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Five Motorcycle Sales Trends Shaking the Vintage Market

By General Posts

Prices for classic motorcycles are changing

by James Hewitt from Hagerty.com

There’s a Hagerty Motorcycle Price Guide that uses thousands of transactions to track values on 9751 motorcycles. Here are five trends that stood out to us in the most recent update, released in June.

The smart take in the motorcycle community of late, much like for cars, is that a full-on, concours-level restoration rarely pays — at least financially speaking.

Click Here to Read the full Feature Article. See Photos of the Motorcycle Brands & Models.

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Estate Planning for Motorcycle Collectors

By General Posts

Or What To Do With Your Beloved Bikes When You’re Not Around To Do It

By John Stein with images from Sam Burns

As motorcycle fanatics, we’ve all laid awake nights wondering how we could add to our collections when at this point in our lives, doing exactly the opposite probably makes more sense.

The reason, of course, is advancing age and the misguided belief that just because we love this stuff, our children will as well.

CLICK HERE To Read this valuable article about your priceless collection.

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Honda RC213V-S Breaks Auction World Record

By General Posts

An as-new example of Honda’s RC213V-S has just broken a new world record, becoming the most expensive Japanese motorcycle ever sold at auction.

Hosted by specialist automotive marketplace Collecting Cars, the ‘MotoGP bike for the road’ sold for a remarkable total sales price of £182,500.

The rare superbike has never been ridden and remains in its original flight case, with just one mile on the odometer. Having never left its shipping crate, the bike is totally pristine with absolutely no damage or wear.

Created with a focus on light weight and agility, the RC213V-S is a road-legal MotoGP bike, built around a hand-fabricated aluminium frame with carbon-fibre body panels and titanium fasteners, resulting in a dry weight of just 170kg.

Powered by a 999cc four-stroke V4 engine, this 2016 model also features the full HRC Race Kit, which comprises a recalibrated ECU, a titanium exhaust system, a front ram duct, a race-pattern quickshifter, a data logger and a remote control cable for the front brake lever. These upgrades reduce the bike’s total weight by 10kg and increase power output from 157hp to 215hp.

Also fitted are some of the highest quality components available, including Ohlins TTX front forks, powerful Brembo brakes and forged magnesium Marchesini Racing wheels.

Edward Lovett, founder of Collecting Cars, said:

“Honda’s RC213V-S is a thrilling, exquisitely crafted machine, and this example attracted global attention and extremely competitive bidding on Collecting Cars. We are proud to have achieved yet another world-record sales price – this time for an incredible road-legal MotoGP that will be a jewel in the new owner’s collection.”

To find out more information on this lot, visit Collecting Cars.
https://collectingcars.com/for-sale/2016-honda-rc213v-s-1

Compared to traditional car auctions, Collecting Cars offers significantly better value for sellers and buyers alike. For sellers, the detailed photographic presentation and professional descriptions mean their car is showcased in the best possible way, and is marketed to a huge captive audience of passionate enthusiasts. Furthermore, there is no listing fee, and they receive 100% of the hammer price.

For buyers, the premium on auction lots is levied at just 5% + VAT – substantially lower than traditional auction houses, which typically charge 12% or more – and is capped at £6,000. On hammer prices above £100,000 this means that the buyer’s premium is even less than 6%.

About Collecting Cars:
Collecting Cars is an online auction platform that curates consignments from around the world and markets them to a global audience.

The streamlined and transparent process makes buying and selling cars, motorbikes, and automobilia via its online auctions one of the most effective and hassle-free ways of transacting.

To date, the Collecting Cars platform has sold more than 5,300 lots, and total sales value generated for sellers exceeds £191 million. The multi-national auction company has headquarters in London, and offices in Munich, Sydney, and Los Angeles.

More than 90% of sales since launch have happened without a physical viewing, underscoring the significant trust that Collecting Cars has earned among its customers.

Visit Website at: https://collectingcars.com/

Pre 30th Yokohama Hot Rod Custom Show 2021

By General Posts

Pre 30th Anniversary YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW 2021
Dec. 5, 2021 at Pacifico Yokohama

YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW OFFICIAL WEBSITE

https://www.yokohamahotrodcustomshow.com/

Pre 30th Anniversary YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW 2021
Date: Sunday December 5, 2021
Location: Pacifico Yokohama
Nearest Hotel : Yokohama Intercontinental Hotel

MQQNEYES Official Website (English Edition)
https://www.mooneyes.co.jp/en/

YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW, organized by MOONEYES, is the largest indoor custom car and motorcycle show in Japan. The event features vendor spaces, custom paint contest, pinstripers and so much more wrapped up in a one-day show.

