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Women on Enfields And Johnny Lewis Takes On I-70 Half-Mile

By General Posts

(L-R) Zaria Martens, Jaycee Jones and Jillian Deschenes share the first “full-grid” BTR Flat Track podium of 2022.

FIRST OFFICIAL BTR FLAT TRACK FULL-GRID, JOHNNY LEWIS DEBUTS NEW CHASSIS AT I-70 HALF-MILE

Jaycee Jones fires first shot of 2022 BUILD. TRAIN. RACE. Flat Track, Moto Anatomy X takes next step in Royal Enfield Twins FT evolution

Milwaukee, WI (Monday, April 25, 2022) – The Royal Enfield Build. Train. Race. Flat Track program held its first full-grid race of the 2022 season at I-70 Motorsports Park in Odessa, Missouri, where seven returning riders and eight new faces took to the track. The larger field of racers combined with a new American Flat Track venue and some wild weather conditions created a whole new race dynamic, but in the end, there was a familiar face atop the podium—Jaycee Jones topped the first 2022 BTR Flat Track race featuring the full roster, storming to victory ahead of newcomer Zaria Martens and BTR veteran Jillian Deschenes.

The women of BTR Flat Track were looking forward to a test day I-70 Motorsports Park as a final test-and-tune session ahead of the season. But due to strong winds and track equipment issues, the program was abbreviated, only leaving the women with two test sessions. From there it was trial by fire as the BTR Flat Track field took to the grid for the first official round of the season (following the “BTR Select” exhibition at the Volusia Half Mile).

Jaycee Jones led the way from start to finish, never relinquishing control of the eight-lap race. Behind her, the battle to watch was between Zaria Martens and Jillian Deschenes. The two dueled throughout the race, much to the Missouri crowd’s delight, with 18-year-old Martens besting veteran BTR racer Deschenes at the checkered flag.

“It was flawless racing by all 15 BTR Flat Track women, and a great start to the season,” said Breeann Poland, Marketing and Communications Lead – Royal Enfield Americas. “Despite limited track time and the ladies not being able to get ample time on their bikes, they supported each other, offered each other advice and feedback, and went out there and put on a great race. Having 15 women from various backgrounds and personalities all under one canopy, working together with a shared competitive spirit is what we’ve always strived for.”

Through the combination of seasoned veterans and newcomers, and an overall faster field of riders, the night proved to be particularly challenging for Gabrielle Hughes, who was faced with the challenge of improving her lap times in order to line up for the main event. Through teamwork and perseverance, Hughes summoned the fortitude to slash several seconds off her lap times to card her best-ever performance.

“It was a rollercoaster of emotions for me,” Hughes said. “Our seven-session practice the day before the race but cut short after only two. The racetrack was a completely different beast the next day and the rough track terrified me. But Jillian and Zaria helped me get my head straight, and Bree lit a fire under my butt. My awesome team wouldn’t leave me behind and I went out and beat two girls. I am hungry to keep pushing forward, and each race I am going to come back stronger this season.”

Johnny Lewis debuted an all-new Harris Performance-built chassis at the I-70 Half Mile–a major step in the Royal Enfield Twins FT evolution.

JOHNNY LEWIS DEBUTS ALL-NEW CHASSIS

The I-70 Half-Mile also marked a first for Johnny Lewis and the Moto Anatomy X Powered by Royal Enfield Team, as they debuted an all-new Harris Performance-designed chassis in the Twins FT motorcycle. Lewis is taking on the full 2022 season in the Production Twins class of American Flat Track, where he and the team continue to make progress on the Twins FT.

“This all-new chassis is a clean-slate design, and is the culmination of two years of race testing and feedback from Johnny Lewis,” said Breeann Poland. “Together with the world championship-winning expertise of Harris Performance, this new chassis is much improved, and ready to take on a full season in American Flat Track racing.”

The I-70 Half-Mile turned into the proving grounds for the new chassis, and although the test sessions that were originally slated to take place at the Odessa, Missouri venue were abbreviated due to weather and complications with track equipment, Lewis and the Moto Anatomy X Team were able to put the new chassis to the test.

“We were able to extensively test the new chassis for the first time at I-70,” Lewis said. “Although we had very limited track time due to weather, we did what we could in that time. We were able to find some areas to improve on between now and our next race, the Red Mile, which happens to be the first Mile for Royal Enfield in AFT. We’re feeling pretty excited and confident heading into uncharted territory in Lexington, Kentucky.”

Lewis put in solid laps during the Production Twins main event, where he finished sixth in order to maintain a solid top-five position in the championship. Johnny and the team look forward to taking an important step at the following round—the first Mile race of the season—the Red Mile Doubleheader in Lexington, Kentucky taking place May 28-29.

