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Harley-Davidson’s 2nd Generation Serial-1 E-bikes going big on software

By General Posts

Harley-Davidson’s updated Serial 1 e-bikes will feature Google Cloud connectivity
Most of the major changes are under the surface

by Andrew J. Hawkins from https://www.theverge.com/

Serial 1, the electric bike company spun out of Harley-Davidson, launched its second-generation lineup of premium e-bikes — but the biggest changes will be coming to the company’s app.

The updated bikes will come with a host of new software features provided by Serial 1’s new partnership with Google Cloud. The company says that Google Cloud has selected Serial 1 as its new “strategic eMobility partner,” meaning the e-bike maker will be among the first to integrate Google’s software products into its vehicles.

The software-enabled e-bikes will allow owners to track their trips, collect data, and “significantly improve safety and security,” Serial 1 says. It reflects a trend in the e-bike industry to install bikes with cloud-connected software as an additional selling point.

The centerpiece of the new partnership will be the Serial 1 app, in which owners can see turn-by-turn navigation, collect ride data, and control security features on their bike. Serial 1 is promising more high-tech features to come thanks to the company’s “access to Google Cloud analytics and business intelligence and integration with Google Cloud AI functionality.”

Google Cloud will also ensure a stronger connection between the bike and the user’s smartphone. Most e-bikes use Bluetooth to connect to a smartphone app, but Serial 1’s bikes will use cellular and GPS technology, in addition to Bluetooth, to ensure owners can connect to their bikes even when they are not in their line of sight.

Just a quick refresher: Serial 1 is a standalone electric bike company that spun out from Harley-Davidson in October 2020. Its current lineup includes four bikes, ranging in price from $3,399 to $4,999. The brand names are Mosh/Cty, a city bike, and the commuter Rush/Cty, which comes in three variants (regular, Step-Thru, and Speed). Each comes with a mid-drive motor capable of generating 250W of continuous power and hitting top speeds of 20mph — except for the Rush/Cty Speed, which can go 28mph.

The powertrains will be the same in the second-generation bikes. Most of the major changes are under the surface. These include improved security features, such as flashing lights, disabled pedal-assist functionality, and real-time locations.

The Serial 1 app will integrate with Google Maps to provide better navigation, for example, by prioritizing routes with bike lanes. Serial 1’s simplified digital displays are supplied by Brose, a German company that also makes the bike’s powertrain, so users will likely have to mount their smartphones on the handlebars to benefit from these types of features.

The app will also feature a “virtual garage” in which owners can name, track, and digitally manage their e-bikes. This will include a new dashboard for owners to monitor their bike’s ride data, including speed, distance, range, power output (both for the rider and the battery), efficiency, and state-of-charge, among other metrics. Serial 1 owners can record their rides to learn more about their performance and progress. And the app will provide automatic service updates when their bikes are in need of a tune-up.

The physical look and controls for the second-generation bikes will remain largely the same. I loved the bikes when I got to test them out last year. The same team that developed the batteries for Harley-Davidson electric LiveWire motorcycles also developed batteries for Serial 1. The integrated batteries are mounted very low on the frame, which helps with the mass centralization and improved handling.

With this new update, it’s clear Serial 1 is taking aim at major manufacturers like Giant, Trek, and Specialized, which sell premium e-bikes for high-end customers. Specialized, in particular, has been touting the connected software in its Turbo lineup. And like Harley-Davidson, the company just announced that it was spinning out its own brand called Globe that will exclusively focus on utility e-bikes.

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Save the Salt – Bonneville Report

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5-Ball Racing and Bikernet.com set a record with the Salt Shaker, Valerie Thompson (her first) and Barry Wardlaw. Top speed 151.5 in 2006.

Restore Bonneville hopes new data will speed salt flat replenishment

The ongoing pursuit to preserve the Bonneville Salt Flats has scored another victory and SEMA, along with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Utah Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Utah Geological Survey (UGS), and Intrepid Potash Inc. marked more progress in restoring the area’s precious salt.

A new well installed in the summer of 2021, along with equipment that will collect data on evaporation, will inform the preservation and replenishment of the salt flats as the Restore Bonneville program kicks off.

CLICK HERE To Read about the unique Salt Flats – it’s lot more than a speed test ground

How to Build a Bonneville Salt Flats Motorcycle documents the construction of “The Worlds Fastest Panhead,” conceived and assembled by Keith Ball, former editor or Easyriders magazine and current owner of Bikernet.com, the most popular biker stop on the internet.

