle; it’s definitely a one-of-a-kind piece of work, even as a render.

The idea behind the concept is a simple one, and Gauvin states on his Behance page that, “My goal was to blend cutting edge technology with pure emotional motoring fascination. I wanted to see an electric motorbike that was actually desirable.” Did he succeed? Well, you tell me. I’m just the messenger.

With the idea of creating a “desirable” EV branded Ducati, the monoposto was underway. Gauvin states that he started with the frame of the bike. Here, carbon fiber was the chosen material. From there, he just kept adding more and more elements until the bike was complete.

After the frame, an electric motor, rear suspension system, and rear hub are designed and set in their according position. One thing you can see is that this bike is a chain driven EV. I recently rode a chain driven EV, and I got to say, those things can be beasts.

Even though Gauvin doesn’t state what cues from the motorsport’s world are being used in the overall design, one feature is very clear; the panel work that wraps the motor housing looks a lot like the air intake to an F1 vehicle. That segment then blends beautifully into a leather seat that’ll have the rider leaning forward quite a bit. Those pits on the sides of the would-be “intake” also look like a perfect place for the rider’s arms to become one with the frame, resulting in some nice aerodynamics.

Speaking of aerodynamics, the carbon fiber fork flares out and looks like it, too, is made to manipulate oncoming air around the bike and rider. Even though the fork looks solid, it also seems like there may be some suspension properties hidden beneath the flares.

One thing is for sure, this motorcycle does not look like it’s one meant for just plain cruising on Sundays. Instead, the rims, massive front brakes, and slick tires tell you that the only place you will ever feel this EV’s true potential is on a track. Even the riders position tells you all you need to know about where this EV belongs.

Even though the designer makes no mention of this motorcycle’s range, he does include a visual as to where the recharge port would be, right underneath the seat and fed directly to the battery system.

Now, take a minute and have a nice long look at this design. If you do so, you too, may begin to believe the rumors about this possibly being the next Ducati motorcycle. Even though those rumors aren’t true, not currently anyway. If Ducati was to ever make an EV that looks like this, I would be out there in line waiting for the test ride.

Unique Hexagon Wheel Design on Custom Harley-Davidson Night Rod

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

If there is one element that can clearly make a custom motorcycle stand out in the crowd, than that element is the wheel. All it takes is a bit of imagination and some equipment to make a unique design, and you’re off to creating something no one else thought about before.

When setting out to customize a motorcycle, more specifically a Harley-Davidson, shops usually spend a lot of time and at times money in selecting the best wheel design for their project. The guys over at Russian shop Box39 are a good an example as any in this respect, as we’ve seen over the past few months.

Created about a decade ago, Box39 has a real thing for Harley’s V-Rods of not so long ago. In fact, the shop gave birth to an entire family of custom bikes based on that, called Giotto, which presently counts around 19 individual builds.

The one you’re looking at is called Giotto 7 and according to the Russians it has been completed in 2021. It was originally a Night Rod version of the American muscle bike, and it received the usual complement of changes to make it unique.

The most in-your-face elements of this apparition are of course the wheels, carefully crafted to display an uncountable number of small hexagons. The wheels are sized 21-inch front and 18-inch rear, the usual size combination when it comes to the Russians.

A custom paint job over the modified body of the bike make the wheels feel right at home in this design, especially when looking at the plastic body kit that was slapped onto the front end and fuel tank of the Milwaukee machine.

Box39 is not in the habit of telling people how much such a build costs to make, but looking at this thing, especially them wheels, we reckon it doesn’t come cheap.

See website: https://box39.ru/giotto-7/

Davinci DC100 Is a Two-Wheeled Robot Disguised as an Electric Motorcycle

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

  • 0 to 60 mph (100 kph) in 3 seconds
  • top speed of 124 mph (200 km)
  • peak power 135 hp and peak torque 627 ft-lb (850 Nm)
  • ride range of 222 miles (357.51 km)
  • fast-charging to full charge in 30 minutes

The motorcycle of tomorrow is, according to makers Davinci Dynamics, the DC100, or its fancier, more expensive version, the limited-edition, hand-crafted masterpiece DC Classic. Introduced this week in Beijing (hat tip to New Atlas), it is said to be the culmination of seven years of hard work, the first step toward the electric two-wheel revolution that the world has been hoping for but is yet to fully witness.

Big words for an equally big moment, but you don’t get the chance to stand out from everyone else if you don’t show cojones, figuratively speaking. Hopefully, Davinci Dynamics can back up the impressive claims with a futuristic cafe racer to match, because, on paper, the DC100 sounds like a dream. It’s more than just an electric motorcycle, the company says: it’s a two-wheeled robot disguised as an elegant, futuristic, electric cafe racer.

The DC100 rides on a monocoque aluminum alloy chassis. It has a single-sided swingarm and a cover for the giant lithium 17.7kWh battery pack that gives it a boxy but still streamlined appearance. It rides on Pirelli Diablo Rosso III tires, and it’s painted in muted gray or bright orange, making it feel as if it belongs in a video game of some sorts.

On paper, the DC100 delivers solid performance, meant to “rival the performance of their 1000cc gas-powered counterparts:” you get 0 to 60 mph (100kph) acceleration time of 3 seconds, peak torque of 627 ft-lb (850 Nm), and a top speed of 124 mph (200 kph). The hub motor delivers a peak power of 135 hp, while the battery is good for an estimated WLTP range of 222 miles (357.51 km). Fast-charging ensures a full charge in just 30 minutes.

The DC100 is also very smart, using technology for smoother and more intuitive, longer, and safer rides. It’s packed with sensors that collect and track information, says Davinci, with the ultimate goal of maximized efficiency and comfort, so you can truly enjoy your ride.

Features include Hill-start Assist Control (HAC), regen braking and improved balancing on descent, reverse assist (which allows you to back out of a spot on torque, even on an incline), traction control, and combined braking for maximized stopping power. In Drive mode, if you release the brake, the motorcycle “creeps forward slowly” at 3 mph (5 kph) to ensure a “smooth” start.

But the most intriguing features are listed as “to come:” self-balancing capabilities, target recognition, and remote control. Davinci promises that the DC100 “will be able to balance itself” and “to automatically follow a target,” hence the promise that it could become your “jogging companion.” The idea, one assumes, is that it won’t ever go any faster than in the creep mode mentioned above, at 3 mph (5 kph). Not that you should ever go out jogging with your bike, as if you’d have your dog tag along.

Remote control will also be offered as an OTA update, through the Davinci App. Though the press materials released so far show the bike with a display, the Davinci website and the press release that went out this week note that, even in this stage, your “phone is the key, and your display.” This means that riders have to use the Davinci App for settings and stats, and their phone to visualize them, including speed. They would also use this method for remote control, when and if it becomes available – maybe even to summon their bike to them in the way drivers do their Teslas today.

As noted above, Davinci is offering two models of this two-wheeled robot that poses as an electric motorcycle: the DC100 and the DC Classic. Spec-wise, the only difference between the two is that the latter will be limited to just 50 units worldwide and will come with a hand-crafted, hand-assembled and custom-tailored body that stands out for the “striking minimalist aesthetics,” each carrying an ID number.

The other, more significant difference is in pricing: the DC100 costs $27,500 / €26,000, while the DC Classic is $90,000/ €78,000. Assuming you picked yourself up from the floor, here’s the good news: the pre-order books are open, and all you need is a $150 / €150 deposit to secure your bike of tomorrow right now. That’s not a figure of speech, because the wait for either is long: the Classic ships in April 2022, and the DC100 in July 2022.