Royal Enfield BUILD. TRAIN. RACE. Flat Track
I-70 Half-Mile Results

1. Jaycee Jones
2. Zaria Martens
3. Jillian Deschenes
4. Lanakila MacNaughton
5. Stephanie Pietz
6. Makenna Hiatt
7. Malary Lee
8. Alex Bumpus McDonald
9. Erin Ferris
10. Anna Serena
11. Kaiela Hobart
12. Nean Kiskela
13. Gabrielle Hughes
14. Moriah Hummer
15. Mia Reese

Visit https://www.americanflattrack.com/results/default for detailed results.

About Royal Enfield: The oldest motorcycle company in continuous production in the world, Royal Enfield made its first motorcycle in 1901. Royal Enfield North America (RENA) is headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and is developing a growing network of more than 150 dealers in North America, including the contiguous U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico. RENA currently offers the all-new Classic 350, Meteor 350, Himalayan and the 650 Twins (INT 650 and Continental GT 650) motorcycles, along with a range of Genuine Motorcycle Accessories and apparel.
For more information on Royal Enfield North America, visit www.RoyalEnfield.com/us/en/, www.Instagram.com/RoyalEnfield_NA, www.Facebook.com/RoyalEnfieldNorthAmerica.

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New Harley-Davidson Cruiser Models

By General Posts

MORE POWERFUL LOW RIDER S AND NEW LOW RIDER ST MODELS JOIN HARLEY-DAVIDSON CRUISER LINE

MILWAUKEE, WI (January 26, 2022) – Harley-Davidson injects exciting performance and adds versatility to its 2022 Cruiser motorcycle line-up with the introduction of the new Low Rider® ST and more powerful Low Rider® S models. Both motorcycles offer the taut handling performance of the Harley-Davidson® Softail® chassis and the V-Twin muscle of a Milwaukee-Eight® 117 powertrain. The Low Rider S 117 model is an aggressive performance kingpin designed for the rider seeking unapologetic power. The new Low Rider ST model offers the versatility of hard bags and a fixed fairing. Both of these new models have a lean, performance-comes-first posture that defines West Coast custom style.

Milwaukee-Eight® 117 High-Performance Engine

The Milwaukee-Eight® 117 V-Twin engine with precision oil/air cooling is the pinnacle of torque and displacement from a factory-installed, regular-production Harley-Davidson® powertrain. This engine delivers outstanding performance and instant bragging rights on the street.

  • 117 cubic inch displacement
  • 125 ft. lbs. of torque at 3500 RPM for a performance boost the rider can feel with every twist of the throttle
  • High-performance camshaft is matched to displacement and air flow intended to maximize performance
  • High-performance, tuned Heavy Breather intake with forward-facing exposed filter element flows more air into the engine to produce exciting mid-range torque, and gives the motorcycle added hot rod presence
  • High-performance 2-into-2 offset shotgun exhaust is tuned to provide smooth and broad mid-range torque while producing a stirring tone
  • Dual counter-balancers reduce primary vibration at idle for improved rider comfort
  • Dealer-installed Screamin’ Eagle® Performance Parts Stage Upgrades from Harley-Davidson® Genuine Motor Parts & Accessories are available to boost engine performance even further

Low Rider ST Model

This is how Harley-Davidson does sport-touring, with style rooted in the California “tall bike” movement. The saddlebags ride high and tight, the rear suspension is jacked up, the handlebar is high, and the FXRT-inspired fairing is frame-mounted. The Low Rider ST model puts the rider in a commanding position on top of the bike, and the riding sensation is direct and reflexive. When the road trip is over, simply pop off the saddlebags to convert the Low Rider® ST model from cross-country mode to urban performance cruiser.

“A key element of this model is the frame-mounted fairing, which has a shape inspired by the classic FXRT Sport Glide model fairing favored by West Coast customizers,” said Brad Richards, Harley-Davidson Vice President of Design. “With a dominant central headlamp flanked by side vents, the genetic connection to the original FXRT remains familiar. The sharper creases and revised proportions in the Low Rider ST fairing provide a look that is intended to be modern, athletic and aerodynamically superior to the FXRT fairing. The raised fitment of the saddlebags high above the exhaust reinforces the performance of the model – the message being that these bags will not limit lean angle when the bike is pushed to the limit.”

The shape of the new frame-mounted fairing was developed through CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysis and real-world testing. Triple fixed splitstream vents help limit rider head buffeting at highway speeds. A six-inch high windshield has a Dark Smoke tint, and the fairing holds a single 5.75-inch LED headlamp.

The lockable, rigid saddlebags feature a sleek clam-shell design that makes them easy to load and unload. The bags can be opened with one hand by a seated rider, and a damping device allows the saddlebag lids to open smoothly. The bags can be removed in seconds with an internal quick-release mechanism. Combined saddlebag capacity is 1.9 cubic feet (53.8 liters).