CLICK HERE To Buy the Book – visit the 5-Ball Racing Shop

Try the Climate Quiz by CO2 Coalition

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The Great Climate Change Debate is one of the “hottest” issues before the public and policy makers today.

How much do you know about the subject?

Or possibly, the real question is one attributed to American humorist Will Rogers: “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble, it’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”

Find out your Climate IQ by taking our Climate Quiz: the answers may surprise you.

CLICK HERE To Take the Climate Quiz Now

The CO2 Coalition was established in 2015 as a 501(c)(3) for the purpose of educating thought leaders, policy makers, and the public about the important contribution made by carbon dioxide to our lives and the economy.

MRF Update: Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS)

By General Posts

Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Transportation released an interactive website with data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). FARS, which became operational in 1975, containing data on a census of fatal traffic crashes within the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. To be included in FARS, a crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a traffic way customarily open to the public and must result in the death of a vehicle occupant or a nonoccupant within 30 days of the crash.

Fatal crash data for motorcyclists and passengers from the years 2010 to 2019 is included on this website.

Users of the website can sort the information on fatalities by a variety of categories, including:

  • State where the crash took place
  • Crash Characteristics
  • Environmental Characteristics
  • Month of Crash
  • Time of Crash
  • Helmet Usage
  • Alcohol Usage
  • Age and Sex of Victims
  • Weather Conditions
  • Single Vehicle v Multi Vehicle

While this information can be useful in understanding when, why and where crashes are taking place, it’s important to note that this data includes not just traditional motorcycles but also mopeds, scooters, minibikes, and pocket bikes.

The Motorcycle Riders Foundation believes crash avoidance is key component of rider safety. There are zero fatalities in crashes that never happen.

To see the website and view the decade’s long data click here.

About Motorcycle Riders Foundation
The Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) provides leadership at the federal level for states’ motorcyclists’ rights organizations as well as motorcycle clubs and individual riders.

Visit MRF Website at: https://mrf.org/

Dynojet to Launch Its Power Vision Product for 2021 Harley-Davidson Touring & Softail Models

By General Posts

A world leader in developing and manufacturing performance enhancement products for vehicles is slated to unveil a new product.

NORTH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, UNITED STATES, September 15, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Representatives with Dynojet Research, Inc. announced today that it will soon launch its Power Vision product for the 2021 Harley-Davidson.

Dan Hourigan, Vice President of Product Management for Dynojet Research, Inc., explained that the Power Vision for 2021 Harley-Davidson Touring and Softails models (part number PV-3B) is slated to launch around Oct. 1. Dynojet Research, Inc. is the world leader in the manufacturing and development of performance enhancement products and tools. The company’s EFI tuning devices, diagnostic products and personalized services empower customers with the necessary resources to maximize performance and efficiency.

As it relates to its soon-to-launch Power Vision product, Hourigan pointed out that some 2021 Harleys use a new ECU that required ground-up development efforts, while other models are already supported. The models using the new ECU include Touring, Softail, Pan-America, and Sportster S. The Power Vision PV-3B will support Touring and Softail to begin with, and then additional support will follow. The current Power Vision PV-2B already supports the remaining 2021 Harleys like the Sportster and Street 500/750.

“No matter your brand of motorcycle or style of riding, our EFI tuning devices can help optimize power, torque, improved rideability, overall speed and fuel-efficiency,” Hourigan stressed before adding, “With our extensive library of dyno-tested tunes and the ability to flash your ECU at your convenience, you’ll have a tune for any combination of parts on your next adventure. Our Power Vision easily connects to your motorcycle through the OEM diagnostic connector, so installation is a snap. You can then flash your bike and unplug the device, or you can use it as an instrument panel for more information on your fuel efficiency, engine temperatures, air/fuel ratio, and more.”

Hourigan noted that its product was also built to last with a weather and shock-resistant design.

“Our Power Vision for Harley-Davidson even has a unique autotune capability that can monitor specific data from your Harley while you ride and create a specific custom tune suited just for your parts and riding style,” Hourigan said. “Our Power Vision can hold multiple tunes right on the device and flash them without the need of a computer. It also allows you to alter the tune with our exclusive “Quick Tune” feature, which means that you can reflash your ECU changing conditions and fuel quality right from the road. Keep a tune available to suit your needs, from maximizing MPG’s to flatout grudge match power, the flexibility to change tunes is at your fingertips.