In order to prevent the spread of the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), the Yokohama Hot Rod Custom Show 2021(HCS) will be taking sufficient measures in accordance with the Guideline for COVID-19 by Pacifico Yokohama. In addition, in accordance with the guideline of restrictions on holding the event, the event will be held with the social distancing necessary to prevent the spread of infection.

Before coming to the event, we would like to ask for your understanding and cooperation to hold a safe event. Please read through it carefully and purchase the ticket and come to the event, after understanding the content enough.

ADMISSION TICKET

Advance Ticket 3,800yen (12 & under Free)
General Advance Ticket for Yokohama Hot Rod Custom Show 2021 (HCS).

General Admission Ticket (Dec, 5) 4,800yen (12 & under Free)
General admission tickets will not sell out so, you will be able to purchase tickets in advance from our physical store in Honmoku, Yokohama MOONEYES Area-1 and MQQN Cafe till the day before the event December 4th (Saturday), closing time of our store.

Due to the prevention of the spread of the COVID-19, please purchase the Advance Ticket.

To keep the safety management for all participants and visitors we will ask you to fill out your Name, Address (Address or Phone Number or Email Address), Attendance Number on the back of the tickets. This is a rule to prevent COVID-19 which is issued by the venue.

If you are able to purchase or pick up the ticket before the event please, fill out the back of the ticket in advance to prevent taking time before entering the event.

If you already have the ticket please fill out the backside in Advance. If you are purchasing the ticket at the gate on the day of the event Dec. 5th(Sun), please bring your writing tools. We will prepare some writing tools, but to prevent the spread of the virus, we recoomend you to bring your own.

If you already purchased the tickets online, we strongly recommend you to pick up your ticket at MOONEYES Area-1 prior to the show.

TIME SCHEDULE

At the Pre 30th Anniversary YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW, we are preparing exciting programs for every one to enjoy from OPEN to CLOSE.

This year’s YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW has many Limited Items!

Beginning with Hot Item of VANS X MOONEYES Shoes, this year celebrating the BLACK FLYS 30th Anniversary we have special collaboration sunglasses and there will be zip hoodie T-shirt and other Clothing and Rat Fink Item. Limited quantity, Special Items will sold out soon so, don’t miss it!

Event Information ※ Date may change without notice.

2021 Dec. 5th(Sun)
Pre 30th Anniversary
YOKOHAMA HOT ROD CUSTOM SHOW 2021 (Scheduled)
Pacifico Yokohama (YOKOHAMA)
Contact:Official Website
http://yokohamahotrodcustomshow.com/

2021 Dec. 31st(Fri)
MOONEYES Area-1, MOON Cafe
working usually till Dec. 31st(Fri)

2022 Jan. 1st(Sat), 2nd(Sun)
MOONEYES Area-1, MOON Cafe New Year’s Holiday

2022 Jan. 3rd(Mon)
New Year Sale

Business Hours
MOONEYES Area-1 : 12:00 -19:00
MOON Cafe : 12:00 – 20:00

2022 Jan. 9th(Sun)
Sidewalk Sale
MOONEYES Area-1 (Yokohama)
Contact:Official Website
https://www.mooneyes.co.jp/

2022 Mar. 26th(Sat)
3rd Surf City Market Place by the Sea
Harbor City Soga (Chiba)
Contact:Official Website
https://www.mooneyes.co.jp/scmp2021/

2022 May 15th(Sun)
34th MOONEYES Street Car Nationals ®
Odaiba N.O.P Area (Tokyo)
Contact:Official Website
https://www.streetcarnationals.com/

Other Upcoming Event Schedule are HERE
https://www.mooneyes.co.jp/en/2017-event-schedule/

Vanishing Breed of gear-heads

By General Posts

Service with a Smile

In a few years if a collector wants to keep the old stuff running he may have problems
Photos and text by Bill May

The cars and motorcycles of today run awesome and last a long time, but they do nothing for me.

People who can work on those old engines are few and far between. We are a vanishing breed.