A deep solo seat helps hold riders in place during aggressive acceleration and cornering. A one-inch moto handlebar is mounted on four-inch pull-back risers while a low-profile textured-black console tops the five-gallon fuel tank. Instrumentation is presented by a compact digital display inset in the handlebar riser for a custom, “no gauges” look.

Ride and handling are enhanced by the chassis, optimized to reduce weight without sacrificing rigidity. The Milwaukee-Eight 117 powertrain is rigid-mounted in the frame to further enhance chassis stiffness. A 43mm inverted fork stiffens the front end for a responsive ride, and its single-cartridge internal technology keeps the front wheel planted for improved braking and handling performance. Fork rake is 28-degrees.

The Low Rider ST is equipped with a taller rear monoshock than the standard Softail® chassis monoshock (1/2-inch more stroke, 1-inch more rear wheel travel, ¾-inch higher at the seat) which raises the rear of the motorcycle. This provides improved ride comfort and increases lean angle by more than one degree, which improves dynamic performance for enhanced ground clearance and improved rider confidence during aggressive cornering. Under-seat hydraulic pre-load adjustment allows the rider to maintain optimal suspension performance for the prevailing load and road conditions. Dual front brakes with 300mm discs deliver the responsive braking demanded by aggressive riders. Standard ABS (antilock braking system) provides confident braking performance when conditions are less than ideal. Premium Michelin® Scorcher® 31 tires (Front 110/90B19, Rear 180/70B16) enhance ride and handling performance. Other features include a Signature LED headlamp, bright LED tail/brake lamps and a USB charging port.

Rugged, blacked-out styling includes Wrinkle Black finish on the powertrain, primary cover, triple clamps, top clamp, rear fender supports and tank console; the derby cover, intake, lower rocker covers, and handlebar riser are Gloss Black. The handlebar is Satin Black. The forks are anodized black. Mufflers and exhaust shields are Jet Black. Radiate cast-aluminum wheels (19-inch front and 16-inch rear diameter) are finished in Matte Dark Bronze for an intriguing contrast to the motorcycle’s dark components.

  • Accessory Audio: A high-performance motorcycle deserves high-output audio. The accessory Harley-Davidson® Audio powered by Rockford Fosgate® – Inner Fairing Audio Kit was designed alongside the Low Rider ST for outstanding performance and an ideal fit within the fairing. The system includes a compact 250-watt amplifier with digital signal processing (DSP) technology and a pair of 5.25-inch woofers and two remote tweeters. Connect to a mobile device via Bluetooth to play stored or streaming audio. Learn More about the Harley-Davidson Audio powered by Rockford Fosgate.

Available Paint Colors: Vivid Black, Gunship Gray

The Low Rider ST model will be available at authorized Harley-Davidson® dealerships globally beginning in late March 2022.

Low Rider S Model

The Low Rider S model is a cruiser designed for riders seeking unapologetic power and willing to push their bike to the limit. The Milwaukee-Eight 117 powertrain produces five percent more torque than Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine that powers the 2021 Low Rider S model, and gives its owner instant bragging rights. Premium suspension enhances the riding experience. Straight from the factory this bike bundles the big attitude of West Coast style and unrelenting performance previously only attainable with significant investment in accessories.

The 2022 Low Rider S model is equipped with a new handlebar-mounted combination analog tachometer/digital speedometer, which replaces the tank console instruments as seen on previous Low Rider S models. The handlebar location places the gauge closer to the rider’s line of sight. A low-profile textured black tank console with FXLRS badge now tops the fuel tank. Outstanding lighting performance is provided by a signature LED headlamp and LED tail/brake lights.

The same taller rear monoshock featured on the Low Rider ST model raises the rear of the Low Rider S model for improved ride comfort and 1.3 degrees more lean angle than the previous Low Rider S model for enhanced ground clearance and improved rider confidence during aggressive cornering. Under-seat hydraulic pre-load adjustment allows the rider to maintain optimal suspension performance for the prevailing load and road conditions. A 43mm inverted fork with single-cartridge internal technology stiffens the front end for a responsive ride and improved braking and handling performance. Fork rake is 28-degrees. Dual front brakes with 300mm discs deliver the responsive braking demanded by aggressive riders, with standard ABS (antilock braking system) for confident braking performance when conditions are less than ideal. Michelin® Scorcher® 31 tires enhance ride and handling.

Other features include these key West Coast styling elements: A one-inch diameter moto bar on four-inch tall risers, a deep solo seat, mid-mount foot controls, and a color-matched mini speed screen fairing that frames the headlamp and blocks the wind when chasing down the freeway. The powertrain, front end and exhaust are totally blacked out, with Radiate cast-aluminum wheels (19-inch front and 16-inch rear diameter) finished in Matte Dark Bronze to contrast the motorcycle’s dark components.