Additional features and benefits include:

● Flash performance tunes via OEM diagnostic connector directly to your ECU, no need to remove ECU or add additional electronics

● Display vehicle data channels in real-time, even set alarms

● Weather-resistant for use in all conditions

● Full color touchscreen display

And more.

“It’s not just a flash tuning device, the Power Vision is also a powerful monitoring and diagnostic tool that provides peace of mind while you ride,” Hourigan said. “The data can also be logged and analyzed using our Power Core Software to help you improve your tune. It also has embedded features such as Autotune, Quick Tune, DTC read / clear, and much more to make it the ultimate EFI tool for your Harley.”

With over four decades of experience, Dynojet, a member of SEMA, has relied on state-of-the-art technology to provide its customers with the best products available. Its philosophy stands behind the belief that its customers are number one. Individualized attention is given so that customers can take full advantage of the products it offers.

When it comes to service, Dynojet Research prides itself on customer service. The company’s team is always standing by to answer any question customers may have about its wide range of products, from dynamometers to EFI tuning devices.

For more information, please visit www.dynojet.com/about-us and https://www.dynojet.com/blog/.

About Dynojet Research, Inc.
At Dynojet Research, our mission is to make every ride the ultimate ride. All of our products, from EFI tuning devices to clutch kits, were made to help your motorcycle, UTV, or other vehicles keep up with your ambitions and exceed your expectations. Our team is made of racers, outdoor enthusiasts, and rebels, so we have the years of experience both on and off the road to help you make every ride the ultimate ride.

Queensland wraps up connected vehicle road safety pilot

By General Posts

by Aimee Chanthadavong from https://www.zdnet.com

The Queensland government said during the nine-month pilot drivers were alerted about on-road hazards, including red lights, pedestrians, and cyclists.

A pilot involved with testing technology that alerted drivers about upcoming on-road hazards, including red lights, pedestrians, and bike riders in Queensland’s Ipswich has now wrapped up after nine months.

As part of the Ipswich Connected Vehicle Pilot (ICVP), 350 participants had their cars retrofitted with cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) technology, including an antenna mounted on a roof-rack, in-vehicle communications box placed under the driver’s seat, and a display on the dashboard that signalled safety warnings to the driver.

The equipment enabled each vehicle’s position, speed, and other data, to be shared, while it also received data from traffic signals and traffic management systems related to traffic lights, speed limits, road works, and road hazards.

The pilot covered 300 square kilometres within the Ipswich local government area, and included 30 traffic signals fitted with roadside communication devices. These devices, plus those that were installed in participant vehicles, had access to cloud-based data sharing systems throughout the pilot area.

The ICVP was delivered by Queensland’s Department of Transport and Main Roads, in partnership with Motor Accident Insurance Commission of Queensland, Telstra, Queensland University of Technology’s Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety Queensland, iMOVE Australia, Ipswich City Council, and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development.

“The connected technology tested allows vehicles to talk with other vehicles, roadside infrastructure, and transport management systems,” Member for Ipswich Jennifer Howard said.

“Messages received are combined with the vehicle’s data and used to generate driver warnings such as red lights, road works, road hazards, congestion, and pedestrians.”

The pilot was launched under the Queensland government’s broader Cooperative and Automated Vehicle Initiative (CAVI) that aims to reduce serious road injuries and death tolls to zero.

Other initiatives being delivered under CAVI include a pilot that involves testing a small number of vehicles with cooperative and automated technologies, and a project looking at how new technology applications can benefit vulnerable road user safety including pedestrians, motorcycle riders, and bicycle riders.

The state government expects the QUT to deliver a final pilot safety evaluation report about the trial in early 2022.

The Queensland government had signalled plans to conduct trials using intelligent vehicles back in 2016.

Other trials are being carried out across the country to improve overall road safety include one that was announced earlier this week by the Transport for NSW. It said was using AI to develop predictive algorithms to help national, state, local governments manage their road safety performance.

Up until now, assessing the standards of roads have relied on collecting video survey footage and manual recording methods. But the initiative aims to develop a faster and more automated method to extract raw road data.