In a few years if a collector wants to keep the old stuff running, he will have to get out the old manuals and train some young guy with an aptitude for it.

Me, I’m just going to keep flying down the road on my old bikes and my ‘34 Ford.

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Bonhams announces its first motorcycle auction in Italy

By General Posts

Bonhams Motorcycles Says Buongiorno Italia with Debut Sale at Moto Dei Miti

FIRST MOTORCYCLE SALE IN ITALY 1-3 APRIL 2022 AT WORLD-RENOWNED MUSEUM OF GENESIO BEVILACQUA

2011 ALTHEA WORLD SUPERBIKE AND SUPERSTOCK CHAMPIONSHIP WINNING MOTORCYCLES ARE EARLY HIGHLIGHTS

Bonhams is proud to announce its first motorcycle sale in Italy – in the world-renowned Moto dei Miti museum, created by paddock great Genesio Bevilacqua, founder of the Althea Racing team, which will be staged on 1-3 April 2022.

The weekend sale is the result of a new partnership with Genesio, which will see his museum, located in Civita Castellana (on the outskirts of Rome) provide a fitting venue for the 100-plus collectors’ motorcycles to be offered.

Telling the story of the evolution of motorcycle racing over the past 50 years, the museum represents Genesio’s own racing experience – as amateur rider and professional team manager – and his passion for two-wheeled sport and culture, featuring some of the most important sports and competition motorcycles of the modern era.

Genesio became General Manager in 2007 of the start-up Althea Racing Team, which picked up trophies in the World Superbike and Supersport series, winning both world championship titles in 2011, with Carlos Checa and Davide Giugliano respectively riding to victory. In 2016, with BMW as partner, Althea again won the World Superstock Championship, with Raffaele Da Rosa in the saddle.

The ex-Carlos Checa, 2011 World Superbike Championship-winning Ducati 1198 F11 estimate for sale is €110,000 – 130,000

Genesio will offer 27 machines from his collection for sale in the debut auction, including the two 2011 World Champion motorcycles: Carlos Checa’s Ducati 1198 RS and Davide Giugliano’s Ducati 1198 F12 and one of Raffaele De Rosa’s victorious BMW S 1000 RRs from 2016.

All motorcycles in the collection are ‘on the button’ and ready to race, having been maintained in the museum’s dedicated workshop, by technicians with years of experience in the paddock, and have recently ridden by Genesio and other riders.

Ben Walker, Global Head of Bonhams Motorcycles, said: “We are really excited to be hosting our debut sale in Italy – arguably THE land of motorcycles – and to have the ‘man who defeated giants’ as our new partner.

“”Genesio’s spectacular private museum will provide a stunning backdrop for the sale, and we are delighted that it will be open to the public for the preview and the auction itself.”

Genesio Bevilacqua, General Manager Althea Racing Team, said: “I am happy and proud to partner with Bonhams to bring to Italy their first auction dedicated to motorcycles and to the history of motorcycles, in which Italy has always played a vital role.

“Moto dei Miti is, without a doubt, the best location to hold this great event. Bonhams’ heritage and professionalism will attract the attention of international collectors and will play an important part in growing the collectors’ market for the motorcycles of the last 50 years”.

Further important collectors’ motorcycles and collections are currently being invited for consignment to this new sale.

Contact: ukmotorcycles@bonhams.com for further details.

Rare Suzuki at Bonhams Auction to fetch £35,000

By General Posts

by Rob Hull from https://www.dailymail.co.uk

A 34-year-old motorcycle with just TWO ‘Push Miles’ on the clock: Rare Suzuki road bike that’s never been ridden is tipped to sell for £35,000

  • The Suzuki RG500 Gamma is an ultra-rare two-stroke road bike from the 1980s
  • It’s based on the factory 500cc Grand Prix racers of the era that won two titles
  • This example has never been ridden with its two recorded miles accrued while being manoeuvred during storage
  • Bonhams will sell it at auction this weekend with an estimate of £30k to £35k

A late eighties Suzuki RG500 motorcycle is set to go under the hammer this weekend with an astonishingly low number of miles clocked in its 34 years – and none of them came from it being driven.

The two-stroke road-going replica of the factory Grand Prix race machines of the era is already a hugely collectible motorbike today – but this particular example stands out for having just two miles on the clock.