Available Paint Colors: Vivid Black, Gunship Gray

The Low Rider S model is available now at authorized Harley-Davidson® dealerships globally.

Harley-Davidson stands for the timeless pursuit of adventure and freedom for the soul. Go to H-D.com to learn more about the complete line of 2022 Harley-Davidson motorcycles, gear, accessories and more.

Ducati DesertX with twin fuel tanks revealed

By General Posts

from https://menafn.com/ by MENAFN

Ducati has officially revealed the DesertX adventure motorcycle in the global market.

It gets a new off-road-friendly chassis and a host of electronic riding aids.

The bike has a retro look, dual fuel tanks for fulfilling additional fuel needs, a 5.0-inch TFT screen, and a 937cc engine that comes paired with a 6-speed gearbox.

Here’s our roundup.

Takeaways
The Ducati DesertX concept was showcased at EICMA 2019 and two years later, we have the production model. It has a similar appearance as the concept version and looks like the Ducati motorbikes of Dankar racing from 1990s.

Distinct features such as dual fuel tanks and dual-pod headlight make it a unique offering.

Design
The bike has a generous ground clearance of 250mm.

The front and rear fuel tanks on Ducati DesertX have capacity of 21 liters and 8 liters, respectively.

Ducati DesertX features a muscular front fuel tank, a transparent windshield, a twin-pod LED headlamp, a split-style seat, an upswept exhaust, and an auxiliary fuel tank at the back.

It houses a 5.0-inch TFT display and rides on 21-inch front and 18-inch rear wheels.

The two-wheeler has a seat height of 875mm, a ground clearance of 250mm, and a kerb weight of 223kg.

Engine & Specs
The Ducati DesertX is powered by a 937cc, Testastretta twin-cylinder motor that churns out 108hp of power at 9,250rpm and 92Nm of peak torque at 6,500rpm. Transmission duties are handled by a 6-speed gearbox.

For the rider’s safety, Ducati DesertX is equipped with disc brakes on both the front and rear wheels, along with cornering ABS, wheelie control, traction control, and engine brake control. It offers six riding modes.

The suspension duties are taken care of by fully-adjustable Kayaba inverted forks on the front and a fully-adjustable mono-shock unit on the rear end.

Pricing and availability
Ducati DesertX will start at $16,795 in the US. It will likely be available in North America starting June 2022.

Yamaha TMax 560cc Scooter for 2022 unveiled

By General Posts

2022 Yamaha TMax comes with updated ergonomics and features
from https://www.rushlane.com by Arun Prakash

Yamaha has taken the covers off from the upcoming 2022 TMax for European markets. The flagship Maxi scooter has received multiple updates in its current iteration over the outgoing model. The scooter is expected to go on sale in many European markets including UK at the start of next year.

TMax has been an immensely successful scooter in Europe since it was first launched in 2001 and has been the best-selling sports scooter in the past two decades. The 2022 model comes equipped with a range of new features as well as updated aesthetics that make it more appealing than before.

Features on offer
In terms of features, 2022 TMax gets a new 7-inch full-colour TFT instrument console enabled with full smartphone connectivity and in-built navigation with Garmin maps connectivity via Bluetooth, Wifi and USB. All these could be controlled through a joystick-like setup on the left handlebar.

Practical creature comforts on offer include heated handlebar grips, heated seats, cruise control, electrically adjustable windshield, and backlit handlebar switches. Other amenities such as traction control, keyless start with Smartkey remote, remote opening fuel cap and seat and multiple ride modes are also included in the package. However, most of these techs are available in the top-spec Tech Max trim.

Powertrain, Hardware Specs
Powertrain of TMax hasn’t been changed with the same 560cc two-cylinder DOHC engine propelling the latest iteration. This motor cranks out 47.6 bhp at 7,500rpm and 55.7 Nm of torque at 5,250rpm with power going to the rear wheel via an automatic transmission and belt drive. That said, there are some tweaks made to the scooter’s hardware configurations.

Suspension setup comprises new 41mm USD forks upfront and a single rear shock which offers a better front-end feel and damping at the rear. Braking duties are handled by dual 262mm front discs and a 282mm rear disc which are complemented by a dual-channel ABS.

Updated Styling
In its latest avatar, TMax has been updated with a sportier and more aggressive styling inspired by supersport motorcycles. It gets restyled twin LED headlamps and a larger windscreen mounted on top of the front apron. The front apron also features a large air intake scoop which gives the face of the scooter a beak-like appearance. The panels are new with a more compact body on offer.