Meanwhile, a six-month trial that used lidar sensors at a busy intersection in Victoria showed the technology has the potential to warn road users in real time about upcoming hazards.

The AU$2 million trial, carried out by the Victorian government, involved the installation of lidar sensors at an intersection in Yarraville, which monitored the movement of road users including pedestrians, cyclists, cars, and trucks to identity potential hazards. The sensors were able to detect potential hazards within 0.2 seconds, the state government said.

The trial also investigated ways how lidar sensors could be provide hazard warnings to connected vehicles.

A Look At Honda’s Proposed Clutch-by-Wire System

By General Posts

by Graeme Jones from https://www.rideapart.com

Computer-assisted clutch would open up new possibilities.

Recent filings with the US Patent Office reveal that Honda is working on a clutch-by-wire system that has the potential to bring some pretty noteworthy tech advances to motorcycles. Patent filings aren’t very easy to understand nor digest, so here’s a Clutch-by-Wire For Dummies version of the basics.

Think about it like a ride-by-wire throttle system, which replaced the age-old throttle cable with an electronic setup. Ride-by-wire, or throttle-by-wire, uses sensors and actuators that control the fuel injectors rather than a cable controlling carbs. Similarly, Honda’s clutch-by-wire system would eliminate the use of a clutch cable or conventional hydraulic setup entirely. Instead, the clutch lever’s position would be monitored electronically, and that data would be fed to the clutch, telling it what to do without any physical connection between the lever and the clutch itself.

Sounds simple, and yet… whoa.

The patent drawings show a hydraulic pressure control unit, which would serve as the heart of this system. In addition to gear lever position, this unit would be fed instantaneous data from the ride-by-wire system like rpm, throttle position, and vehicle speed. The most obvious result would be improved shifting and smoother clutch operation at slower speeds, great for newer riders and possibly something that could bring new blood into the sport.

For experienced riders that still want the usual lever feel, Honda’s got a “reactive force generation device” to replicate the feel of a conventional clutch lever.

According to the patent drawings, this system will employ a traditional clutch lever setup on the handlebar. Hydraulic pressure would still be used to engage the clutch, albeit via an electric motor rather than any direct physical connection from your hand. Neat, huh?

What’s the point, you ask? Well, in theory, this type of setup opens up many possibilities. Like ride-by-wire—which has brought us things like riding modes, traction control and launch control—Honda’s clutch-by-wire will be able to recognize when the clutch lever position isn’t optimal compared to wheel speed, rpm, etc. Smoother, more precise shifts are an obvious reward to this setup, but think about launch control: the motorcycle can now incorporate clutch lever position in addition to existing data like rpm, speed and even wheelie height to further optimize acceleration.

Given Honda’s success with the Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) setup, we see no reason why this technology won’t become reality in the near future.

Rideet One smart assistant for motorcycles

By General Posts

from https://motorcycles.einnews.com

Start the new bike season safely with the smart assistant Rideet One

Rideet One app provides important data about bikes – performance analysis, maintenance information, safety functions, lean angle and tour management. But the little assistant can do much more.

Spring is getting closer and closer and the excitement around the motorcycle season is getting stronger and stronger. Many motorcycle fans are slowly getting down to work and getting their beloved bike out of hibernation. In the future, the small and smart black box from Rideet can help with this. Rideet One can be easily installed by the user and simply establishes a connection between the bike and the biker via app. Rideet One is now available online and will soon be available in stores. To meet the high demand before the start of the motorbike season, the company has once again increased its stock.

Small and smart
Rideet One gives bikers the ability to monitor and analyse their motorbike remotely. Simply connect it to the 12V battery, install the app, download data about the motorbike from the manufacturer’s database and you’re ready to go. Thanks to its IP69K protection class, Rideet can even withstand high-pressure cleaners. The assistant, developed and designed in Italy, is Amazon Alexa-compatible, so bikers can conveniently ask Alexa about the condition of the motorbike battery, the last ride or the next service appointment. Thanks to GPS, GLONASS and smart sensors, the maximum speed, acceleration and lean angle can be tracked. For sporty drivers, there is also a drag mode. This measures the acceleration times from 0-100km/h or 0-200 km/h.

The Rideet development team is constantly working on new features, which are rolled out via the app and firmware updates. The determination of the angle of inclination for wheelies/stoppies will also be implemented in the app in the future. In addition, bikers will be able to see their best 10 results from drag mode, share them with their friends and compare them.