Bonhams, which is offering the bike at its 9 October sale at the Classic Motorcycle Mechanics Show in Stafford, says these are ‘push miles’ only, accrued by owners moving the bike around by hand – meaning it’s never actually been ridden.

The auction house has estimated that the motorcycle could sell for between £30,000 and £35,000 – though its like-new condition and lack of use could see it easily eclipse that valuation when bidding commences on Saturday.

Bonhams says it represents ‘a possibly once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire an unused and unregistered example of this iconic Suzuki model’.

The RG500 ‘Gamma’ was only produced by the Japanese motorcycle brand for two years between 1985 and 1987 and was heavily based on the racing machine used by its factory team.

And it was a title-winning package, with Italians Marco Lucchinelli and Franco Uncini taking the riders’ world championship in back-to-back years in 1981 and 1982.

Suzuki’s advertisement for the motorcycle at launch said: ‘No one has ever built a road machine so close in technical basis to a current GP winner. Quite frankly we do not expect that any one else ever will.’

This example was first delivered to GS Motorcycles on 7 February 1989, which is confirmed by documents that are sold with the machine – as well as copies of the owner registration card, warranty card, dealer record, and new vehicle licence application.

However, it was never actually registered, with the bike instead being retained in storage and never ridden on the road.

That means the liquid-cooled, four-cylinder, two-stroke 498cc engine has never had its full 95bhp of power exploited at 9,500rpm.

The engine used the same square-four engine layout, geared-together crankshafts, and disc-valve induction, as the racer, while the aluminum frame, rear suspension and triple disc brakes were also taken from the GP machines.

Performance was mighty for the era, with a 130mph-plus top speed, 11.5-second quarter-mile time and incredibly agile handling and brakes.

But the peaky two-stroke engine could easily punish riders who were unable to exploit the narrow power band it provided, with surges of acceleration being developed when the revs peaked.

Suzuki RG500 Gamma specs

Production: 1985-1987
Engine: 498cc, liquid cooled, square-four cylinder, two-stroke
Gearbox: 6-speed
Power: 95bhp @9500rpm
Torque: 52.6 ft-lb @9000rpm
Suspension: Front: 38mm telescopic forks, Rear: full floater rear
Brakes: Front: 260mm discs 4-piston calipers, Rear: 210mm disc 2-piston caliper
Weight: 154kgs
Top speed: 133 mph
Fuel tank capacity: 22 litres

‘Today this legendary model is highly sought after by collectors of modern Japanese classics,’ says Bonhams.

And it won’t be the first time this specific model goes to the block, with it last changing hands at the same Stafford Sale held in October 2017, where it sold for £31,050.

‘The machine has not been used/run since acquisition and has been kept dry stored in the garage,’ the lot description explains.

‘Accordingly, it will need to be fully re-commissioned to a greater or lesser extent before use,’ it adds.

Other collectible two-wheelers up for grabs this month

Ex-Barry Sheene 1979 Dunstall Suzuki GS1000 F1 race bike
Auction: Bonhams’ The Classic Motorcycle Mechanics Show, Stafford – 9 October
Estimate: £30,000-£35,000

The late Barry Sheene is the last Briton to win a premier class motorcycle Grand Prix riders’ championship, having taken the title in 1976 and ’77.

While his 500cc career continued until 1984 (his last win coming in 1981), in 1979 Suzuki GB requested for Sheene to guest ride this GS1000S at a domestic August Bank Holiday meeting at Oulton Park in 1979.

That’s despite the Briton – who made his career racing two-stroke machines – making his dislike for four-stroke racing bikes well known. He previously referred to them as ‘muck-spreaders’.

This Dunstall Suzuki is believed to be the only Japanese four-stroke he ever raced.

Despite this, Sheene finishing second in the event, narrowly beaten by fellow GP rider Ron Haslam.

Sheene, who died in March 2003 after suffering from cancer, is still today considered on of the country’s greatest motorcycle racers – hence the expectation for this rare model to achieve a high sale price this weekend.

Barn-find 1964 Lambretta GT200 scooter
Auction: H&H Classics National Motorcycle Museum Sale, Birmingham – 27 October
Estimate: £3,000-£4,000

This ‘extremely rare’ 1964 Lambretta GT 200 Italian has been sitting in a makeshift lean-to shed since 1976 and was uncovered in July before being brought to auction later this month.