The single-piece seat with a raised tail section features lumbar support for the rider for additional comfort during long journeys. The new TMax sits on a lighter aluminium chassis which should feel easier to manoeuver and handle around corners. A sporty riding posture has been attained with a slightly forward-leaning position by adjusting all points of the ‘rider triangle’.

Yamaha is offering the Maxi scooter in two derivatives- TMax and TMax Tech Max. The former will be offered with three colour options namely Extreme Yellow, Icon Blue and Sword Grey. The latter, on the other hand, will be reserved for UK markets only and will be available in two shades- Dark Petrol and Power Grey. The yellow-coloured alloys and rims also add to the visual appeal of the scooter.

 

What is Hub-center Steering Motorcycle & Why it is Better

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Hub-center steering is one of several different types of front-end suspension and steering mechanisms used in motorcycles and cargo bicycles. It is essentially a mechanism that uses steering pivot points inside the wheel hub rather than a geometry that places the wheel in a headstock like the traditional motorcycle layout.

Perhaps the most venerable example of the idea came in the form of the 1930 Majestic. This Georges Roy design used a novel pressed-steel monocoque chassis, and it incorporated an automotive-type chassis with hub-center steering. Other bikes had already used the configuration in such machines as the Ner-A-Car and the Zenith Auto-Bi, but the Majestic made it lovely to behold.

Another bike, the Vyrus 984 C3 2V Razzetto, was one such motorcycle that used hub-center geometry.

Vyrus is a small Italian motorcycle manufacturer based in Coriano, Italy, and their bikes such as the “Tesi” – Thesis in Italian – had their designs originate from a university engineering project linked to the motorcycle legend Massimo Tamburini. The Tesi, and the Vyrus 984, were instantly identifiable by their use of their hub-center steering front suspension and steering arrangement.

Those fabulously expensive bespoke motorcycles have been called “functional works of art,” and they look a bit like something you might see in a video game.

In hub-centered bikes, the front wheel is attached to a swingarm with a shock and an internal pivot point. Steering is achieved using those linkages to turn the wheel on a pivot point. Hub-center steering has been employed on motorcycles for more than a century, but the design, despite what some engineers say offers a distinct advantage, never took hold.

But the founder of Vyrus, Ascanio Rodorigo, once worked for Bimota as a race mechanic and engineer during the 1970s and his tenure there lasted until 1985. When Rodorigo finally left Bimota, he started his own company but partnered with Bimota on the hub-center-steered Tesi. He then went on to take the steering concept deeper and refined it for his own company’s motorcycles.

A Ducati dual spark bored out to 1,079cc and making 100hp L-twin provides the power for the 319 lbs (145 kg) Vyrus 984 bike, and it’s delivered to the road for via a six-speed transmission.

Now builders like Bryan Fuller of Fuller Moto, Revival Cycles, and others have built beautiful machines which harken back to the hub-centered glory days of the Majestic. Builders such as Stellan Egeland used a hopped-up 1200 boxer engine from a BMW HP2 Sport. He also added his own hub-center steering setup from ISR to a frame he made from a 2391 steel tube. The ISR kit is a thing to behold.

Revival’s ‘The Six,’ which features a ballsy Honda CBX motor, is another take on the hub-steer geometry. It was commissioned by museum owner and bike collector Bobby Haas for his Haas Moto Museum in Dallas and made by Revival’s Alan Stulberg and his crew.

Stulberg said the commission was aimed at paying homage to the Art Deco classic Majestic and added that he and the team became “obsessed with its design language and flow” since they first saw the bike at the Barber Museum.

Hub steering systems don’t dive as much under braking and hard cornering as do conventional telescopic fork setups. They push braking forces back into the chassis more efficiently rather than transferring immense bending forces to a pair of upright forks. The ride experience is exceptional as braking performance throughout corners is greatly enhanced.

It works like this: A wheel hub pitches back and forth on a central pivot and is supported by two large steering arms actuated by handlebars. The handlebars connect to the front steering and swingarm using complex linkages. A fixed arm connects a pull-and-push rod on either side of the hub-center to help steer the bike. The geometry also includes a second pair of static rods to ensure the axle stays level with the bike’s mass.

While hub steering has a number of clear advantages, its downfall is that it is considerably more expensive to manufacture and maintain and requires exceptionally experienced mechanics to tune and repair.

But it does look good, works more efficiently from an engineering standpoint, and directly addresses the most important factor in the motorcycling experience: braking.

The Majestic – Artistic Design from the 1920s
from https://www.odd-bike.com

While the engineering of the Majestic might have been relatively conventional, what was unprecedented was the styling, the hallmark of the Majestic to this day.

All the oily bits were fully enclosed under louvered panels, with partially enclosed fenders covering the wheels at both ends. The rider was completely isolated from the grime and muck of the running gear and powertrain, perched upon a sprung saddle and controlling the machine via levers and bars that poke through the all-encompassing body.