Which oil fits my bike, which tyre pressure is the right one?
Rideet One gives its owners access to one of the world’s most comprehensive databases of information, technical data and maintenance manuals for almost every bike from the past 40 years. Thanks to the Rideet app, users can see when their bike needs to be inspected and what work needs to be done. This eliminates the need to look up information in the manual. For example, information about tire pressure and tightening torque can be viewed in the app within seconds. In addition, the smart helper also provides detailed information on the oil type and the oil quantity, which significantly speeds up the work during winterization. All maintenance work can also be entered and viewed in a digital service log.

Trip management and safety
Of course, Rideet can record essential parameters such as speed and the duration of a ride. With the help of the integrated sensors, Rideet One records detailed telemetry data, which can then be viewed on the Rideet app. The intelligent AI-driven algorithm reliably detects whether an accident has occurred. When an accident is detected, Rideet One triggers an alarm to the driver, which must be actively responded to within one minute if it is a false report. If this does not happen, Rideet One sends an SMS to the emergency contacts preset by the biker and a notification to Rideet users located within a 10 km radius. The SMS contains all information about the current GPS position and preset medical information such as blood type and allergies. The emergency signal can be stopped by the biker at any time by pressing the button on the Rideet Key supplied.

Anti-theft protection
Thanks to the Rideet Key, which is ideally attached to the key ring, the assistant recognizes when the biker moves away from the motorbike. The system then starts the noiseless anti-theft system. If unauthorized persons move the motorbike or the power supply is interrupted, owners receive a notification on their smartphone. Rideet One then starts automatic live position streaming. Bikers can also create a “security geo-fence”, which is handy for carports, underground garages and larger properties to avoid setting off false alarms. A pre-installed multi-carrier SIM card ensures a stable and secure connection in all networks worldwide. There is no data limit for users, the costs are only 4.90 € per month for worldwide roaming (country list available on request). The first year of connectivity is included with the purchase of Rideet One.

Price and availability
Rideet One is available at a RRP of EUR 249 (incl. VAT) including one year of connectivity (worldwide roaming) at https://shop.rideet.de/. The scope of delivery includes 1x Rideet One + 1 x Rideet Key, 1x branch connector, 2 cable ties and quick start guide.

At a glance:
Rideet One
• GPS + GLONASS
• GSM + GPRS (always on)
• 9-axis High Resolution IMU
• IP69K protection class
• WiFi + Bluetooth
• MicroSD (eMMC ready)
• 3FF SIM (eSIM ready)
• Removable flat car fuse
• 12 V & earth cable with hook fork connectors, alternative branch connectors included
• Works with Amazon Alexa

Rideet Key
• Bluetooth LE
• Button cell (6-7 months runtime)
• Control button
• LED
• Buzzer

Rideet – The first smart assistant for motorcycles.

How data is driving new approaches to transportation

By General Posts

from New York Times

Analysing digital streams of information from electric scooters and motor-assisted bicycles are helping solve travel congestion issues.

Five seconds after a Los Angeles rider unlocks a dockless electric scooter with a smartphone app and sets off to a destination, a cityoperated databank is informed.

Five seconds after the trip ends, typically no more than a mile away, another alert updates the record, noting the location. In 24 hours, the exact route is uploaded and logged for analysis.

That ride to the bus stop or the convenience store, emissions-free and nearly silent, would seem to be a zero-disruption event in a sprawling city with millions of people and vehicles. Yet extrapolated over years, it foreshadows a shift of potentially enormous consequences.

While the identity of that rider is unknown to the city, a stream of data from the scooter’s GPS module and cellphone link — speed, time of day, battery state of charge — flows to cloud servers an average of a million times a month during Los Angeles’s pilot program. Each trip is but a trickle of bytes, yet it is a rich resource for the planners and the policymakers who hope to tame the persistent tangle of traffic in this vehicle-dependent metropolis.

That vehicular chokehold can weigh as heavily on a neighborhood dweller as it does on a road user. “Cities have to assure that their resources are used efficiently, and that includes the shared spaces,” said Stephen Zoepf, chief of policy development at Ellis & Associates, a Silicon Valley consultancy that helps cities develop transportation technology plans.

“The effects of crowding, in noise and emissions, are a tragedy of the commons,” he continued, using an economist’s term for situations in which resources are depleted by those acting in self-interest rather than the general good.