While it needs plenty of restoration, Mike Davis of H&H, said: ‘There has been lots of commission bids already after it appeared on our website for the coming sale. I will not be surprised if it far exceeds its estimate. It is a fantastic opportunity to restore and ride.’

The scooter is mostly complete with original tinware and it has been confirmed as a correct numbers machine.

The engine turns over with compression. It comes with an old RF60 continuation logbook, but the V5c will have to be applied for. Once restored by its new owner, it would easily become a collector’s item.

What is Hub-center Steering Motorcycle & Why it is Better

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Hub-center steering is one of several different types of front-end suspension and steering mechanisms used in motorcycles and cargo bicycles. It is essentially a mechanism that uses steering pivot points inside the wheel hub rather than a geometry that places the wheel in a headstock like the traditional motorcycle layout.

Perhaps the most venerable example of the idea came in the form of the 1930 Majestic. This Georges Roy design used a novel pressed-steel monocoque chassis, and it incorporated an automotive-type chassis with hub-center steering. Other bikes had already used the configuration in such machines as the Ner-A-Car and the Zenith Auto-Bi, but the Majestic made it lovely to behold.

Another bike, the Vyrus 984 C3 2V Razzetto, was one such motorcycle that used hub-center geometry.

Vyrus is a small Italian motorcycle manufacturer based in Coriano, Italy, and their bikes such as the “Tesi” – Thesis in Italian – had their designs originate from a university engineering project linked to the motorcycle legend Massimo Tamburini. The Tesi, and the Vyrus 984, were instantly identifiable by their use of their hub-center steering front suspension and steering arrangement.

Those fabulously expensive bespoke motorcycles have been called “functional works of art,” and they look a bit like something you might see in a video game.

In hub-centered bikes, the front wheel is attached to a swingarm with a shock and an internal pivot point. Steering is achieved using those linkages to turn the wheel on a pivot point. Hub-center steering has been employed on motorcycles for more than a century, but the design, despite what some engineers say offers a distinct advantage, never took hold.

But the founder of Vyrus, Ascanio Rodorigo, once worked for Bimota as a race mechanic and engineer during the 1970s and his tenure there lasted until 1985. When Rodorigo finally left Bimota, he started his own company but partnered with Bimota on the hub-center-steered Tesi. He then went on to take the steering concept deeper and refined it for his own company’s motorcycles.

A Ducati dual spark bored out to 1,079cc and making 100hp L-twin provides the power for the 319 lbs (145 kg) Vyrus 984 bike, and it’s delivered to the road for via a six-speed transmission.

Now builders like Bryan Fuller of Fuller Moto, Revival Cycles, and others have built beautiful machines which harken back to the hub-centered glory days of the Majestic. Builders such as Stellan Egeland used a hopped-up 1200 boxer engine from a BMW HP2 Sport. He also added his own hub-center steering setup from ISR to a frame he made from a 2391 steel tube. The ISR kit is a thing to behold.

Revival’s ‘The Six,’ which features a ballsy Honda CBX motor, is another take on the hub-steer geometry. It was commissioned by museum owner and bike collector Bobby Haas for his Haas Moto Museum in Dallas and made by Revival’s Alan Stulberg and his crew.

Stulberg said the commission was aimed at paying homage to the Art Deco classic Majestic and added that he and the team became “obsessed with its design language and flow” since they first saw the bike at the Barber Museum.

Hub steering systems don’t dive as much under braking and hard cornering as do conventional telescopic fork setups. They push braking forces back into the chassis more efficiently rather than transferring immense bending forces to a pair of upright forks. The ride experience is exceptional as braking performance throughout corners is greatly enhanced.

It works like this: A wheel hub pitches back and forth on a central pivot and is supported by two large steering arms actuated by handlebars. The handlebars connect to the front steering and swingarm using complex linkages. A fixed arm connects a pull-and-push rod on either side of the hub-center to help steer the bike. The geometry also includes a second pair of static rods to ensure the axle stays level with the bike’s mass.

While hub steering has a number of clear advantages, its downfall is that it is considerably more expensive to manufacture and maintain and requires exceptionally experienced mechanics to tune and repair.

But it does look good, works more efficiently from an engineering standpoint, and directly addresses the most important factor in the motorcycling experience: braking.