Presented in 1929, the prototype Majestic (which was reported as Roy’s personal machine) featured an air-cooled 1000cc longitudinal four-cylinder engine from a 1927-28 Cleveland 4-61. This would not remain for production, however.

While at least two Majestics were built with a 750cc JAP V-twin (arranged, like a much later Moto-Guzzi , with the Vee transverse and the heads poking through the bodywork) and records note that JAP singles, a Chaise Four, and at least one Gnome et Rhone flat twin were also employed, the majority of production machines coming out of Chartenay featured air-cooled Chaise engines.

These were overhead valve singles featuring unit two or three-speed gearboxes operated by hand-shift, available in 350cc and 500cc displacements. Distinctive for their single pushrod tube that resembles a bevel tower (but contains a pair of tightly-spaced parallel pushrods) and external bacon-slicer flywheel, these powerplants were a favourite of French manufacturers during the interwar period and were used by a variety of marques in lieu of producing their own engines.

The base price of the Majestic was 5200 Francs for a 350 with chain final drive; an extra 500 Francs netted you optional shaft drive.

An additional option that is rarely seen on surviving examples was a fine “craquelure” paint option that was applied by skilled artisans. It involves a process of deliberately screwing up the paint job in the most controlled and flawless way possible, applying a contrasting top coat over a base using incompatible paints that will cause the top coat to crack in a uniform fashion, something like a well-aged oil painting or antique piece of furniture.

The result is spectacular – and perhaps a bit tacky, giving the machine the appearance of a lizard skin handbag. (Maybe a later Rock Star would have loved to ride it as the “The Lizard King” ? )

The Majestic was impeccably stable at higher speeds compared to the other motorcycles of that era.

It was also agile and light footed in a way that similar machines, like the Ner-A-Car, were not.

The relatively low weight, around 350 pounds, carried with a very low centre of gravity made for tidy handling that was more than up to the meagre output offered by the powerplants.

Majestic was targeting a clientele that didn’t really exist: the gentlemanly rider who might desire a superior (read: expensive) machine as a stablemate to their elegant automobiles.

Georges Roy’s previous design produced under the name “New Motorcycle”

Georges Roy’s earlier 1927 brand called New Motorcycle was a far better barometer of things to come, predicting the style and design of machines that would emerge during the 1930s and beyond. The Majestic has far less impact and was more of a curiosity than predictor of trends to come.

Georges Roy’s brilliance as a designer is unquestionable, and deserves more praise than he ever earned during his lifetime.

Majestic is a little bit of elegance floating on the sea of staid machines that clutter up the history books.

Georges Roy was a French industrialist and engineer born in 1888 who achieved success in the textile business – specifically in knitting and sewing equipment. He was, however, an early adopter of motorcycling at the turn of the 20th Century – reportedly his first machine was a Werner, a Parisian machine that introduced the term “Motocyclette” in 1897.

Harley-Davidson XL Sportster 1957 & the OHV Engine

By General Posts

The XL commonly known as the Sportster.

The original XL Sportster used a lot of parts from the previous K Model, but the real revelation was its new OHV engine. Harley-Davidson was aware of the interest of buyers in customizing.

While the humble XL Sportster had made an impact of sorts upon its initial release in 1957, it was the continual evolution of this lighter-weight V-twin engine that cemented it as a staple in the Harley-Davidson range.

It has truly helped instill the Harley-Davidson name in motorcycle history.

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Motorcycle Vibrations Can Damage iPhone cameras as per Apple

By General Posts

by Kim Lyons from https://www.theverge.com

by Edward Moyer from https://www.cnet.com

From Apple: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803

Motorcycle vibrations can degrade iPhone camera performance, Apple says

High amplitude vibrations can cause problems for the cameras’ gyroscopes

A new post on Apple’s Support forum https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803 says exposing iPhones to high-amplitude vibrations, “specifically those generated by high-power motorcycle engines” could degrade the devices’ camera system. The company recommends against mounting an iPhone on a motorcycle, as the vibrations may be transmitted via the bike’s handlebars and chassis.

Here’s the technical explanation from Apple:

If you accidentally move a camera when you take a picture, the resulting image can be blurry. To prevent this, some iPhone models have optical image stabilization (OIS).1 OIS lets you take sharp photos even if you accidentally move the camera. With OIS, a gyroscope senses that the camera moved. To reduce image motion, and the resulting blur, the lens moves according to the angle of the gyroscope.

Additionally, some iPhone models have closed-loop autofocus (AF).2 Closed-loop AF resists the effects of gravity and vibration to preserve sharp focus in stills, videos, and panoramas. With closed-loop AF, on-board magnetic sensors measure gravity and vibration effects and determine the lens position so that the compensating motion can be set accurately.