The arrival of electric scooters and motor-assisted bicycles, backbones of a transportation mode known as micromobility, has been greeted as part of the solution to clogged roadways and unbearable travel delays. There’s a business opportunity as well, with a projection of a micromobility market valued at up to $15 billion annually in the United States and Europe by 2025, according to a study by the Boston Consulting Group.

The urgency to sort out the conflict between vehicles and road space is growing. About 55 percent of the world’s population lives in urban areas, according to the United Nations; by 2050, that share is projected at 68 percent. Cities, already teeming, are increasingly frustrating to get around.

Yet the route to clearing the congestion has been a highway paved with obstacles. Linking transportation hubs to housing in the affordable last mile, where the need is greatest, proves a hurdle too high. Getting people out of their cars is a vexing problem; delivering goods without bulky trucks is nearly impossible.

Seleta Reynolds, general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation since 2014, is an eyewitness to monumental shifts in transportation, her job expanding from oversight of city functions like parking and public transit to coping with the onset of digital platforms for hailing rides.

“What became clear to me was that the digital version was going away from public management of the right of way,” she said in a telephone interview, referring to innovations like Uber and Lyft, which arrived in Los Angeles without regulations in place for driver pay, working hours or background checks.

Zoepf said cities were caught by surprise. “Now we had companies supported by venture capital saying, ‘We’re not providing transportation, we’re platforms,’ and doing business on the public right of way without a permit arrangement,” he said. But a greater upheaval lay ahead.

“Then scooters showed up,”Reynolds said, noting that Los Angeles was unprepared for the 2017 arrival of easy-toride, motorized upgrades to what were once deemed children’s toys. “We got caught flat-footed in the transformation.”

In part, the solution to this cat-herding problem lay in making use of the data generated by the dockless scooters for fleet owners, who need to know where the scooters are in order to gather them each night for battery charging and reposition them the next morning where demand will be greatest.

That data set is also a key to solving congestion: Knowing what route they have used historically makes it possible for policymakers to plan infrastructure. The ability to monitor their every movement is no longer alarming to users — privacy is a serious concern, but not a showstopper, given that our smartphones already feed generous helpings to any number of data-digesting apps.

To collect the digital stream in a form useful to all, the Mobility Data Specification, or MDS, was created by the Los Angeles transportation department.

As an open-source software platform built on a set of application programming interfaces — the communication protocols between parts of a computer program — MDS is now used by more than 50 American cities and dozens more around the globe. It is governed by the Open Mobility Foundation, chaired by Reynolds.

MDS IN USE
Hoboken, New Jersey, could serve as the ideal petri dish for testing micromobility. A mile square, with 55,000 residents and little elevation change, it is home to thousands of commuters who connect to buses, trains and ferries that will carry them to workplaces in Manhattan, across the Hudson River. Hoboken’s escooter pilot also fit perfectly with sustainability goals.

Ducati partners with Lenovo for designing superbikes

By General Posts

The bike manufacturer will use a Lenovo high-performance computing cluster that will help the company to drive rapid innovation.

Ducati Motor Holding has joined hands with Lenovo for the design of its superbikes.

The bike manufacturer will use a Lenovo high-performance computing cluster that will help the company to drive rapid innovation.

As the brand says, it is continually looking for innovative ways to make its vehicles faster, safer and even more attractive.

Konstantin Kostenarov, Chief Technology Officer at Ducati, said, “Our HPC environment is the engine that drives the development and design of our road and racing bikes.”

He also added, “We use advanced aerodynamic and fluid dynamic modelling tools to calculate how a particular design or bike feature will react in different riding conditions. We don’t just do this for the superbikes that we sponsor on the racecourse, but for our road models too, so all bikers that choose Ducati enjoy an exceptional riding experience.”

Previously, Ducati used its own HPC infrastructure for the design process, but recently, it found that is no longer delivering the performance, reliability or flexibility which is needed in order to test new designs within tight deadlines. Hence, Ducati decided to use Lenovo’s HPC infrastructure.

Stefano Rendina, IT Manager at Ducati, said, “Previously, we had to transfer the results of our models and stress tests from the HPC environment and then use an entirely different workstation to transform this data into easy-to-understand visualizations. The process of transferring data in this way was both time-intensive and expensive—slowing down research and development.”

News Source https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com