The Majestic – Artistic Design from the 1920s
from https://www.odd-bike.com

While the engineering of the Majestic might have been relatively conventional, what was unprecedented was the styling, the hallmark of the Majestic to this day.

All the oily bits were fully enclosed under louvered panels, with partially enclosed fenders covering the wheels at both ends. The rider was completely isolated from the grime and muck of the running gear and powertrain, perched upon a sprung saddle and controlling the machine via levers and bars that poke through the all-encompassing body.

Presented in 1929, the prototype Majestic (which was reported as Roy’s personal machine) featured an air-cooled 1000cc longitudinal four-cylinder engine from a 1927-28 Cleveland 4-61. This would not remain for production, however.

While at least two Majestics were built with a 750cc JAP V-twin (arranged, like a much later Moto-Guzzi , with the Vee transverse and the heads poking through the bodywork) and records note that JAP singles, a Chaise Four, and at least one Gnome et Rhone flat twin were also employed, the majority of production machines coming out of Chartenay featured air-cooled Chaise engines.

These were overhead valve singles featuring unit two or three-speed gearboxes operated by hand-shift, available in 350cc and 500cc displacements. Distinctive for their single pushrod tube that resembles a bevel tower (but contains a pair of tightly-spaced parallel pushrods) and external bacon-slicer flywheel, these powerplants were a favourite of French manufacturers during the interwar period and were used by a variety of marques in lieu of producing their own engines.

The base price of the Majestic was 5200 Francs for a 350 with chain final drive; an extra 500 Francs netted you optional shaft drive.

An additional option that is rarely seen on surviving examples was a fine “craquelure” paint option that was applied by skilled artisans. It involves a process of deliberately screwing up the paint job in the most controlled and flawless way possible, applying a contrasting top coat over a base using incompatible paints that will cause the top coat to crack in a uniform fashion, something like a well-aged oil painting or antique piece of furniture.

The result is spectacular – and perhaps a bit tacky, giving the machine the appearance of a lizard skin handbag. (Maybe a later Rock Star would have loved to ride it as the “The Lizard King” ? )

The Majestic was impeccably stable at higher speeds compared to the other motorcycles of that era.

It was also agile and light footed in a way that similar machines, like the Ner-A-Car, were not.

The relatively low weight, around 350 pounds, carried with a very low centre of gravity made for tidy handling that was more than up to the meagre output offered by the powerplants.

Majestic was targeting a clientele that didn’t really exist: the gentlemanly rider who might desire a superior (read: expensive) machine as a stablemate to their elegant automobiles.

Georges Roy’s previous design produced under the name “New Motorcycle”

Georges Roy’s earlier 1927 brand called New Motorcycle was a far better barometer of things to come, predicting the style and design of machines that would emerge during the 1930s and beyond. The Majestic has far less impact and was more of a curiosity than predictor of trends to come.

Georges Roy’s brilliance as a designer is unquestionable, and deserves more praise than he ever earned during his lifetime.

Majestic is a little bit of elegance floating on the sea of staid machines that clutter up the history books.

Georges Roy was a French industrialist and engineer born in 1888 who achieved success in the textile business – specifically in knitting and sewing equipment. He was, however, an early adopter of motorcycling at the turn of the 20th Century – reportedly his first machine was a Werner, a Parisian machine that introduced the term “Motocyclette” in 1897.

New Triumph Tiger 900 Limited Edition Celebrating James Bond

By General Posts

Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition

by Shakti Nath Jha from https://www.financialexpress.com

New Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition Revealed; Limited to just 250 units globally
Triumph Motorcycles has revealed the ultra-exclusive Bond Edition of the Triumph Tiger 900. Only 250 units of the new Tiger 900 Bond Edition will be available worldwide.

Triumph Motorcycles has officially revealed the new ultra-exclusive Bond Edition of the Triumph Tiger 900. The company has introduced the Tiger 900 Bond Edition to celebrate the iconic British partnership between James Bond and Triumph. The new Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition is inspired by the incredible Tiger 900 Rally Pro, which features in amazing stunt sequences in the upcoming 25th ‘007’ James Bond movie, ‘No Time To Die’.