The OIS and closed-loop AF systems in iPhone are designed for durability. However, as is the case with many consumer electronics that include systems like OIS, long-term direct exposure to high-amplitude vibrations within certain frequency ranges may degrade the performance of these systems and lead to reduced image quality for photos and videos. It is recommended to avoid exposing your iPhone to extended high-amplitude vibrations.

The iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and all iPhones since the iPhone 7 have both optical image stabilization and closed-loop autofocus (as noted by MacRumors, the first outlet to spot the Apple support post). Both features are also vulnerable to magnetic interference from some iPhone accessories, Apple warned earlier this year, but removing the accessories should take care of that issue.

Additionally in the new post, Apple says if you’re planning to mount your iPhone to a scooter or a moped, it recommends using a vibration-dampening mount to lessen the risk to the phone and its camera system. And avoiding prolonged regular use of an iPhone mounted to a vehicle that produces lower-amplitude vibrations is also a good idea.

Apple says iPhone cameras can be hurt by motorcycle vibrations

High-power or high-volume motorcycle engines produce potentially damaging high-amplitude vibrations, so the company says don’t attach your phone to your hawg.

If you’ve been rockin’ down the highway with an iPhone mounted on your motorcycle, you might want to think again. On Friday, Apple said certain motorcycle engines can give your iPhone’s camera bad vibes.

“Exposing your iPhone to high amplitude vibrations within certain frequency ranges, specifically those generated by high-power motorcycle engines, can degrade the performance of the camera system,” the company said in a post on its support site.

The vibes are channeled through the chassis and handlebars, so you shouldn’t attach your phone to motorcycles with high-power or high-volume engines, the company said. It said mopeds and scooters, which tend to have small-volume or electric engines, are less of a concern but that you should use a vibration dampening mount and “avoid regular use for prolonged periods.”

The problem has to do with high-tech gyroscope- and magnet-based camera systems designed to compensate for shaky shots. Such systems, like optical image stabilization and closed-loop autofocus, make automatic adjustments if you accidentally move while taking a picture.

“The OIS and closed-loop AF systems in iPhone are designed for durability,” Apple said. But “long-term direct exposure to high-amplitude vibrations … may degrade the performance of these systems and lead to reduced image quality for photos and videos.”

For details on which iPhone models feature these camera systems, you can check out Apple’s post.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212803

 

Honda CB200 Modified Into An Electric Motorcycle

By General Posts

by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

The electric powertrain of the modified Honda CB200 has fitted onto a stylish aluminum enclosure

Manufacturing EVs from scratch is an uphill task in itself but it is a whole new level of challenge when one has to convert a vehicle already fitted with an IC engine. We have earlier witnessed such projects being undertaken in four-wheelers such as Land Rovers and VW Beetles but this time an electric powertrain has been fitted into a motorcycle.

An aftermarket workshop named Omega Motors, based out of San Francisco in USA, has converted a 1975 Honda CB200 into an electric motorcycle. The donor model back in 1970s and 80s was a hot-selling retro-style motorcycle with a cafe racer design. The makers of this modified prototype haven’t tried to alter the design of the motorcycle in any way.

Updated Styling
Rechristened as Omega EV200, it still retains a part-scrambler and part-cafe racer design with round headlamps, single-piece ripped seat and wire-spoke wheels lending it a retro appeal. The electric CB200 gets refurbished front forks, wheels and brakes while retaining the cable-actuated front brake and rear drum brake.

Subtle modifications have been made to the chassis in order to incorporate a battery and electric motor setup. The frame has been shortened and the welded-in rear fender has been chopped off.

The pillion footpegs have also been removed while a small part of its spine has also been cut in order to weld a mounting plate for the controller. Interestingly, the motor mounts from the original bike have been left intact while the new battery pack and electric motor are attached via a set of custom mounting plates.

Specs & Features
Speaking of specifications, the motorcycle has been fitted with an electric motor sourced from Golden Motor and raed to produce 5kW (6.7 bhp) of continuous supply and peak power of 10kW (13.4 bhp). This motor feeds energy of a 1.6 kWh battery pack specifically designed and built for Omega EV200. Omega has also added a Kelly Controls controller which has been packaged neatly under the modified fuel tank and seat.

Coming to its performance, numbers are fairly modest with a top speed of 60mph (96.5 kmph). However, the electric bike weighs only 111 kilos which is 22 percent lighter than the stock CB200. The motorcycle offers a riding range of only 48 km on a single charge while charging the battery takes five to eight hours.

There isn’t much to offer in terms of features but Omega has got the stock analogue speedometer and switches working. Most importantly the clutch lever has been repurposed to work as an analogue regenerative braking control. The most attractive addition is a small digital display to reveal battery-related information which has been covered with the same piece of leather as the custom seat.