This new limited edition motorcycle from Triumph is based on the top-spec Rally Pro variant of the Tiger 900. Triumph Motorcycles has revealed that only 250 units of the new Tiger 900 Bond Edition will be available globally. Each of these limited edition motorcycles will be individually numbered on the handlebar clamp with a signed certificate of authenticity. The Tiger 900 Bond edition will be finished in a unique Matt Sapphire Black paint scheme and it will feature exclusive ‘007’ graphics with blacked-out inserts to make this good-looking ADV even more appealing.

The new Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition gets exclusive features such as the ‘007’ TFT start-up screen animation, heated rider and pillion seat along with Bond Edition branding on the saddle, a set of high-specification Michelin Anakee wild off-road tyres for advanced off-road capabilities, etc. The new Tiger 900 Bond Edition is the second limited-edition motorcycle from Triumph to be built in collaboration with the Bond franchise.

Last year, this British two-wheeler manufacturer launched the Bond Edition of the Scrambler 1200. However, in terms of mechanicals, the Tiger 900 Bond Edition remains the same as the Tiger 900 Rally Pro.

The new Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition is powered by a BS6-compliant 888cc, liquid-cooled, inline 3-cylinder engine. This motor churns out 95 PS of maximum power at 8750 RPM and 87 Nm of peak torque at 7250 RPM. The engine comes mated to a 6-speed manual gearbox and it gets six different riding modes. They are – Rain, Road, Sport, Off-Road, Rider-configurable, and Off-Road Pro. As already mentioned before, only 250 units of the Tiger 900 Bond Edition will be available globally.

The Triumph Scrambler 1200 on the set of No Time To Die

Triumph unveils new limited-edition Tiger based on bike that stars in new James Bond film No Time to Die

Two Triumph models star in the latest Bond blockbuster

by Enda Mullen from https://www.coventrytelegraph.net

Triumph Motorcycles has followed in the footsteps of Coventry car maker Jaguar Land Rover by playing a starring role in the latest James Bond film No Time To Die

The Hinckley-based motorcycle maker is an official partner in the James Bond film franchise for the first time, with two models used in stunts in the 25th Bond Blockbuster.

Not only that but the company has created a new limited-edition model inspired by one of the models used in the film.

The Tiger 900 Bond Edition takes direct influence from the Tiger 900 used in a series of action sequences in the new 007 movie.

Tiger 900 and Scrambler 1200 motorcycles feature in stunt scenes in the film, following a partnership between Triumph Motorcycles and EON Productions announced in December 2019.

No Time To Die was filmed in 2019 in several locations including Jamaica, Norway, Italy and the UK, and Triumph is the only motorcycle partner in the movie.

It joins other 007 vehicle partners including Jaguar Land Rover.

The James Bond stunt team required high performance bikes for some key action sequences.

Lee Morrison with a Triumph Scrambler 1200 on the set of No Time To Die

For months, the Triumph design workshop team collaborated behind closed doors with the stunt team to configure several feature motorcycles for the movie, including special preparations of Tiger 900 and Scrambler 1200 models to handle the extreme and dynamic action sequences – and the film’s stunt riders – demanded.

Lee Morrison, No Time To Die stunt coordinator, said: “First and foremost, as a stunt coordinator I have to be sure that we can achieve the action on that motorcycle.

“Is it agile and powerful enough for the stunt riders to achieve what I want them to? And also, crucially, does it fit the story of the film in a way that’s credible onscreen.”

He added: ““We loved the look of the Scrambler 1200, and we already knew we would use those in No Time To Die, but then Triumph offered us several prototypes of a bike that hadn’t yet been launched at that time, and that was the Tiger 900.

“The whole stunt team realised very quickly that these were amazing bikes.

“We spent a long time on the Tiger and it is so balanced. You can just have great fun with it.

“The Tiger 900 is the most confidence-inspiring bike, it allows you to really push the ride as far as you want, you can take as many liberties as you want; stand up sideways drifting in third gear, slow wheelie it, slide it Supermoto-style. I honestly think it’s one of the best bikes I’ve ever ridden, it’s fantastic.”

Lee is also a big fan of the Scrambler 1200?

“Ah it’s just so much fun, isn’t it,” he said.

“Get on it, and it’s an absolute blast straight off. I’d switch everything off (Off-Road Pro mode) and ride that thing like it was a motocross bike, couldn’t stop grinning.

“For the film we rode the Scrambler 1200 absolutely flat out, I mean as aggressive as you can ride a motorcycle, lighting it up off-road on tough terrain in Scotland, drifting it through really slippery streets in Matera (Italy), hitting steps flat out in third gear, quick direction changes, jumps, everything you could imagine, and that bike performed brilliantly.”

Lee also highlighted one particular stunt scene in which the Tiger 900 performed as the ‘most challenging’ in the new film.

He said: “We were riding them at high speeds and bouncing off the sides of cars during the Norway chase scene.

“It was amazing being able to ride behind and direct my lead stunt rider, constantly telling him to get in there, I want you alongside Bond, hitting the side of his door, cutting behind. There was a point where we jumped the Tiger over a car and under a helicopter.

“To have the confidence in a motorcycle to do all those things, on the move, while directing through an earpiece shows you how good that bike is.”

Limited to just 250 examples – with each individually numbered and accompanied by a signed certificate of authenticity – the Tiger 900 Bond Edition receives a matt black paint scheme and 007 graphics, as well as a billet-machined handlebar clamp.

A blacked-out styling package brings a black finish to the frame, headlight finishers, side panels and sump guard – among other components – giving the bike an understated look.

Each bike gets a unique 007-theme start-up animation on the screen, while the heated rider and pillion seat receive special Bond Edition branding. Prices for the Tiger 900 Bond Edition start from £16,500.

Triumph also created a limited-edition Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition model but it has already sold out.

Bonhams digital auction platform Expands into Europe

By General Posts

from https://www.bonhams.com/press_release/32734/

The Market by Bonhams digital auction platform is set to launch across Europe in September, marking the latest expansion for one of the leading and fastest-growing online marketplaces for classic and collectible car and motorcycle auctions.

The Market by Bonhams EU launches for bids on Wednesday 8 September 2021, with the first sales closing on Wednesday 15 September 2021. It marks the latest development in Bonhams Motoring’s ‘always on’ motoring strategy which has a growing focus on daily online auctions.

Since its conception in 2016, The Market has become one of the most successful market offerings, combining traditional auction practices on an innovative, exciting digital platform. Delivering industry-leading expertise across the platform’s premier digital offering, The Market has a proven track record for delivering results, service and quality.

By expanding the platform internationally, The Market is meeting growing appetite and demand from buyers and sellers across Europe to reach a wider, more global audience.

Launching The Market by Bonhams internationally marks a natural progression following the success of the platform in the UK. In 2020, The Market sold £10.6m of hammer value over 640 auctions, while in this current year in the UK, it is working successfully towards a hammer value of £20m. The Market has also had a sale rate of more than 90% for the last four years.

In July 2021 the platform sold an ultra-rare metallic blue 1989 Ferrari F40, which had become a worldwide social media star, for a record-breaking £1,000,500, the first seven-figure result for an online platform in the UK and Europe.

Users worldwide will be able to benefit from using the same platform that has been successfully deployed in the UK, with the added enhancement of the platform being translated in to multiple languages.

All of the established benefits of The Market by Bonhams will be available as part of the launch. Buyers will ‘pay what they bid’ when using the platform, meaning there is no buyers’ commission. The Sellers’ Commission remains at 5% (+VAT). This is the lowest in the industry and means that vendors receive 94% of the vehicle’s sale price. The cars and their customers will be looked after by the same team that has been delivering 5-star TrustPilot service for the past five years.

Maarten ten Holder, Managing Director of Bonhams Motoring, said: “The Market by Bonhams’ success lies in its technology, transparency and client service. It is a natural progression for our Bonhams Motoring business to expand into Europe and provide this premier service to a wider audience. Our EU expansion marks a key milestone for our ‘always on’ approach.

“Prospective clients want to have choices when working with auctioneers and we are now able to provide these options, from live sales to online timed auctions and daily online sales via The Market. There is clearly an appetite from buyers and sellers for this service and the launch marks the next step in our motoring strategy.”

Tristan Judge, Director at The Market by Bonhams, said: “It has always been our ambition to reach a wider, more global audience, and launching The Market across Europe delivers that objective. We have a proven track record for delivering results, service and quality and we look forward to continuing this internationally.

“The platform has proved a resounding success since it was launched five years ago, and now the service is backed by Bonhams’ heritage and history, leveraging their established market position across Europe.”

“We have always had great interest from European buyers and sellers on The Market UK. Our left-hand drive cars were already popular with our European customers, so it is natural for us to expand fully across Europe.”