Exclusive in the Cantina

By General Posts

Hall of Fame Collector Cards
Honoring Those Who Support Motorcycling
By Rogue

I was using the 2019 Official Sturgis Publication put out by the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum to make sure I had information correct in the article I was doing on the Hall Of Fame Induction Breakfast.

If you went to Sturgis, I hope you picked up a copy, if not you may want to contact the museum and see if they have any left. www.sturgismuseum.com

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REPORT – ONLY IN THE CANTINA

New Chassis, Engine & Design: Harley-Davidson introduces Next Custom Revolution with Eight New Iconic Softail Motorcycles

What are the benefits of the new Softail Frame over the old Dyna Configuration?
By Bandit and Harley-Davidson

To celebrate Harley-Davidson’s 115th Anniversary year, the Motor Company is launching a custom revolution: Eight all-new Softail® models that merge the hard-riding performance of the Dyna® line with the unparalleled custom look of the Softail line.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REPORT – ONLY IN THE CANTINA

SUBSCRIBE to the Cantina TodayClick Here to pay securely online

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

All the best motorcycline features, only at Bandit’s Cantina

2019 Screamin’ Eagle Drag Team and H-D Factory Flat Track Team

By General Posts

2019 Screamin’ Eagle / Vance & Hines Drag Team and H-D Factory Flat Track Team Season Previews

Harley-Davidson is excited to share a preview of the 2019 NHRA Screamin’ Eagle/Vance & Hines Drag Team and Harley-Davidson Factory Flat Track Team seasons.

2019 NHRA Screamin’ Eagle/Vance & Hines Drag Team

The Harley-Davidson® Screamin’ Eagle®/Vance & Hines drag racing team opens its 17th season of NHRA Pro Stock Motorcycle competition at the 50th Amalie Motor Oil NHRA Gatornationals, March 14-17 in Gainesville, Fla.

The team will begin pursuit of a 10th Pro Stock Motorcycle championship with a three-rider squad, as Angelle Sampey joins Andrew Hines and Ed Krawiec on Harley-Davidson® Street Rod™ competition motorcycles. The trio of veteran riders have won a combined 12 NHRA Pro Stock Motorcycle titles.

“We will be bringing a formidable team to the track at Gainesville,” said Vance & Hines Motorsports owner Terry Vance. “Three former champions with all the savvy and experience it takes to reach the pinnacle of our sport, backed by a strong team in the pits and Harley-Davidson V-Twin power. We are racing in a very competitive class but we expect to be one of the teams to beat for the championship this season.”

The Harley-Davidson Screamin’ Eagle/Vance & Hines team races competition drag bikes are inspired by the Harley-Davidson Street Rod production motorcycle, an agile middle-weight powered by the liquid-cooled High Output Revolution X 750 engine.

The Gatornationals is the first of 16 Pro Stock Motorcycle events on the 2019 NHRA Mello Yellow Drag Racing Series schedule. After the first 10 events, the points are re-set for the top-10 riders that then qualify for the Countdown to the Championship playoffs (the final six races), with the season ending in November at the Auto Club NHRA Finals in Pomona, Calif.

2019 Harley-Davidson Factory Flat Track Team

The Harley-Davidson® Factory Flat Track Racing Team is preparing to open the 2019 American Flat Track (AFT) Twins season on March 14 at the Daytona TT at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla. Factory Team riders Sammy Halbert and Jarod Vanderkooi will contest the 18-race AFT series aboard Harley-Davidson® XG750R competition motorcycles prepared by Factory Team partner Vance & Hines Motorsports.

The team will field an all-new XG750R flat tracker for 2019, according to Vance, with a new chassis and a revised liquid-cooled, fuel-injected and race-tuned 750cc Harley-Davidson® Revolution X™ V-Twin based on the production engine originally designed for the Harley-Davidson Street 750 motorcycle.

The Daytona TT will provide an interesting test for the Harley Factory Team and other AFT competitors. A new 0.6-mile course will for the first time utilize the paved front straight of the historic Daytona International Speedway tri-oval, requiring racers to transition from dirt to pavement to dirt on each lap while negotiating left- and right-hand turns and a jump on the dirt section laid out on the infield of the speedway.

Flat track is the most-historic form of American motorcycle racing and Harley-Davidson has been part of the sport since the heyday of the Harley “Wrecking Crew” teams of the 1920s. In 2019 the Harley-Davidson Factory Flat Track Racing Team will compete on a diverse 18-event AFT Twins schedule that includes six miles, five half-miles, three short tracks and four TT courses. After a one-year hiatus So-Cal Half Mile at Perris Auto Speedway in Perris, Calif., (May 11) returns to the schedule.